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Sample records for 16-slice spiral ct

  1. The feasibility of a 64-slice MDCT for detection of the Adamkiewicz artery: comparison of the detection rate of intravenous injection CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT versus intra-arterial and intravenous injection CT angiography using a 16-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Negi, Noriyuki; Hashimura, Hiromi; Uotani, Kensuke; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) using CT angiography (CTA) is crucial in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) or aortic dissection (AD). The purpose of this study was to compare the AKA detection rate of intravenous injection with a 64-slice MDCT (IV64) versus a 16-slice MDCT (IV16) as well as by CTA using intra-arterial injection with a 16-slice MDCT (IA16). A retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients who underwent CTA was performed. There were 108 TAA and 52 AD cases, 105 of whom were examined with IV64, 15 with IV16, and 40 with IA16. The AKA detectability for each imaging method was assessed, and the factors influencing the detectability were analyzed by multivariate analysis. The detection rates for IV64, IV16, and IA16 were 85.7, 60.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, with IV64 being more sensitive than IV16 (P = 0.025). The detection rate for AD patients was 66.7 % with IV64, which was similar to IV16 (57.1 %) and IA16 (66.8 %). On the other hand, the detection rate for TAA patients was 93.3 % with IV64, which was higher than IV16 (62.5 %, P = 0.021) and similar to IA16 (88.0 %). Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent factors for AKA detectability were TAA versus AD (P = 0.005, Odds ratio = 3.98) and IV64 versus IV16 (P = 0.037, Odds ratio = 4.03). The detection rate was higher for IV64 than for IV16, especially for TAA patients, while the rate was similar between IV64 and invasive IA16. A 64-slice MDCT thus provides a less invasive visualization of the AKA.

  2. Spiral CT pneumocolon: applications, status and limitations.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C J; Renfrew, I; Taylor, S; Gillams, A R; Lees, W R

    2001-01-01

    CT pneumocolon is a promising new technique in the diagnosis and management of colon pathology. CT pneumocolon can detect (sensitivity >95%) and stage (accuracy 79%) colorectal cancer and is very accurate in the differentiation of malignant from benign colonic pathologies. It has excellent detection rates for polyps >10 mm in diameter. Several studies using 3D virtual colonoscopy have already proven its high sensitivity and specificity in polyp detection making this technique robust as a screening tool. The combined results for virtual colonoscopy, from all centres, show a sensitivity of >85% in the detection of polyps 10 mm or greater in size, 70-80% for 5-9 mm polyps and an overall specificity of 90%. CT pneumocolon is a safe, non-invasive and cost-effective method for detecting colonic carcinomas and adenomas and correctly identifying which patients need further colonoscopy. The technique is quick, well tolerated and non-operator dependent. It can also image the proximal colon when distal stenoses prevent endoscopic and barium examination. CT pneumocolon is able to identify the features and complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Further research is warranted to fully assess its impact in terms of a screening tool, acceptability, availability and cost benefit.

  3. Usefulness of 4-, 8-, and 16-slice computed tomography for detection of graft occlusion or patency after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Beemath, Afzal; Skaf, Elias; Kayali, Fadi; Janjua, Muhammad; Alesh, Issa; Olson, Ronald E

    2005-12-15

    The sensitivity and specificity of computed tomographic angiography for the evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs) was reviewed. A search of published studies in all languages was performed, incorporating electronic and manual components. A total of 985 patients with 2,200 CABGs participated in investigations with single-detector computed tomography (CT), 441 patients (1,246 CABGs) with 4-slice CT, none with 8-slice CT, and 144 patients (416 grafts) with 16-slice CT. Pooled data showed a sensitivity for the detection of complete occlusion with single-slice CT of 81% (402 of 494 patients), with 4-slice CT of 93% (293 of 315 patients), and with 16-slice CT of 99% (75 of 76 patients). The specificity, based on pooled data, using single-slice CT was 89% (1,507 of 1,697 patients), with 4-slice CT was 96% (878 of 915 patients), and with 16-slice CT was 98% (301 of 306 patients). The detection of complete occlusion and the detection of patency in saphenous vein bypass grafts and arterial bypass grafts were similar with multislice CT. Limited data were available on the detection of significant stenosis, exclusive of complete occlusion. With 4-slice CT, the sensitivity was 74% (23 of 31 patients) and was 88% (21 of 24 patients) with 16-slice CT. In conclusion, single-detector CT was able to detect graft patency, but it was not sensitive for graft occlusion. The data suggest that 4- and 16-slice CT can be used for the detection of complete graft occlusion or graft patency of CABGs. Significant stenosis was better assessed with 16-slice CT than with 4-slice CT. PMID:16360355

  4. Thromboembolic Complications Following Spine Surgery Assessed with Spiral CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Jo; Walcott-Sapp, Sarah; Adler, Ronald S.; Pavlov, Helene; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2010-01-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a significant risk of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) and/or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The goal of this study was to determine which symptoms and risk factors were associated with spiral CT scans positive for PE and/or DVT in the postoperative spine surgery patient. We conducted a retrospective review of all spine patients who underwent a postoperative CT to rule out PE during the period of March 2004–February 2006. The type of surgical procedure, risk factors, symptoms prompting scan ordering, anticoagulation, and treatment were recorded. Logistic regression models were used to determine significant predictors of a positive CT in this patient population. Of the 3,331 patients that had spine surgery during the study period, 130 (3.9%) had a spiral CT scan to rule out PE and/or proximal DVT. Thirty-three of the 130 (25.4%) CT scans were positive for PE only, five (3.8%) for PE and DVT, and three (2.3%) for DVT only. Only 24.5% (32) patients had risk factors for thromboembolic disease, and of these, a history of PE and/or DVT was the only significant risk factor for a positive scan (p = 0.03). No presenting symptoms or demographic variables were noted to have a significant association with PE and/or DVT. The type of surgical procedure (i.e., anterior, posterior, and percutaneous) was not associated with an increased risk for PE and/or DVT. Patients who are undergoing spine surgery with a history of thromboembolic disease should be carefully monitored postoperatively and may benefit from more aggressive prophylaxis. PMID:22294955

  5. Comparison of spiral CT and US in the evaluation of pediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Oner, S; Oto, A; Tekgul, S; Koroglu, M; Hascicek, M; Sahin, A; Akhan, O

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the value of spiral computerized tomography (CT) in detecting urolithiasis in pediatric patients and compare its efficacy with ultrasound (US). Twenty-nine infants aged between 2 to 94 months with clinical presentation suggestive of urolithiasis and a negative or indeterminate plain film were included in the study. Abdominal US and spiral CT were performed in all patients. Presence, size and localization of stones were noted for each patient on both CT and US. The diagnosis of urolithiasis was confirmed by passage of stones spontaneously, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), surgery, or clinical follow-up. Presence of stones was confirmed in 23 of 29 patients (79%). Eight patients had single stone and the remaining 15 had multiple stones either in a single localization (single kidney or single ureter) or multiple localizations. Spiral CT detected 57 stones (45 renal and 12 ureteral). US detected 34 stones (59.6%) in 18 (78.2%) patients. US was able to localize 31 stones (68.8%) in 21 kidneys (75%), and 3 stones (25%) in 11 ureters (27.2%). Spiral CT is very effective in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis. Spiral CT is more efficient than US in imaging pediatric patients with symptoms and signs of urolithiasis, when KUB is inconclusive.

  6. Automated segmentation of CBCT image using spiral CT atlases and convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ken Chung; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Steve G F; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K M; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X; Xia, James J; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. CBCT scans have relatively low cost and low radiation dose in comparison to conventional spiral CT scans. However, a major limitation of CBCT scans is the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening and inhomogeneity, causing great difficulties for accurate segmentation of bony structures from soft tissues, as well as separating mandible from maxilla. In this paper, we presented a novel fully automated method for CBCT image segmentation. In this method, we first estimated a patient-specific atlas using a sparse label fusion strategy from predefined spiral CT atlases. This patient-specific atlas was then integrated into a convex segmentation framework based on maximum a posteriori probability for accurate segmentation. Finally, the performance of our method was validated via comparisons with manual ground-truth segmentations. PMID:24505768

  7. Reproducibility of the coronary calcium measurement with different cardiac algorithms using multislice spiral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Chen, Laigao M.; Meyer, Cristopher A.

    2002-05-01

    Subsecond multi-slice spiral CT has now been recognized with its great potential in cardiac imaging, in particularly for the coronary calcification detection (CCD). Different reconstruction algorithms have been developed in order to optimize the temporal resolution and to improve the measurement accuracy. These algorithms typically incorporate retrospectively gated reconstructions based on a synchronized electrocardiography (ECG) recording. However, these algorithms consist of different approaches in choosing spatial filters, setting ECG delays, and employing the reconstruction geometry (direct fan-beam vs. parallel rebining). These differences are likely to contribute to the intrascanner and interscanner variability in the coronary calcium measurements. This paper investigates in detail about the quantitative effect on calcium detection among different approaches.

  8. Spiral interpolation algorithms for multislice spiral CT--part II: measurement and evaluation of slice sensitivity profiles and noise at a clinical multislice system.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, T; Krause, J; Schaller, S; Flohr, T; Kalender, W A

    2000-09-01

    The recently introduced multislice data acquisition for computed tomography (CT) is based on multirow detector design, increased rotation speed, and advanced z-interpolation and z-filtering algorithms. We evaluated slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and noise of a clinical multislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanner with M = 4 simultaneously acquired slices and adaptive axial interpolator (AAI) reconstruction software. SSPs were measured with a small gold disk of 50 microm thickness and 2-mm diameter located at the center of rotation (COR) and 100 mm off center. The standard deviation of CT values within a 20-cm water phantom was used as a measure of image noise. With a detector slice collimation of S = 1.0 mm, we varied spiral pitch p from 0.25 to 2.0 in steps of 0.025. Nominal reconstructed slice thicknesses were 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 mm. For all possible pitch values, we found the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the respective sensitivity profile at the COR equivalent to the selected nominal slice thickness. The profiles at 100 mm off center are broadened less than 7 % on the average compared with the FWHM at the COR. In addition, variation of the full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) at the COR was below 10% for p < or = 1.75. Within this range, image noise varied less than 10% with respect to the mean noise level. The slight increase in measured slice-width above p = 1.75 for nominal slice-widths of 1.25 and 1.50 mm is accompanied by a decrease of noise according to the inverse square root relationship. The MSCT system that we scrutinized provides reconstructed slice-widths and image noise, which can be regarded as constant within a wide range of table speeds. With respect to this, MSCT is superior to single-slice spiral CT. These facts can be made use of when defining and optimizing clinical protocols: the spiral pitch can be selected almost freely, and scan protocols can follow the diagnostic requirements without technical restrictions. In summary, MSCT offers

  9. The evaluation and comparison of kidney length obtained from axial cuts in spiral CT scan with its true length

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mehdi; Rahimi, Farshad; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased size of kidney is the main symptom of pyelonephritis and renal ischemia in children. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan methods are the imaging methods for evaluating the urogenital system. The aim of this study is to compare the kidney length obtained from spiral CT scan with the true length obtained from multi-slice CT. Materials and Methods: From 100 patients 200 kidneys were examined in Alzahra Hospital in 2012. Multi-slice CT was used to obtain coronal and sagittal cuts to find the length of kidneys. Results: The mean values of true size of axial sections of the right and left kidneys were 108.37 ± 12.3 mm and 109.74 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean difference of axial sections’ lengths in the right and left kidneys was 1.37 ± 1.22 mm. The mean values of length in the spiral CT scan of the right and left kidneys were 98.61 ± 15.8 mm and 103.11 ± 15.9 mm, respectively. The difference in the estimated size by multi-slice CT scan in oblique and axial images was significant (9.77 ± 1.19 mm and 6.63 ± 0.8 mm for the right and left kidneys, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The average size of both kidneys determined in axial images was smaller than the actual size. The estimation of kidney size in axial images is not reliable, and to obtain the actual size, it is required to have the coronal and sagittal cuts with proper quality, which could be achieved by multi-slice method. PMID:25709984

  10. Spiral CT During Selective Accessory Renal Artery Angiography: Assessment of Vascular Territory Before Aortic Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Youssefzadeh, Soraya; Hoelzenbein, Thomas; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    We evaluated the vascular territory of accessory renal arteries in cases where the vessel might be overlapped by an aortic stent-graft. Spiral CT during selective accessory renal artery angiography was performed in four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (including one with a horseshoe kidney). The volume of the vascular territory of each renal artery was measured using a software program provided by the CT unit manufacturer. The supernumerary renal arteries perfused 32%, 37%, 15%, and 16% of the total renal mass, respectively. In two patients, stent-grafts were implanted, which resulted in occlusion of the supernumerary renal artery. The volume of the renal infarction was equal to the volume perfused by the artery as calculated before implantation of the stent-graft.The method proposed is accurate for estimating the size of the expected renal infarction. It might help to determine whether placement of a stent-graft is acceptable.

  11. Image Quality of 3rd Generation Spiral Cranial Dual-Source CT in Combination with an Advanced Model Iterative Reconstruction Technique: A Prospective Intra-Individual Comparison Study to Standard Sequential Cranial CT Using Identical Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E.; Meyer, Mathias; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Flohr, Thomas; Leidecker, Christianne; Groden, Christoph; Scharf, Johann; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively intra-individually compare image quality of a 3rd generation Dual-Source-CT (DSCT) spiral cranial CT (cCT) to a sequential 4-slice Multi-Slice-CT (MSCT) while maintaining identical intra-individual radiation dose levels. Methods 35 patients, who had a non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT examination on a 4-slice MDCT within the past 12 months, underwent a spiral cCT scan on a 3rd generation DSCT. CTDIvol identical to initial 4-slice MDCT was applied. Data was reconstructed using filtered backward projection (FBP) and 3rd-generation iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm at 5 different IR strength levels. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was assessed in white matter and nucleus caudatus with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) being subsequently calculated. Results Subjective image quality of all spiral cCT datasets was rated significantly higher compared to the 4-slice MDCT sequential acquisitions (p<0.05). Mean SNR was significantly higher in all spiral compared to sequential cCT datasets with mean SNR improvement of 61.65% (p*Bonferroni0.05<0.0024). Subjective image quality improved with increasing IR levels. Conclusion Combination of 3rd-generation DSCT spiral cCT with an advanced model IR technique significantly improves subjective and objective image quality compared to a standard sequential cCT acquisition acquired at identical dose levels. PMID:26288186

  12. Segmentation of pulmonary nodules in three-dimensional CT images by use of a spiral-scanning technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiahui; Engelmann, Roger; Li Qiang

    2007-12-15

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography (CT) is an important and difficult task for computer-aided diagnosis of lung cancer. Therefore, the authors developed a novel automated method for accurate segmentation of nodules in three-dimensional (3D) CT. First, a volume of interest (VOI) was determined at the location of a nodule. To simplify nodule segmentation, the 3D VOI was transformed into a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a key 'spiral-scanning' technique, in which a number of radial lines originating from the center of the VOI spirally scanned the VOI from the 'north pole' to the 'south pole'. The voxels scanned by the radial lines provided a transformed 2D image. Because the surface of a nodule in the 3D image became a curve in the transformed 2D image, the spiral-scanning technique considerably simplified the segmentation method and enabled reliable segmentation results to be obtained. A dynamic programming technique was employed to delineate the 'optimal' outline of a nodule in the 2D image, which corresponded to the surface of the nodule in the 3D image. The optimal outline was then transformed back into 3D image space to provide the surface of the nodule. An overlap between nodule regions provided by computer and by the radiologists was employed as a performance metric for evaluating the segmentation method. The database included two Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC) data sets that contained 23 and 86 CT scans, respectively, with 23 and 73 nodules that were 3 mm or larger in diameter. For the two data sets, six and four radiologists manually delineated the outlines of the nodules as reference standards in a performance evaluation for nodule segmentation. The segmentation method was trained on the first and was tested on the second LIDC data sets. The mean overlap values were 66% and 64% for the nodules in the first and second LIDC data sets, respectively, which represented a higher performance level than those of two

  13. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion

    PubMed Central

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D.; Ramsay, Jason B.; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A.

    2013-01-01

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays. PMID:23445952

  14. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion.

    PubMed

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D; Ramsay, Jason B; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A

    2013-04-23

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays.

  15. [The meaning and usefulness of spiral CT for radiolucent ureteric stones diagnosis: our experience].

    PubMed

    Passavanti, Giandomenico; Pizzuti, Valerio; Costantini, Fabio Massimo; Bragaglia, Alessandro; Franci, Luca; Paolini, Riccardo

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work was to report some case histories on the usefulness of spiral TC, used for several years both to diagnose renal colic and urinary lithiasis and to study radio lucent stones that are often difficult to be detected with traditional radiology. 13 patients, aged between 31 and 76 (average age: 54.2), were therefore examined. Eight of them had a ureteral colic when examined, while five patients had shown symptoms some days before being hospitalised in our ward. In all cases, ultrasonography showed a significant hydronephrosis, while direct radiography of the urinary tract could not detect any images that could be associated with radio-opaque lithiasis. All patients therefore underwent an abdominal spiral TC with no contrast medium within 24 hours after hospitalisation. The confrontation between the results obtained by ultrasonography and those obtained by spiral TC, showed the usefulness of the former method to detect stones located in the proximal ureter or in its intramural tract, while the latter could detect the lithiasis of the proximal ureter in 3 cases (23%), of the mid ureter in 2 cases (15.3%), and of the distal ureter in 8 cases (61%). The stones had, approximately, a 5 mm diameter in 5 cases. In 6 cases the diameter was between 6 and 10 mm, and more than 1 cm in 2 cases. Both methods proved to be equally accurate in the assessment of the hydronephrosis degree and of the thickness of the renal parenchyma. The therapy was medical in 2 cases and open surgery in 3 cases, while 8 patients were treated with ureterolitholapaxy with a ballistic searcher. The usefulness of TC in the study of urolithiasis nowadays is supported by a large literature which clearly supplies with documentary evidence the high sensitivity and specificity of such a method in diagnosing the presence of urolithiasis in general and above all of ureteric stones. Such a method not only makes an accurate evaluation of the stones location possible, but it can also assess the

  16. Clinical experience with a computer-aided diagnosis system for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules at spiral CT of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormanns, Dag; Fiebich, Martin; Saidi, Mustafa; Diederich, Stefan; Heindel, Walter

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) workstation with automatic detection of pulmonary nodules at low-dose spiral CT in a clinical setting for early detection of lung cancer. Two radiologists in consensus reported 88 consecutive spiral CT examinations. All examinations were reviewed using a UNIX-based CAD workstation with a self-developed algorithm for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules. The algorithm was designed to detect nodules with at least 5 mm diameter. The results of automatic nodule detection were compared to the consensus reporting of two radiologists as gold standard. Additional CAD findings were regarded as nodules initially missed by the radiologists or as false positive results. A total of 153 nodules were detected with all modalities (diameter: 85 nodules <5mm, 63 nodules 5-9 mm, 5 nodules >= 10 mm). Reasons for failure of automatic nodule detection were assessed. Sensitivity of radiologists for nodules >=5 mm was 85%, sensitivity of CAD was 38%. For nodules >=5 mm without pleural contact sensitivity was 84% for radiologists at 45% for CAD. CAD detected 15 (10%) nodules not mentioned in the radiologist's report but representing real nodules, among them 10 (15%) nodules with a diameter $GREW5 mm. Reasons for nodules missed by CAD include: exclusion because of morphological features during region analysis (33%), nodule density below the detection threshold (26%), pleural contact (33%), segmentation errors (5%) and other reasons (2%). CAD improves detection of pulmonary nodules at spiral CT significantly and is a valuable second opinion in a clinical setting for lung cancer screening. Optimization of region analysis and an appropriate density threshold have a potential for further improvement of automatic nodule detection.

  17. Technical note: A new TLD-phantom measurement system for determining dose distribution levels in the right and left breast from spiral CT chest imaging.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeffery L; Navarrete, Jorge L; Surprenant, Edgar; Sklansky, Jack; Eisenman, Jack I

    2002-01-01

    Two specially designed plastic/aluminum phantoms positioned thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at the right and left breast location of an anthrophomorophic chest torso. Imaging was performed on a spiral CT for a Volume of the chest phantom through the breast area for a noncontiguous (pitch 1.5) helical chest scan. Conventional pencil beam ionization chamber measurements were made at the same operating parameters. The doses ranged from approximately 1 to 3 cGy. For both breast phantoms, the doses were highest for the medial inner quadrants near the mediastinum. The doses were lowest for the outer quadrants (lateral aspects) of both breasts.

  18. Spiral CT Quantification of Aorto-Renal Calcification and Its Use in the Detection of Atheromatous Renal Artery Stenosis: A Study in 42 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gayard, Pierre; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Boire, Jean-Yves; Ravel, Anne; Perez, Nessim; Privat, Christian; Lucien, Pascal; Viallet, Jean-Francois; Boyer, Louis

    2000-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether a correlation exists between aortic and renal arterial calcifications detected with spiral CT and significant angiographic renal artery stenosis (RAS).Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age 67 years, range 37-84 years), of whom 24 were hypertensive, prospectively underwent abdominal helical CT and aortic and renal arteriography. The 3-mm thickness CT scans (pitch = 1) were reconstructed each millimeter. A manual outline of the renal artery including its ostial portion was produced. Calcific hyperdensities were defined as areas of density more than 130 HU. CT data were compared with the presence or absence of RAS on angiography (24 cases); hypertension and age were taken into account (Mann-Whitney U-test).Results: CT detection and quantification appeared to be reliable and reproductible. We did not find any correlation between aortic and renal arterial calcifications and RAS, even for the patients above 65 years, with or without hypertension. There was no correlation either between calcifications and hypertension in patients without RAS. Conclusion: In this population, aortic and renal arterial calcifications have no predictive value for RAS.

  19. Comparison between coronary plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and risk factors of coronary artery disease patients in Chinese Han population and Mongolian

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Han, Xiaodong; Dong, Peide; Liu, Aishi

    2013-01-01

    Objective : To compare the coronary atherosclerotic plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and the risk factors of Han (in Inner Mongolia) and Mongolian coronary artery disease patients. Metho d s: The plaques of 126 Mongolian and 269 Han patients were analyzed by 64-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Their gender, age, height, body mass, the history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and family diseases, the levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were compared. Results: The incidence of plaques (P <0.05), the proportion of plaques in the circumflex branch (P <0.05), the proportion of medium-severe lumen stenosis induced by plaques (P <0.05), and the proportion of obstructive plaque involved multi-branch (P <0.05) of the Mongolian patients were higher. The plaque compositions of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). The body mass index of the Mongolian patients was higher (P <0.05). The hypertension, diabetes, smoking history, TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). Conclusion: The higher incidence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the more severe lesions of the Mongolian patients may be related to their higher body mass index. PMID:24353662

  20. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  1. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder. Clinical applications and limits, with MR arthrography and arthroscopic correlations.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaïssoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-10-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Echographic Detection of Hepato Cellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Patients Previously Treated with Multiple Techniques: Comparison of Conventional US, Spiral CT and 3-Dimensional CEUS with Navigator Technique (3DNav CEUS).

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available technique named "NAVIGATOR" (Esaote, Italy) easily enables a 3-D reconstruction of a single 2-D acquisition of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of the whole liver (with a volumetric correction thanks to the electromagnetic device of NAVIGATOR). Aim of the study was to evaluate this "panoramic" technique in comparison with conventional US and spiral CT in the detection of new hepatic lesions. 144 cirrhotic patients (previously treated for hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC)) in follow-up with detection of 98 new nodules (N), 28 multinodular (Nmulti), 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR) 94 efficaciously treated without new nodules (neg) and four multinodular without new nodules, were submitted to 200 examinations with this new technique from November 2008 to November 2009. 3DNavCEUS was performed using SonoVue (Bracco), as contrast agent, and a machine (Technos MPX, Esaote). Spiral CT and 3DNav CEUS were performed in the same month during follow up. Sens.,Spec.,diagn.-Acc.,PPV and NPV were evaluated; comparison and differences between the techniques were obtained with chi-square (SPSS release-15). Final diagnosis was: 98 new lesions (N) (one to three), 28 multinodular HCC (Nmulti) and 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR); in 94 no more lesions were observed during follow-up; conventional US obtained: 58 N (+18 multinodularN and 8 LR), 40 false negative (+10 Nmulti and 6 LR) (sens:59.2, spec:100%, Diagn Accur:73.6, PPV:100; NPV:70.1); spiral CT obtained: 84N (+26-multinodularN and 14-LR), 14 false-negative (+2-Nmulti), and one false-positive (sens:85.7, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:90.9, PPV:97.7; NPV:86.8); 3DNAV obtained: 92N (+28 multinodularN and 14LR), 6 false-negative, and two false-positives (sens:93.9, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:95.6, PPV:97.9; NPV:93.9). 3-DNav CEUS is significantly better than US and almost similar to spiral CT for detection of new HCC. This technique, in particular, showed the presence of lesions even in the cases not detected

  3. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  4. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  5. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy.

  6. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy. PMID:23944089

  7. High-pitch spiral CT with 3D reformation: an alternative choice for imaging vascular anomalies with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Li, H-O; Huo, R; Xu, G-Q; Duan, Y-H; Nie, P; Ji, X-P; Cheng, Z-P; Xu, Z-D

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of high-pitch spiral CT in imaging vascular anomalies (VAs) with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children. Methods: For patients with suspected VAs and affluent blood flow pre-detected by ultrasound, CT was performed with high-pitch mode, individualized low-dose scan protocol and three-dimensional (3D) reformation. A five-point scale was used for image quality evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated with clinical diagnosis with/without pathological results as the reference standard. Radiation exposure and single-phase scan time were recorded. Treatment strategies were formulated based on CT images and results and were monitored through follow-up results. Results: 20 lesions were identified in 15 patients (median age of 11 months). The mean score of image quality was 4.13 ± 0.74. 7 patients (7/15, 46.67%) were diagnosed with haemangiomas, 6 patients (6/15, 40%) were diagnosed with venous malformations and 2 patients (2/15, 13.33%) were diagnosed with arteriovenous malformations. The average effective radiation doses of a single phase and of the total procedure were 0.27 ± 0.08 and 0.86 ± 0.21 mSv. The average scanning time of a single phase was 0.46 ± 0.09 s. After treatment, 13 patients (13/15, 86.67%) achieved excellent results, and 2 patients (2/15, 13.33%) showed good results in follow-up visits. Conclusion: High-pitch spiral CT with an individualized low-dose scan protocol and 3D reformation is an effective modality for imaging VAs with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children when vascular details are needed and ultrasound and MRI could not provide the complete information. Advances in knowledge: This study proposes an alternative modality for imaging VAs with affluent blood flow. PMID:26055504

  8. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  9. Radiation Exposure of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Contribution of CT Examinations Performed on Different MDCT (16 and 64 Slices) Scanners and Image Quality Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality. CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability. Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients’ weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality. The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT. Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  10. Spiral tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Asadiyan, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Spiral Tectonics (ST) is a new window to global tectonics introduced as alternative model for Plate Tectonics (PT). ST based upon Dahw(rolling) and Tahw(spreading) dynamics. Analogues to electric and magnetic components in the electromagnetic theory we could consider Dahw and Tahw as components of geodynamics, when one component increases the other decreases and vice versa. They are changed to each other during geological history. D-component represents continental crust and T-component represents oceanic crust. D and T are two arm of spiral-cell. T-arm 180 degree lags behind D-arm so named Retard-arm with respect to D or Forward-arm. It seems primary cell injected several billions years ago from Earth's center therefore the Earth's core was built up first then mantel and finally the crust was build up. Crust building initiate from Arabia (Mecca). As the universe extended gravitation wave swirled the earth fractaly along cycloid path from big to small scale. In global scale (order-0) ST collect continents in one side and abandoned Pacific Ocean in the other side. Recent researches also show two mantels upwelling in opposite side of the Earth: one under Africa (tectonic pose) and the other under Pacific Ocean (tectonic tail). In higher order (order-1) ST build up Africa in one side and S.America in the other side therefore left Atlantic Ocean meandered in between. In order-n e.g. Khoor Musa and Bandar-Deylam bay are seen meandered easterly in the Iranian part but Khoor Abdullah and Kuwait bay meandered westerly in the Arabian part, they are distributed symmetrically with respect to axis of Persian Gulf(PG), these two are fractal components of easterly Caspian-wing and westerly Black Sea-wing which split up from Anatoly. Caspian Sea and Black Sea make two legs of Y-like structure, this shape completely fitted with GPS-velocity map which start from PG and split up in the Catastrophic Point(Anatoly). We could consider PG as remnants of Ancient Ocean which spent up

  11. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  12. Multiarmed Spirals in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiev, Bakthier; Siegert, Florian; Weijer, Cornelis

    1997-03-01

    Numerical studies of the properties of multiarmed spirals show that they can form spontaneously in low excitability media. The maximum number of arms in a multiarmed spiral is proportional to the ratio of the single spiral period to the refractoriness of the medium. Multiarmed spirals are formed due to attraction of single spirals if these spirals rotate in the same direction and their tips are less than one wavelength apart, i.e., a spiral broken not far from its tip can evolve into a 2-armed spiral. We propose this mechanism to be responsible for the formation of multiarmed spirals in mounds of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  13. Electromechanics of graphene spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Korhonen, Topi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2014-12-15

    Among the most fascinating nanostructure morphologies are spirals, hybrids of somewhat obscure topology and dimensionality with technologically attractive properties. Here, we investigate mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene spirals upon elongation by using density-functional tight-binding, continuum elasticity theory, and classical force field molecular dynamics. It turns out that electronic properties are governed by interlayer interactions as opposed to strain effects. The structural behavior is governed by van der Waals interaction: in its absence spirals unfold with equidistant layer spacings, ripple formation at spiral perimeter, and steadily increasing axial force; in its presence, on the contrary, spirals unfold via smooth local peeling, complex geometries, and nearly constant axial force. These electromechanical trends ought to provide useful guidelines not only for additional theoretical investigations but also for forthcoming experiments on graphene spirals.

  14. Square-Spiral Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.

    1994-01-01

    Square-spiral microstrip antennas for wideband reception at frequencies of several gigahertz proposed. These could be made to conform to surfaces of aircraft and other vehicles. Offers advantage of thinness. Square shapes of spirals in these spiral microstrip antennas offers advantage over curved shapes of spirals of other spiral microstrip antennas in that square shapes simplifies fabrication.

  15. Spherical long spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, G. H.; Dinkova, C. L.

    2013-10-01

    Long spirals in the Euclidean plane have been introduced by A. Kurnosenko five years ago. Using a natural map of the shape sphere into the extended Gaussian plane we study spherical curves that are pre-images of plane long spirals. Loxodromes and spherical spiral antennas are typical examples of such spherical long spirals. The set of all planar spirals leaves invariant under an arbitrary similarity transformation. This set is divided in two disjoint classes by A. Kirnosenko. The first class is consist of the so-called short spirals which are widely used in geometric modeling. The second class of planar long spirals contains well-known logarithmic spiral and Archimedean spirals which have many applications in mathematics, astrophysics and industry. The notion of simplicial shape space is due to D. Kendall. The most popular simplicial shape space of order (2,3) is the set of equivalence classes of similar triangles in the plane. The sphere of radius 1/2 centered at the origin can be considered as a model of this quotient space, so-called the shape sphere. F. Bookstein and J. Lester showed that the one-point extension of the Euclidean plane, so-called the extended Gaussian plane, is another model of the same simplicial shape space. The present paper gives a description of long spirals on the shape sphere by the use a natural conformal mapping between two models. First, we examine long spirals in the extended Gaussian plane. After that, we describe some differential geometric properties of the shape sphere. Finally, we discuss parameterizations of long spirals on the shape sphere.

  16. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  17. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  18. Spiral model of pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James D.

    2003-10-01

    A spiral model of pitch interrelates tone chroma, tone height, equal temperament scales, and a cochlear map. Donkin suggested in 1870 that the pitch of tones could be well represented by an equiangular spiral. More recently, the cylindrical helix has been popular for representing tone chroma and tone height. Here it is shown that tone chroma, tone height, and cochlear position can be conveniently related to tone frequency via a planar spiral. For this ``equal-temperament spiral,'' (ET Spiral) tone chroma is conceived as a circular array with semitones at 30° intervals. The frequency of sound on the cent scale (re 16.351 Hz) is represented by the radius of the spiral defined by r=(1200/2π)θr, where θr is in radians. By these definitions, one revolution represents one octave, 1200 cents, 30° represents a semitone, the radius relates θ to cents in accordance with equal temperament (ET) tuning, and the arclength of the spiral matches the mapping of sound frequency to the basilar membrane. Thus, the ET Spiral gives tone chroma as θ, tone height as the cent scale, and the cochlear map as the arclength. The possible implications and directions for further work are discussed.

  19. Assessment of multislice CT to quantify pulmonary emphysema function and physiology in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Presson, Robert G., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate multi-slice computed tomography technology to quantify functional and physiologic changes in rats with pulmonary emphysema. Method: Seven rats were scanned using a 16-slice CT (Philips MX8000 IDT) before and after artificial inducement of emphysema. Functional parameters i.e. lung volumes were measured by non-contrast spiral scan during forced breath-hold at inspiration and expiration followed by image segmentation based on attenuation threshold. Dynamic CT imaging was performed immediately following the contrast injection to estimate physiology changes. Pulmonary perfusion, fractional blood volume, and mean transit times (MTTs) were estimated by fitting the time-density curves of contrast material using a compartmental model. Results: The preliminary results indicated that the lung volumes of emphysema rats increased by 3.52+/-1.70mL (p<0.002) at expiration and 4.77+/-3.34mL (p<0.03) at inspiration. The mean lung densities of emphysema rats decreased by 91.76+/-68.11HU (p<0.01) at expiration and low attenuation areas increased by 5.21+/-3.88% (p<0.04) at inspiration compared with normal rats. The perfusion for normal and emphysema rats were 0.25+/-0.04ml/s/ml and 0.32+/-0.09ml/s/ml respectively. The fractional blood volumes for normal and emphysema rats were 0.21+/-0.04 and 0.15+/-0.02. There was a trend toward faster MTTs for emphysema rats (0.42+/-0.08s) than normal rats (0.89+/-0.19s) with p<0.006, suggesting that blood flow crossing the capillaries increases as the capillary volume decreases and which may cause the red blood cells to leave the capillaries incompletely saturated with oxygen if the MTTs become too short. Conclusion: Quantitative measurement using CT of structural and functional changes in pulmonary emphysema appears promising for small animals.

  20. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  1. Spiral fluid separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fluid separator for separating particulate matter such as contaminates is provided which includes a series of spiral tubes of progressively decreasing cross sectional area connected in series. Each tube has an outlet on the outer curvature of the spiral. As fluid spirals down a tube, centrifugal force acts to force the heavier particulate matter to the outer wall of the tube, where it exits through the outlet. The remaining, and now cleaner, fluid reaches the next tube, which is smaller in cross sectional area, where the process is repeated. The fluid which comes out the final tube is diminished of particulate matter.

  2. Spiral concentrators recover fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-12-15

    Compound spirals offer better performance in a more efficient configuration. Prep plant operators in the US are increasingly opting to use spiral concentrators. They are easy to install, operate and maintain but their downfall is low capacity. The article describes spirals available from PrepTech/Multotec, Krebs Engineers and Roche MT. It reports on research on spiral concentrator technology. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  3. Auroral spirals at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Roussos, E.; Mitchell, D.; Bonfond, B.; Pryor, W.

    2015-10-01

    We report observations of auroral spirals at Saturn propagating from midnight to noon via dawn, based on Cassini/UVIS measurements. The aurora during that sequence is observed for the first time to consist of detached features swirling as they propagate from dawn to early afternoon. The features have a diameter of ˜6000 km in the ionosphere, which would correspond to 12 to 15 RS wide plasma regions in the magnetosphere. Simultaneous ENA enhancements are observed; however, they do not show a clear spiral form. We estimate the velocity of the UV auroral features to decrease from 85% of rigid corotation (28°/h) near the equatorward edge to 68% of rigid corotation (22°/h) in the poleward edge. We discuss two possible scenarios which could explain the generation of the auroral spirals. First, we suggest that the auroral spirals could be related to large dynamic hot populations which create regions with strong velocity gradients. Alternatively, a less possible theory could be that the auroral spirals are related to field line deformation from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere, similar to the scenario proposed to explain auroral spirals at Earth. Such field line twist can happen for a configuration where the magnetospheric source region is located between a pair of plasma flow vortices.

  4. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  5. [Helical CT of urinary tract: clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Roy, C; Tuchmann, C; Guth, S; Lang, H; Saussine, C; Jacqmin, D

    2000-09-01

    Helical CT is the most useful imaging modality to evaluate kidney diseases. Different imaging protocols are used to assess the correct diagnosis in each clinical situation. The nephrographic phase (between 90 and 100 s of delay after injection) is more accurate than the cortical phase (between 30 and 40 s of delay) to depict and characterise small renal masses. Multiplanar and 3D reconstruction are useful to plan partial kidney surgery or percutaneous surgery of lithiasis. In emergency, spiral CT, if available, is suitable to assess renal colic. Spiral CT is the best modality to evaluate traumatic kidney.

  6. Comparison of Conventional Versus Spiral Computed Tomography with Three Dimensional Reconstruction in Chronic Otitis Media with Ossicular Chain Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Naghibi, Saeed; Seifirad, Sirous; Adami Dehkordi, Mahboobeh; Einolghozati, Sasan; Ghaffarian Eidgahi Moghadam, Nafiseh; Akhavan Rezayat, Amir; Seifirad, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic otitis media (COM) can be treated with tympanoplasty with or without mastoidectomy. In patients who have undergone middle ear surgery, three-dimensional spiral computed tomography (CT) scan plays an important role in optimizing surgical planning. Objectives: This study was performed to compare the findings of three-dimensional reconstructed spiral and conventional CT scan of ossicular chain study in patients with COM. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients enrolled in the study underwent plane and three dimensional CT scan (PHILIPS-MX 8000). Ossicles changes, mastoid cavity, tympanic cavity, and presence of cholesteatoma were evaluated. Results of the two methods were then compared and interpreted by a radiologist, recorded in questionnaires, and analyzed. Logistic regression test and Kappa coefficient of agreement were used for statistical analyses. Results: Sixty two ears with COM were found in physical examination. A significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle erosion (11.3% in conventional CT vs. 37.1% in spiral CT, P = 0.0001), decrease of mastoid air cells (82.3% in conventional CT vs. 93.5% in spiral CT, P = 0.001), and tympanic cavity opacity (12.9% in conventional CT vs. 40.3% in spiral CT, P=0.0001). No significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle destruction (6.5% conventional CT vs. 56.4% in spiral CT, P = 0.125), and presence of cholesteatoma (3.2% in conventional CT vs. 42% in spiral CT, P = 0.172). In this study, spiral CT scan demonstrated ossicle dislocation in 9.6%, decrease of mastoid air cells in 4.8%, and decrease of volume in the tympanic cavity in 1.6%; whereas, none of these findings were reported in the patients' conventional CT scans. Conclusion: Spiral-CT scan is superior to conventional CT in the diagnosis of lesions in COM before operation. It can be used for detailed evaluation of ossicular chain in such patients. PMID:27127583

  7. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  8. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  9. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  10. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    PubMed

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  11. Spiral computed tomography phase-space source model in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc Monte Carlo system: implementation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2013-04-01

    Currently, the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) system does not provide a spiral CT source model for the simulation of spiral CT scanning. We developed and validated a spiral CT phase-space source model in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. The spiral phase-space source model was implemented in the DOSXYZnrc user code of the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system by analyzing the geometry of spiral CT scan—scan range, initial angle, rotational direction, pitch, slice thickness, etc. Table movement was simulated by changing the coordinates of the isocenter as a function of beam angles. Some parameters such as pitch, slice thickness and translation per rotation were also incorporated into the model to make the new phase-space source model, designed specifically for spiral CT scan simulations. The source model was hard-coded by modifying the ‘ISource = 8: Phase-Space Source Incident from Multiple Directions’ in the srcxyznrc.mortran and dosxyznrc.mortran files in the DOSXYZnrc user code. In order to verify the implementation, spiral CT scans were simulated in a CT dose index phantom using the validated x-ray tube model of a commercial CT simulator for both the original multi-direction source (ISOURCE = 8) and the new phase-space source model in the DOSXYZnrc system. Then the acquired 2D and 3D dose distributions were analyzed with respect to the input parameters for various pitch values. In addition, surface-dose profiles were also measured for a patient CT scan protocol using radiochromic film and were compared with the MC simulations. The new phase-space source model was found to simulate the spiral CT scanning in a single simulation run accurately. It also produced the equivalent dose distribution of the ISOURCE = 8 model for the same CT scan parameters. The MC-simulated surface profiles were well matched to the film measurement overall within 10%. The new spiral CT phase-space source model was implemented in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. This work will be beneficial in estimating the

  12. Spiral computed tomography phase-space source model in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc Monte Carlo system: implementation and validation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-04-21

    Currently, the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) system does not provide a spiral CT source model for the simulation of spiral CT scanning. We developed and validated a spiral CT phase-space source model in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. The spiral phase-space source model was implemented in the DOSXYZnrc user code of the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system by analyzing the geometry of spiral CT scan-scan range, initial angle, rotational direction, pitch, slice thickness, etc. Table movement was simulated by changing the coordinates of the isocenter as a function of beam angles. Some parameters such as pitch, slice thickness and translation per rotation were also incorporated into the model to make the new phase-space source model, designed specifically for spiral CT scan simulations. The source model was hard-coded by modifying the 'ISource = 8: Phase-Space Source Incident from Multiple Directions' in the srcxyznrc.mortran and dosxyznrc.mortran files in the DOSXYZnrc user code. In order to verify the implementation, spiral CT scans were simulated in a CT dose index phantom using the validated x-ray tube model of a commercial CT simulator for both the original multi-direction source (ISOURCE = 8) and the new phase-space source model in the DOSXYZnrc system. Then the acquired 2D and 3D dose distributions were analyzed with respect to the input parameters for various pitch values. In addition, surface-dose profiles were also measured for a patient CT scan protocol using radiochromic film and were compared with the MC simulations. The new phase-space source model was found to simulate the spiral CT scanning in a single simulation run accurately. It also produced the equivalent dose distribution of the ISOURCE = 8 model for the same CT scan parameters. The MC-simulated surface profiles were well matched to the film measurement overall within 10%. The new spiral CT phase-space source model was implemented in the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. This work will be beneficial in estimating the spiral

  13. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  14. Ferroelectricity in spiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Maxim

    2006-02-17

    It was recently observed that the ferroelectrics showing the strongest sensitivity to an applied magnetic field are spiral magnets. We present a phenomenological theory of inhomogeneous ferroelectric magnets, which describes their thermodynamics and magnetic field behavior, e.g., dielectric susceptibility anomalies at magnetic transitions and sudden flops of electric polarization in an applied magnetic field. We show that electric polarization can also be induced at domain walls and that magnetic vortices carry electric charge. PMID:16606047

  15. Toroidal spiral field theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. B.

    1996-09-01

    A toroidal spiral field is introduced that propagates around all the objects in the universe. The nature of this field can be either gravitational or electrostatic or magnetic, and it governs the motion of the objects as well as the forces that act upon them. The topology of the toroidal spiral field is obtained when the Bertrami vortex comprised of two helical fluxes of opposite vorticity is curved into a circle. The main parameter that defines the geometry of the toroidal spiral field is the inversion radius of a sphere at which the toroidal fluxes of opposite vorticity meet. The inversion sphere is the border surface at which the matter converts into anti-matter, and at which the law of physics are inverted. The theory covers the problem of two objects orbiting each other with possible sizes ranging from an elementary particle to a black hole and to a galaxy. The equations obtained define the radii of the stationary quantum orbits which can be applied to a structure of the hydrogen atom, including its nucleus, as well as to a structure of a planetary system and a black hole. They also establish the relativistic relationships for the gravitational and inertial masses as well as for the electrical charge which are quite different than those proposed by Lorentz.

  16. Imaging detection of new HCCs in cirrhotic patients treated with different techniques: Comparison of conventional US, spiral CT, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced US with the Navigator technique (Nav 3D CEUS)().

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, F; Comparato, G; Marinone, M G; Di Stasi, M; Sbolli, G; Aragona, G; Tansini, P; Fornari, F

    2009-03-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: Il sistema “Navigator” di Esaote consente di ottenere ricostruzioni 3-D di tutto il fegato (corrette volumetricamente da un sistema di guida) mediante singola acquisizione con CEUS (mediante scansione perpendicolare all'asse lungo del fegato, per una completa acquisizione 2-D del suo asse corto) e sovrappone tali ricostruzioni 3-D con quelle ottenute con la TC. SCOPO: valutare la capacità di tale sistema di diagnosticare nuovi HCC rispetto all'US e alla TC in una popolazione di HCC su cirrosi precedentemente trattati con varie metodiche. MATERIALI E METODI: Settantadue cirrotici con pregressi HCC (M/F: 38/34; tutti HCV +vi, Child A/B: 58/14, con detection di 49 nuovi noduli (N) in 34 pazienti; 10 nuovi HCC multinodulari (NMulti); 6 riprese locali di malattia (Ri) in 4 pazienti (3 riprese singole, in un paziente tre noduli con ripresa di malattia); 47 HCC trattati efficacemente (neg) in 22 pazienti + 2 pazienti con HCC multinodulare senza segni di ripresa (neg-Multi) sono stati sottoposti a 100 esami (1 esame: 48 pazienti; 2 esami: 20 pazienti; 3 esami: 4 pazienti) dal 1 novembre 2006 al novembre 2007. La Nav 3D CEUS è stata eseguita con SonoVue (BR1; Bracco) e con l'ecografo Esaote MPX collegato a un sistema “Navigator” con software di ricostruzione 3-D dedicato. La TC spirale di controllo è stata eseguita entro 30 giorni dall'esecuzione di Nav 3D CEUS. Sono stati valutati sensibilità, specificità, accuratezza diagnostica (ODA), valore predittivo positivo (PPV) e negativo (NPV). RISULTATI: La diagnosi finale fu: 34 pazienti con 49 nuove lesioni (N), 10 con HCC multiN e 6 recidive loco-regionali in 4 pazienti; 47 noduli in 24 pazienti senza nuove lesioni durante il follow-up. Gli US hanno ottenuto: 29 N (+5 multinodularN e 3 LR), 20 falsi negativi (+5 Nmulti e 3 LR) (sensibilità: 59,2, specificità: 100%; accuratezza diagnostica: 73;6; VPP: 100; VPN: 70, 1); la TC spirale ha ottenuto: 42 N (+9 multinodularN e 7 LR), 7 falsi

  17. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  18. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  19. Stellar Populations in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, L. A.; Courteau, S.; Bell, E. F.; Holtzman, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate optical and near-IR color gradients in a sample of 172 low-inclination galaxies spanning Hubble types S0--Irr. The colors are compared to stellar population synthesis models from which luminosity-weighted average ages and metallicities are determined. We explore the effects of different underlying star formation histories and additional bursts of star formation. Because the observed gradients show radial structure, we measure ``inner'' and ``outer'' disk age and metallicity gradients. Relative trends in age and metallicity and their gradients are explored as a function of Hubble type, rotational velocity, total near-IR galaxy magnitude, central surface brightness, and scale length. We find strong correlations in age and metallicity with Hubble type, rotational velocity, total magnitude, and central surface brightness in the sense that earlier-type, faster rotating, more luminous, and higher surface brightness galaxies are older and more metal-rich, suggesting an early and more rapid star formation history for these galaxies. The increasing trends level off for T ⪉ 4 (Sbc and earlier), V {rot} ⪆ 120 km s-1, MK ⪉ -23 mag, and μ 0 ⪉ 18.5 mag arcsec-2. Outer disk gradients are weaker than the inner gradients as expected for a slower variation of the potential and surface brightness in the outer parts. We find that stronger age gradients are associated with weaker metallicity gradients. Relative trends in gradients with galaxy parameters do not agree with predictions of semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation, possibly as a result of bar-induced radial flows. However, the observed trends are in agreement with chemo-spectro photometric models of spiral galaxy evolution based on CDM-motivated scaling laws but including none of the hierarchical merging characteristics. This implies a strong dependence of the star formation history of spiral galaxies on the galaxy potential and halo spin parameter. L.A.M. and S.C acknowledge support

  20. Spiral Microstrip Antenna with Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor elements embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  1. Spiral Orbit Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Kingsbury, Edward; Jansen, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) bridges the gap between full-scale life testing and typically unrealistic accelerated life testing of ball-bearing lubricants in conjunction with bearing ball and race materials. The SOT operates under realistic conditions and quickly produces results, thereby providing information that can guide the selection of lubricant, ball, and race materials early in a design process. The SOT is based upon a simplified, retainerless thrust bearing comprising one ball between flat races (see figure). The SOT measures lubricant consumption and degradation rates and friction coefficients in boundary lubricated rolling and pivoting contacts. The ball is pressed between the lower and upper races with a controlled force and the lower plate is rotated. The combination of load and rotation causes the ball to move in a nearly circular orbit that is, more precisely, an opening spiral. The spiral s pitch is directly related to the friction coefficient. At the end of the orbit, the ball contacts the guide plate, restoring the orbit to its original radius. The orbit is repeatable throughout the entire test. A force transducer, mounted in-line with the guide plate, measures the force between the ball and the guide plate, which directly relates to the friction coefficient. The SOT, shown in the figure, can operate in under ultra-high vacuum (10(exp -9) Torr) or in a variety of gases at atmospheric pressure. The load force can be adjusted between 45 and 450 N. By varying the load force and ball diameter, mean Hertzian stresses between 0.5 and 5.0 GPa can be obtained. The ball s orbital speed range is between 1 and 100 rpm.

  2. Spiral sunspot spotted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A pinwheel-shaped sunspot sighted by astronomers at Kitt Peak National Observatory has been labeled by veteran solar observers as ‘unprecedented,’ according to the National Science Foundation. The sunspot, with a diameter about 6 times that of the earth, was spotted on February 19 with the vacuum solar telescope at Kitt Peak.The average sunspot, which usually appears in photographs as an irregularly shaped dark hole, has a diameter of about 9600 km. The spiral sunspot's diameter approximated 80,450 km. It maintained its shape for about 2 days before it broke up and changed form.

  3. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected.

    A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue.

    Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise.

    NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy.

    Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.

    The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State

  4. Spirally wound electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Veigh, J.B. Jr.; Reise, T.F.; Taylor, A.H.

    1987-11-17

    A spirally wound electrochemical cell having improved abuse resistance is described comprising a container having a cathode, an anode consisting essentially of an anode metal comprising an alkali or alkaline earth metal, a separator, and a fluid electrolyte all in operative association with each other. Each of the cathode, anode and separator have lengths substantially greater than their respective widths; and the anode, cathode and separator are spirally wound with the separator being positioned to maintain the anode and the cathode out of direct contact with each other. The anode is comprised of first and second sections integral with each other but subject to different rates of utilization during discharge of the cell with the first section of anode being a minor part of the anode and being substantially completely discharged and depleted, during discharge of the cell, prior to completion of discharge and depletion of the second section of anode, with the second section comprising a major portion of the anode. The cell further comprises an anode tab located on the second section of the anode, whereby the discharge and depletion of the first section does not prematurely end the life of the cell.

  5. Spiral scan peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    King, K F; Schaefer, D J

    2000-07-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields induce electric fields that can cause physiological stimulation. Stimulation has been empirically characterized as a function of dB/dt and duration based on experiments using trapezoidal and sinusoidal gradient waveforms with constant ramp time, amplitude, and direction. For two-dimensional (2D) spiral scans, the readout gradient waveforms are frequency- and amplitude-modulated sinusoids on two orthogonal axes in quadrature. The readout gradient waveform therefore rotates with amplitude and angular velocity that are generally not constant. It does not automatically follow that spiral stimulation thresholds can be predicted using available stimulation models. We scanned 18 normal volunteers with a 2D spiral scan and measured global thresholds for axial, sagittal, and coronal planes. We concluded that the stimulation model evaluated accurately predicts slew rate-limited spiral mean stimulation thresholds, if the effective ramp time is chosen to be the half-period at the end of the spiral readout.

  6. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Radio polarization observations have revealed large-scale magnetic fields in spiral galaxies. The average total field strength most probably increases with the rate of star formation. The uniform field generally follows the orientation of the optical spiral arms, but is often strongest {ital outside} the arms. Long magnetic-field filaments are seen, sometimes up to a 30 kpc length. The field seems to be anchored in large gas clouds and is inflated out of the disk; e.g., by a galactic wind. The field in radio halos around galaxies is highly uniform in limited regions, resembling the structure of the solar corona. The detection of Faraday rotation in spiral galaxies excludes the existence of large amounts of antimatter. The distribution of Faraday rotation in the disks shows two different large-scale structures of the interstellar field: Axisymmetric-spiral and bisymmetric-spiral, which are interpreted as two modes of the galactic dynamo driven by differential rotation.

  7. Spiral vane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  8. Arsia Mons Spiral Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the benefits of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) Extended Mission is the opportunity to observe how the planet's weather changes during a second full martian year. This picture of Arsia Mons was taken June 19, 2001; southern spring equinox occurred the same day. Arsia Mons is a volcano nearly large enough to cover the state of New Mexico. On this particular day (the first day of Spring), the MOC wide angle cameras documented an unusual spiral-shaped cloud within the 110 km (68 mi) diameter caldera--the summit crater--of the giant volcano. Because the cloud is bright both in the red and blue images acquired by the wide angle cameras, it probably consisted mostly of fine dust grains. The cloud's spin may have been induced by winds off the inner slopes of the volcano's caldera walls resulting from the temperature differences between the walls and the caldera floor, or by a vortex as winds blew up and over the caldera. Similar spiral clouds were seen inside the caldera for several days; we don't know if this was a single cloud that persisted throughout that time or one that regenerated each afternoon. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the left/upper left.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  9. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging of the in vivo lung: combining spiral computed tomography with multiplanar and volumetric rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, J E; Ney, D R; Fishman, E K

    1994-02-01

    We applied multiplanar techniques and a modified version of our volumetric rendering program for three-dimensional imaging to single-breath hold spiral computed tomography (CT) datasets to generate two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) images of the in vivo lung. We report details of the combined 2-D/3-D spiral CT technique along with three representative cases from our initial experience.

  10. Rejuvenation of spiral bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel; Davies, Roger L.

    2006-02-01

    indistinguishable as far as their stellar populations are concerned. These results favour an inside-out formation scenario and indicate that the discs in spiral galaxies of Hubble types Sbc and earlier cannot have a significant influence on the evolution of the stellar populations in the bulge component. The phenomenon of pseudo-bulge formation must be restricted to spirals of types later than Sbc.

  11. Chiral asymmetry in spiral galaxies?

    PubMed

    Kondepudi, D K; Durand, D J

    2001-07-01

    Spiral galaxies are chiral entities when coupled with the direction of their recession velocity. As viewed from the Earth, the S-shaped and Z-shaped spiral galaxies are two chiral forms. What is the nature of chiral symmetry in spiral galaxies? In the Carnegie Atlas of Galaxies that lists photographs of a total of 1,168 galaxies, we found 540 galaxies, classified as normal or barred spirals, that are clearly identifiable as S- or Z- type. The recession velocities for 538 of these galaxies could be obtained from this atlas and other sources. A statistical analysis of this sample reveals no overall asymmetry but there is a significant asymmetry in certain subclasses: dominance of S-type galaxies in the Sb class of normal spiral galaxies and a dominance of Z-type in the SBb class of barred spiral galaxies. Both S- and Z-type galaxies seem to have similar velocity distribution, indicating no spatial segregation of the two chiral forms.

  12. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  14. Cardiac cone-beam CT volume reconstruction using ART

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, T.; Manzke, R.; Proksa, R.; Grass, M.

    2005-04-01

    Modern computed tomography systems allow volume imaging of the heart. Up to now, approximately two-dimensional (2D) and 3D algorithms based on filtered backprojection are used for the reconstruction. These algorithms become more sensitive to artifacts when the cone angle of the x-ray beam increases as it is the current trend of computed tomography (CT) technology. In this paper, we investigate the potential of iterative reconstruction based on the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for helical cardiac cone-beam CT. Iterative reconstruction has the advantages that it takes the cone angle into account exactly and that it can be combined with retrospective cardiac gating fairly easily. We introduce a modified ART algorithm for cardiac CT reconstruction. We apply it to clinical cardiac data from a 16-slice CT scanner and compare the images to those obtained with a current analytical reconstruction method. In a second part, we investigate the potential of iterative reconstruction for a large area detector with 256 slices. For the clinical cases, iterative reconstruction produces excellent images of diagnostic quality. For the large area detector, iterative reconstruction produces images superior to analytical reconstruction in terms of cone-beam artifacts.

  15. Mystery Spiral Arms Explained?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    Using a quartet of space observatories, University of Maryland astronomers may have cracked a 45-year mystery surrounding two ghostly spiral arms in the galaxy M106. The Maryland team, led by Yuxuan Yang, took advantage of the unique capabilities of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, and data obtained almost a decade ago with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. NGC X-ray Image NGC 4258 X-ray Image M106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a stately spiral galaxy 23.5 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici. In visible-light images, two prominent arms emanate from the bright nucleus and spiral outward. These arms are dominated by young, bright stars, which light up the gas within the arms. "But in radio and X-ray images, two additional spiral arms dominate the picture, appearing as ghostly apparitions between the main arms," says team member Andrew Wilson of the University of Maryland. These so-called "anomalous arms" consist mostly of gas. "The nature of these anomalous arms is a long-standing puzzle in astronomy," says Yang. "They have been a mystery since they were first discovered in the early 1960s." By analyzing data from XMM-Newton, Spitzer, and Chandra, Yang, Bo Li, Wilson, and Christopher Reynolds, all at the University of Maryland at College Park, have confirmed earlier suspicions that the ghostly arms represent regions of gas that are being violently heated by shock waves. Previously, some astronomers had suggested that the anomalous arms are jets of particles being ejected by a supermassive black hole in M106's nucleus. But radio observations by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array, and the Very Large Array in New Mexico, later identified another pair of jets originating in the core. "It is highly unlikely that an active galactic nucleus could have more than one pair of jets," says Yang. In 2001, Wilson, Yang, and Gerald Cecil

  16. Laplace operator based reconstruction algorithm for truncated spiral cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaobing; Yu, Hengyong; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    To reconstruct images from truncated projections collected along a spiral trajectory, the most common approach is to smoothly extrapolate each projection to suppress truncation artifacts. Based on the work of Dennerlein, a local reconstruction algorithm is developed for spiral cone beam computed tomography (CT), which does not need explicit projection extrapolation. This algorithm is a filtered-backprojection (FBP) format and contains three major steps: cosine weight, filtration, and backprojection. While the cosine weight and backprojection steps are the same as the classical Feldkamp - Davis - Kress (FDK) scheme, the filtering step contains two steps: Laplace filtering and Radon transform-based filtering. Numerical simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a better performance than FDK algorithm for region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction of spiral cone-beam CT.

  17. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  18. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  19. Coronary artery bypass graft flow: qualitative evaluation with cine single-detector row CT and comparison with findings at angiography.

    PubMed

    Tello, Richard; Hartnell, George G; Costello, Philip; Ecker, Christian P

    2002-09-01

    A four-point ordinal-scale qualitative flow index was used for assessment of patency of 75 coronary artery bypass grafts in 26 patients examined with spiral computed tomography (CT). CT findings were compared with selective graft angiographic findings. Of 54 open grafts, 52 were patent at initial selective graft angiography and 50 were patent at spiral CT; accuracy rates were 97% (73 of 75) and 95% (71 of 75), respectively. Spiral CT flow index agreed with angiographically determined flow in 85% (95% CI: 0.77, 0.93) of grafts. The kappa statistic demonstrated very good to excellent intermodality (0.75) and interobserver (0.89) agreement. Spiral CT may be a feasible means of assessing quality of flow in bypass grafts. PMID:12202732

  20. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  1. Aleurodicus rugioperculatus (Regose spiraling whitefly)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aleurodicus rugioperculatus Martin, infamous as gumbo limbo or the rugose spiraling whitefly (RSWF), is a new addition in the list of whitefly species found in Florida. It is a newly introduced pest, endemic to Central America, and reported for the first time in Florida from Miami-Dade County in 200...

  2. The enigma of auroral spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    One of the most spectacular forms that the aurora borealis can assume is the large-scale spiral Spirals are dominantly observed along the poleward boundary of the auroral oval during active periods Two concepts have been pursued in explaining their origin and in particular the counterclockwise sense of rotation of the luminous structures when viewed along the magnetic field direction An essentially magnetostatic theory following Hallinan 1976 attributes the spiral pattern to the twisting of field-lines caused by a centrally located upward field-aligned current According to Oguti 1981 and followers a clockwise rotation of the plasma flow produces the anticlockwise structure There are observations seemingly confirming or contradicting either theory In this paper it is argued that both concepts are insufficient in that only parts of the underlying physics are considered Besides field-aligned currents and plasma flow one has to take into at least two further aspects The ionospheric conductivity modified by particle precipitation has an impact on the magnetospheric plasma dynamics Furthermore auroral arcs are not fixed entities subject to distortions by plasma flows or twisted field-lines but sites of transient releases of energy We suggest that auroral spirals are ports of entry or exit of plasma into or out of the auroral oval This way it can be understood why a clockwise plasma flow can create an anticlockwise luminous pattern

  3. Spiral Galactic Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2009-05-01

    Before the period of galactic formation the uiverse consisted of a vast number of pre-formed systems consisting of two or more pre-galactic arms, the arms orbiting each other. As the orbits of the arms decayed the sides of the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided and joined and thereby forming multi-armed spiral galaxies which began to rotate.The rotation resulted from the conversion of the orbital motion of the individual arms when joined into faster rotational motion of the newly formed galaxy. The spiral arms were maintained by the centripital force of the rapidly rotational motion of the galaxy system. As the rotational motion of the galaxy slowed down the arms of the spiral galaxy collapsed towards the body of the galaxy due to lessening of centripetal force on the arms and elliptical galaxies were formed and with further lessening of galactic rotational motion galactic disks were formed. One can see in galaxies M51, M100, NGC2336 and NGC4939 the galactic arms came from external orbit, not disks or instabilities in support of this theory. Also in support of this theory of galactic evolution is that spiral galaxies rotate faster than ellipticals or disks.

  4. Theoretical problems of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, C.

    1982-01-01

    Three theoretical problems concerning the large scale structure of disk galaxies in general, and the Milky Way System, in particular, were proposed to study. They are, namely, modes of spiral density waves, evolutionary change of the abundance distribution of the gas in the Milky Way System and the motions of the cloud medium behind the large scale galactic shock.

  5. Power spiral conveyor section and method

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, J.C.; Delli-Gatti, F. Jr.

    1992-02-11

    This patent describes a method of mining a mine having a mine mouth, using a mining head with a spiral conveyor including a spiral conveyor screw rotatable with a shaft about an axis of rotation. It comprises: inserting the mining head in the mine through the mine mouth, and advancing the head into the mine mouth; continuously conveying mined material from the mine toward the mine mouth using the spiral conveyor; adding incremental lengths to the spiral conveyor screw as the distance from the mining head to the mouth increases; periodically providing power assists for effecting powered rotating of the spiral conveyor about its axis of rotation along the length of the spiral conveyor about its axis of rotation along the length of the spiral conveyor in the mine as the incremental lengths are added.

  6. On site testing of the compound spiral

    SciTech Connect

    MacNamara, L.; Toney, T.A.; Moorhead, R.G.; Davies, P.; Miles, N.J.; Bethell, P.; Everitt, B.

    1996-12-31

    Research undertaken over the last few years has shown that a short turn spiral can effectively replace a conventional full length spiral. A recent development of this work has been the design of a Compound spiral, incorporating two short turn units on one central column. Conventional spirals have become almost universally applied to clean 14M x 100M size fine coal in the Eastern and Midwestern U.S. coal fields and widely used in UK coal preparation plants to process fine coal. Compound spiral were installed at Cyprus Amax`s Lady Dunn Plant in West Virginia for on site testing and, at the time of going to press, at a UK coal preparation plant operated by RJB Mining (UK) for comparison testing with a conventional duplex spiral. This paper describes the testing approach used by Cyprus Amax and Krebs Engineers to test a compound spiral at Cyprus Amax`s Lady Dunn Plant.

  7. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  8. Cervix carcinoma and incidental finding of medullary thyroid carcinoma by 18F-FDG PET/CT--clinical case.

    PubMed

    Chaushev, Borislav; Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Anelia; Yordanov, Kaloyan; Encheva, Elitsa; Dancheva, Jivka; Yordanova, Cvetelina; Hristozov, Kiril; Krasnaliev, Ivan; Radev, Radoslav; Nenkov, Rumen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are encountered in clinical practice during the diagnostic procedures or patients' follow-up due to other diseases quite far from the thyroid gland with prevalence 4-50% in general population, depending on age, diagnostic method and race. The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age and their clarification should be done for their adequate treatment. An 18F-FDG PET/CT was done with a PET/CT scanner (Philips Gemini TF), consisting of dedicated lutetium orthosilicate full ring PET scanner and 16 slice CT. The PET/CT scan of the whole-body revealed on the CT portion a hypodense nodular lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland with increased uptake of 18F-FDG on the PET with SUVmax 10.3 and demonstrated a complete response to the induction therapy of the main oncological disease of the patient--squamous cell carcinoma. This clinical case demonstrates that whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/CT has an increasingly important role in the early evaluation of thyroid cancer as a second independent malignant localization. Focal thyroid lesion with high risk of thyroid malignancy was incidentally found on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:25088110

  9. M51's spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S.; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-01-01

    The M51 system (NGC 5194/5195) provides an excellent problem both in spiral structure and in galaxy interactions. The authors present an analytic study of a computer experiment on the excitation mechanisms for M51's spiral arms and whether or not a halo is important for these mechanisms. This work extends previous numerical studies of the M51 system by including self-gravitation in a two component disk: gas and stars, and a dark halo. The analytic study provides two new observational constraints: the time (approx. 70 to 84 million years ago) and position angle of perigalacticon (300 degrees). By using these constraints and a simple conic approximation, the search for the companion's possible orbit is greatly simplified. This requires fewer N-body simulations than a fully self-gravitating orbit search.

  10. Spiralling dynamics near heteroclinic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre A. P.; Labouriau, Isabel S.

    2014-02-01

    There are few explicit examples in the literature of vector fields exhibiting complex dynamics that may be proved analytically. We construct explicitly a two parameter family of vector fields on the three-dimensional sphere S, whose flow has a spiralling attractor containing the following: two hyperbolic equilibria, heteroclinic trajectories connecting them transversely and a non-trivial hyperbolic, invariant and transitive set. The spiralling set unfolds a heteroclinic network between two symmetric saddle-foci and contains a sequence of topological horseshoes semiconjugate to full shifts over an alphabet with more and more symbols, coexisting with Newhouse phenomena. The vector field is the restriction to S of a polynomial vector field in R. In this article, we also identify global bifurcations that induce chaotic dynamics of different types.

  11. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for

  12. Saved by a Spiral Notebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kristan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how she used journal exercises to unify her classroom. Students used cheap spiral notebooks and followed a few very basic rules: (1) Start out by writing for 5 minutes, increasing to 15 or more; (2) Read the entry to the class only if you want to; and (3) Use the given topic or write whatever is on your mind.…

  13. THE SPIRAL GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An image of the grand design of spiral galaxy M100 obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope resolves individual stars within the majestic spiral arms. (These stars typically appeared blurred together when viewed with ground-based telescopes.) Hubble has the ability to resolve individual stars in other galaxies and measure accurately the light from very faint stars. This makes space telescope invaluable for identifying a rare class of pulsating stars, called Cepheid Variable stars embedded within M100's spiral arms. Cepheids are reliable cosmic distance mileposts. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance, which turns out to be 56 million light-years. M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a majestic face-on spiral galaxy. It is a rotating system of gas and stars, similar to our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Hubble routinely can view M100 with a level of clarity and sensitivity previously possible only for the very few nearby galaxies that compose our 'Local Group.'' M100 is a member of the huge Virgo cluster of an estimated 2,500 galaxies. The galaxy can be seen by amateur astronomers as a faint, pinwheel-shaped object in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken on December 31, 1993 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This color picture is a composite of several images taken in different colors of light. Blue corresponds to regions containing hot newborn stars. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: J. Trauger, JPL and NASA

  14. Dynamical mechanisms supporting barred-spiral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsis, P. A.

    We review some recent results of the orbital theory, related with the dynamics of barred-spiral galaxies. The method we use is to study the responses of stellar and gaseous disks when time-independent, external potentials are imposed. These potentials are directly estimated from near-infrared images of disk galaxies. The goal of the work is to detect dynamical mechanisms that reinforce the bars and the spirals in realistic systems. Besides the known mechanism for building bars by quasiperiodic orbits trapped around stable orbits of the {xx} family, we find cases where bars can be supported, to a large extent, by chaotic orbits. These bars are of the ``ansae'' type and their effective potentials are characterized by multiple Lagrangian points roughly along the major axis of the bar. On the other hand the spirals are supported mainly by chaotic orbits and extend usually beyond corotation. We find that the spirals and the outer parts of the bars share the same orbital content. However, we have found also barred-spiral systems with spirals inside corotation, consisting mainly by chaotic orbits. Finally we indicate, that in barred-spiral systems with different pattern speeds for the two components, the dynamics of the spirals can be similar to the dynamics of the spirals of normal spiral galaxies.

  15. Spiral inertial waves emitted from geophysical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    By numerically simulating an initially unstable geophysical vortex, we discover for the first time a special kind of inertial waves, which are emitted in a spiral manner from the vortices; we refer to these waves as spiral inertial waves (SIWs). SIWs appear at small Rossby numbers (0.01 ≤ Ro ≤ 1) according to our parameter sweep experiments; the amplitude, wavelength and frequency of SIWs are sensitive to Rossby numbers. We extend the Lighthill-Ford radiation into inertial waves, and propose an indicator for the emission of inertial waves; this indicator may be adopted into general circulation models to parameterize inertial waves. Additionally, in our tracer releasing experiments, SIWs organize tracers into spirals, and modify the tracer's local rate of change by advecting tracers vertically. Further, the spirals of SIWs resembles some spiral features observed in the ocean and atmosphere, such as spiral ocean eddies and spiral hurricane rainbands; thus, SIWs may offer another mechanism to form spiral eddies and rainbands. Since no density anomaly is required to generate the spirals of SIWs, we infer that the density anomaly, hence the baroclinic or frontal instability, is unlikely to be the key factor in the formation of these spiral features.

  16. [Examination of motion artifacts for helical and non-helical scanning modes in head CT].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Ichiro; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Terakawa, Shoichi; Hara, Takanori; Miura, Yohei

    2011-01-01

    For head computed tomography (CT), non-helical scanning has been recommended even in the widely used multi-slice CT (MSCT). Also, an acute stroke imaging standardization group has recommended the non-helical mode in Japan. However, no detailed comparison has been reported for current MSCT with more than 16 slices. In this study, we compared the non-helical and helical modes for head CT, focusing on temporal resolution and motion artifacts. The temporal resolution was evaluated by using temporal sensitivity profiles (TSPs) measured using a temporal impulse method. In both modes, the TSPs and temporal modulation transfer factors (MTFs) were measured for various pitch factors using 64-slice CT (Aquilion 64, Toshiba). Two motion phantoms were scanned to evaluate motion artifacts, and then quantitative analyses for motion artifacts and helical artifacts were performed by measuring multiple regions of interest (ROIs) in the phantom images. In addition, the rates of artifact occurrence for retrospective clinical cases were compared. The temporal resolution increased as the pitch factor was increased. Remarkable streak artifacts appeared in the non-helical images of the motion phantom, in spite of the equivalent effective temporal resolution. In clinical analysis, results consistent with the phantom studies were shown. These results indicated that the low pitch helical mode would be effective for emergency head CT with patient movement.

  17. Radiochromic films for dental CT dosimetry: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Rampado, O; Bianchi, S D; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Rossetti, V; Ropolo, R

    2014-02-01

    Dental CT dose evaluations are commonly performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside anthropomorphic phantoms. Radiochromic films with good sensitivity in the X-ray diagnostic field have recently been developed and are commercially available as GAFCHROMIC XR-QA. There are potential advantages in the use of radiochromic films such as a more comprehensive dosimetry thanks to the adjustable size of the film samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using radiochromic films for dental CT dose evaluations. Film samples were cut with a width of 5mm and a length of 25 mm (strips), the same size as the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom holes used in this study. Dental CT dose measurements were performed using simultaneously both TLD and radiochromic strips in the same phantom sites. Two equipment types were considered for dental CT examinations: a 16 slice CT and a cone beam CT. Organ equivalent doses were then obtained averaging the measurements from the sites of the same organ and effective doses were calculated using ICRP 103 weighting factors. The entire procedure was repeated four times for each CT in order to compare also the repeatability of the two dosimeter types. A linear correlation was found between the absorbed dose evaluated with radiochromic films and with TLD, with slopes of 0.930 and 0.944 (correlation r>0.99). The maximum difference between the two dosimeter's measurements was 25%, whereas the average difference was 7%. The measurement repeatability was comparable for the two dosimeters at cumulative doses above 15 mGy (estimated uncertainty at 1 sigma level of about 5%), whereas below this threshold radiochromic films show a greater dispersion of data, of about 10% at 1 sigma level. We obtained, using respectively Gafchromic and TLD measurements, effective dose values of 107 μSv and 117 μSv (i.e. difference of 8.6%) for the cone beam CT and of 523 μSv and 562 μSv (i.e. difference of 7%) for the

  18. Automatic phase determination for retrospectively gated cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, R.; Koehler, Th.; Nielsen, T.; Hawkes, D.; Grass, M.

    2004-12-01

    The recent improvements in CT detector and gantry technology in combination with new heart rate adaptive cone beam reconstruction algorithms enable the visualization of the heart in three dimensions at high spatial resolution. However, the finite temporal resolution still impedes the artifact-free reconstruction of the heart at any arbitrary phase of the cardiac cycle. Cardiac phases must be found during which the heart is quasistationary to obtain outmost image quality. It is challenging to find these phases due to intercycle and patient-to-patient variability. Electrocardiogram (ECG) information does not always represent the heart motion with an adequate accuracy. In this publication, a simple and efficient image-based technique is introduced which is able to deliver stable cardiac phases in an automatic and patient-specific way. From low-resolution four-dimensional data sets, the most stable phases are derived by calculating the object similarity between subsequent phases in the cardiac cycle. Patient-specific information about the object motion can be determined and resolved spatially. This information is used to perform optimized high-resolution reconstructions at phases of little motion. Results based on a simulation study and three real patient data sets are presented. The projection data were generated using a 16-slice cone beam CT system in low-pitch helical mode with parallel ECG recording.

  19. Tilted helical Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithm for multislice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Ilmar A.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Mori, Issei; Kazama, Masahiro; Silver, Michael D.

    2003-05-01

    In many clinical applications, it is necessary to tilt the gantry of an X-ray CT system with respect to the patient. Tilting the gantry introduces no complications for single-slice fan-beam systems; however, most systems today are helical multislice systems with up to 16 slices (and this number is sure to increase in the future). The image reconstruction algorithms used in multislice helical CT systems must be modified to compensate for the tilt. If they are not, the quality of reconstructed images will be poor with the presence of significant artifacts produced by the tilt. Practical helical multislice algorithms currently incorporated in today"s systems include helical fan-beam, ASSR (Advanced single-slice rebinning), and Feldkamp algorithms. This paper presents the modifications necessary to compensate for gantry tilt for the helical cone-beam Feldkamp algorithm implemented by Toshiba (referred to as TCOT for true cone-beam tomography). Unlike some of the other algorithms, gantry tilt compensation is simple and straightforward to implement with no significant increase in computational complexity. It will be shown that the effect of the gantry tilt is to introduce a lateral shift in the isocenter of the reconstructed slice of interest, which is a function of the tilt, couch speed, and view angle. This lateral shift is easily calculated and incorporated into the backprojection algorithm. The tilt-compensated algorithm is called T-TCOT. Experimental tilted-gantry data has been obtained with 8- and 16 slice Toshiba Aquilion systems, and examples of uncompensated and tilt compensated images are presented.

  20. Translational Symmetry-Breaking for Spiral Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, V. G.; Wulff, C.

    2000-10-01

    Spiral waves are observed in numerous physical situations, ranging from Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) chemical reactions, to cardiac tissue, to slime-mold aggregates. Mathematical models with Euclidean symmetry have recently been developed to describe the dynamic behavior (for example, meandering) of spiral waves in excitable media. However, no physical experiment is ever infinite in spatial extent, so the Euclidean symmetry is only approximate. Experiments on spiral waves show that inhomogeneities can anchor spirals and that boundary effects (for example, boundary drifting) become very important when the size of the spiral core is comparable to the size of the reacting medium. Spiral anchoring and boundary drifting cannot be explained by the Euclidean model alone. In this paper, we investigate the effects on spiral wave dynamics of breaking the translation symmetry while keeping the rotation symmetry. This is accomplished by introducing a small perturbation in the five-dimensional center bundle equations (describing Hopf bifurcation from one-armed spiral waves) which is SO(2)-equivariant but not equivariant under translations. We then study the effects of this perturbation on rigid spiral rotation, on quasi-periodic meandering and on drifting.

  1. Optical fiber antenna generating spiral beam shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar Pal, S.; Mondal, S. K. Kumar, R.; Akula, A.; Ghosh, R.; Bhatnagar, R.; Kumbhakar, D.

    2014-01-20

    A simple method is proposed here to generate vortex beam and spiral intensity patterns from a Gaussian source. It uses a special type of optical fiber antenna of aperture ∼80 nm having naturally grown surface curvature along its length. The antenna converts linearly polarized Gaussian beam into a beam with spiral intensity patterns. The experimentally obtained spiral patterns with single and double spiral arms manifest the orbital angular momentum, l = ±1, 2, carried by the output beam. Such beam can be very useful for optical tweezer, metal machining, and similar applications.

  2. Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, X.; Levine, H. ); Kessler, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Spiral waves, a type of reentrant excitation,'' are believed to be associated with the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Recent experimental findings have implicated defective regions as a means of trapping spirals which would otherwise drift and (eventually) disappear. Here, we model the myocardium as a simple excitable medium and study via simulation the interaction between a drifting spiral and one or more such defects. We interpret our results in terms of a criterion for the transition between trapped and untrapped drifting spirals.

  3. Disk's Spiral Arms Point to Possible Planets

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulations of young stellar systems suggest that planets embedded in a circumstellar disk can produce many distinctive structures, including rings, gaps and spiral arms. This video compares comput...

  4. Multiple spiral patterns in a cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhanguo; Li, Xia

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the major cause of sudden cardiac death, the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. However, the mechanisms for its onset are still not well understood. Recent experiments indicate that VF is induced by transitions of cardiac electric propagationg waves from a single spiral wave to multiple waves. To further understand the underlying mechanism of VF, we investigated the interaction between two waves in a two-dimensional excitable media. Three types of multiple spirals including multi-arm spirals have been found depending on the rotation direction and the distance among spiral waves.

  5. Recent manufacturing advances for spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Bill, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), through the Propulsion Directorate at NASA Lewis Research Center, has recently sponsored projects to advance the manufacturing process for spiral bevel gears. This type of gear is a critical component in rotary-wing propulsion systems. Two successfully completed contracted projects are described. The first project addresses the automated inspection of spiral bevel gears through the use of coordinate measuring machines. The second project entails the computer-numerical-control (CNC) conversion of a spiral bevel gear grinding machine that is used for all aerospace spiral bevel gears. The results of these projects are described with regard to the savings effected in manufacturing time.

  6. Recent manufacturing advances for spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Bill, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), through the Propulsion Directorate at NASA LRC, has recently sponsored projects to advance the manufacturing process for spiral bevel gears. This type of gear is a critical component in rotary-wing propulsion systems. Two successfully completed contracted projects are described. The first project addresses the automated inspection of spiral bevel gears through the use of coordinate measuring machines. The second project entails the computer-numerical-control (CNC) conversion of a spiral bevel gear grinding machine that is used for all aerospace spiral bevel gears. The results of these projects are described with regard to the savings effected in manufacturing time.

  7. Emergency Physicians Think in Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Tia; Whalen, Desmond; Pollard, Megan

    2015-01-01

    As adult learners, junior clerks on core rotations in emergency medicine (EM) are expected to “own” their patients and follow them from presentation to disposition in the Emergency Department (ED). Traditionally, we teach clerks to present an exhaustive linear list of symptoms and signs to their preceptors. This does not apply well to the fast-paced ED setting. Mnemonics have been developed to teach clerks how to present succinctly and cohesively. To address the need for continual patient reassessment throughout the patient’s journey in the ED, we propose a complimentary approach called SPIRAL. PMID:26719824

  8. HUBBLE REVEALS 'BACKWARDS' SPIRAL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have found a spiral galaxy that may be spinning to the beat of a different cosmic drummer. To the surprise of astronomers, the galaxy, called NGC 4622, appears to be rotating in the opposite direction to what they expected. Pictures by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise by showing which side of the galaxy is closer to Earth. A Hubble telescope photo of the oddball galaxy is this month's Hubble Heritage offering. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars [shown in blue]. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. To add to the conundrum, NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction it is rotating. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. What caused this galaxy to behave differently from most galaxies? Astronomers suspect that NGC 4622 interacted with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a small companion galaxy. The galaxy's core provides new evidence for a merger between NGC 4622 and a smaller galaxy. This information could be the key to understanding the unusual leading arms. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 resides 111 million light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. The pictures were taken in May 2001 with Hubble

  9. Emergency Physicians Think in Spirals.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Tia; Whalen, Desmond; Pollard, Megan; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    As adult learners, junior clerks on core rotations in emergency medicine (EM) are expected to "own" their patients and follow them from presentation to disposition in the Emergency Department (ED). Traditionally, we teach clerks to present an exhaustive linear list of symptoms and signs to their preceptors. This does not apply well to the fast-paced ED setting. Mnemonics have been developed to teach clerks how to present succinctly and cohesively. To address the need for continual patient reassessment throughout the patient's journey in the ED, we propose a complimentary approach called SPIRAL. PMID:26719824

  10. Evaluation of a low-dose/slow-rotating SPECT-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, M.; Aldridge, M.; Dickson, J.; Endozo, R.; Lozhkin, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2008-05-01

    The 4-slice CT that forms part of the GE Infinia Hawkeye-4 SPECT-CT scanner (Hawkeye) is evaluated against the diagnostic 16-slice CT that is incorporated in the GE Discovery ST PET-CT system (DST). The x-ray tube of the slow-rotating Hawkeye system (23 s/rotation) operates at approximately a third of the dose of diagnostic systems as used for conventional diagnostic imaging. Image reconstruction is optimized for low noise. High-contrast spatial resolution significantly falls behind diagnostic figures: the average of MTF50 and MTF10 (resolution where the MTF has fallen to 50% and 10%) is 2.8 ± 0.1 cm-1 for Hawkeye and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm-1 for the DST (standard reconstruction filters). Resolution in the direction of the couch movement (z coordinate) is governed by the fixed Hawkeye slice width of 5 mm. Reconstruction accuracy is found to be increased by reducing the default z increment from 4.4 mm to 2.2 mm. Low-contrast object detectability is superior compared with diagnostic systems operating in the Hawkeye dose range. In the diagnostic dose regime, however, small low-contrast details remain visible in DST that are not detectable with Hawkeye. Although not of diagnostic quality, the low-dose Hawkeye provides appropriate data for SPECT attenuation correction and anatomical localization capability. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  11. Spiral density waves in M81. I. Stellar spiral density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Chien-Chang; Lin, Lien-Hsuan; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Taam, Ronald E.

    2014-04-20

    Aside from the grand-design stellar spirals appearing in the disk of M81, a pair of stellar spiral arms situated well inside the bright bulge of M81 has been recently discovered by Kendall et al. The seemingly unrelated pairs of spirals pose a challenge to the theory of spiral density waves. To address this problem, we have constructed a three-component model for M81, including the contributions from a stellar disk, a bulge, and a dark matter halo subject to observational constraints. Given this basic state for M81, a modal approach is applied to search for the discrete unstable spiral modes that may provide an understanding for the existence of both spiral arms. It is found that the apparently separated inner and outer spirals can be interpreted as a single trailing spiral mode. In particular, these spirals share the same pattern speed 25.5 km s{sup –1} kpc{sup –1} with a corotation radius of 9.03 kpc. In addition to the good agreement between the calculated and the observed spiral pattern, the variation of the spiral amplitude can also be naturally reproduced.

  12. Spiral Cloud Band Associated with a Tornado.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, A

    1960-09-16

    The radarscope photographic sequence, by far the best example on record, reveals a spirally banded structure about 10 miles in diameter which is similar to spiral bands of hurricanes ranging as far as 250 miles and to the banded cloud structure of well-developed storms of 1000 miles as photographed by Tiros I.

  13. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  14. Termination of pinned spirals by local stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Guo, Ming-Ming; Ma, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The termination of pinned spirals on a defect by means of local stimuli is studied. On a completely unexcitable defect, the elimination process is discussed and its corresponding mechanism is presented. Especially, the mechanism of unpinning spirals on a partially unexcitable defect, which has not been investigated so far, is explored. With fixed pacing frequency ω L , there exists a maximal radius R max above which the pinned spiral cannot be removed. It is found that the value of R max does not increase as ω L in a dynamical regime, forming a platform in the R\\textit{max}\\text-ωL curves. Based on analyzing the dispersion relation on the spiral tip around the obstacle, the underlying mechanism is clarified. Also, it is found that when multiple spirals are pinned, the value of R max decreases on a partially unexcitable defect while the change is very slight on a completely unexcitable one.

  15. The Lifetimes of Spirals and Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of isolated galaxy disks that are stable against bar formation readily manifest multiple, transient spiral patterns. It therefore seems likely that some spirals in real galaxies are similarly self-excited, although others are clearly driven by tidal interactions or by bars. The rapidly changing appearance of simulated spirals does not, however imply that the patterns last only a fraction of an orbit. Power spectrum analysis reveals a few underlying, longer-lived spiral waves that turn at different rates, which when super-posed give the appearance of swing-amplified transients. These longer-lived waves are genuine unstable spiral modes; each grows vigorously, saturates and decays over a total of several orbit periods. As each mode decays, the wave action created as it grew drains away to the Lindblad resonances, where it scatters stars. The resulting changes to the disk create the conditions for a new instability, giving rise to a recurring cycle of unstable modes.

  16. Electrodynamics of planar Archimedean spiral resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleeva, N.; Averkin, A.; Abramov, N. N.; Fistul, M. V.; Karpov, A.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of electrodynamics of a planar spiral superconducting resonator of a finite length. The resonator is made in the form of a monofilar Archimedean spiral. By making use of a general model of inhomogeneous alternating current flowing along the resonator and specific boundary conditions on the surface of the strip, we obtain analytically the frequencies fn of resonances which can be excited in such system. We also calculate corresponding inhomogeneous RF current distributions ψ n ( r ) , where r is the coordinate across a spiral. We show that the resonant frequencies and current distributions are well described by simple relationships f n = f 1 n and ψ n ( r ) ≃ sin [ π n ( r / R e ) 2 ] , where n = 1 , 2... and Re is the external radius of the spiral. Our analysis of electrodynamic properties of spiral resonators' is in good agreement with direct numerical simulations and measurements made using specifically designed magnetic probe and laser scanning microscope.

  17. Solar Interactions on Spiral Petroglyphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian F.; Preston, Robert A.

    2003-11-01

    Like most prehistoric cultures, the ancestors of the native Puebloan people of the Southwest were aware of the yearly cycle of the sun. This and other natural phenomena are fundamental for interpreting their world view, religion, and art. Some researchers have argued that rock art, particularly petroglyphs, displays this focus on the natural world through the distinctive interplay of sunlight on these carvings. However, the question of whether or not these interactions occur by intention or chance has hampered the acceptance of this evidence by the archaeological community. To address this question we have performed a detailed study of a complete sample of over 100 spiral petroglyphs within a limited area (less than 20 km^2) of central New Mexico. We have examined this sample on both solstices and equinoxes, and have observed well-defined and consistent sunlight interactions on about 80This work clearly demonstrates the reality and profusion of this ancient cultural tradition. Several examples will be presented.

  18. Low-Noise Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Coy, John J.; Henry, Zachary; Thomas, John; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1994-01-01

    Modified spiral bevel gears that generate relatively little noise and vibration designed and fabricated for use in U.S. Army OH-58D helicopter. Noise reduced by 12 to 19 dB. Similar low-noise, low-vibration spiral bevel gears used in other helicopters, with consequent benefits in comfort and health of pilots and passengers, enhancement of pilots' performance and safety through reduction of audible distraction, and reduction in cost and weight of helicopters through reduction in amount of sound-proofing material. Low-noise, low-vibration spiral bevel gears also used in drive axles of cars and trucks for smoother, quieter rides.

  19. Complications of Hydatid Cysts of the Liver: Spiral Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Konstantinos; Mitsos, Sofoklis; Fotopoulos, Athanasios; Karanikas, Ioannis; Tavernaraki, Kiriaki; Konstantinidis, Fotis; Antonopoulos, Peter; Ekonomou, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the role of Spiral Computed Tomography (CT) in the detection of the complications of hepatic hydatid cysts. Methods During a period of 8 years and after establishing the diagnosis of numerous hydatid cysts, 7 patients with complications of hydatid cysts were found. These 7 patients (5 females, 2 males, mean age 74.2 years, range 63 - 92 years) were studied. Four of them had a known medical history of hydatid disease, while all of them presented to our department as emergency cases. Results They underwent Spiral CT which revealed the following complications of hydatid cysts: intrabiliary rupture in 2 patients, rupture into the peritoneal cavity resulting to peritonitis in 1 patient, contained rupture and secondary transdiaphragmatic thoracic rupture in 1 patient, rupture into both biliary tract and hepatic subcapsular space in 1 patient, rupture into the subcapsular hepatic space in 1 patient and secondary bacterial infection of the cyst resulting to abscess formation in 1 patient. All of these CT findings were surgically confirmed. Conclusions CT provided a rapid and accurate diagnosis in all of these cases and proved to be a very useful preoperative imaging method.

  20. Explosions in Majestic Spiral Beauties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-12-01

    Images of beautiful galaxies, and in particular of spiral brethren of our own Milky Way, leaves no-one unmoved. It is difficult indeed to resist the charm of these impressive grand structures. Astronomers at Paranal Observatory used the versatile VIMOS instrument on the Very Large Telescope to photograph two magnificent examples of such "island universes", both of which are seen in a southern constellation with an animal name. But more significantly, both galaxies harboured a particular type of supernova, the explosion of a massive star during a late and fatal evolutionary stage. The first image (PR Photo 33a/04) is of the impressive spiral galaxy NGC 6118 [1], located near the celestial equator, in the constellation Serpens (The Snake). It is a comparatively faint object of 13th magnitude with a rather low surface brightness, making it pretty hard to see in small telescopes. This shyness has prompted amateur astronomers to nickname NGC 6118 the "Blinking Galaxy" as it would appear to flick into existence when viewed through their telescopes in a certain orientation, and then suddenly disappear again as the eye position shifted. There is of course no such problem for the VLT's enormous light-collecting power and ability to produce sharp images, and this magnificent galaxy is here seen in unequalled detail. The colour photo is based on a series of exposures behind different optical filters, obtained with the VIMOS multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT Melipal telescope during several nights around August 21, 2004. About 80 million light-years away, NGC 6118 is a grand-design spiral seen at an angle, with a very small central bar and several rather tightly wound spiral arms (it is classified as of type "SA(s)cd" [2]) in which large numbers of bright bluish knots are visible. Most of them are active star-forming regions and in some, very luminous and young stars can be perceived. Of particular interest is the comparatively bright stellar-like object situated directly

  1. Serial CT features of pulmonary leptospirosis in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Gendron, K; Christe, A; Walter, S; Schweighauser, A; Francey, T; Doherr, M G; Lang, J

    2014-02-15

    Leptospirosis pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a frequent manifestation of Leptospira infection in dogs and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Three helical 16-slice thoracic CT scans were performed in 10 dogs naturally infected with Leptospira, within 24 hours of admission, and three and seven days later. Patients were sedated and scanned without breathhold, with a protocol adapted for rapid scanning. One dog died of respiratory failure on the morning following the first scan. On the initial scan, imaging features of LPHS included ground-glass nodules (10/10), peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (10/10), diffuse or patchy ground-glass opacity (9/10), solid nodules (8/10) and consolidation (7/10). Temporary bronchiolar dilation was observed in all dogs in association with peribronchovascular interstitial thickening, which had completely resolved at day 7. Nodules were with few exceptions assigned to the centrilobular region. Regression of lesion severity was observed after each subsequent scan. Consolidation and solid nodules changed over time into lesions of ground-glass attenuation. Pleural effusion (3/10) and mediastinal effusion (2/10) were mild and transient. Lesion severity appeared unassociated with survival to discharge. PMID:24420873

  2. Dynamics of ultraharmonic resonances in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel; Lubow, Stephen H.

    1992-01-01

    The mildly nonlinear response of a fluid disk with pressure, viscosity, and self-gravity to spiral stellar forcing is considered as a model of the interstellar medium in spiral galaxies. Nonlinear effects are analyzed through a quasi-linear flow analysis ordered by successive powers of a dimensionless spiral perturbing force, which is the ratio of imposed nonaxisymmetric gravitational to axisymmetric gravitational forces. Waves with mn arms are launched from a position where the wavenumber of a free wave matches n times the wavenumber of the spiral forcing. The launched short wave in the gas is an interarm feature that is more tightly wrapped than the stellar wave. The gas wave extracts energy and angular momentum from the stellar wave, causing it to damp. The application of the results to the stellar disk alone reveals even stronger damping, as stars undergo Landau damping of the short wave. For parameters in M81, damping times are less than 10 exp 9 yr.

  3. Spiral Kicker for the beam abort system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. L.

    The feasibility of a special kicker to produce a damped spiral beam at the beam dump for the beam abort system was determined. There appears to be no problem with realizing this concept at a reasonably low cost.

  4. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  5. The mass of spiral galaxy halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    A discussion is presented of previous and current work on the determination of the mass distribution of spiral galaxy halos. The two most common tools utilized to determine the mass of spiral galaxies, i.e., companion galaxies and rotation curves are discussed. The most recent research of companion galaxies, which probes the potential to larger distances and utilizes more accurate dynamic modeling, demonstrates that isolated late-type galaxies do have very large dark-matter halos.

  6. Spiral core in singly diffusive excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A. ); Levine, H.; Reynolds, W.N. )

    1992-01-20

    We formulate the problem of finding the spiral core which smoothly matches onto the asymptotic rotating solution of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We prove that the inner problem (with scale {epsilon}, the ratio of the reaction rates) has a solution for all possible outer solutions on scale {epsilon}{sup 2/3}; furthermore, we explicitly determine this solution via a simple numerical procedure. This completes the rigorous demonstration of the existence of rotating spiral solutions in singly diffusive excitable systems.

  7. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  8. Analytical forms of chaotic spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsoula, M.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Contopoulos, G.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory of chaotic spiral arms in galaxies. This is based on the Moser theory of invariant manifolds around unstable periodic orbits. We apply this theory to the chaotic spiral arms, which start from the neighbourhood of the Lagrangian points L1 and L2 at the end of the bar in a barred-spiral galaxy. The series representing the invariant manifolds starting at the Lagrangian points L1, L2, or unstable periodic orbits around L1 and L2, yield spiral patterns in the configuration space. These series converge in a domain around every Lagrangian point, called `Moser domain', and represent the orbits that constitute the chaotic spiral arms. In fact, these orbits are not only along the invariant manifolds, but also in a domain surrounding the invariant manifolds. We show further that orbits starting outside the Moser domain but close to it converge to the boundary of the Moser domain, which acts as an attractor. These orbits stay for a long time close to the spiral arms before escaping to infinity.

  9. DO BARS DRIVE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES?

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Puerari, Ivanio; Block, David L. E-mail: jhk@iac.es E-mail: hsalo@sun3.oulu.fi E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: David.Block@wits.ac.za

    2009-05-15

    We present deep near-infrared K{sub s} -band Anglo-Australian Telescope Infrared Imager and Spectrograph observations of a selected sample of nearby barred spiral galaxies, including some with the strongest known bars. The sample covers a range of Hubble types from SB0{sup -} to SBc. The goal is to determine if the torque strengths of the spirals correlate with those of the bars, which might be expected if the bars actually drive the spirals as has been predicted by theoretical studies. This issue has implications for interpreting bar and spiral fractions at high redshift. Analysis of previous samples suggested that such a correlation exists in the near-infrared, where effects of extinction and star formation are less important. However, the earlier samples had only a few excessively strong bars. Our new sample largely confirms our previous studies, but still any correlation is relatively weak. We find two galaxies, NGC 7513 and UGC 10862, where there is only a weak spiral in the presence of a very strong bar. We suggest that some spirals probably are driven by their bars at the same pattern speed, but that this may be only when the bar is growing or if there is abundant gas and dissipation.

  10. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  11. SU-E-T-541: Measurement of CT Density Model Variations and the Impact On the Accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Calculation in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H; Li, B; Behrman, R; Russo, G; Kachnic, L; Lu, H; Fernando, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the CT density model variations between different CT scanners used for treatment planning and impact on the accuracy of MC dose calculation in lung SBRT. Methods: A Gammex electron density phantom (RMI 465) was scanned on two 64-slice CT scanners (GE LightSpeed VCT64) and a 16-slice CT (Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT). All three scanners had been used to acquire CT for CyberKnife lung SBRT treatment planning. To minimize the influences of beam hardening and scatter for improving reproducibility, three scans were acquired with the phantom rotated 120° between scans. The mean CT HU of each density insert, averaged over the three scans, was used to build the CT density models. For 14 patient plans, repeat MC dose calculations were performed by using the scanner-specific CT density models and compared to a baseline CT density model in the base plans. All dose re-calculations were done using the same plan beam configurations and MUs. Comparisons of dosimetric parameters included PTV volume covered by prescription dose, mean PTV dose, V5 and V20 for lungs, and the maximum dose to the closest critical organ. Results: Up to 50.7 HU variations in CT density models were observed over the baseline CT density model. For 14 patient plans examined, maximum differences in MC dose re-calculations were less than 2% in 71.4% of the cases, less than 5% in 85.7% of the cases, and 5–10% for 14.3% of the cases. As all the base plans well exceeded the clinical objectives of target coverage and OAR sparing, none of the observed differences led to clinically significant concerns. Conclusion: Marked variations of CT density models were observed for three different CT scanners. Though the differences can cause up to 5–10% differences in MC dose calculations, it was found that they caused no clinically significant concerns.

  12. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography in the evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Choi, Jun Ho; Choi, Song; Chung, Tae Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) offers distinct advantages over traditional spiral CT. Multi-detector row CT scanners are faster and allow thinner collimation than single-detector row spiral CT scanners. The use of multi-detector row CT combined with postprocessing of the imaging data with a variety of three-dimensional reformatting techniques (eg, maximum intensity projection, shaded surface display, volume rendering) allows creation of vascular maps whose quality equals or exceeds that of maps created at classic angiography for many applications. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography can help determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels (eg, left gastric vein, short gastric vein, esophageal and paraesophageal varices, splenorenal and gastrorenal shunts, paraumbilical and abdominal wall veins) in patients with liver cirrhosis and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  13. Six Decades of Spiral Density Wave Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    2016-09-01

    The theory of spiral density waves had its origin approximately six decades ago in an attempt to reconcile the winding dilemma of material spiral arms in flattened disk galaxies. We begin with the earliest calculations of linear and nonlinear spiral density waves in disk galaxies, in which the hypothesis of quasi-stationary spiral structure (QSSS) plays a central role. The earliest success was the prediction of the nonlinear compression of the interstellar medium and its embedded magnetic field; the earliest failure, seemingly, was not detecting color gradients associated with the migration of OB stars whose formation is triggered downstream from the spiral shock front. We give the reasons for this apparent failure with an update on the current status of the problem of OB star formation, including its relationship to the feathering substructure of galactic spiral arms. Infrared images can show two-armed, grand design spirals, even when the optical and UV images show flocculent structures. We suggest how the nonlinear response of the interstellar gas, coupled with overlapping subharmonic resonances, might introduce chaotic behavior in the dynamics of the interstellar medium and Population I objects, even though the underlying forces to which they are subject are regular. We then move to a discussion of resonantly forced spiral density waves in a planetary ring and their relationship to the ideas of disk truncation, and the shepherding of narrow rings by satellites orbiting nearby. The back reaction of the rings on the satellites led to the prediction of planet migration in protoplanetary disks, which has had widespread application in the exploding data sets concerning hot Jupiters and extrasolar planetary systems. We then return to the issue of global normal modes in the stellar disk of spiral galaxies and its relationship to the QSSS hypothesis, where the central theoretical concepts involve waves with negative and positive surface densities of energy and angular

  14. Spiral arms as cosmic ray source distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M.; Kissmann, R.; Strong, A. W.; Reimer, O.

    2015-04-01

    The Milky Way is a spiral galaxy with (or without) a bar-like central structure. There is evidence that the distribution of suspected cosmic ray sources, such as supernova remnants, are associated with the spiral arm structure of galaxies. It is yet not clearly understood what effect such a cosmic ray source distribution has on the particle transport in our Galaxy. We investigate and measure how the propagation of Galactic cosmic rays is affected by a cosmic ray source distribution associated with spiral arm structures. We use the PICARD code to perform high-resolution 3D simulations of electrons and protons in galactic propagation scenarios that include four-arm and two-arm logarithmic spiral cosmic ray source distributions with and without a central bar structure as well as the spiral arm configuration of the NE2001 model for the distribution of free electrons in the Milky Way. Results of these simulation are compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution. Also, effects on the cosmic ray flux and spectra due to different positions of the Earth relative to the spiral structure are studied. We find that high energy electrons are strongly confined to their sources and the obtained spectra largely depend on the Earth's position relative to the spiral arms. Similar finding have been obtained for low energy protons and electrons albeit at smaller magnitude. We find that even fractional contributions of a spiral arm component to the total cosmic ray source distribution influences the spectra on the Earth. This is apparent when compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution as well as with respect to the Earth's position relative to the spiral arm structure. We demonstrate that the presence of a Galactic bar manifests itself as an overall excess of low energy electrons at the Earth. Using a spiral arm geometry as a cosmic ray source distributions offers a genuine new quality of modeling and is used to explain features in cosmic ray spectra at the Earth

  15. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  16. Long-lived spiral waves in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comins, Neil F.; Schroeder, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    Results of N-body simulations of disc galaxies using a two-dimensional Cartesian N-body code are presented. Both trailing arm spirals (TAS) and leading arm spirals (LAS) were used with varieties of pitch angles and pattern speeds. LAS perturbations transferred their energy to TAS via swing amplification; TAS perturbations led to TAS arms. In both cases the spiral arms persisted for more than 5 rotation periods, but the maximum amplitude 2-armed spirals were generated by LAS perturbations. The persistence of the trailing arm spiral waves is thought to be caused by the kinematic spiral arm mechanism described by Kalnajs (1973).

  17. The molecular spiral arms of NGC 6946

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Xie, S.

    1990-01-01

    From CO-12(J=1 to 0) observations at 45 seconds resolution Tacconi and Young (1989) have found evidence for enhancements in both the CO emissivity and the massive star formation efficiency (MSFE) on optical spiral arms of the bright spiral galaxy NGC 6946. In the optically luminous and well-defined spiral arm in the NE quadrant, there are enhancements in both the H2 surface density and MSFE relative to the interarm regions. In contrast, a poorly defined arm in the SW shows no arm-interarm contrast in the MSFE. To further investigate the molecular gas content of these two spiral arms, researchers have made CO-12 J=2 to 1 and 3 to 2 observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. In the J=2 to 1 line, they made observations of the NE and SW spiral arm and interarm regions in 4 x 9 10 seconds spaced grids (36 points per grid). Because of decreased sensitivity in the J=3 to 2 line, they were limited to mapping the two arm regions in 2 x 3 10 seconds spaced grids (6 points per grid). The centers of each of the grids lie 2.4 minutes to the NE and 2.3 minutes to the SW of the nucleus of NGC 6946. With the CO J=2 to 1 data researchers are able to fully resolve the two observed spiral arms in NGC 6946. In both cases the CO emission is largely confined to the optical spiral arm regions with the peak observed T asterisk sub A being up to 4 times higher on the spiral arms than in the interarm regions. Researchers are currently estimating massive star formation efficiencies on and off the spiral arms through direct comparison of the CO maps with an H alpha image. They are also comparing the CO J=2 to 1 data with an HI map made at similar resolution. Thus, they will be able to determine structure in all components of the IS on scales of less than 20 inches.

  18. Precision distances with spiral galaxy apparent diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Spiral galaxy diameters offer the oldest extragalactic distance indicator known. Although outdated and hitherto imprecise, two spiral diameter-based distance indicators applied in the 1980s can be tested, calibrated, and re-established for precision era use, based on abundant redshift-independent distances data available in NED-D. Indicator one employs the largest Giant Spiral Galaxies, which have an absolute isophotal major diameter of ~70 +/- 10 kpc, offering standard ruler-based distances with <10% precision. Indicator two employs the diameter-magnitude relation for spirals in general, as a secondary indicator, offering ~20% precision. The ruler-based indicator is the only indicator with <10% precision able to independently calibrate type Ia supernovae-based distances at cosmological distances. The secondary-based indicator is the only indicator with 20% precision applicable to more galaxies than in current Tully-Fisher surveys. The primary indicator gives researchers a new tool to confirm or refute if, as currently believed, universal expansion is accelerating. The secondary indicator gives researchers a new path toward acquiring a more complete 3D picture of the local universe and potentially, because the majority of galaxies in the universe are spirals, the distant universe.

  19. Spiral: Automated Computing for Linear Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püschel, Markus

    2010-09-01

    Writing fast software has become extraordinarily difficult. For optimal performance, programs and their underlying algorithms have to be adapted to take full advantage of the platform's parallelism, memory hierarchy, and available instruction set. To make things worse, the best implementations are often platform-dependent and platforms are constantly evolving, which quickly renders libraries obsolete. We present Spiral, a domain-specific program generation system for important functionality used in signal processing and communication including linear transforms, filters, and other functions. Spiral completely replaces the human programmer. For a desired function, Spiral generates alternative algorithms, optimizes them, compiles them into programs, and intelligently searches for the best match to the computing platform. The main idea behind Spiral is a mathematical, declarative, domain-specific framework to represent algorithms and the use of rewriting systems to generate and optimize algorithms at a high level of abstraction. Experimental results show that the code generated by Spiral competes with, and sometimes outperforms, the best available human-written code.

  20. Spiral computed tomography of fetuses: reference data and interest in fetopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braillon, Pierre M.; Bouvier, Raymonde

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this work was to define reference values for the skeletal and total body volumes (SV and TBV) of human fetuses from 3D reconstructions obtained with spiral computed tomography (CT). The interest of the technique in fetopathy was also estimated. Twenty three fetuses who died just before delivery were studied. The causes of death were not associated with any metabolism abnormality, and all these babies were appropriated for gestational age (GA: 14 - 41.5 wks; Body Weight BW: 22 - 3760 g). They were scanned with a spiral mode on a CT scanner (Elscint CT Twin) using a 2.7 mm slice thickness, a pitch value of 0.7, and a 512 X 512 image matrix. Lengths and volumes were measured on 3D images reconstructed with appropriate windows. High correlations (r greater than 0.95) were found between BW, SV or TBV and the long bone lengths. The ratio SV/TBV was 8.2 plus or minus 0.2%. With the scanning and analysis parameters used, it was extremely difficult to make a precise segmentation of a given organ. However, some few alterations of these parameters could largely increase the potential of the technique in fetopathy.

  1. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Jane D. McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  2. Lung cancer screening with low-dose chest CT: current issues.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Myeong Im

    2004-06-01

    Computed tomography offers many advantages over routine radiographs in screening for lung cancer, and it is clear that low-dose spiral CT screening can more frequently find considerably smaller lung cancers than previous detection tools. Recently, investigators have performed low-dose spiral CT scanning for screening of lung cancer, and have suggested that CT screening can depict lung cancers at smaller sizes and at earlier stages. With technological advances in spiral CT scanners, the detection rate of small noncalcified pulmonary nodules has markedly increased, with higher rates noted with thinner collimation of CT scanning. Unfortunately, the majority of these have proved to be benign, i.e. false positive results. If, even in part, CT features could be found to predict benign nodules without follow-up, the false-positive rate would be reduced, and consequently, the cost, emotional stress, radiation dose, morbidity and mortality associated with interventional procedures would also be reduced. There have been several studies trying to establish reliable CT features for benign lesions in small pulmonary nodules and to determine their outcome. Although these efforts have not completely resolved the issue of false positive results, it is expected that lessons will be learnt on how to manage these small nodules through experience with screening in the near future. Because pulmonary nodules on CT are much more common in Korea than in western countries, the management algorithm for screening CT-detected nodules should be modified according to different circumstances, with consensus among related physicians and radiologists. In addition, to enhance patient care and avoid misunderstanding of inherent limitation of CT screening by the screening subjects, physicians, hospital managers as well as radiologists should provide proper information regarding CT screening to the screenees.

  3. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules with dual-source spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhitao; Wang, Yanhui; He, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the value of applying dual-source 64-layer spiral computed tomography (CT) in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Mediastinal windows from 45 cases were selected to study SPNs (maximum diameter, ≤3 cm), and the pathological nature of lesions was determined by clinical and pathological diagnosis. Conventional 64-layer spiral CT scanning, local enhancement and 3D recombination technologies were used to determine the occurrence rate, lesion diameter, degree of enhancement, lobular sign, spicule sign, pleural indentation sign, vessel convergence sign and bronchus sign. The final diagnoses indicated 34 cases of malignant SPNs (75.6%) and 11 benign cases (24.4%). When the nodule diameter in the malignant group was compared with that of the benign group, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Nodules in the malignant group showed inhomogeneous enhancement while nodules in the benign group showed homogeneous enhancement. The enhanced CT values in the malignant group were higher than those in the benign group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of nodules with lobular sign in the malignant group was significantly higher than that in the benign group (P<0.05). The proportion of nodules with calcification, vessel convergence sign and bronchus sign in the malignant group were significantly higher than those in the benign group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). A comparison of vacuole sign, pleural indentation sign, spiculate protuberance and fat occurrence between the two groups yielded no statistically significant differences (P>0.05). The sensitivity of CT enhancement was 85.6%, specificity was 79.6%, positive predicated value was 92.3%, and the negative predicted value was 85.2%. In conclusion, SPNs diagnosed by CT enhancement manifested with enhancement degree, lobular sign, calcification, vessel convergence sign

  4. Intertwined Multiple Spiral Fracture in Perforated Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, Juan-Francisco; Hamm, Eugenio; Roman, Benoît

    2016-04-01

    We study multiple tearing of a thin, elastic, brittle sheet indented with a rigid cone. The n cracks initially prepared symmetrically propagate radially for n ≥4 . However, if n <4 the radial symmetry is broken and fractures spontaneously intertwine along logarithmic spiral paths, respecting order n rotational symmetry. In the limit of very thin sheets, we find that fracture mechanics is reduced to a geometrical model that correctly predicts the maximum number of spirals to be strictly 4, together with their growth rate and the perforation force. Similar spirals are also observed in a different tearing experiment (this time up to n =4 , in agreement with the model), in which bending energy of the sheet is dominant.

  5. Maximum life spiral bevel reduction design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Prasanna, M. G.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Optimization is applied to the design of a spiral bevel gear reduction for maximum life at a given size. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial values. Gear tooth bending strength and minimum contact ratio under load are included in the active constraints. The optimal design of the spiral bevel gear reduction includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. System life is maximized subject to a fixed backcone distance of the spiral bevel gear set for a specified speed reduction, shaft angle, input torque, and power. Design examples show the influence of the bearing lives on the gear parameters in the optimal configurations. For a fixed back-cone distance, optimal designs with larger shaft angles have larger service lives.

  6. Circularly symmetric light scattering from nanoplasmonic spirals.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Jacob; Cao, Hui; Dal Negro, Luca

    2011-05-11

    In this paper, we combine experimental dark-field imaging, scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy with rigorous electrodynamics calculations in order to investigate light scattering from planar arrays of Au nanoparticles arranged in aperiodic spirals with diffuse, circularly symmetric Fourier space. In particular, by studying the three main types of Vogel's spirals fabricated by electron-beam lithography on quartz substrates, we demonstrate polarization-insensitive planar light diffraction in the visible spectral range. Moreover, by combining dark-field imaging with analytical multiparticle calculations in the framework of the generalized Mie theory, we show that plasmonic spirals support distinctive structural resonances with circular symmetry carrying orbital angular momentum. The engineering of light scattering phenomena in deterministic structures with circular Fourier space provides a novel strategy for the realization of optical devices that fully leverage on enhanced, polarization-insensitive light-matter coupling over planar surfaces, such as thin-film plasmonic solar cells, plasmonic polarization devices, and optical biosensors. PMID:21466155

  7. Discontinuous spirals of stable periodic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Sack, Achim; Freire, Joana G; Lindberg, Erik; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A C

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental discovery of a remarkable organization of the set of self-generated periodic oscillations in the parameter space of a nonlinear electronic circuit. When control parameters are suitably tuned, the wave pattern complexity of the periodic oscillations is found to increase orderly without bound. Such complex patterns emerge forming self-similar discontinuous phases that combine in an artful way to produce large discontinuous spirals of stability. This unanticipated discrete accumulation of stability phases was detected experimentally and numerically in a Duffing-like proxy specially designed to bypass noisy spectra conspicuously present in driven oscillators. Discontinuous spirals organize the dynamics over extended parameter intervals around a focal point. They are useful to optimize locking into desired oscillatory modes and to control complex systems. The organization of oscillations into discontinuous spirals is expected to be generic for a class of nonlinear oscillators. PMID:24284508

  8. Smoothing Rotation Curves in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Sellwood, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    We present evidence that spiral activity is responsible for the creation of featureless rotation curves. We examine a variety of simulations of disk galaxies beginning in equilibrium and allow them to evolve while adding particles in annuli to the hot disk using a variety of rules. Two unstable spiral modes develop when this new material forms a ridge-like feature in the surface density profile of the disk. The extra material is redistributed radially by the spiral activity, and the associated angular momentum changes remove more particles from the ridge than are added to it. This process eventually removes the density feature from the galaxy and creates a locally flat rotation curve. We argue that the lack of a feature when transitioning from disk to halo dominance in the rotation curves of disk galaxies, the so called ``disk-halo conspiracy'', could also be accounted for by this mechanism.

  9. HOW DIFFERENT ARE NORMAL AND BARRED SPIRALS?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2011-06-15

    No significant color differences are found between normal and barred spirals over the range of Hubble stages a-ab-b-bc. Furthermore, no significant difference is seen between the luminosity distributions of normal and barred galaxies over the same range of Hubble stages. However, SBc galaxies are found to be systematically fainter than Sc galaxies at 99% confidence. The observation that normal and barred spirals with Hubble stages a-ab-b-bc have indistinguishable intrinsic colors hints at the possibility that the bars in such spiral galaxies might be ephemeral structures. Finally, it is pointed out that lenticular galaxies of types S0 and SB0 are systematically fainter than are other early-type galaxies, suggesting that such galaxies are situated on evolutionary tracks that differ systematically from those of galaxies that lie along the E-Sa-Sb-Sc and E-SBa-SBb-SBc sequences.

  10. Discontinuous Spirals of Stable Periodic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Achim; Freire, Joana G.; Lindberg, Erik; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental discovery of a remarkable organization of the set of self-generated periodic oscillations in the parameter space of a nonlinear electronic circuit. When control parameters are suitably tuned, the wave pattern complexity of the periodic oscillations is found to increase orderly without bound. Such complex patterns emerge forming self-similar discontinuous phases that combine in an artful way to produce large discontinuous spirals of stability. This unanticipated discrete accumulation of stability phases was detected experimentally and numerically in a Duffing-like proxy specially designed to bypass noisy spectra conspicuously present in driven oscillators. Discontinuous spirals organize the dynamics over extended parameter intervals around a focal point. They are useful to optimize locking into desired oscillatory modes and to control complex systems. The organization of oscillations into discontinuous spirals is expected to be generic for a class of nonlinear oscillators. PMID:24284508

  11. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  12. Cinematique et dynamique des galaxies spirales barrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Olivier

    The total mass (luminous and dark) of galaxies is derived from their circular velocities. Spectroscopic Fabry-Perot observations of the ionized gas component of spiral galaxies allow one to derive their kinematics. In the case of purely axisymmetric velocity fields--as in non-active and unbarred spirals galaxies-- the circular velocities can be derived directly. However, the velocity fields of barred galaxies (which constitute two thirds of the spirals) exhibit strong non-circular motions and need a careful analysis to retrieve the circular component. This thesis proposes the necessary steps to recover the axisymmetric component of barred spiral galaxies. The first step was to develop the best instrumentation possible for this work. [Special characters omitted.] , which is the most sensitive photon counting camera ever developed, was coupled to a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The observations of a sample of barred spiral galaxies--the BH a BAR sample--was assembled in order to obtain the most rigourous velocity fields. Then, the Tremaine-Weinberg method, which can determine the bar pattern speed and is usually used with the observations of stellar component, has been tested on the ionised gas and gave satisfactory results. Finally, all the above techniques have been applied to the BH a BAR sample in order to study the key parameters of the galaxies' evolution--bar pattern speeds, multiple stationary waves, resonances etc.--which will allow one to use N-body+SPH simulations to model properly the non-circular motions and determine the true total mass of barred spiral galaxies.

  13. Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1997-01-01

    The data related to this grant on the Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies have been entirely reduced and analyzed. It is incorporated into templates of Spiral galaxies used in the calculation of K corrections towards the understanding of high redshift galaxies. The main paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal, August 1996, Volume 467, page 38. The data was also used in another publication, The Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Starburst and Active Galaxies, June 1997, preprint series No. 1158. Copies of both have been attached.

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  15. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  16. 2DFFT: Measuring Galactic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Puerari, Ivânio

    2016-08-01

    2DFFT utilizes two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms; this provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature and allows comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. 2DFFT requires fourn.c from Numerical Recipes in C (Press et al. 1989).

  17. Dynamical instability of the XY spiral state of ferromagnetic condensates.

    PubMed

    Cherng, R W; Gritsev, V; Stamper-Kurn, D M; Demler, E

    2008-05-01

    We calculate the spectrum of collective excitations of the XY spiral state prepared adiabatically or suddenly from a uniform ferromagnetic F=1 condensate. For spiral wave vectors past a critical value, spin wave excitation energies become imaginary indicating a dynamical instability. We construct phase diagrams as functions of spiral wave vector and quadratic Zeeman energy. PMID:18518354

  18. Dynamical Instability of the XY Spiral State of Ferromagnetic Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Cherng, R. W.; Gritsev, V.; Demler, E.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2008-05-09

    We calculate the spectrum of collective excitations of the XY spiral state prepared adiabatically or suddenly from a uniform ferromagnetic F=1 condensate. For spiral wave vectors past a critical value, spin wave excitation energies become imaginary indicating a dynamical instability. We construct phase diagrams as functions of spiral wave vector and quadratic Zeeman energy.

  19. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  20. Fabrication of X-ray Spiral Masks by Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.; McMahon, P. J.; Paterson, D.; Tran, C. Q.

    2002-01-01

    The authors describe microfabrication of a spiral mask modulation structure by excimer laser ablation. A multi-step fabrication using 15 separate chrome-on-quartz mask pattern is used to create a 16 step spiral staircase structure approximating the desired spiral ramp. The results of simulations and experimental results are presented.

  1. A HAMILTONIAN FORMULATION FOR SPIRAL-SECTOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.

    2007-11-05

    I develop a formulation for Hamiltonian dynamics in an accelerator with magnets whose edges follow a spiral. I demonstrate using this Hamiltonian that a spiral FFAG can be made perfectly 'scaling'. I examine the effect of tilting an RF cavity with respect a radial line from the center of the machine, potentially with a different angle than the spiral of the magnets.

  2. Experimental study on the spiral and oval spiral EGR cooler efficiencies in a diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Ki; Lee, Jungkoo; Kim, Hyung-Man

    2014-12-01

    The cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is one of the most effective techniques currently available for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions in diesel engine. Because the combustion characteristics in diesel engine involves high temperature and load, the amount of particulate matter (PM) emission tends to increase, thereby the PM fouling in EGR cooler degrades the heat transfer performance considerably, which in turn has a significant influence on the design of the EGR cooler. In the present study, engine dynamometer tests are performed to investigate the influences of PM fouling on the heat exchange characteristics of spiral and oval-spiral type EGR coolers equipped with a diesel engine. The evaluation test results show that the oval-spiral type EGR cooler has higher efficiency by approximate 10 % than the spiral type EGR cooler because of the increase of heat transfer area and the increased removal of PM from the deposit layer due to fluid shear force.

  3. Maximum life spiral bevel reduction design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Prasanna, M. G.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Optimization is applied to the design of a spiral bevel gear reduction for maximum life at a given size. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial values. Gear tooth bending strength and minimum contact ratio under load are included in the active constraints. The optimal design of the spiral bevel gear reduction includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. System life is maximized subject to a fixed back-cone distance of the spiral bevel gear set for a specified speed ratio, shaft angle, input torque, and power. Significant parameters in the design are: the spiral angle, the pressure angle, the numbers of teeth on the pinion and gear, and the location and size of the four support bearings. Interpolated polynomials expand the discrete bearing properties and proportions into continuous variables for gradient optimization. After finding the continuous optimum, a designer can analyze near optimal designs for comparison and selection. Design examples show the influence of the bearing lives on the gear parameters in the optimal configurations. For a fixed back-cone distance, optimal designs with larger shaft angles have larger service lives.

  4. Spiral waves in a model of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, John J.; Keener, James P.

    1987-11-01

    Myocardial tissue is an excitable medium through which propagate waves of electrical stimulation and muscular contraction. In addition to radially expanding waves of neuromuscular activity characterizing the normal heartbeat, myocardial tissue may also support high frequency, rotating spiral waves of activity which are associated with cardiac pathologies (flutter and fibrillation). Recently Pertsov, Ermakova and Panfilov have presented a numerical study of rotating spiral waves in a two-dimensional excitable medium modeled on the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations, suitably modified to reflect the electrical properties of myocardium. We show that some of their principal numerical results can be reproduced in quantitative detail by a general theory of rotating spiral waves in excitable media. The critical ingredients of our theory are the dispersion of nonlinear plane waves and the effects of curvature on the propagation of wave fronts in two-dimensional media. The close comparison of our analytical results with numerical simulations of the full reaction-diffusion equations lends credence to our theoretical description of spiral waves in excitable media.

  5. How to make a spiral bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Inclan, Yuki F.; Quan, Julie; Mukherjee, Sulav; Oster, George; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2005-09-01

    The motility of some kinds of bacteria depends on their spiral form, as does the virulence of certain pathogenic species. We propose a novel mechanism for the development of spiral shape in bacteria and the supercoiling of chains ('filaments') of many cells. Recently discovered actin-like proteins lying just under the cell wall form fibers that play a role in maintaining cell shape. Some species have a single actin-like fiber helically wrapped around the cell, while others have two fibers wrapped in the same direction. Here, we show that if these fibers elongate more slowly than growth lengthens the cell, the cell both twists and bends, taking on a spiral shape. We tested this mechanism using a mathematical model of expanding fiber-wound structures and via experiments that measure the shape changes of elongating physical models. Comparison of the model with in vivo experiments on stationary phase Caulobacter crescentus filaments provide the first evidence that mechanical stretching of cytoskeletal fibers influences cell morphology. Any hydraulic cylinder can spiral by this mechanism if it is reinforced by stretch-resistant fibers wrapped helically in the same direction, or shortened by contractile elements. This might be useful in the design of man-made actuators.

  6. Asymptotic dynamics of reflecting spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Langham, Jacob; Biktasheva, Irina; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-12-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as pointlike objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly nonspecular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small- and large-core spiral waves in the Barkley model. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved far beyond the asymptotic limit of weak boundary effects and slow resonant drift. PMID:25615159

  7. Spiral Growth in Plants: Models and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Bradford D.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis and simulation of spiral growth in plants integrates algebra and trigonometry in a botanical setting. When the ideas presented here are used in a mathematics classroom/computer lab, students can better understand how basic assumptions about plant growth lead to the golden ratio and how the use of circular functions leads to accurate…

  8. Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Philip; Ameri, Ali; Culley, Dennis; Raghu, Surya; Shyam, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and Square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the non-diffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing rations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ration of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS.

  9. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  10. Spiral groove seal. [for hydraulic rotating shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Mating flat surfaces inhibit leakage of a fluid around a stationary shaft. A spiral groove pattern produces a pumping action toward the fluid when the shaft rotates which prevents leakage while a generated hydraulic lifting force separates the mating surfaces to minimize wear.

  11. Irrational Numbers Can "In-Spiral" You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Leslie D.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the instructional process of helping students visualize irrational numbers. Students learn to create a spiral, called "the wheel of Theodorus," which demonstrates irrational and rational lengths. Examples of student work help the reader appreciate the delightful possibilities of this project. (Contains 4 figures.)

  12. The Spiral Curriculum. Research into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The Spiral Curriculum is predicated on cognitive theory advanced by Jerome Bruner (1960), who wrote, "We begin with the hypothesis that any subject can be taught in some intellectually honest form to any child at any stage of development." In other words, even the most complex material, if properly structured and presented, can be understood by…

  13. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  14. Effects of Spiral Arms on Gaseous Structures and Mass Drift in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Stellar spiral arms play a key role in the formation and evolution of gaseous structures in disk galaxies as well as mass drift in the radial direction. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate nonlinear responses of self-gravitating gas to an imposed stellar spiral potential in galactic disks. By considering various models with different arm strength and pattern speed, we find that the physical properties of imposed spiral potential have profound influences on the shapes and extent of gaseous arms as well as the related mass drift rate. To produce quasi-steady spiral shocks, the gas has to not only move faster than the local sound speed relative to the perturbing potential, but also have sufficient time to respond to one arm before encountering the next arm. From our numerical results, we provide a simple expression for the existence of quasi-steady spiral shocks depending on the pitch angle and pattern speed of stellar spiral arms, which appears consistent to the previous study. We also measure the mass drift rates which are in the range of ~0.5-3.0 M⊙/yr inside the corotation radius, and further quantify the relative contribution of shock dissipation (~50%), external torque (~40%), and self-gravitational torque (~10%) to them. The offset between the pitch angles of stellar and gaseous arms is larger for smaller arm strength and larger pattern speed, since a deeper potential tends to form shocks closer to the potential minima of the arms. We demonstrate that the distributions of line-of-sight velocities and spiral shock densities can be a diagnostic tool in distinguishing whether the spiral pattern rotates fast or not.

  15. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: Status and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Gales, S.

    2008-05-12

    To pursue the investigation of a new territory of nuclei with extreme N/Z called 'terra incognita' several projects, all aiming at the increase by several orders of magnitude of the RIB intensities are now under discussions worldwide. In Europe, two major new projects have been approved recently FAIR-GSI using the so-called 'in-flight' method and SPIRAL2-GANIL, based on the ISOL method. Both projects were selected in the European Strategic Roadmap For research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The main goal of SPIRAL2 is clearly to extend our knowledge of the limit of existence and the structure of nuclei deeply in the medium and heavy mass region (A = 60 to 140) which is to day an almost unexplored continent. SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting driver LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 10{sup 13} fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities for exotic species in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, of the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 10} pps will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 {mu}A to 1 mA), heavier ions up to Ar at 14 MeV/n producing also proton rich exotic nuclei. In applied areas SPIRAL2 is considered as a powerful variable energy neutron source, a must to study the impact of nuclear fission and fusion on materials. The intensities of these unstable species are excellent opportunities for new tracers and diagnostics either for solid state, material or for radiobiological science and medicine. The 'Go' decision has been taken in May 2005. The investments and personnel costs amount to 190 Meuro, for the construction period 2006-2012. Construction of the SPIRAL2 facility is shared by ten French laboratories and a network of international partners. Under the 7FP program of

  16. Curved spiral antennas for underwater biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas, Ruben

    We developed curved spiral antennas for use in underwater (freshwater) communications. Specifically, these antennas will be integrated in so-called mussel backpacks. Backpacks are compact electronics that incorporate sensors and a small radio that operate around 300 MHz. Researchers attach these backpacks in their freshwater mussel related research. The antennas must be small, lightweight, and form-fit the mussel. Additionally, since the mussel orientation is unknown, the antennas must have broad radiation patterns. Further, the electromagnetic environment changes significantly as the mussels burrow into the river bottom. Broadband antennas, such a spiral antennas, will perform better in this instance. While spiral antennas are well established, there has been little work on their performance in freshwater. Additionally, there has been some work on curved spiral antennas, but this work focused on curving in one dimension, namely curving around a cylinder. In this thesis we develop spiral antennas that curve in two dimensions in order to conform the contour of a mussel's shell. Our research has three components, namely (a) an investigation of the relevant theoretical underpinning of spiral antennas, (b) extensive computer simulations using state-of-the art computational electromagnetics (CEM) simulation software, and (c) experimental validation. The experimental validation was performed in a large tank in a laboratory setting. We also validated some designs in a pool (~300,000 liters of water and ~410 squared-meter dive pool) with the aid of a certified diver. To use CEM software and perform successful antenna-related experiments require careful attention to many details. The mathematical description of radiation from an antenna, antenna input impedance and so on, is inherently complex. Engineers often make simplifying assumptions such as assuming no reflections, or an isotropic propagation environment, or operation in the antenna far field, and so on. This makes

  17. GANIL-SPIRAL2: A new era

    SciTech Connect

    Gales, Sydney

    2011-05-06

    GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. A few examples of recent highlights are discussed in the present paper.With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more than 10{sup 13} fissions/s. The expected radioactive beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, will surpass by two orders of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 {mu}A to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called *Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4MEuro to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  18. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  19. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  20. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Formation of spiral waves with substructure in a bursting media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-12-01

    Formation of spiral waves in a bursting media is investigated. Due to the multiple timescale oscillation of the local dynamics, an interesting substructure of traveling wave (STW) is observed in the spiral arm. As a result of the special moving media formed by neurons in the spiral arm, STWs propagate from the spiral tip to far field with an increasing wave length and move faster along the front of the spiral arm than along the back, leading to the formation of fragments in STWs. Moreover, we find that a sharp change of stimulus current can lead to backfiring of STWs, which may break the spiral wave front and further result in the formation of a multi-spiral pattern. PMID:26723144

  3. Formation of spiral waves with substructure in a bursting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-12-01

    Formation of spiral waves in a bursting media is investigated. Due to the multiple timescale oscillation of the local dynamics, an interesting substructure of traveling wave (STW) is observed in the spiral arm. As a result of the special moving media formed by neurons in the spiral arm, STWs propagate from the spiral tip to far field with an increasing wave length and move faster along the front of the spiral arm than along the back, leading to the formation of fragments in STWs. Moreover, we find that a sharp change of stimulus current can lead to backfiring of STWs, which may break the spiral wave front and further result in the formation of a multi-spiral pattern.

  4. Structure in galactic bulges - Rings or tight spirals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pismis, P.; Moreno, E.

    The structure of spirals studded with 'hot spots' that are observed in bulges of some galaxies (such as some early Hubble-type spirals) is considered by reexamining the Pismis and Moreno (1984) model for the formation of tight spirals, which assumes the existence of a pair of tightly wound spirals generated around the galaxy's nucleus. Using the expressions derived by Pismis and Moreno and adopting the physical parameters derived for NGC 4736 by van der Kruit (1976), the locus was computed which is shown to have a spiral form remarkably similar to the central spiral observed in NGC 4736. It is concluded that the widespread practice of referring to nuclear spirals as rings is contrary to observational and theoretical evidences.

  5. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. ...

  6. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. ...

  7. Optimization of the imaging quality of 64-slice CT acquisition protocol using Taguchi analysis: A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lung Fa; Erdene, Erdenetsetseg; Chen, Chun Chi; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the phantom imaging quality of 64-slice CT acquisition protocol was quantitatively evaluated using Taguchi. The phantom acrylic line group was designed and assembled with multiple layers of solid water plate in order to imitate the adult abdomen, and scanned with Philips brilliance CT in order to simulate a clinical examination. According to the Taguchi L8(2(7)) orthogonal array, four major factors of the acquisition protocol were optimized, including (A) CT slice thickness, (B) the image reconstruction filter type, (C) the spiral CT pitch, and (D) the matrix size. The reconstructed line group phantom image was counted by four radiologists for three discrete rounds in order to obtain the averages and standard deviations of the line counts and the corresponding signal to noise ratios (S/N). The quantified S/N values were analyzed and the optimal combination of the four factor settings was determined to be comprised of (A) a 1-mm thickness, (B) a sharp filter type, (C) a 1.172 spiral CT pitch, and (D) a 1024×1024 matrix size. The dominant factors included the (A) filter type and the cross interaction between the filter type and CT slice thickness (A×B). The minor factors were determined to be (C) the spiral CT pitch and (D) the matrix size since neither was capable of yielding a 95% confidence level in the ANOVA test. PMID:26405931

  8. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-12-15

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging.

  9. Star formation and evolution in spiral galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, W. J.; Tinsley, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    Evolutionary models for regions of M31 and M33 and the solar neighborhood are based on a stellar birthrate suggested by the dynamics of spiral structure: we assume that stars are formed very efficiently until the gas content reaches equilibrium at its present value, which takes about 1 b.y.; thereafter, the birthrate just equals the rate at which gas enters the system from stellar mass-loss or infall of intergalactic matter. Each model represents an average around a cylindrical-shell-shaped region, which is homogeneous and closed except for possible infall. The disk and spiral-arm populations only are considered. Each star is followed in the H-R diagram from the main sequence to death as an invisible remnant. Integrated magnitudes, colors, mass-to-light ratio (M/L), gas content, helium and metal abundance (Z), are computed in steps of 1 b.y.

  10. ON THE FRACTION OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Preethi B.; Abraham, Roberto G. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of {approx}14,000 visually classified nearby galaxies given by Nair and Abraham. The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find that bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  11. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Barué, C.; Bertrand, P.; Biarrotte, J. L.; Canet, C.; Denis, J.-F.; Ferdinand, R.; Flambard, J.-L.; Jacob, J.; Jardin, P.; Lamy, T.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B.; Peaucelle, C.; Roger, A.; Sole, P.; Touzery, R.; Tuske, O.; Uriot, D.

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ˜50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  12. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Barué, C; Bertrand, P; Biarrotte, J L; Canet, C; Denis, J-F; Ferdinand, R; Flambard, J-L; Jacob, J; Jardin, P; Lamy, T; Lemagnen, F; Maunoury, L; Osmond, B; Peaucelle, C; Roger, A; Sole, P; Touzery, R; Tuske, O; Uriot, D

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ∼50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  13. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A

    2014-12-01

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction-diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space. PMID:25385581

  14. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens

    PubMed Central

    Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction–diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space. PMID:25385581

  15. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  16. Gaseous Vortices in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Martin N.; Hunter, James H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of examining many two-dimensional, as well as a smaller sample of three-dimensional, models of gas flows in barred spiral galaxies, we have been impressed by the ubiquitous presence fo vortex pairs, oriented roughly perpendicular to their bars, with one vortex on each side. The vortices are obvious only when viewed in the bar frame, and the centers of their velocity fields usually are near Lagrangian points L(sub 4,5). In all models that we have studied, the vortices form on essentially the same time scale as that for the development of gaseous spiral arms, typically two bar rotations. Usually the corotation radius, r(sub c), lies slightly beyond the end of the bar. Depending upon the mass distributions of the various components, gas spirals either into, or out of, the vortices: In the former case, the vortices become regions of high density, whereas the opposite is true if the gas spirals out of a vortex. The models described in this paper have low-density vortices, as do most of the models we have studied. Moreover, usually the vortex centers lie approximately within +/- 15 deg of L(sub 4,5). In the stellar dynamic limit, when pressure and viscous forces are absent, short-period orbits exist, centered on L(sub 4,5). These orbits need not cross and therefore their morphology is that of gas streamlines, that is, vortices. We believe that the gas vortices in our models are hydrodynamic analogues of closed, short-period, libration orbits centered on L(sub 4,5).

  17. A Fermat's spiral multifilament-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartara, L.; Codemard, C.

    2013-02-01

    A multifilament-core optical fiber where the microstructure is arranged in a Fermat's spiral is presented. The properties of such a fiber to be exploited for laser light amplification are numerically investigated by means of a full-vectorial finite-element method. Thanks to this peculiar microstructure, the fiber is shown to have an increased Brillouin threshold power and very low bending losses, while preserving a very good beam spatial quality.

  18. Spark gap switch with spiral gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, John P.

    1989-01-01

    A spark gap switch having a contaminate removal system using an injected gas. An annular plate concentric with an electrode of the switch defines flow paths for the injected gas which form a strong spiral flow of the gas in the housing which is effective to remove contaminates from the switch surfaces. The gas along with the contaminates is exhausted from the housing through one of the ends of the switch.

  19. Spiral inflation with Coleman-Weinberg potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2015-03-01

    We apply the idea of spiral inflation to the Coleman-Weinberg potential and show that inflation matching our observations well is allowed for a symmetry-breaking scale ranging from an intermediate scale to a grand unified theory (GUT) scale even if the quartic coupling λ is of O (0.1 ). The tensor-to-scalar ratio can be of O (0.01 ) in the case of GUT-scale symmetry breaking.

  20. Gastric spiral bacteria in small felids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, M J; Kovarik, P; Murnane, R D

    1998-06-01

    Nine small cats, including one bobcat (Felis rufus), one Pallas cat (F. manul), one Canada lynx (F. lynx canadensis), two fishing cats (F. viverrina), two margays (F. wiedii), and two sand cats (F. margarita), necropsied between June 1995 and March 1997 had large numbers of gastric spiral bacteria, whereas five large cats, including one African lion (Panthera leo), two snow leopards (P. uncia), one Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica), and one jaguar (P. onca), necropsied during the same period had none. All of the spiral organisms from the nine small cats were histologically and ultrastructurally similar. Histologically, the spiral bacteria were 5-14 microm long with five to nine coils per organism and were located both extracellularly within gastric glands and surface mucus, and intracellularly in parietal cells. Spiral bacteria in gastric mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx, one fishing cat, and the two sand cats were gram negative and had corkscrewlike to tumbling motility when viewed with phase contrast microscopy. The bacteria were 0.5-0.7 microm wide, with a periodicity of 0.65-1.1 microm in all cats. Bipolar sheathed flagella were occasionally observed, and no periplasmic fibrils were seen. The bacteria were extracellular in parietal cell canaliculi and intracellular within parietal cells. Culture of mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx and sand cats was unsuccessful. Based on morphology, motility, and cellular tropism, the bacteria were probably Helicobacter-like organisms. Although the two margays had moderate lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, the other cats lacked or had only mild gastric lymphoid infiltrates, suggesting that these organisms are either commensals or opportunistic pathogens. PMID:9732040

  1. Generation Method Improves Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Tsung, Wei-Jiung; Coy, John J.; Heine, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Conjugate tooth surfaces reduce kinematic errors. Method for generation of spiral bevel gears provides conjugated gear-tooth surfaces and improved bearing contact. Conjugated surfaces preferable because maintain constant gear ratios during tooth-contact cycles. Changing gear ratios of nonconjugated surfaces give rise to kinematical errors in transfer of motion from driving gears to driven gears. Errors major sources of noise in power transmissions. Computer program developed to simulate cutting and meshing processes for pinions and gears to minimize kinematical errors.

  2. Spiral lead platen robotic end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic end effector is disclosed which makes use of a rotating platen with spiral leads used to impact lateral motion to gripping fingers. Actuation is provided by the contact of rolling pins with the walls of the leads. The use of the disclosed method of actuation avoids jamming and provides excellent mechanical advantage while remaining light in weight and durable. The entire end effector is compact and easily adapted for attachment to robotic arms currently in use.

  3. Spiral laser beams in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Mahalov, Alex; Suazo, Erwin; Suslov, Sergei K

    2013-08-01

    Explicit solutions of the inhomogeneous paraxial wave equation in a linear and quadratic approximation are applied to wave fields with invariant features, such as oscillating laser beams in a parabolic waveguide and spiral light beams in varying media. A similar effect of superfocusing of particle beams in a thin monocrystal film, harmonic oscillations of cold trapped atoms, and motion in magnetic field are also mentioned. PMID:23903135

  4. Integral Field Spectroscopy of 23 Spiral Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheldor, D.; Axon, D.; Merritt, D.; Hughes, M. A.; Marconi, A.; Binney, J.; Capetti, A.; Merrifield, M.; Scarlata, C.; Sparks, W.

    2005-09-01

    We have obtained integral-field spectroscopy for 23 spiral bulges using INTEGRAL on the William Herschel Telescope and SPIRAL on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This is the first two-dimensional survey directed solely at the bulges of spiral galaxies. Eleven galaxies of the sample do not have previous measurements of the stellar velocity dispersion (σ*). These data are designed to complement our Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph program for estimating black hole masses in the range 106-108 Msolar using gas kinematics from nucleated disks. These observations will serve to derive the stellar dynamical bulge properties using the traditional Mg b and Ca II triplets. We use both cross-correlation and maximum penalized likelihood to determine projected σ* in these systems and present radial velocity fields, major axis rotation curves, curves of growth, and σ* fields. Using cross-correlation to extract the low-order two-dimensional stellar dynamics we generally see coherent radial rotation and irregular velocity dispersion fields suggesting that σ* is a nontrivial parameter to estimate.

  5. Imperfect Hopf bifurcation in spiral Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Abshagen, J; Heise, M; Langenberg, J; Pfister, G

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study on the transition to spiral vortices in flow between concentric counter-rotating cylinders in the presence of an axial through-flow, i.e., in spiral Poiseuille flow. The experiments were performed in an apparatus having an aspect ratio Gamma=L/d=22.8 ( L axial length, d gap width between cylinders) and end plates enabling an in and outflow of mass. As a result of an applied axial through-flow the "classical" Hopf bifurcation to spiral vortices (SPI) splits up and a primary and secondary branch of down and upstream propagating SPI, respectively, as well as a transient quasiperiodic flow appear. Downstream propagating SPI resulting from the primary supercritical Hopf bifurcation are either convectively or absolutely unstable. The bifurcation structure observed in this open flow experiment is in qualitative agreement with predictions from theory of Hopf bifurcation with broken reflection symmetry [J. D. Crawford and E. Knobloch, Nonlinearity 1, 617 (1988)] and also in quantitative agreement with results from recent numerical calculations [A. Pinter, M. Lücke, and C. Hoffmann, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026318 (2003); C. Hoffmann, M. Lücke, and A. Pinter, Phys. Rev. E 69, 056309 (2004)].

  6. Spiraling Fermi arcs in Weyl materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, Anton

    In Weyl materials the valence and conduction electron bands touch at an even number of isolated points in the Brillouin zone. In the vicinity of these points the electron dispersion is linear and may be described by the massless Dirac equation. This results in nontrivial topology of Berry connection curvature. One of its consequences is the existence of peculiar surface electron states whose Fermi surfaces form arcs connecting projections of the Weyl points onto the surface plane. Band bending near the boundary of the crystal also produces surface states. We show that in Weyl materials band bending near the crystal surface gives rise to spiral structure of energy surfaces of arc states. The corresponding Fermi surface has the shape of a spiral that winds about the projection of the Weyl point onto the surface plane. The direction of the winding is determined by the helicity of the Weyl point and the sign of the band bending potential. For close valleys arc state morphology may be understood in terms of avoided crossing of oppositely winding spirals. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46452.

  7. Spiraling Fermi arcs in Weyl materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    In Weyl materials the valence and conduction electron bands touch at an even number of isolated points in the Brillouin zone. In the vicinity of these points the electron dispersion is linear and may be described by the massless Dirac equation. This results in nontrivial topology of the Berry connection curvature. One of its consequences is the existence of peculiar surface electron states whose Fermi surfaces form arcs connecting projections of the Weyl points onto the surface plane. Band bending near the boundary of the crystal also produces surface states. We show that in Weyl materials band bending near the crystal surface gives rise to a spiral structure of energy surfaces of arc states. The corresponding Fermi surface has the shape of a spiral that winds about the projection of the Weyl point onto the surface plane. The direction of the winding is determined by the helicity of the Weyl point and the sign of the band-bending potential. For close valleys the arc state morphology may be understood in terms of the avoided crossing of oppositely winding spirals.

  8. A new spiral model for Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Rather than a clock-like strobe, a rotating spiral may underlie the ~10.7 h periodicities observed in many phenomena in Saturn's magnetosphere. This spiral is a density or flux wave propagating outward from the planet, and the periodicity is generated when a spacecraft encounters the wave. The wave moves outward with the Alfvén speed, which can be computed from the magnetic field strength and plasma mass density. Using data from the first 200 days of 2010, the observed field strength and plasma density are used to compute this speed and construct the spiral. When the Cassini spacecraft "flies through" this model on a real trajectory, the model produces a strong main period at 10.7 h with weaker secondary periods at 10.4 h and 11.0 h resulting from Doppler effects. Periodograms of observed phenomena from the same interval show a main peak at 10.7 h but with spurious secondary peaks due to noise.

  9. Basis for Synthesis of Spiral Lattice Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursill, L. A.; Ryan, George; Fan, Xudong; Rouse, J. L.; Peng, Julin; Perkins, Anne

    Observations of the sunflower Helianthus tuberosus reveal the occurrence of both Fibonacci and Lucas numbers of visible spirals (parastichies). This species is multi-headed, allowing a quantitative study of the relative abundance of these two types of phyllotaxis. The florets follow a spiral arrangement. It is remarkable that the Lucas series occurred, almost invariably, in the first-flowering heads of individual plants. The occurrence of left-and right-handed chirality was found to be random, within experimental error, using an appropriate chirality convention. Quantitative crystallographic studies allow the average growth law to be derived (r = alτ-1 θ = 2πl/(τ + 1), where a is a constant, l is the seed cell number and τ is the golden mean (1 +√ {5})/2). They also reveal departures from classical theoretical models of phyllotaxis, taking the form of persistent oscillations in both divergence angle and radius. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a new theoretical model for the close-packing of growing discs. Finally, a basis for synthesis of (inorganic) spiral lattice structures is proposed.

  10. Diagnosis demystified: CT as diagnostic tool in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Shruthi, Nagaraja; Sreenivasa Murthy, B V; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis in endodontics is usually based on clinical and radiographical presentations, which are only empirical methods. The role of healing profession is to apply knowledge and skills towards maintaining and restoring the patient's health. Recent advances in imaging technologies have added to correct interpretation and diagnosis. CT is proving to be an effective tool in solving endodontic mysteries through its three-dimensional visualisation. CT imaging offers many diagnostic advantages to produce reconstructed images in selected projection and low-contrast resolution far superior to that of all other X-ray imaging modalities. This case report is an endeavour towards effective treatment planning of cases with root fracture, root resorption using spiral CT as an adjuvant diagnostic tool. PMID:23814212

  11. Theoretical study of electron tunneling through the spiral molecule junctions along spiral paths.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Feng, Jikang; Tian, Wei Quan; Jiang, Yongyuan

    2016-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of carbohelicenes and heterohelicenes absorbed between two metal electrodes have been investigated by using the nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with the density function theory. The transport properties of the molecular junctions are mainly dependent on the nature of spiral molecules. The detailed analyses of the transmission spectra, the energy levels as well as the spatial distribution of molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian explain how the geometry of molecules affects the intra-molecular electronic coupling. The spiral current in the configurations can be achieved by tuning the outer edge states of spiral-shaped molecules. Furthermore, the symmetric current-voltage characteristics are investigated with the bias changing for all devices as well as an negative differential resistance behavior is observed. PMID:26762548

  12. Theoretical study of electron tunneling through the spiral molecule junctions along spiral paths.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Feng, Jikang; Tian, Wei Quan; Jiang, Yongyuan

    2016-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of carbohelicenes and heterohelicenes absorbed between two metal electrodes have been investigated by using the nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with the density function theory. The transport properties of the molecular junctions are mainly dependent on the nature of spiral molecules. The detailed analyses of the transmission spectra, the energy levels as well as the spatial distribution of molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian explain how the geometry of molecules affects the intra-molecular electronic coupling. The spiral current in the configurations can be achieved by tuning the outer edge states of spiral-shaped molecules. Furthermore, the symmetric current-voltage characteristics are investigated with the bias changing for all devices as well as an negative differential resistance behavior is observed.

  13. Spiral density waves in a young protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Carpenter, John M.; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Isella, Andrea; Linz, Hendrik; Sargent, Anneila I.; Wilner, David J.; Henning, Thomas; Deller, Adam T.; Chandler, Claire J.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Lazio, Joseph; Menten, Karl M.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Storm, Shaye; Testi, Leonardo; Tazzari, Marco; Kwon, Woojin; Calvet, Nuria; Greaves, Jane S.; Harris, Robert J.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational forces are expected to excite spiral density waves in protoplanetary disks, disks of gas and dust orbiting young stars. However, previous observations that showed spiral structure were not able to probe disk midplanes, where most of the mass is concentrated and where planet formation takes place. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we detected a pair of trailing symmetric spiral arms in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star Elias 2-27. The arms extend to the disk outer regions and can be traced down to the midplane. These millimeter-wave observations also reveal an emission gap closer to the star than the spiral arms. We argue that the observed spirals trace shocks of spiral density waves in the midplane of this young disk.

  14. Super-spiral structures in an excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Muñuzuri, V.; Aliev, R.; Vasiev, B.; Perez-Villar, V.; Krinsky, V. I.

    1991-10-01

    ROTATING spiral waves have been observed in various excitable media, including heart muscle1, retinae2, cultures of the slime mould Dyctiostelium discoideum3,4 and chemical oscillators such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction5-7. Under certain conditions the spiral wave does not exhibit simple periodic rotation, but quasiperiodic8 (or 'compound'9) rotation, in which the spiral's origin (the tip) meanders10. Recent calculations11 have shown that highly meandering tip motion can impose superstructures on spiral waves. Here we reproduce these patterns experimentally, using the BZ reaction as the excitable medium. We induce high tip meander by applying pulses of electrical current locally at the tip12. Image processing of the patterns reveals a spiral wave of larger wavelength superimposed on the original wave, an effect that can be described in terms of a Doppler shift in the original spiral.

  15. Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction: Clinical characteristics and diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Li, Hai-Fei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible predisposing factors of bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction (BI-SBO) and to discuss the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography, particularly contrast-enhanced scanning, in this condition. METHODS: A total of 35 BI-SBO cases treated at our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Complete clinical and computed tomography (CT) data of the patients were available and confirmed by surgery. SBO was clinically diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations. Of the 35 patients, 18 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT and 17 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT combined with contrast-enhanced examination. Original images were processed using a GE ADW4.3 workstation to obtain MPR, CPR, MIP and CTA images. The images of all patients were evaluated by two abdominal imaging experts. The main analytical contents of planar scanning included intestinal bezoar conditions, changes in the intestinal wall and changes in peri-intestinal conditions. Vascular hyperaemia and arterial blood supply conditions at a specific obstruction site and the distal end of the obstruction site were evaluated through contrast-enhanced examination. RESULTS: The proportion of males to females among the 35 cases was 1:1.69 (13:22); median age was 63.3 years. The following cases were observed: 29 (82.8%) cases occurred in autumn and winter and showed a history of consuming high amounts of persimmon and hawthorn; 19 (54.3%) cases revealed a history of gastrointestinal surgery; 19 exhibited incomplete dentition, with missing partial or whole posterior teeth; 26 suffered from obstruction at the ileum. A total of 51 bezoars were found in these patients, of whom 16 (45.7%) had multiple bezoars. CT planar scanning of bezoars showed lumps with mottled gas inside the intestinal cavity. Furthermore, 9 cases of bezoars had envelopes and 11 cases

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.; Raskovalov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and properties of pulsating solitons (breathers) in the spiral structures of magnets are analyzed within the sine-Gordon model. The breather core pulsations are shown to be accompanied by local shifts and oscillations of the spiral structure with the formation of "precursors" and "tails" in the moving soliton. The possibilities for the observation and excitation of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets and multiferroics are discussed.

  17. Surface geometry of circular cut spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the surface geometry of spiral bevel gears formed by a circular cutter is presented. The emphasis is upon determining the tooth surface principal radii of curvature of crown (flat) gears. Specific results are presented for involute, straight, and hyperbolic cutter profiles. It is shown that the geometry of circular cut spiral bevel gears is somewhat simpler than a theoretical logarithmic spiral bevel gear.

  18. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  19. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  20. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  1. On a new coordinate system with astrophysical application: Spiral coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Gil, P. J. S.

    In this presentation are introduced spiral coordinates, which are a particular case of conformal coordinates, i.e. orthogonal curvelinear coordinates with equal factors along all coordinate axis. The spiral coordinates in the plane have as coordinate curves two families of logarithmic spirals, making a constant angle, respectively phi and pi / 2-phi, with all radial lines, where phi is a parameter. They can be obtained from a complex function, representing a spiral potential flow, due to the superposition of a source/sink with a vortex; the parameter phi in this case specifies the ratio of the ass flux of source/sink to the circulation of the vortex. Regardless of hydrodynamical or other interpretations, spiral coordinates are particulary convenient in situation where physical quantities vary only along a logarithmicspiral. The example chosen is the propagation of Alfven waves along a logarithmic spiral, as an approximation to Parker's spiral. The equation of dissipative MHD are written in spiral coordinates, and eliminated to specify the Alfven wave equation in spiral coordinates; the latter is solved exactly in terms of Bessel functions, and the results analyzed for values of the parameters corresponding to the solar wind.

  2. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  3. A Unified Scaling Law in Spiral Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Koda; Sofue; Wada

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the origin of a unified scaling relation in spiral galaxies. Observed spiral galaxies are spread on a plane in the three-dimensional logarithmic space of luminosity L, radius R, and rotation velocity V. The plane is expressed as L~&parl0;VR&parr0;alpha in the I passband, where alpha is a constant. On the plane, observed galaxies are distributed in an elongated region which looks like the shape of a surfboard. The well-known scaling relations L-V (Tully-Fisher [TF] relation), V-R (also the TF relation), and R-L (Freeman's law) can be understood as oblique projections of the surfboard-like plane into two-dimensional spaces. This unified interpretation of the known scaling relations should be a clue to understand the physical origin of all the relations consistently. Furthermore, this interpretation can also explain why previous studies could not find any correlation between TF residuals and radius. In order to clarify the origin of this plane, we simulate formation and evolution of spiral galaxies with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, including cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback. Initial conditions are set to 14 isolated spheres with two free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum. The cold dark matter (h=0.5, Omega0=1) cosmology is considered as a test case. The simulations provide the following two conclusions: (1) The slope of the plane is well reproduced but the zero point is not. This zero-point discrepancy could be solved in a low-density (Omega0<1) and high-expansion (h>0.5) cosmology. (2) The surfboard-shaped plane can be explained by the control of galactic mass and angular momentum.

  4. STAR CLUSTERS IN PSEUDOBULGES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nino, Daiana; Trenti, Michele; Stiavelli, Massimo; Carollo, C. Marcella; Scarlata, Claudia; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2009-11-15

    We present a study of the properties of the star-cluster systems around pseudobulges of late-type spiral galaxies using a sample of 11 galaxies with distances from 17 Mpc to 37 Mpc. Star clusters are identified from multiband Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFPC2 imaging data by combining detections in three bands (F435W and F814W with ACS and F606W with WFPC2). The photometric data are then compared to population synthesis models to infer the masses and ages of the star clusters. Photometric errors and completeness are estimated by means of artificial source Monte Carlo simulations. Dust extinction is estimated by considering F160W NICMOS observations of the central regions of the galaxies, augmenting our wavelength coverage. In all galaxies we identify star clusters with a wide range of ages, from young (age {approx}< 8 Myr) blue clusters, with typical mass of 10{sup 3} M {sub sun} to older (age >100-250 Myr), more massive, red clusters. Some of the latter might likely evolve into objects similar to the Milky Way's globular clusters. We compute the specific frequencies for the older clusters with respect to the galaxy and bulge luminosities. Specific frequencies relative to the galaxy light appear consistent with the globular cluster specific frequencies of early-type spirals. We compare the specific frequencies relative to the bulge light with the globular cluster specific frequencies of dwarf galaxies, which have a surface brightness profile that is similar to that of the pseudobulges in our sample. The specific frequencies we derive for our sample galaxies are higher than those of the dwarf galaxies, supporting an evolutionary scenario in which some of the dwarf galaxies might be the remnants of harassed late-type spiral galaxies that hosted a pseudobulge.

  5. The Circle in the Spiral: Up the Down Spiral with English, Vol. 2, Project Insight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catholic Board of Education, Diocese of Cleveland, OH.

    Units contained in this second volume of a spiral curriculum guide for English (See also TE 002 061.) are (1) An Insight into the Writing Process--Composition, 7-12; (2) A Program for Culturally Different, Underachieving, Low I.Q., Seventh Grade Students ("an approach to English conceived for the modern black American"); (3) Seventh Grade Program…

  6. VLA continuum observations of barred spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Barreto, J. Antonio; Pismis, P.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of NGC 613, NGC 1300, NGC 4314 and NGC 5383 using the VLA at frequencies of 1464.9 and 4885.1 MHz are reported. These objects are a subset of galaxies from which radio emission were searched. The selection criteria were: (1) they are barred spiral galaxies preferentially with different Hubble type; (2) they have a peculiar or hot spot nucleus; (3) they have been observed at far infrared wavelengths by IRAS; and (4) they are observable from the northern hemisphere. Their radio and far infrared properties are summarized and their composite spectra are shown.

  7. The Dynamics of Spiral Arms in Pure Stellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Baba, J.; Saitoh, T. R.; Makino, J.; Kokubo, E.; Wada, K.

    2011-04-01

    It has been believed that spiral arms in pure stellar disks, especially the ones spontaneously formed, decay in several galactic rotations due to the increase of stellar velocity dispersions. Therefore, some cooling mechanism, for example dissipational effects of the interstellar medium, was assumed to be necessary to keep the spiral arms. Here, we show that stellar disks can maintain spiral features for several tens of rotations without the help of cooling, using a series of high-resolution three-dimensional N-body simulations of pure stellar disks. We found that if the number of particles is sufficiently large, e.g., 3 × 106, multi-arm spirals developed in an isolated disk can survive for more than 10 Gyr. We confirmed that there is a self-regulating mechanism that maintains the amplitude of the spiral arms. Spiral arms increase Toomre's Q of the disk, and the heating rate correlates with the squared amplitude of the spirals. Since the amplitude itself is limited by Q, this makes the dynamical heating less effective in the later phase of evolution. A simple analytical argument suggests that the heating is caused by gravitational scattering of stars by spiral arms and that the self-regulating mechanism in pure stellar disks can effectively maintain spiral arms on a cosmological timescale. In the case of a smaller number of particles, e.g., 3 × 105, spiral arms grow faster in the beginning of the simulation (while Q is small) and they cause a rapid increase of Q. As a result, the spiral arms become faint in several Gyr.

  8. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  9. Self-destructing Spiral Waves: Global Simulations of a Spiral-wave Instability in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Nelson, Richard P.; Hartmann, Lee; Richard, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We present results from a suite of three-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations that shows that spiral density waves propagating in circumstellar disks are unstable to the growth of a parametric instability that leads to break down of the flow into turbulence. This spiral wave instability (SWI) arises from a resonant interaction between pairs of inertial waves, or inertial-gravity waves, and the background spiral wave. The development of the instability in the linear regime involves the growth of a broad spectrum of inertial modes, with growth rates on the order of the orbital time, and results in a nonlinear saturated state in which turbulent velocity perturbations are of a similar magnitude to those induced by the spiral wave. The turbulence induces angular momentum transport and vertical mixing at a rate that depends locally on the amplitude of the spiral wave (we obtain a stress parameter α ˜ 5 × 10-4 in our reference model). The instability is found to operate in a wide range of disk models, including those with isothermal or adiabatic equations of state, and in viscous disks where the dimensionless kinematic viscosity ν ≤ 10-5. This robustness suggests that the instability will have applications to a broad range of astrophysical disk-related phenomena, including those in close binary systems, planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (including Jupiter in our own solar system) and FU Orionis outburst models. Further work is required to determine the nature of the instability and to evaluate its observational consequences in physically more complete disk models than we have considered in this paper.

  10. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  11. Analyses of magnetic field in spiral steel pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Xinjing; Chen, Shili; Guo, Shixu; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-02-01

    In order to confirm the feasibility of identifying the girth welds using the magnetic field in spiral pipelines, the distributions of the magnetic field in spiral steel pipes with different sizes and different magnetizations were analyzed using the equivalent magnetic charge method, and were verified experimentally. The magnetic field inside spiral steel pipes is generally uniform with very small magnetic sudden changes at the spiral welds, whereas the magnetic field near the pipe ends has very big local changes. The size of spiral pipes, including its wall thickness, length, diameter, and the lift-off, has various influences on the local magnetic sudden changes at the spiral welds (LMASW) and the magnetic incremental near the pipe ends (MINPE), whereas the difference between LMASW and MINPE is always quite considerable. The bigger the radial magnetization component is, the bigger the difference between LMASW and MINPE is. When the radial magnetization component is small, changes of the circumferential and axial magnetization components can reduce this difference. Since the magnetizations of each pipe are seldom identical, the magnetic field inside each pipe is usually quite different. Thus there will be a big local magnetic sudden change at the girth weld inside the spiral pipeline, and this sudden change is much stronger than LMASW. Therefore, we can still consider identifying the girth welds using the magnetic field in spiral pipelines to improve the positioning accuracy of the in-pipe detector.

  12. Design considerations for an archimedean slot spiral antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurnberger, Michael W.; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The design goal is to develop a 118-157 MHz, vertically polarized, low-profile (or conformal) antenna as a replacement for VHF AM blade antennas on aircraft. This design is to be arrived at by scaling the dimensions of an antenna designed for a center frequency of 1.1 GHz. The design prior to scaling may have the following maximum dimensions: diameter less than 3.70 in. and thickness less than 0.50 in. Although a four-arm spiral design was originally suggested, a two-arm spiral may also be used, as both mode-1 and mode-2 (sum and difference) radiation patterns aren't required. While a four-arm spiral can easily be designed should both sum and difference patterns be required, the two-arm design will provide the required sum pattern and simplify the design problem somewhat: only one feed is required, and the feed area geometry is more straightforward. Polarization requirements dictate that a slot spiral be used, as opposed to a wire spiral. Two similar radiating structures were considered. The first is the standard archimedean spiral antenna. The second is a hollow archimedean spiral antenna, essentially a standard archimedean spiral with the inner portion removed.

  13. Surface geometry of circular cut spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The tooth surface principal radii of curvature of crown (flat) gears were determined. Specific results are presented for involute, straight, and hyperbolic cutter profiles. It is shown that the geometry of circular cut spiral bevel gears is somewhat simpler than a theoretical logarithmic spiral bevel gear.

  14. Ray transfer matrix for a spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, M; Godat, T; Munro, E; Alonso, M A; Shi, H; Bhattacharya, M

    2013-12-01

    We present a ray transfer matrix for a spiral phase plate. Using this matrix we determine the stability of an optical resonator made of two spiral phase plates and trace stable ray orbits in the resonator. Our results should be relevant to laser physics, optical micromanipulation, quantum information, and optomechanics.

  15. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, Clint

    1998-01-15

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed.

  16. Spiral plate method for bacterial determination.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, J E; Campbell, J E; Donnelly, C B; Peeler, J T; Delaney, J M

    1973-02-01

    A method is described for determining the number of bacteria in a solution by the use of a machine which deposits a known volume of sample on a rotating agar plate in an ever decreasing amount in the form of an Archimedes spiral. After the sample is incubated, different colony densities are apparent on the surface of the plate. A modified counting grid is described which relates area of the plate of volume of sample. By counting an appropriate area of the plate, the number of bacteria in the sample is estimated. This method was compared to the pour plate procedure with the use of pure and mixed cultures in water and milk. The results did not demonstrate a significant difference in variance between duplicates at the alpha = 0.01 level when concentrations of 600 to 12 x 10(5) bacteria per ml were used, but the spiral plate method gave counts that were higher than counts obtained by the pour plate method. The time and materials required for this method are substantially less than those required for the conventional aerobic pour plate procedure.

  17. When the Largest Spiral is Formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; de Mello, Duília F.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Dwek, Eli

    2013-03-01

    We used UV-to-IR archival data to investigate the nature of the giant spiral galaxy, NGC 6872, 65 Mpc away. It belongs to the southern Pavo group and is interacting with a small lenticular galaxy, IC4970. GALEX UV images show a very large part of the galaxy not seen before, making it one of the largest spiral galaxies known, with a physical size greater than 150 kpc. The SED of 17 regions (10 kpc of diameter) across the two arms show a remarkable spatial distribution, as if they were mirror images with respect to their stellar population. However, the last 40 kpc of the northeastern arm are much bluer than any other region of the southwestern one. There is a strong spatial correlation between the NUV luminosity and the distance to the nucleus. The UV data supports the scenario of an interaction at 130 Myr which triggered star formation all over the disk of NGC 6872. The tip of the northeastern arm resembles a tidal dwarf galaxy in the process of formation.

  18. Spiraling Into Gallstone Disease: A Physicist's Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastavker, Y. V.; Tilley, B. S.; Pratt, J. C.

    2005-10-01

    Scientists have been fascinated for decades with the ability of nature to form self-assembled structures of various configurations. One such configuration is a spiral or a helix. The (double) helical geometrical configuration is a well-known secondary structure of DNA; however, DNA is not the only biological system possessing this shape. Spirals have been found in a variety of biological and synthetic systems, one of which is bile in the gallbladder. In this system, helical ribbons appear as metastable intermediates in the process of cholesterol crystallization that leads to the formation of gallstones. The bile system is particularly interesting and unique due to the richness in variety of the helical structures formed. Understanding the mechanisms for nature's self-assembly of helical ribbons is crucial in both the prevention of gallstone disease and in developing potential technological and medical applications. We describe a model bile system, composed of three major components of native bile in water: a phospholipid, a fatty acid, and a sterol. This system behaves similarly to the native bile in terms of the kinetics of the formation and evolution of intermediate metastables, including helical ribbons. We further describe our experimental findings and phenomenological model explaining the geometrical shape, elastic properties, and behavior of helical ribbons in model bile systems. We also propose possible applications of these structures as drug delivery vehicles, metallization templates, and antifouling devices.

  19. Precision of spiral-bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The kinematic errors in spiral bevel gear trains caused by the generation of nonconjugate surfaces, by axial displacements of the gears during assembly, and by eccentricity of the assembled gears were determined. One mathematical model corresponds to the motion of the contact ellipse across the tooth surface, (geometry I) and the other along the tooth surface (geometry II). The following results were obtained: (1) kinematic errors induced by errors of manufacture may be minimized by applying special machine settings, the original error may be reduced by order of magnitude, the procedure is most effective for geometry 2 gears, (2) when trying to adjust the bearing contact pattern between the gear teeth for geometry 1 gears, it is more desirable to shim the gear axially; for geometry II gears, shim the pinion axially; (3) the kinematic accuracy of spiral bevel drives are most sensitive to eccentricities of the gear and less sensitive to eccentricities of the pinion. The precision of mounting accuracy and manufacture are most crucial for the gear, and less so for the pinion.

  20. Precision of spiral-bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic errors in spiral bevel gear trains caused by the generation of nonconjugate surfaces, by axial displacements of the gears during assembly, and by eccentricity of the assembled gears were determined. One mathematical model corresponds to the motion of the contact ellipse across the tooth surface, (geometry I) and the other along the tooth surface (geometry II). The following results were obtained: (1) kinematic errors induced by errors of manufacture may be minimized by applying special machine settings, the original error may be reduced by order of magnitude, the procedure is most effective for geometry 2 gears, (2) when trying to adjust the bearing contact pattern between the gear teeth for geometry I gears, it is more desirable to shim the gear axially; for geometry II gears, shim the pinion axially; (3) the kinematic accuracy of spiral bevel drives are most sensitive to eccentricities of the gear and less sensitive to eccentricities of the pinion. The precision of mounting accuracy and manufacture are most crucial for the gear, and less so for the pinion. Previously announced in STAR as N82-30552

  1. Self-perpetuating Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-01

    The causes of spiral structure in galaxies remain uncertain. Leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals with their own well-known complications, here we consider the possibility that multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can thus survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed.

  2. Effects of non Newtonian spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmudul; Maruf, Mahbub Alam; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The spiral component of blood flow has both beneficial and detrimental effects in human circulatory system. A numerical investigation is carried out to analyze the effect of spiral blood flow through an axisymmetric three dimensional artery having 75% stenosis at the center. Blood is assumed as a Non-Newtonian fluid. Standard k-ω model is used for the simulation with the Reynolds number of 1000. A parabolic velocity profile with spiral flow is used as inlet boundary condition. The peak values of all velocity components are found just after stenosis. But total pressure gradually decreases at downstream. Spiral flow of blood has significant effects on tangential component of velocity. However, the effect is mild for radial and axial velocity components. The peak value of wall shear stress is at the stenosis zone and decreases rapidly in downstream. The effect of spiral flow is significant for turbulent kinetic energy. Detailed investigation and relevant pathological issues are delineated throughout the paper.

  3. A photometrically and spectroscopically confirmed population of passive spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Dolley, Tim; Crossett, Jacob P.; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a population of passive spiral galaxies from photometry and integral field spectroscopy. We selected z < 0.035 spiral galaxies that have WISE colours consistent with little mid-infrared emission from warm dust. Matched aperture photometry of 51 spiral galaxies in ultraviolet, optical and mid-infrared show these galaxies have colours consistent with passive galaxies. Six galaxies form a spectroscopic pilot study and were observed using the Wide-Field Spectrograph to check for signs of nebular emission from star formation. We see no evidence of substantial nebular emission found in previous red spiral samples. These six galaxies possess absorption-line spectra with 4000 Å breaks consistent with an average luminosity-weighted age of 2.3 Gyr. Our photometric and integral field spectroscopic observations confirm the existence of a population of local passive spiral galaxies, implying that transformation into early-type morphologies is not required for the quenching of star formation.

  4. Spiral wave chimeras in locally coupled oscillator systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Wei; Dierckx, Hans

    2016-02-01

    The recently discovered chimera state involves the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized states for a group of identical oscillators. In this work, we show the existence of (inwardly) rotating spiral wave chimeras in the three-component reaction-diffusion systems where each element is locally coupled by diffusion. A transition from spiral waves with the smooth core to spiral wave chimeras is found as we change the local dynamics of the system or as we gradually increase the diffusion coefficient of the activator. Our findings on the spiral wave chimera in the reaction-diffusion systems suggest that spiral chimera states may be found in chemical and biological systems that can be modeled by a large population of oscillators indirectly coupled via a diffusive environment. PMID:26986275

  5. Spiral wave chimeras in locally coupled oscillator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Dierckx, Hans

    2016-02-01

    The recently discovered chimera state involves the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized states for a group of identical oscillators. In this work, we show the existence of (inwardly) rotating spiral wave chimeras in the three-component reaction-diffusion systems where each element is locally coupled by diffusion. A transition from spiral waves with the smooth core to spiral wave chimeras is found as we change the local dynamics of the system or as we gradually increase the diffusion coefficient of the activator. Our findings on the spiral wave chimera in the reaction-diffusion systems suggest that spiral chimera states may be found in chemical and biological systems that can be modeled by a large population of oscillators indirectly coupled via a diffusive environment.

  6. A FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Shields, Douglas W.; Flatman, Russell; Hartley, Matthew T.; Berrier, Joel C.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2015-03-20

    Spiral structure is the most distinctive feature of disk galaxies and yet debate persists about which theory of spiral structure is correct. Many versions of the density wave theory demand that the pitch angle be uniquely determined by the distribution of mass in the bulge and disk of the galaxy. We present evidence that the tangent of the pitch angle of logarithmic spiral arms in disk galaxies correlates strongly with the density of neutral atomic hydrogen in the disk and with the central stellar bulge mass of the galaxy. These three quantities, when plotted against each other, form a planar relationship that we argue should be fundamental to our understanding of spiral structure in disk galaxies. We further argue that any successful theory of spiral structure must be able to explain this relationship.

  7. Equiangular-spiral bent lightpipes with arbitrary bent angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shu-Chun; Cheng, Yi-Kai; Chern, Jyh-Long

    2009-05-01

    A recent study proposed the concept of a leakage-free bent lightpipe with an equiangular-spiral shape [S.-C. Chu, J.-L. Chern, Opt. Lett. 30 (2005) 3006]. This paper extends the design of a leakage-free equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe with arbitrary-bend-angle and addresses in detail the mathematical formalism required to build such an equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe. Furthermore, a comparison of the proposed equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe and a conventional circular bent lightpipe is provided. Numerical verifications are discussed, and experimental explorations with different bent shapes and angles are carried out for comparison. Results show that equiangular-spiral bent lightpipes with different bent angles exhibit a theoretical 100% transmission with more than 76% efficiency when practically propagating, which is much better than conventional circular bent lightpipes. The output irradiance distributions of bent lightpipes with different bent shapes are also investigated.

  8. The Primordial Origin Model of Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Machida, Mami; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    We propose a primordial-origin model for composite configurations of global magnetic fields in spiral galaxies. We show that a uniform tilted magnetic field wound up into a rotating disk galaxy can evolve into composite magnetic configurations comprising bisymmetric spiral (S = BSS), axisymmetric spiral (A = ASS), plane-reversed spiral (PR), and/or ring (R) fields in the disk, and vertical (V) fields in the center. By MHD simulations we show that these composite galactic fields are indeed created from a weak primordial uniform field, and that different configurations can co-exist in the same galaxy. We show that spiral fields trigger the growth of two-armed gaseous arms. The centrally accumulated vertical fields are twisted and produce a jet toward the halo. We found that the more vertical was the initial uniform field, the stronger was the formed magnetic field in the galactic disk.

  9. SELF-PERPETUATING SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-20

    The causes of spiral structure in galaxies remain uncertain. Leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals with their own well-known complications, here we consider the possibility that multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can thus survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed.

  10. Advanced magnetorheological damper with a spiral channel bypass valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, G.; Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid has a yield stress that is readily controllable using an applied magnetic field. MR dampers adjust this yield stress in a magnetic valve to accommodate a wide range of shock or vibration loads. In this study, the performance of an MR damper with a spiral channel bypass valve is examined. Three bypass damper configurations, i.e., a spiral channel, a spiral channel with beads, and a straight channel with beads, are subject to sinusoidal forcing at constant amplitude, while varying frequency, and applied field (current). These configurations are characterized using tortuosity and porosity parameters. The spiral channel without beads had the largest porosity and smallest tortuosity, which produced the smallest damper force, but the widest controllable damping range. The spiral channel with beads had the smallest porosity, and a comparable tortuosity, which produced the largest damping force, but similar controllable damping range to the straight channel with beads.

  11. Fabrication of Spiral Micro-Coil Utilizing LIGA Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Osamu; Kusumi, Shinji; Mekaru, Harutaka; Sato, Noriaki; Shimizu, Masami; Yamashita, Michiru; Hattori, Tadashi

    We developed a method for fabricating a three-dimensional spiral micro-inductor with high inductance using the LIGA process. The spiral inductor created had a diameter of 0.5mm, and a length of 1mm. The width of the spiral line was 10µm, the pitch was 20µm, and the number of turns was 15. It was made of plated copper. The master was a brass round bar coated with PMMA resist. Deep X-ray lithography was employed to fabricate a master for a metallic mold at the NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility, University of Hyogo. The inductor core was made of resin by injection molding. It has a spiral micro flute on the surface. We chose the worm injection molding technique in order to avoid the parting line across the spiral line. The worm injection molding was the method─for demolding the work such as that used in loosening a screw.

  12. DYNAMICS OF NON-STEADY SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-20

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  13. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  14. Logarithmic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle of Spiral Galaxies: Measurement and Relationship to Galactic Structure and Nuclear Supermassive Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin

    In this dissertation, I explore the geometric structure of spiral galaxies and how the visible structure can provide information about the central mass of a galaxy, the density of its galactic disk, and the hidden mass of the supermassive black hole in its nucleus. In order to quantitatively measure the logarithmic spiral pitch angle (a measurement of tightness of the winding) of galactic spiral arms, I led an effort in our research group (the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey) to modify existing two-dimensional fast Fourier transform software to increase its efficacy and accuracy. Using this software, I was able to lead an effort to calculate a black hole mass function (BHMF) for spiral galaxies in our local Universe. This work effectively provides us with a census of local black holes and establishes an endpoint on the evolutionary history of the BHMF for spiral galaxies. Furthermore, my work has indicated a novel fundamental relationship between the pitch angle of a galaxy's spiral arms, the maximum density of neutral atomic hydrogen in its disk, and the stellar mass of its bulge. This result provides strong support for the density wave theory of spiral structure in disk galaxies and poses a critical question of the validity of rival theories for the genesis of spiral structure in disk galaxies.

  15. The influence of exposure parameters on jawbone model accuracy using cone beam CT and multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, B; Luchsinger, S; Hostens, J; Dhoore, E; Jacobs, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective The main purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of exposure parameters on jawbone model accuracy when using cone beam CT (CBCT) and multislice CT (MSCT). Methods A lower and an upper edentulous human cadaver jaw were scanned using micro-CT (Skyscan 1173 high energy spiral scan micro-CT; Skyscan NV, Kontich, Belgium) at 35 μm to serve as true reference. The in vitro samples were exposed using six CBCT units and one MSCT system. CBCT exposure protocols were chosen according to clinically available settings. The variables were kilovoltage, milliamperage, voxel size and/or scan time. Image segmentation was based on local thresholds using profile lines. The resulting jawbone segmentations were registered with the reference and image processing was done to internally fill the segmentations. A point-based distance calculation was performed between the three-dimensional objects and reference scans and deviation percentages were calculated for 2 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm intervals. Results All points of the MSCT surface models lay within a 1 mm deviation range and 98.5% within 0.5 mm compared with micro-CT. For the different CBCT systems, accuracy came close to MSCT with mean percentages of 98.9% within 1 mm deviation and 92.8% within 0.5 mm. A difference of approximately 1% between lower and upper jaws could be perceived. For the specific CBCT exposure protocols, only scan time and voxel size revealed certain significant differences. Conclusion Jawbone model accuracy using CBCT was comparable with MSCT. The surface models of the upper jaws deviated slightly more than those for lower jaws. CBCT exposure settings had a limited influence on accuracy with scan time and voxel size as the main factors. PMID:22282512

  16. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  17. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  18. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  19. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  20. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  1. Structure of magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, Hanna; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2009-04-01

    We present a set of global, self-consistent N-body/SPH simulations of the dynamic evolution of galactic discs with gas and including magnetic fields. We have implemented a description to follow the ideal induction equation in the SPH part of the code Vine. Results from a direct implementation of the field equations are compared to a representation by Euler potentials, which pose a ∇ ċ B-free description, a constraint not fulfilled for the direct implementation. All simulations are compared to an implementation of magnetic fields in the code Gadget. Starting with a homogeneous field we find a tight connection of the magnetic field structure to the density pattern of the galaxy in our simulations, with the magnetic field lines being aligned with the developing spiral pattern of the gas. Our simulations clearly show the importance of non-axisymmetry of the dynamic pattern for the evolution of the magnetic field.

  2. Highly nonlinear layered spiral microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Sílvia M.; Facão, Margarida M.; Latas, Sofia C.; Ferreira, Mário F.

    2013-08-01

    A layered spiral microstructured optical fiber (LS-MOF) is presented, which offers the possibility of a good control of both the dispersion and the nonlinear properties. The proposed design is analyzed using a finite element method considering silica and air as the materials. Zero dispersion, low confinement loss, and a record value of γ = 70.0 W-1/km for the LS-MOF nonlinear parameter are simultaneously obtained at 1.55 μm, whereas a higher value γ = 169.4 W-1/km can be achieved at 1.06 μm. Our results demonstrate the great potential of the LS-MOF for several nonlinear applications, namely for an efficient generation of the supercontinuum.

  3. Spiral model pilot project information model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was an evaluation of the Spiral Model (SM) development approach to allow NASA Marshall to develop an experience base of that software management methodology. A discussion is presented of the Information Model (IM) that was used as part of the SM methodology. A key concept of the SM is the establishment of an IM to be used by management to track the progress of a project. The IM is the set of metrics that is to be measured and reported throughout the life of the project. These metrics measure both the product and the process to ensure the quality of the final delivery item and to ensure the project met programmatic guidelines. The beauty of the SM, along with the IM, is the ability to measure not only the correctness of the specification and implementation of the requirements but to also obtain a measure of customer satisfaction.

  4. How do spiral troughs form on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional model for the coupled evolution of ice-surface temperature and elevation in the Martian polar ice caps is presented. The model includes (1) enhanced heat absorption on steep, dust-exposed scarps, (2) accumulation and ablation, and (3) lateral conduction of heat within the ice cap. The model equations are similar to classic equations for excitable media, including nerve fibers and chemical oscillators. In two dimensions, a small zone of initial melting in the model develops into a train of poleward-migrating troughs with widths similar to those observed on Mars. Starting from random initial conditions, the three-dimensional model reproduces spiral waves very similar to those in the north polar ice cap, including secondary features such as gull-wing shaped troughs, bifurcations, and terminations. These results suggest that eolian processes and ice flow may not control trough morphology.

  5. Enhanced automated spiral bevel gear inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frint, Harold K.; Glasow, Warren

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are the results of a manufacturing and technology program to define, develop, and evaluate an enhanced inspection system for spiral bevel gears. The method uses a multi-axis coordinate measuring machine which maps the working surface of the tooth and compares it with nominal reference values stored in the machine's computer. The enhanced technique features a means for automatically calculating corrective grinding machine settings, involving both first and second order changes, to control the tooth profile to within specified tolerance limits. This enhanced method eliminates the subjective decision making involved in the tooth patterning method, still in use today, which compares contract patterns obtained when the gear is set to run under light load in a rolling test machine. It produces a higher quality gear with significant inspection time and cost savings.

  6. Spiral Galaxies in MKW/AWM Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Barbara A.

    1997-03-01

    Observations have been made of the neutral hydrogen content of more than 170 galaxies within MKW 4, MKW 7, MKW 8, MKW 9, MKW 11, AWM 1, AWM 3, AWM 4, and AWM 5. This sample of nine clusters is representative of the general class of poor clusters identified by MKW and AWM in that they all contain D-- or cD--like dominant galaxies at their dynamical centers. We examine the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of the spiral members in these systems as a function of the local and global properties of the cluster, i.e., galaxy density, x-ray intra cluster gas pressure, x-ray and optical luminosities, and compare our findings with the HI properties of similar galaxies in rich clusters and loose groups of galaxies.

  7. Effects of spiral arms on star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no arms or corotating arms is active only during around the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion both significantly enhances and prolongs the ring star formation in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ∼3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ∼45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no notable age gradient is found in the radial direction for models with arm-induced star formation.

  8. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  9. Variable Stars in a Distant Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) view of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4603, the most distant galaxy in which a special class of pulsating stars called Cepheid variables have been found. It is associated with the Centaurus cluster, one of the most massive assemblages of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Local Group of galaxies, of which the Milky Way is a member, is moving in the direction of Centaurus at a speed of more than a million miles an hour under the influence of the gravitational pull of the matter in that direction. Clusters of young bright blue stars highlight the galaxy's spiral arms. In contrast, red giant stars in the process of dying are also found. Only the very brightest stars in NGC 4603 can be seen individually, even with the unmatched ability of the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain detailed images of distant objects. Much of the diffuse glow comes from fainter stars that cannot be individually distinguished by Hubble. The reddish filaments are regions where clouds of dust obscure blue light from the stars behind them. This galaxy was observed by a team affiliated with the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Because NGC 4603 is much farther away than the other galaxies studied with Hubble by the Key Project team, 108 million light-years, its stars appear very faint from the Earth, and so accurately measuring their brightness, as is required for distinguishing the characteristic variations of Cepheids, is extremely difficult. Determining the distance to the galaxy required an unprecedented statistical analysis based on extensive computer simulations.

  10. Spiral Waves Triggered by Shadows in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Matías; Perez, Sebastian; Casassus, Simon; Marino, Sebastian; Cuadra, Jorge; Christiaens, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    Circumstellar asymmetries such as central warps have recently been shown to cast shadows on outer disks. We investigate the hydrodynamical consequences of such variable illumination on the outer regions of a transition disk, and the development of spiral arms. Using 2D simulations, we follow the evolution of a gaseous disk passively heated by the central star, under the periodic forcing of shadows with an opening angle of ˜28°. With a lower pressure under the shadows, each crossing results in a variable azimuthal acceleration, which in time develops into spiral density waves. Their pitch angles evolve from Π ˜ 15°-22° at the onset, to ˜11°-14°, over ˜65 au to 150 au. Self-gravity enhances the density contrast of the spiral waves, as also reported previously for spirals launched by planets. Our control simulations with unshadowed irradiation do not develop structures, except for a different form of spiral waves seen at later times only in the gravitationally unstable control case. Scattered light predictions in the H-band show that such illumination spirals should be observable. We suggest that spiral arms in the case-study transition disk HD 142527 could be explained as a result of shadowing from the tilted inner disk.

  11. Photocreating supercooled spiral-spin states in a multiferroic manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Y. M.; Ogawa, N.; Kaneko, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the dynamics of the a b -spiral-spin order in a magnetoelectric multiferroic Eu0.55Y0.45MnO3 can be unambiguously probed through optical second harmonic signals, generated via spin-induced ferroelectric polarization. In the case of weak excitation, the ferroelectric and the spiral-spin order remains interlocked, both relaxing through spin-lattice relaxation in the nonequilibrium state. When the additional optical pulse illuminating the sample is intense enough to induce a local phase transition thermally, the system creates a metastable state of the b c -spiral-spin order (with the electric polarization P ∥c ) via supercooling across the first-order phase transition between the a b and b c spiral. The supercooled state of the b c -spiral spin is formed in the thermodynamical ground state of the a b spiral (P ∥a ), displaying a prolonged lifetime with strong dependence on the magnetic field along the a axis. The observed phenomena provide a different paradigm for photoswitching between the two distinct multiferroic states, motivating further research into a direct observation of the photocreated supercooled b c -spiral spin in multiferroic manganites.

  12. Spiral Waves Triggered by Shadows in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Matías; Perez, Sebastian; Casassus, Simon; Marino, Sebastian; Cuadra, Jorge; Christiaens, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    Circumstellar asymmetries such as central warps have recently been shown to cast shadows on outer disks. We investigate the hydrodynamical consequences of such variable illumination on the outer regions of a transition disk, and the development of spiral arms. Using 2D simulations, we follow the evolution of a gaseous disk passively heated by the central star, under the periodic forcing of shadows with an opening angle of ˜28°. With a lower pressure under the shadows, each crossing results in a variable azimuthal acceleration, which in time develops into spiral density waves. Their pitch angles evolve from Π ˜ 15°–22° at the onset, to ˜11°–14°, over ˜65 au to 150 au. Self-gravity enhances the density contrast of the spiral waves, as also reported previously for spirals launched by planets. Our control simulations with unshadowed irradiation do not develop structures, except for a different form of spiral waves seen at later times only in the gravitationally unstable control case. Scattered light predictions in the H-band show that such illumination spirals should be observable. We suggest that spiral arms in the case-study transition disk HD 142527 could be explained as a result of shadowing from the tilted inner disk.

  13. Self-Consistent Models of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, David E.

    1994-02-01

    Self-consistent models of barred spiral galaxies based on the observed properties of NGC3992, NGC1073, and NGC1398 are constructed and analyzed. The method of model construction is a slight modification of the technique developed by Contopoulos and Grosbol for the case of unbarred spirals. The main factors which influence self-consistency are the amplitude, pitch angle, scale length and z-thickness of the spirals, the mass of the bar, the angular velocity of the bar/spiral pattern, the central surface density and scale length of the disk, and the central value and slope of the velocity dispersion. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie between the values at the Lagrange points L_1 and L_4 are found to play a significant role in supporting self-consistent spiral structure, especially in the regions just beyond the ends of the bar. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie below this interval tend to fill more or less uniformly either rings in the outer disk or ovals in the bar region, depending on the regions to which they are confined. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie above that of L_4 also tend not to support any imposed structure. The model bars are predominantly comprised of elongated orbits trapped around the x_1 family and terminate close to corotation. The response of gas to the forces of the most successful models is calculated using a two-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The results confirm that a bar alone is not sufficient to drive a strong spiral response in the gas of the outer disk. An underlying spiral structure in the more massive stellar component appears to be required. If stellar spirals are present, strong gas spirals may persist for long times. (SECTION: Dissertation Summaries)

  14. Self-consistent models of barred spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, David Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Self-consistent models of barred spiral galaxies based on the observed properties of NGC 3992, NGC 1073, and NGC 1398 are constructed and analyzed. The method of model construction is a slight modification of the technique developed by Contopoulos and Grosbol for the case of unbarred spirals. The main factors which influence self-consistency are the amplitude, pitch angle, scale length and z-thickness of the spirals, the mass of the bar, the angular velocity of the bar/spiral pattern, the central surface density and scale length of the disk, and the central value and slope of the velocity dispersion. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie between the values at the Lagrange points L1 and L4 are found to play a significant role in supporting self-consistent spiral structure, especially in the regions just beyond the ends of the bar. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie below this interval tend to fill more or less uniformly either rings in the outer disk or ovals in the bar region, depending on the regions to which they are confined. Stochastic orbits whose Jacobi constants lie above that of L4 also tend not to support any imposed structure. The model bars are predominantly comprised of elongated orbits trapped around the chi1 family and terminate close to corotation. The response of gas to the forces of the most successful models is calculated using a two-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The results confirm that a bar alone is not sufficient to drive a strong spiral response in the gas of the outer disk. An underlying spiral structure in the more massive stellar component appears to be required. If stellar spirals are present, strong gas spirals may persist for long times.

  15. Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, G. A.; Blanc, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of abundances in spiral galaxies of the Pegasus I cluster (cz = 4000 km/s), motivated by evidence for high interstellar abundances in the spirals of the Virgo cluster. Spectra of H II regions in six galaxies with a range of H I deficiency were obtained with the VIRUS-P integral field spectrograph on the 2.7-meter telescope at McDonald Observatory. The results suggest a pattern of higher abundances in more hydrogen deficient galaxies. This resembles the case for Virgo, despite the lower velocity dispersion and higher spiral fraction in the Pegasus cluster.

  16. Analysis of spiral-groove face seals for liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, W.; Walowit, J.; Jones, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses and predicted performance of a 50-mm diameter, spiral-groove face seal to seal liquid oxygen at 5.17 MPa pressure, and operating at surface speeds of 183 m/s are described. The pressure-balanced spiral-groove concept is introduced that circulates spiral-groove flow independent of leakage flow. Independent flow paths preclude overheating from vaporization and consequent flow blockage. The analysis accounts for fluid turbulence and inertia, thermoelastic distortions, and dynamic response. An operating-range map was developed as a function of speed and pressure. The fluid-film analysis is summarized in the Appendix.

  17. The spiral structure of the outer Milky Way in hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Levine, E S; Blitz, Leo; Heiles, Carl

    2006-06-23

    We produce a detailed map of the perturbed surface density of neutral hydrogen in the outer Milky Way disk, demonstrating that the Galaxy is a non-axisymmetric multiarmed spiral. Spiral structure in the southern half of the Galaxy can be traced out to at least 25 kiloparsecs, implying a minimum radius for the gas disk. Overdensities in the surface density are coincident with regions of reduced gas thickness. The ratio of the surface density to the local median surface density is relatively constant along an arm. Logarithmic spirals can be fit to the arms with pitch angles of 20 degrees to 25 degrees .

  18. Spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nessim; Williams, Ronald B; Yarmozik, June A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2014-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically determined heart muscle disease; characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Spiral HCM is described as having a counterclockwise rotation pattern of hypertrophy along with variable degrees of fibrosis. A 34-year-old female presented with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Echocardiography showed concentric LVH with normal contractility. Cardiac MRI showed asymmetric septal hypertrophy with mid-cavity obliteration and a spiral pattern of variably increasing wall thickness. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrated several areas of abnormal postgadolinium uptake. We report a case of spiral HCM. We should consider cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard for diagnosing HCM. PMID:24749165

  19. A Software Development Simulation Model of a Spiral Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for simulation models of software development processes other than the waterfall because processes such as spiral development are becoming more and more popular. The use of a spiral process can make the inherently difficult job of cost and schedule estimation even more challenging due to its evolutionary nature, but this allows for a more flexible process that can better meet customers' needs. This paper will present a discrete event simulation model of spiral development that can be used to analyze cost and schedule effects of using such a process in comparison to a waterfall process.

  20. Structure of spiral arm S6 in the Andromeda Nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, Y.N.

    1982-05-01

    The star distribution across spiral arm S6 in Baade's M31 field IV is investigated. The brightest stars congregate toward the arm midline, along which maximum star density also occurs. The symmetric structure of S6 may result from its being located near the corotation radius, as indicated by the spiral-pattern rotational velocity ..cap omega../sub p/roughly-equal10 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ derived from the Cepheid age gradient in S4. Arm S6 has features similar to the galactic spiral arms in the solar neighborhood.

  1. Dynamics in a Spiral FFAG with Tilted Cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.

    2007-12-20

    I develop a formulation for Hamiltonian dynamics in an accelerator with magnets whose edges follow a spiral. I demonstrate using this Hamiltonian that a spiral FFAG can be made perfectly 'scaling'. I describe how one computes the RF phase during a rapid acceleration cycle to keep the beam at the appropriate RF phase. I examine the effect of tilting an RF cavity with respect a radial line from the center of the machine, potentially with a different angle than the spiral of the magnets. I discuss partially the effects of the finite energy jumps on the dynamics. This is a status report of work that is still incomplete.

  2. LSO based dual slice helical CT and PET demonstrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valastyán, I.; Kerek, A.; Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Kalinka, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.

    2011-05-01

    Two demonstrators, a spiralCT and a miniPET, have been designed and constructed for educational purposes. Computed tomographs (CTs) and positron emission tomographs (PETs) are some of the most commonly used structural and functional imaging devices in medicine, respectively. There is a need for transparent demonstrators where the principles of the different modalities and their functions are presented. The aim of the developments of these systems was to present the major building blocks of CT and PET for undergraduate students. Photon detection in both systems is based on small pixelised scintillation crystals with position sensitive PMT readout. Similar analogue and digital data processing based on FPGA technique is applied for the demonstrators and common image reconstruction and presentation software components are used.

  3. Unenhanced CT in the evaluation of urinary calculi: application of advanced computer methods.

    PubMed

    Olcott, E W; Sommer, F G

    1999-04-01

    Recent advances in computer hardware and software technology enable radiologists to examine tissues and structures using three-dimensional figures constructed from the multiple planar images acquired during a spiral CT examination. Three-dimensional CT techniques permit the linear dimensions of renal calculi to be determined along all three coordinate axes with a high degree of accuracy and enable direct volumetric analysis of calculi, yielding information that is not available from any other diagnostic modality. Additionally, three-dimensional techniques can help to identify and localize calculi in patients with suspected urinary colic.

  4. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  5. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  6. CFD numerical simulation of Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wei, L.; Chang, B. H.; Xing, J. L.; Jia, K.

    2013-12-01

    For traditional linear type inlet, hydrocyclone has an unstable inner field, high turbulence intensity and low separation efficiency, this paper proposes an inlet mode that uses an Archimedes spiral hydrocyclone. A Mixture liquid-solid multiphase flow model combined with the kinetic theory of granular flow was used to simulate the high concentration water-sand-air three-phase flow in a hydrocyclone. We analyzed the pressure field, velocity field and turbulent kinetic energy and compared with traditional linear type inlet hydrocyclone inner field. The results show that Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone's pressure field is evenly distributed. The Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone can guide and accelerate the mixture flow and produce small forced vortex and less short circuit flow. The particles easily go to the outer vortex and are separated. The Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone has effectively improved the stability of inner flow field and separation efficiency.

  7. Focusing phenomenon and stability of spiral-flow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Kiyoshi; Matsumae, Yuji; Cheng, Xiao M.; Takei, Masahiro; Yasukawa, Eiji

    1991-02-01

    A new nozzle assembly has been developed for an improved focusing of spiral air jet streams. To obtain a focused and highly stable spiral-flow jet, a nozzle is designed with an annular slit connected to a conical cylinder. Pressurized fluid is forced through the sides of the device into the buffer area and then through the annular slit into the pipe entrance. The fluid, passing through the conical cylinder, develops a spiral structure with a steeper axial velocity distribution, caused by Coanda effect and the instability of flow. The jet stream velocity as well as its focusing phenomenon was experimentally determined using a laser sheet method. The results clearly indicate the focusing characteristic and the high stability of spiral flow jet.

  8. 15. April 1963 SPIRAL STAIRS AND EGGSHELL DORMER Shaker ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. April 1963 SPIRAL STAIRS AND EGG-SHELL DORMER - Shaker Centre Family Trustees' Office, South side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  9. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    PubMed

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  10. Topological Signatures in the Electronic Structure of Graphene Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Koskinen, Pekka; Sevinçli, Haldun; Popov, Alexey A.; Rocha, Claudia G.

    2013-01-01

    Topology is familiar mostly from mathematics, but also natural sciences have found its concepts useful. Those concepts have been used to explain several natural phenomena in biology and physics, and they are particularly relevant for the electronic structure description of topological insulators and graphene systems. Here, we introduce topologically distinct graphene forms - graphene spirals - and employ density-functional theory to investigate their geometric and electronic properties. We found that the spiral topology gives rise to an intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit splitting. Through a Hamiltonian constrained by space curvature, graphene spirals have topologically protected states due to time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we argue that the synthesis of such graphene spirals is feasible and can be achieved through advanced bottom-up experimental routes that we indicate in this work. PMID:23568379

  11. Spiral structures in the rotor-router walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoyan, Vl V.; Poghosyan, V. S.; Priezzhev, V. B.

    2016-04-01

    We study the rotor-router walk on the infinite square lattice with the outgoing edges at each lattice site ordered clockwise. In the previous paper (Papoyan et al 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 285203), we considered the loops created by rotors and labeled the sites where the loops become closed. The sequence of labels in the rotor-router walk was conjectured to form a spiral structure asymptotically obeying an Archimedean property. In the present paper, we select a subset of labels called ‘nodes’ and consider the spirals formed by them. The new spirals are directly related to tree-like structures, which represent the evolution of the cluster of vertices visited by the walk. We show that the average number of visits to the origin < {{n}0}(t)> by the moment t\\gg 1 is < {{n}0}(t)> =4< n(t)> +O(1) where < n(t)> is the average number of spiral rotations.

  12. Spiral formation at microscale by μ-pyro-electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, L.; Gennari, O.; Rega, R.; Grilli, S.; Bhowmick, S.; Gioffrè, M. A.; Coppola, G.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-05-01

    Spiral shapes occur frequently in nature, such as in case of snail shells or in case of the so-called cochlea, namely the auditory portion of the inner ear. They also inspire many technological devices that take advantage of this geometry. Here we show that μ-pyro electrospinning is able to control the whipping instabilities in order to form polymeric spirals directly onto the target support and with true regularity at microscale. The results show that the polymer concentration plays a key role in producing reliable and long spirals. We investigate the cell response to these spiral templates that, thanks to their true regularity, would be useful for developing innovative cochlea regeneration scaffolds.

  13. Fabrication of x-ray spiral masks by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; McMahon, Phillip J.; Paterson, David; Tran, Chanh Q.; Mancuso, Adrian; Mackin, Tracy R.; Hayes, Jason P.; Harvey, Erol C.; McNulty, Ian

    2002-11-01

    The manipulation of x-rays by phase structures is becoming more common through devices such as compound refractive lenses, blazed zone-plates and other structures. A spiral phase modulation structure can be used to condition an x-ray beam to produce an x-ray vortex. An x-ray beam in this form can be used as the first step towards a self-collimating beam. Also it can be used as a controllable pathological feature in studies of x-ray phase retrieval. We describe the microfabrication of a spiral phase modulation structure by excimer laser ablation. A multi-step fabrication using 15 separate chrome-on-quartz mask patterns is used to create a 16 step spiral staircase structure approximating the desired spiral ramp. The results of simulations and initial experimental results are presented.

  14. Equation for the Origin of Spiral Galactic Formation and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2012-03-01

    Already formed galactic arms existed in sets of two or more orbiting each other due to the Big Bang. As the orbits of the arms decayed due to gravitational attraction they attached in their fore sections tangentially accreting forming spiral galaxies which began to rotate due to the transformation of the orbital motion of the pre-galactic arms into the rotational motion of the newly formed spiral galaxy. If I1φ1, I2φ2, and Inφn are the angular momentums of the pre-galactic arms, and (Iφ)galaxy is the angular momentum of the newly formed spiral galaxy, the equation for the formation and origin of spiral galaxy rotation is I1φ1+ I2φ2+...+ Inφn= (Iφgalaxy).

  15. Twin Masks of Spiral Structure? A Local Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    We examine models for the spiral structure of the Milky Way proposed over the past half century. Many approaches have been pursued to decipher the geometry of the Galaxy's spiral arms, often with conflicting results. While a general consensus exists that a global pattern exists, considerable disagreement remains in the details. Arm geometries, orientations, and even the number of arms are still debated. Close examination of the literature reveals a clear division between four- and two-arm spiral arms. Four-arm models follow naturally from observations of classical tracers of spiral arms - enhanced gas densities and associated star formation - while two-arm models primarily flow from observations linked to the distribution of cool evolved stars. We examine the dichotomy between two-arm and four-arm models and discuss its implications.

  16. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations. PMID:23944539

  17. Chirality-induced spin current through spiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Hoshi, Koujiro; Ohe, Jun-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Spin-polarized current through helimagnets and the conductance modulation due to the chirality mismatch are studied numerically. The one-dimensional spiral magnet structure is obtained by taking into account the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the ferromagnetic interaction. Although the spiral magnetic structure consists of the y -z components of the magnetization, the conduction electron through the spiral magnet is polarized in the x direction, and its sign depends on the chirality of the spiral structure. We also investigate charge transport through the junction system consisting of two helimagnets. Similar to the giant magnetoresistance in the uniform ferromagnet, the conductance is reduced significantly by attaching the helimagnets with different chiralities. It is possible that our proposed mechanism can make use of the chirality measuring method by using electron transport and an alternative type of magnetoresistance using a topological property.

  18. Exterior, detail, showing spiral stair, looking northwest Beale Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, detail, showing spiral stair, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Guard Tower, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  20. A new planar feed for slot spiral antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurnberger, M. W.; Volakis, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a new planar, wideband feed network for a slot spiral antenna, and the subsequent design and performance of a VHF antenna utilizing this feed design. Both input impedance and radiation pattern measurements are presented to demonstrate the performance and usefulness of this feed. Almost all previous designs have utilized wire spirals, requiring bulky, non-planar feeds with separate baluns, and large absorbing cavities. The presented slot spiral antenna feed integrates the balun into the structure of the slot spiral antenna, making the antenna and feed planar. This greatly simplifies the design and construction of the antenna, in addition to providing repeatable accuracy. It also allows the use of a very shallow reflecting cavity for conformal applications. Finally, this feeding approach now makes many of the known miniaturization techniques viable options.

  1. In-plant testing of a compound spiral

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, R.G.; Toney, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Spirals have become almost universally applied to clean 14M x 100M size fine coal in the Eastern and Midwestern US coal fields. However, because the spirals separating performance can be affected by the raw-feed`s washability characteristics, as well as its particle shape and size, a simplex coal spiral represents one of the simpler units in a coal-cleaning plant, its visual simplicity belies the complexity typically encountered in performing a test program on the unit installed in a plant. This paper describes the testing approach used by Cyprus Amax and Krebs Engineers to test a duplex compound spiral at Cyprus Amax`s Lady Dunn Plant in West Virginia.

  2. VIEW FROM THE GENERATOR FLOOR LOOKING DOWN AT THE SPIRAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM THE GENERATOR FLOOR LOOKING DOWN AT THE SPIRAL DISTRIBUTOR AND DRAFT CONE. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Turbine & Generator Unit, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  3. Data Fusion Tool for Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Antolick, Lance J.; Branning, Jeremy S.; Thomas, Josiah

    2014-01-01

    Tests were performed on two spiral bevel gear sets in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig to simulate the fielded failures of spiral bevel gears installed in a helicopter. Gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed on two or more gear or pinion teeth. During testing, gear health monitoring data was collected with two different health monitoring systems. Operational parameters were measured with a third data acquisition system. Tooth damage progression was documented with photographs taken at inspection intervals throughout the test. A software tool was developed for fusing the operational data and the vibration based gear condition indicator (CI) data collected from the two health monitoring systems. Results of this study illustrate the benefits of combining the data from all three systems to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears. The tool also enabled evaluation of the effectiveness of each CI with respect to operational conditions and fault mode.

  4. Ultraminiature broadband light source with spiral shaped filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Collura, Joseph S. (Inventor); Helvajian, Henry (Inventor); Pocha, Michael D. (Inventor); Meyer, Glenn A. (Inventor); McConaghy, Charles F. (Inventor); Olsen, Barry L. (Inventor); Hansen, William W (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An ultraminiature light source using a double-spiral shaped tungsten filament includes end contact portions which are separated to allow for radial and length-wise unwinding of the spiral. The double-spiral filament is spaced relatively far apart at the end portions thereof so that contact between portions of the filament upon expansion is avoided. The light source is made by fabricating a double-spiral ultraminiature tungsten filament from tungsten foil and housing the filament in a ceramic package having a reflective bottom and a well wherein the filament is suspended. A vacuum furnace brazing process attaches the filament to contacts of the ceramic package. Finally, a cover with a transparent window is attached onto the top of the ceramic package by solder reflow in a second vacuum furnace process to form a complete hermetically sealed package.

  5. Discovery of a low-luminosity spiral DRAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Clarke, A. O.; Babazaki, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Suganuma, R.; Matsumoto, H.; Tawara, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Standard galaxy formation models predict that large-scale double-lobed radio sources, known as DRAGNs, will always be hosted by elliptical galaxies. In spite of this, in recent years a small number of spiral galaxies have also been found to host such sources. These so-called spiral DRAGNs are still extremely rare, with only 5 cases being widely accepted. Here we report on the serendipitous discovery of a new spiral DRAGN in data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 322 MHz. The host galaxy, MCG+07-47-10, is a face-on late-type Sbc galaxy with distinctive spiral arms and prominent bulge suggesting a high black hole mass. Using WISE infra-red and GALEX UV data we show that this galaxy has a star formation rate of 0.16-0.75 M⊙ yr-1, and that the radio luminosity is dominated by star-formation. We demonstrate that this spiral DRAGN has similar environmental properties to others of this class, but has a comparatively low radio luminosity of L1.4 GHz = 1.12 × 1022 W Hz-1, two orders of magnitude smaller than other known spiral DRAGNs. We suggest that this may indicate the existence of a previously unknown low-luminosity population of spiral DRAGNS. FITS cutout image of the observed spiral DRAGN MCG+07-47- 10 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/L8

  6. Period Tripling Causes Rotating Spirals in Agitated Wet Granular Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Rehberg, Ingo

    2011-07-01

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  7. Status of the SPIRAL I upgrade at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, P.; Bajeat, O.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Feierstein, C.; Pellemoine, F.; Lecomte, P.; Leherissier, P.; Maunoury, L.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Traykov, E.

    2012-02-15

    The upgrade of the ''Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs en Ligne'' phase I (SPIRAL I) installed at the ''Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds'' (GANIL) situated at Caen, France, is in progress and should be ready by 2014. In parallel, the first part of SPIRAL II facility is currently under construction. The global status of the upgrade is presented: goal, radioactive ion production systems, modification of the production cave and impact of the current safety re-evaluation of GANIL.

  8. Ideal spiral bevel gears: A new approach to surface geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental geometrical characteristics of spiral bevel gear tooth surfaces are discussed. The parametric representation of an ideal spiral bevel tooth is developed based on the elements of involute geometry, differential geometry, and fundamental gearing kinematics. A foundation is provided for the study of nonideal gears and the effects of deviations from ideal geometry on the contact stresses, lubrication, wear, fatigue life, and gearing kinematics.

  9. Ideal spiral bevel gears - A new approach to surface geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental geometrical characteristics of spiral bevel gear tooth surfaces. The parametric representation of an ideal spiral bevel tooth is developed. The development is based on the elements of involute geometry, differential geometry, and fundamental gearing kinematics. A foundation is provided for the study of nonideal gears and the effects of deviations from ideal geometry on the contact stresses, lubrication, wear, fatigue life, and gearing kinematics.

  10. When the UV Unveils the Largest Spiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, D. F.; Urrutia-Viscarra, F.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Dwek, E.

    2013-01-01

    We used archival data GALEX (FUV and NUV), VLT (UBVRI), 2MASS (J,H,K), and Spitzer (IRAC) to investigate the nature of the giant spiral galaxy, NGC 6872, 65 Mpc away. It belongs to the southern Pavo group and is interacting with a small lenticular galaxy, IC4970. GALEX UV images show a very large part of the galaxy not seen before, making it one of the largest spiral galaxies known, with physical size greater than 150 kpc. We have convolved all the images to the same 5.3” FHWM spatial resolution, reprojected them to the same astrometric grid (pixel size of 1.0”) and obtained SED for each pixel. Photometry was performed across the galaxy in circular apertures with diameters of 32”(or 10 kpc at 65 Mpc). When the SEDs are normalized by the 4.5 micron fluxes, the FUV and NUV fluxes span a wide range of a thousand, while the main properties of the normalized SEDs are almost unchanged from the R band to 4.5 micron. We also find an intriguing symmetry between regions in the southwestern and the northeastern arms having nearly identical SEDs. Furthermore, we estimated the metallicity of 12 areas using multi-object spectra taken with Gemini GMOS and we find no clear signature of metallicity gradient, trend supported by numerical simulations (Rupke el at. 2010). As proposed by Mihos et al. (1993) and Horellou & Koribalski (2007), NGC 6872 suffered a major collision with IC 4970 around 130 Myr ago. Our results are consistent with a global mixing of the pre-collision stellar population all over the disk of NGC 6872 at the epoch of the collision and a consequent star formation propagation to the outskirts of the galaxy. This mixing may have contributed to triggering star formation, in agreement with what was predicted by Bastian et al. (2005). The last 40kpc of the northeastern arm is UV-brighter than any region in the other arm, having the youngest population and least contamination of pre-collision stars thrown there by the encounter. There is also a strong UV source at

  11. Gas Ejection from Spiral Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durelle, Jeremy

    We present the results of three proposed mechanisms for ejection of gas from a spiral arm into the halo. The mechanisms were modelled using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) as a theoretical template. Each mechanism was run through simulations using a Fortran code: ZEUS-3D, an MHD equation solver. The first mechanism modelled the gas dynamics with a modified Hartmann flow which describes the fluid flow between two parallel plates. We initialized the problem based on observation of lagging halos; that is, that the rotational velocity falls to a zero at some height above the plane of the disk. When adopting a density profile which takes into account the various warm and cold H I and HII molecular clouds, the system evolves very strangely and does not reproduce the steady velocity gradient observed in edge-on galaxies. This density profile, adopted from Martos and Cox (1998), was used in the remaining models. However, when treating a system with a uniform density profile, a stable simulation can result. Next we considered supernova (SN) blasts as a possible mechanism for gas ejection. While a single SN was shown to be insufficient to promote vertical gas structures from the disk, multiple SN explosions proved to be enough to promote gas ejection from the disk. In these simulations, gas ejected to a height of 0.5 kpc at a velocity of 130 km s--1 from 500 supernovae, extending to an approximate maximum height of 1 kpc at a velocity of 6.7 x 103 km s--1 from 1500 supernovae after 0.15 Myr, the approximate time of propagation of a supernova shock wave. Finally, we simulated gas flowing into the spiral arm at such a speed to promote a jump in the disk gas, termed a hydraulic jump. The height of the jump was found to be slightly less than a kiloparsec with a flow velocity of 41 km s--1 into the halo after 167 Myr. The latter models proved to be effective mechanisms through which gas is ejected from the disk whereas the Hartmann flow (or toy model) mechanism remains unclear as the

  12. Spiral instabilities in media supporting complex oscillations under periodic forcing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingyu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Kailong; Epstein, Irving R

    2009-09-01

    The periodically forced Brusselator model displays temporal mixed-mode and quasiperiodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. We explore the behavior of such media as reaction-diffusion systems for investigating spiral instabilities. Besides near-core breakup and far-field breakup resulting from unstable modes in the radial direction or Doppler-induced instability (destabilization of the core's location), the observed complex phenomena include backfiring, spiral regeneration, and amplitude modulation from line defects. Amplitude modulation of spirals can evolve to chambered spirals resembling those found in nature, such as pine cones and sunflowers. When the forcing amplitude is increased, the spiral-tip meander evolves from simple rotation to complex petals, corresponding to transformation of the local dynamics from simple oscillations to mixed-mode, period-2, and quasiperiodic oscillations. The number of petals is related to the complexity of the mixed-mode oscillations. Spiral turbulence, standing waves, and homogeneous synchronization permeate the entire system when the forcing amplitude is further increased. PMID:19792014

  13. Solidification modeling of a spiral casting to determine material fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Grabel, J.V.

    1994-02-01

    In casting, fluidity is the measure of the distance a metal can flow in a channel before being stopped by solidification. During mold filling, the metal loses heat to the surrounding mold, thereby cooling and becoming more viscous until the leading portion solidifies and no further flow is possible. A coupled heat-transfer and fluid-flow modeling of a spiral, involving the use of thermophysical properties to determine material fluidity, has been conducted. Fluidity experiments were performed by Caterpillar; several spiral test castings were poured. Simulations of these experiments utilized the Casting Process Simulator (CaPS) software developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Two types of spiral geometries with different assumptions were considered: (1) a two-dimensional laterally stretched spiral and (2) a three-dimensional lateral spiral.The computed extent of mold filling is in good agreement with the experimental results. Time required by the metal/gas interface to attain specific positions in the spiral arm also compared favorably with the experimental results. The influence of process variables, especially pour time, is discussed. The CaPS software has been used as a computational tool to investigate the validity of the dimensionality assumptions and to evaluate the ability of CaPS to model fluidity adequately.

  14. Solidification modeling of a spiral casting to determine material fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Grabel, J.V.

    1993-11-01

    In casting, fluidity is the measure of the distance a metal can flow in a channel before being stopped by solidification. During mold filling, the metal loses heat to the surrounding mold, thereby cooling and becoming more viscous until the leading portion solidifies and no further flow is possible. A coupled heat-transfer and fluid-flow modeling of a spiral, involving the use of thermophysical properties to determine material fluidity, has been conducted. Fluidity experiments were performed by Caterpillar; several spiral test castings were poured. Simulations of these experiments utilized the Casting Process Simulator (CAPS) software developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Two types of two dimensional spiral geometries with different assumptions were considered: (1) a 2-D laterally stretched spiral and (2) a 3-D lateral spiral. Computed mold filling is in good agreement with experiment. Time required by metal/gas interface to attain specific positions in the spiral arm also compares favorably with the experiment. Influence of process variables, especially pour time, is discussed. CAPS software was used to investigate validity of dimensionality assumptions and to evaluate ability of CAPS to model fluidity adequately.

  15. Stellar spiral structures in triaxial dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaoran; Sijacki, Debora

    2016-09-01

    We employ very high resolution simulations of isolated Milky Way-like galaxies to study the effect of triaxial dark matter haloes on exponential stellar discs. Non-adiabatic halo shape changes can trigger two-armed grand-design spiral structures which extend all the way to the edge of the disc. Their pattern speed coincides with the inner Lindblad resonance indicating that they are kinematic density waves which can persist up to several Gyr. In dynamically cold discs, grand-design spirals are swing amplified and after a few Gyr can lead to the formation of (multi-armed) transient recurrent spirals. Stellar discs misaligned to the principal planes of the host triaxial halo develop characteristic integral shaped warps, but otherwise exhibit very similar spiral structures as aligned discs. For the grand-design spirals in our simulations, their strength dependence with radius is determined by the torque on the disc, suggesting that by studying grand-design spirals without bars it may be possible to set constraints on the tidal field and host dark matter halo shape.

  16. Spiral instabilities in media supporting complex oscillations under periodic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qingyu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Kailong; Epstein, Irving R.

    2009-09-01

    The periodically forced Brusselator model displays temporal mixed-mode and quasiperiodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. We explore the behavior of such media as reaction-diffusion systems for investigating spiral instabilities. Besides near-core breakup and far-field breakup resulting from unstable modes in the radial direction or Doppler-induced instability (destabilization of the core's location), the observed complex phenomena include backfiring, spiral regeneration, and amplitude modulation from line defects. Amplitude modulation of spirals can evolve to chambered spirals resembling those found in nature, such as pine cones and sunflowers. When the forcing amplitude is increased, the spiral-tip meander evolves from simple rotation to complex petals, corresponding to transformation of the local dynamics from simple oscillations to mixed-mode, period-2, and quasiperiodic oscillations. The number of petals is related to the complexity of the mixed-mode oscillations. Spiral turbulence, standing waves, and homogeneous synchronization permeate the entire system when the forcing amplitude is further increased.

  17. Magnetic field evolution and reversals in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Price, D. J.; Pettitt, A. R.; Bate, M. R.; Tricco, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the evolution of galactic magnetic fields using 3D smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of galaxies with an imposed spiral potential. We consider the appearance of reversals of the field, and amplification of the field. We find that magnetic field reversals occur when the velocity jump across the spiral shock is above ≈20 km s-1, occurring where the velocity change is highest, typically at the inner Lindblad resonance in our models. Reversals also occur at corotation, where the direction of the velocity field reverses in the corotating frame of a spiral arm. They occur earlier with a stronger amplitude spiral potential, and later or not at all with weaker or no spiral arms. The presence of a reversal at radii of around 4-6 kpc in our fiducial model is consistent with a reversal identified in the Milky Way, though we caution that alternative Galaxy models could give a similar reversal. We find that relatively high resolution, a few million particles in SPMHD, is required to produce consistent behaviour of the magnetic field. Amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the models, and while some may be genuinely attributable to differential rotation or spiral arms, some may be a numerical artefact. We check our results using ATHENA, finding reversals but less amplification of the field, suggesting that some of the amplification of the field with SPMHD is numerical.

  18. Mechanics and spiral formation in the rat cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Nejad, T; Iannaccone, S; Rutherford, W; Iannaccone, P M; Foster, C D

    2015-01-01

    During the maturation of some mammals such as mice and rats, corneal epithelial cells tend to develop into patterns such as spirals over time. A better understanding of these patterns can help to understand how the organ develops and may give insight into some of the diseases affecting corneal development. In this paper, a framework for explaining the development of the epithelial cells forming spiral patterns due to the effect of tensile and shear strains is proposed. Using chimeric animals, made by combining embryonic cells from genetically distinguishable strains, we can observe the development of patterns in the cornea. Aggregates of cell progeny from one strain or the other called patches form as organs and tissue develop. The boundaries of these patches are fitted with logarithmic spirals on confocal images of adult rat corneas. To compare with observed patterns, we develop a three-dimensional large strain finite element model for the rat cornea under intraocular pressure to examine the strain distribution on the cornea surface. The model includes the effects of oriented and dispersed fibrils families throughout the cornea and a nearly incompressible matrix. Tracing the directions of critical strain vectors on the cornea surface leads to spiral-like curves that are compared to the observed logarithmic spirals. Good agreement between the observed and numerical curves supports the proposed assumption that shear and tensile strains facilitate sliding of epithelial cells to develop spiral patterns. PMID:24897951

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPIRAL ARMS IN LATE-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, Z. N.; Reid, M. J.

    2015-02-10

    We have measured the positions of large numbers of H II regions in four nearly face-on, late-type, spiral galaxies: NGC 628 (M74), NGC 1232, NGC 3184, and NGC 5194 (M51). Fitting log-periodic spiral models to segments of each arm yields local estimates of spiral pitch angle and arm width. While pitch angles vary considerably along individual arms, among arms within a galaxy, and among galaxies, we find no systematic trend with galactocentric distance. We estimate the widths of the arm segments from the scatter in the distances of the H II regions from the spiral model. All major arms in these galaxies show spiral arm width increasing with distance from the galactic center, similar to the trend seen in the Milky Way. However, in the outermost parts of the galaxies, where massive star formation declines, some arms reverse this trend and narrow. We find that spiral arms often appear to be composed of segments of ∼5 kpc length, which join to form kinks and abrupt changes in pitch angle and arm width; these characteristics are consistent with properties seen in the large N-body simulations of D'Onghia et al. and others.

  20. SPIRAL FLOWS IN COOL-CORE GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Keshet, Uri

    2012-07-10

    We argue that bulk spiral flows are ubiquitous in the cool cores (CCs) of clusters and groups of galaxies. Such flows are gauged by spiral features in the thermal and chemical properties of the intracluster medium, by the multiphase properties of CCs, and by X-ray edges known as cold fronts. We analytically show that observations of piecewise-spiral fronts impose strong constraints on the CC, implying the presence of a cold, fast flow, which propagates below a hot, slow inflow, separated by a slowly rotating, trailing, quasi-spiral, tangential discontinuity surface. This leads to the nearly logarithmic spiral pattern, two-phase plasma, {rho} {approx} r{sup -1} density (or T {approx} r{sup 0.4} temperature) radial profile, and {approx}100 kpc size, characteristic of CCs. By advecting heat and mixing the gas, such flows can eliminate the cooling problem, provided that a feedback mechanism regulates the flow. In particular, we present a quasi-steady-state model for an accretion-quenched, composite flow, in which the fast phase is an outflow, regulated by active galactic nucleus bubbles, reproducing the observed low star formation rates and explaining some features of bubbles such as their R{sub b} {proportional_to}r size. The simplest two-component model reproduces several key properties of CCs, so we propose that all such cores harbor a spiral flow. Our results can be tested directly in the next few years, for example by ASTRO-H.

  1. SNOMED CT in pathology.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Daniel, Christel; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2012-01-01

    Pathology information systems have been using SNOMED II for many years, and in most cases, they are in a migration process to SNOMED CT. COST Action IC0604 (EURO-TELEPATH) has considered terminology normalization one of its strategic objectives. This paper reviews the use of SNOMED CT in healthcare, with a special focus in pathology. Nowadays, SNOMED CT is mainly used for concept search and coding of clinical data. Some ontological errors found in SNOMED CT are described. The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has fostered the use of SNOMED CT, also in Pathology, as recommended in the Supplement Anatomic Pathology Structured Reports of the IHE Anatomic Pathology Technical Framework. Rule governing concept post-coordination is also described. Some recent initiatives are trying to define a SNOMED CT subset for Pathology. The Spanish Society of Pathology has defined a subset for specimens and procedures in Pathology. Regarding diagnosis coding, the morphological abnormality sub-hierarchy of SNOMED CT need to be significantly extended and improved to become useful for pathologists. A consensus is needed to encode pathology reports with the adequate hierarchies and concepts. This will make the implementation of pathology structured reports more feasible.

  2. Mapping IR Enhancements in Closely Interacting Spiral-Spiral Pairs: I. ISO CAM and ISO SWS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.; Gao, Y.; Mazzarella, J.; Lu, N.; Sulentic, J.; Domingue, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging and spectroscopic observations are presented for a well defined sample of eight closely interacting (CLO) pairs of spiral galaxies that have overlapping disks and show enhanced far-infrared (FIR) emission.

  3. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  4. Chemical evolution in spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of models of chemical evolution of the interstellar medium in our galaxy and other galaxies is presented. These models predict the time variation and radial dependence of chemical composition in the gas as function of the input parameters; initial mass function, stellar birth rate, chemical composition of mass lost by stars during their evolution (yields), and the existence of large scale mass flows, like infall from the halo, outflow to the intergalactic medium or radial flows within a galaxy. At present there is a considerable wealth of observational data on the composition of HII regions in spiral and irregular galaxies to constrain the models. Comparisons are made between theory and the observed physical conditions. In particular, studies of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are reviewed. In many molecular clouds the information we have on the amount of H2 is derived from the observed CO column density, and a standard CO/H2 ratio derived for the solar neighborhood. Chemical evolution models and the observed variations in O/H and N/O values, point out the need to include these results in a CO/H2 relation that should be, at least, a function of the O/H ratio. This aspect is also discussed.

  5. Analytical modeling of orthogonal spiral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Auteliano A.; Hobeck, Jared D.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the analytical modeling of orthogonal spiral structures (OSS), a promising option for small-scale energy harvesting applications. This unique multi-beam structure is analyzed using a distributed parameter approach with Euler–Bernoulli assumptions. First, an aluminum substrate is evaluated to determine if the proposed design can be used to capture vibration energy in the desired frequency range using a twelve beam OSS. Finite element calculations are used to validate the analytical model. This model is then modified to include the electromechanical effects of a piezoelectric layer added to the aluminum substrate. Lastly, the effects of the beam width and the number of beams is analyzed for a particular surface area of the OSS. Results show that increasing the number of beams causes a reduction in the first natural frequency. From those results, it is possible to conclude that OSS can be used as an alternative to current energy harvesting systems for MEMS applications, allowing the capture of environmental energy in the frequency range of common mechanical systems.

  6. Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzik, P.

    2007-05-15

    In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

  7. Spiralizations and tropisms in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, F; Piconese, S

    2001-12-01

    When Arabidopsis seedlings are grown on a hard-agar plate, their primary roots show characteristic spiralling movements, apparent as waves, coils and torsions, together with a slanting toward the right-hand side. All these movements are believed to be the result of three different processes acting on the roots: circumnutation, positive gravitropism and negative thigmotropism. The basic movement of the roots is described as that of a growing right-handed helix, which, because of the root tip hitting the agar plate, is continuously switched from the right-hand to the left-hand of the growth direction, and vice versa. This movement also produces a slanting root-growth direction toward the right-hand because of the incomplete waves made by the right-handed root to the left-hand. By contrast, the torsions seen in the coils and waves are interpreted as artefacts that form as an adaptation of the three-dimensional root helix to the flat two-dimensional agar surface.

  8. The Nineteenth-Century Spiral Nebula Whodunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of the first spiral nebula was a milestone in the history of astronomy, but the initial observations of it are shrouded in mystery. The discovery came within months of the commissioning of the Third Earl of Rosse’s very large 72-inch optical telescope at Birr Castle in the center of Ireland. Unfortunately, no observing records have survived, and while there is no doubt that the observations took place in the spring of 1845, there is some uncertainty as to whom was actually present when the discovery was made. The construction of the Earl’s telescope (the Leviathan) was a magnificent achievement, since it was entirely of his design, built with his own funds, and constructed by his own workers who were literally taken “from the plough” on his estate. The summer of 1845 saw the first appearance of the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1848, which would seriously curtail astronomical activity when Lord Rosse’s 72-inch telescope was in prime condition.

  9. The Hot Gaseous Halos of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, J.

    2016-06-01

    In the Milky Way, absorption and emission line measurements of O VII and O VIII show that the halo environment is dominated by a nearly spherical halo of temperature 2 × 10^6 K, metallicity of 0.3-0.5 solar, and with a density decreasing as r^{-3/2}. The mass of the hot gas, estimated through extrapolation to the virial radius, is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing mass. The Milky Way hot halo appears to be rotating at about 180 km/s, which is consistent with model expectations, depending on the time of infall. Around massive spiral galaxies, hot halos are seen in emission out to about 70 kpc in the best cases. These show similar gas density laws and metallicities in the range 0.1-0.5 solar. The gas mass is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing baryons within the virial radius. If the density law can be extrapolated to about three virial radii, the missing baryons would be accounted for.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About ...

  12. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... creates detailed pictures of the body, including the pelvis and areas near the pelvis. The test may ...

  13. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  14. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  15. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  16. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  17. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-08-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterizes spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterizes spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  18. Engineering aperiodic spiral order for photonic-plasmonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevino, Jacob Timothy

    Deterministic arrays of metal (i.e., Au) nanoparticles and dielectric nanopillars (i.e., Si and SiN) arranged in aperiodic spiral geometries (Vogel's spirals) are proposed as a novel platform for engineering enhanced photonic-plasmonic coupling and increased light-matter interaction over broad frequency and angular spectra for planar optical devices. Vogel's spirals lack both translational and orientational symmetry in real space, while displaying continuous circular symmetry (i.e., rotational symmetry of infinite order) in reciprocal Fourier space. The novel regime of "circular multiple light scattering" in finite-size deterministic structures will be investigated. The distinctive geometrical structure of Vogel spirals will be studied by a multifractal analysis, Fourier-Bessel decomposition, and Delaunay tessellation methods, leading to spiral structure optimization for novel localized optical states with broadband fluctuations in their photonic mode density. Experimentally, a number of designed passive and active spiral structures will be fabricated and characterized using dark-field optical spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and Fourier space imaging. Polarization-insensitive planar omnidirectional diffraction will be demonstrated and engineered over a large and controllable range of frequencies. Device applications to enhanced LEDs, novel lasers, and thin-film solar cells with enhanced absorption will be specifically targeted. Additionally, using Vogel spirals we investigate the direct (i.e. free space) generation of optical vortices, with well-defined and controllable values of orbital angular momentum, paving the way to the engineering and control of novel types of phase discontinuities (i.e., phase dislocation loops) in compact, chip-scale optical devices. Finally, we report on the design, modeling, and experimental demonstration of array-enhanced nanoantennas for polarization-controlled multispectral nanofocusing, nanoantennas for resonant near-field optical

  19. The Globular Cluster System of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 7814

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2003-11-01

    We present the results of a wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system of the edge-on Sab spiral NGC 7814. This is the first spiral to be fully analyzed from our survey of the GC systems of a large sample of galaxies beyond the Local Group. NGC 7814 is of particular interest because a previous study estimated that it has 500-1000 GCs, giving it the largest specific frequency (SN) known for a spiral. Understanding this galaxy's GC system is important in terms of our understanding of the GC populations of spirals in general and has implications for the formation of massive galaxies. We observed the galaxy in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and used image classification and three-color photometry to select GC candidates. We also analyzed archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of NGC 7814, both to help quantify the contamination level of the WIYN GC candidate list and to detect GCs in the inner part of the galaxy halo. Combining HST data with high-quality ground-based images allows us to trace the entire radial extent of this galaxy's GC system and determine the total number of GCs directly through observation. We find that rather than being an especially high-SN spiral, NGC 7814 has <~200 GCs and SN~1, making it comparable to the two most well-studied spiral galaxies, the Milky Way and M31. We explore the implications of these results for models of the formation of galaxies and their GC systems. The initial results from our survey suggest that the GC systems of typical elliptical galaxies can be accounted for by the merger of two or more spirals, but that for highly luminous elliptical galaxies, additional physical processes may be needed.

  20. Clear New View of a Classic Spiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    ESO is releasing a beautiful image of the nearby galaxy Messier 83 taken by the HAWK-I instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The picture shows the galaxy in infrared light and demonstrates the impressive power of the camera to create one of the sharpest and most detailed pictures of Messier 83 ever taken from the ground. The galaxy Messier 83 (eso0825) is located about 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (the Sea Serpent). It spans over 40 000 light-years, only 40 percent the size of the Milky Way, but in many ways is quite similar to our home galaxy, both in its spiral shape and the presence of a bar of stars across its centre. Messier 83 is famous among astronomers for its many supernovae: vast explosions that end the lives of some stars. Over the last century, six supernovae have been observed in Messier 83 - a record number that is matched by only one other galaxy. Even without supernovae, Messier 83 is one of the brightest nearby galaxies, visible using just binoculars. Messier 83 has been observed in the infrared part of the spectrum using HAWK-I [1], a powerful camera on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). When viewed in infrared light most of the obscuring dust that hides much of Messier 83 becomes transparent. The brightly lit gas around hot young stars in the spiral arms is also less prominent in infrared pictures. As a result much more of the structure of the galaxy and the vast hordes of its constituent stars can be seen. This clear view is important for astronomers looking for clusters of young stars, especially those hidden in dusty regions of the galaxy. Studying such star clusters was one of the main scientific goals of these observations [2]. When compared to earlier images, the acute vision of HAWK-I reveals far more stars within the galaxy. The combination of the huge mirror of the VLT, the large field of view and great sensitivity of the camera, and the superb observing conditions

  1. Characterizing Spiral Arm and Interarm Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Groves, B.; Adamo, A.; Hughes, A.; Meidt, S.

    2016-08-01

    Interarm star formation contributes significantly to a galaxy’s star formation budget and provides an opportunity to study stellar birthplaces unperturbed by spiral arm dynamics. Using optical integral field spectroscopy of the nearby galaxy NGC 628 with VLT/MUSE, we construct Hα maps including detailed corrections for dust extinction and stellar absorption to identify 391 H ii regions at 35 pc resolution over 12 kpc2. Using tracers sensitive to the underlying gravitational potential, we associate H ii regions with either arm (271) or interarm (120) environments. Using our full spectral coverage of each region, we find that most physical properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) of H ii regions are independent of environment. We calculate the fraction of Hα luminosity due to the background of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contaminating each H ii region, and find the DIG surface brightness to be higher within H ii regions than in the surroundings, and slightly higher within arm H ii regions. Use of the temperature-sensitive [S ii]/Hα line ratio instead of the Hα surface brightness to identify the boundaries of H ii regions does not change this result. Using the dust attenuation as a tracer of the gas, we find depletion times consistent with previous work (2 × 109 yr) with no differences between the arm and interarm, but this is very sensitive to the DIG correction. Unlike molecular clouds, which can be dynamically affected by the galactic environment, we see fairly consistent properties of H ii regions in both arm and interarm environments. This suggests either a difference in star formation and feedback in arms or a decoupling of dense star-forming clumps from the more extended surrounding molecular gas.

  2. Core solutions of rigidly rotating spiral waves in highly excitable media.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Chun; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Analytical spiral wave solutions for reaction-diffusion equations play an important role in studying spiral wave dynamics. In this paper, we focus on such analytical solutions in the case of highly excitable media. We present numerical evidence that, for rigidly rotating spiral waves in highly excitable media, the species values in the spiral core region do harmonic oscillations but not relaxation ones, and their amplitudes grow linearly with the distance from the rotation center. An analytical solution is proposed to describe such spiral wave dynamics, and the quantitative comparisons between the numerical results and the analytical solutions show that the proposed spiral core solution works well in highly excitable media. PMID:25353558

  3. CT angiography - arms and legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 6th ed. ...

  4. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  5. An alternative view of flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, D. S. L.

    1992-04-01

    The present view of flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies relies upon the necessity of a dark mass component to push up the predicted declining portion of the rotation curve, that arises when the galaxy luminous matter and mass to light ratios similar to the ones in the solar neighbourhood are combined. Mass to light ratios obtained from binary galaxy studies are about ten times as large as the values currently assumed for spiral galaxies (Schweizer, 1987; Soares, 1989). Considering them as the real M/L for spiral galaxies, it implies that the Keplerian rotation curve derived by the combination of these M/L values and the luminous matter distribution of a spiral galaxy lies above observed rotational profiles. Here the author argues that a more convincing and coherent approach is to search for the physical processes responsible for pulling down such a predicted rotation curve to the observed levels. Accordingly, a toy model is proposed based on the existence of significant buoyancy forces in the gaseous disk of spiral galaxies. The model has a plausible phenomenological counterpart, and predicts a wide range of rotation curve shapes including flat ones.

  6. Continuing research on the classical spiraling photon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongrui

    2014-11-01

    Based no the classical spiraling photon model proposed by Hongrui Li, the laws of reflection, refraction of a single photon can be derived. Moreover, the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon can be elucidated. However, this photon model is still unfinished. Especially, the spiraling diameter of a photon is not definite. In this paper, the continuous research works on this new theory are reported. According to the facts that the diffraction limit of light and the smallest diameter of the focal spot of lenses are all equal to the wavelength λ of the light, we can get that the spiraling diameter of a photon equals to the wavelength λ, so we gain that the angle between the linear velocity of the spiraling photon υ and the component of the linear velocity in the forward direction υb is 45°, and the energy of a classical spiraling photon E = (1/2)mυ2 = (1/2)m2c2 = mc2. This coincides with Einstein's mass-energy relation. While it is obtained that the velocity of the evanescent wave in the vacuum is slower than the velocity of light in glass in straight line. In such a way, the optical fiber can slow the light down. In addition, the force analysis of a single photon in optical tweezers system is discussed. And the reason that the laser beam can capture the particle slightly downstream from the focal point can be explained.

  7. Gas and stellar spiral structures in tidally perturbed disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies and low-mass companions are an established method for generating galactic spiral features. In this work, we present a study of the structure and dynamics of spiral arms driven in interactions between disc galaxies and perturbing companions in 3D N-body/smoothed hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Our specific aims are to characterize any differences between structures formed in the gas and stars from a purely hydrodynamical and gravitational perspective, and to find a limiting case for spiral structure generation. Through analysis of a number of different interacting cases, we find that there is very little difference between arm morphology, pitch angles and pattern speeds between the two media. The main differences are a minor offset between gas and stellar arms, clear spurring features in gaseous arms, and different radial migration of material in the stronger interacting cases. We investigate the minimum mass of a companion required to drive spiral structure in a galactic disc, finding the limiting spiral generation cases with companion masses of the order of 1 × 109 M⊙, equivalent to only 4 per cent of the stellar disc mass, or 0.5 per cent of the total galactic mass of a Milky Way analogue.

  8. Morphologies introduced by bistability in barred-spiral galactic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridi, L.; Patsis, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of a barred-spiral model when the system is rotating slowly and corotation is located beyond the end of the spiral arms. In the characteristic of the central family of periodic orbits, we find a `bistable region'. In the response model, we observe a ring surrounding the bar and spiral arms starting tangential to the ring. This is a morphology resembling barred-spiral systems with inner rings. However, the dynamics associated with this structure in the case we study is different from that of a typical bar ending close to corotation. The ring of our model is round, or rather elongated perpendicular to the bar. It is associated with a folding (an `S'-shaped feature) of the characteristic of the central family, which is typical in bistable bifurcations. Along the `S' part of the characteristic, we have a change in the orientation of the periodic orbits from an x1-type to an x2-type morphology. The orbits populated in the response model change rather abruptly their orientation when reaching the lowest energy of the `S'. The spirals of the model follow a standard `precessing ellipses flow' and the orbits building them have energies beyond the `S' region. The bar is structured mainly by sticky orbits from regions around the stability islands of the central family. This leads to the appearance of X features in the bars on the galactic plane. Such a bar morphology appears in the unsharp-masked images of some moderately inclined galaxies.

  9. Spirals in the Heart Muscle- From Ventricular Tachycardia to Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    1997-03-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is an often fatal cardiac arrhythmia. It is associated with the sudden onset of a spatiotemporally disorganised electrical wave activity that destroys the main pumping function of the ventricular muscle. In a healthy heart, VF is preceded by a brief period of ventricular tachycardia (VT), a rapid contraction of the heart muscle which decays into VF in a few seconds. Over the last few years, experiments and theoretical models have converged on the idea that the propagation of a single spiral wave of electrical activity (analogous to spirals found in other excitable media such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction) is responsible for VT, and that several spirals moving across the heart surface are responsible for VF. Yet, there is still no clear picture of how VT degenerates into VF after being initiated by a premature stimulus. Results of numerical simulations of wave propagation in two and three-dimensional cardiac tissue that identify two important factors in the transition from VT to VF will be presented. The first is the action potential restitution property of cardiac cells that leads to spiral wave instabilities. The second is the twist of the fiber axis that leads to the breakup of scroll wave filaments (i.e. the three-dimensional analog of spiral waves) above a critical muscle thickness.

  10. On galaxy spiral arms' nature as revealed by rotation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Valenzuela, Octavio; Figueras, Francesca; Romero-Gómez, Mercè; Velázquez, Héctor; Antoja, Teresa; Pichardo, Bárbara

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution N-body simulations using different codes and initial condition techniques reveal two different behaviours for the rotation frequency of transient spiral arms like structures. Whereas unbarred discs present spiral arms nearly corotating with disc particles, strong barred models (bulged or bulgeless) quickly develop a bar-spiral structure dominant in density, with a pattern speed almost constant in radius. As the bar strength decreases the arm departs from bar rigid rotation and behaves similar to the unbarred case. In strong barred models, we detect in the frequency space other subdominant and slower modes at large radii, in agreement with previous studies, however, we also detect them in the configuration space. We propose that the distinctive behaviour of the dominant spiral modes can be exploited in order to constraint the nature of Galactic spiral arms by the astrometric survey Gaia and by 2D spectroscopic surveys like Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) and Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MANGA) in external galaxies.

  11. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh; Bray, Hubert L. E-mail: bray@math.duke.edu

    2015-12-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter.

  12. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy’s major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms. PMID:27704048

  13. Electrodynamics of a ring-shaped spiral resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleeva, N.; Fistul, M. V.; Karpov, A.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Averkin, A.; Jung, P.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    We present analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations of electromagnetic resonant modes of a compact monofilar Archimedean spiral resonator shaped in a ring, with no central part. Planar spiral resonators are interesting as components of metamaterials for their compact deep-subwavelength size. Such resonators couple primarily to the magnetic field component of the incident electromagnetic wave, offering properties suitable for magnetic meta-atoms. Surprisingly, the relative frequencies of the resonant modes follow the sequence of the odd numbers as f1:f2:f3:f4… = 1:3:5:7…, despite the nearly identical boundary conditions for electromagnetic fields at the extremities of the resonator. In order to explain the observed spectrum of resonant modes, we show that the current distribution inside the spiral satisfies a particular Carleman type singular integral equation. By solving this equation, we obtain a set of resonant frequencies. The analytically calculated resonance frequencies and the current distributions are in good agreement with experimental data and the results of numerical simulations. By using low-temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting spiral resonator, we compare the experimentally visualized ac current distributions over the spiral with the calculated ones. Theory and experiment agree well with each other. Our analytical model allows for calculation of a detailed three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the resonators.

  14. THE SHEARING H I SPIRAL PATTERN OF NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect

    Speights, Jason C.; Westpfahl, David J.

    2011-07-20

    The Tremaine-Weinberg equations are solved for a pattern speed that is allowed to vary with radius. The solution method transforms an integral equation for the pattern speed to a least-squares problem with well-established procedures for statistical analysis. The method applied to the H I spiral pattern of the barred, grand-design galaxy NGC 1365 produces convincing evidence for a radial dependence in the pattern speed. The pattern speed behaves approximately as 1/r and is very similar to the material speed. There are no clear indications of corotation or Lindblad resonances. Tests show that the results are not selection biased, and that the method is not measuring the material speed. Other methods of solving the Tremaine-Weinberg equations for shearing patterns are found to produce results in agreement with those obtained using the current method. Previous estimates that relied on the assumptions of the density-wave interpretation of spiral structure are inconsistent with the results obtained using the current method. The results are consistent with spiral structure theories that allow for shearing patterns, and contradict fundamental assumptions in the density-wave interpretation that are often used for finding spiral arm pattern speeds. The spiral pattern is winding on a characteristic timescale of {approx}500 Myr.

  15. Electrodynamics of a ring-shaped spiral resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Maleeva, N.; Karpov, A.; Averkin, A.; Fistul, M. V.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Jung, P.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2014-02-14

    We present analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations of electromagnetic resonant modes of a compact monofilar Archimedean spiral resonator shaped in a ring, with no central part. Planar spiral resonators are interesting as components of metamaterials for their compact deep-subwavelength size. Such resonators couple primarily to the magnetic field component of the incident electromagnetic wave, offering properties suitable for magnetic meta-atoms. Surprisingly, the relative frequencies of the resonant modes follow the sequence of the odd numbers as f{sub 1}:f{sub 2}:f{sub 3}:f{sub 4}… = 1:3:5:7…, despite the nearly identical boundary conditions for electromagnetic fields at the extremities of the resonator. In order to explain the observed spectrum of resonant modes, we show that the current distribution inside the spiral satisfies a particular Carleman type singular integral equation. By solving this equation, we obtain a set of resonant frequencies. The analytically calculated resonance frequencies and the current distributions are in good agreement with experimental data and the results of numerical simulations. By using low-temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting spiral resonator, we compare the experimentally visualized ac current distributions over the spiral with the calculated ones. Theory and experiment agree well with each other. Our analytical model allows for calculation of a detailed three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the resonators.

  16. Spirals in protoplanetary disks from photon travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Pinilla, P.; Heays, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Spiral structures are a common feature in scattered-light images of protoplanetary disks, and of great interest as possible tracers of the presence of planets. However, other mechanisms have been put forward to explain them, including self-gravity, disk-envelope interactions, and dead zone boundaries. These mechanisms explain many spirals very well, but are unable to easily account for very loosely wound spirals and single spiral arms. We study the effect of light travel time on the shape of a shadow cast by a clump orbiting close (within ~ 1 au) of the central star, where there can be significant orbital motion during the light travel time from the clump to the outer disk and then to the sky plane. This delay in light rays reaching the sky plane gives rise to a variety of spiral- and arc-shaped shadows, which we describe with a general fitting formula for a flared, inclined disk. The three movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Pinion tooth surface generation strategy of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guanglei; Fan, Hongwei

    2012-07-01

    Aviation spiral bevel gears are often generated by spiral generated modified (SGM) roll method. In this style, pinion tooth surface modified generation strategy has an important influence on the meshing and contact performances. For the optimal contact pattern and transmission error function, local synthesis is applied to obtain the machine-tool settings of pinion. For digitized machine, four tooth surface generation styles of pinion are proposed. For every style, tooth contact analysis (TCA) is applied to obtain contact pattern and transmission error function. For the difference between TCA transmission error function and design objective curve, the degree of symmetry and agreement are defined and the corresponding sub-objective functions are established. Linear weighted combination method is applied to get an equivalent objective function to evaluate the shape of transmission error function. The computer programs for the process above are developed to analyze the meshing performances of the four pinion tooth surface generation styles for a pair of aviation spiral bevel gears with 38/43 teeth numbers. The four analytical results are compared with each other and show that the incomplete modified roll is optimal for this gear pair. This study is an expansion to generation strategy of spiral bevel gears, and offers new alternatives to computer numerical control (CNC) manufacture of spiral bevel gears.

  18. SU-E-I-98: Dose Comparison for Pulmonary Embolism CT Studies: Single Energy Vs. Dual Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the size specific dose estimate (SSDE), dose length product (DLP) and noise relationship for pulmonary embolism studies evaluated by single source dual energy computed tomography (DECT) against conventional CT (CCT) studies in a busy cancer center and to determine the dose savings provided by DECT. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study was performed to determine the CTDIvol and DLP from a subset of patients scanned with both DECT and CCT over the past five years. We were able to identify 30 breast cancer patients (6 male, 24 female, age range 24 to 81) who had both DECT and CCT studies performed. DECT scans were performed with a GE HD 750 scanner (140/80 kVp, 480 mAs and 40 mm) and CCT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 slice scanner (120 kVp, 352 mAs, 20 mm). Image noise was measured by placing an ROI and recording the standard deviation of the mean HU along the descending aorta. Results: The average DECT patient size specific dose estimate was to be 14.2 ± 1.7 mGy as compared to 22.4 ± 2.7 mGy from CCT PE studies, which is a 37% reduction in the SSDE. The average DECT DLP was 721.8 ± 84.6 mGy-cm as compared to 981.8 ± 106.1 mGy-cm for CCT, which is a 26% decrease. Compared to CCT the image noise was found to decrease by 19% when using DECT for PE studies. Conclusion: DECT SSDE and DLP measurements indicate dose savings and image noise reduction when compared to CCT. In an environment that heavily debates CT patient doses, this study confirms the effectiveness of DECT in PE imaging.

  19. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi.

    PubMed

    Karst, Nathaniel; Dralle, David; Thompson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of soil fungi form the annular patterns known as 'fairy rings' and provide one of the only means to observe spatio-temporal dynamics of otherwise cryptic fungal growth processes in natural environments. We present observations of novel spiral and rotor patterns produced by fairy ring fungi and explain these behaviors mathematically by first showing that a well known model of fairy ring fungal growth and the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model are mathematically equivalent. We then use bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations to identify the conditions under which spiral waves and rotors can arise. We demonstrate that the region of dimensionless parameter space supporting these more complex dynamics is adjacent to that which produces the more familiar fairy rings, and identify experimental manipulations to test the transitions between these spatial modes. These same manipulations could also feasibly induce fungal colonies to transition from rotor/spiral formation to a set of richer, as yet unobserved, spatial patterns.

  20. Influences of periodic mechanical deformation on pinned spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Qiang; Zhao, Ye-Hua; Ying, He-Ping

    2014-09-01

    In a generic model of excitable media, we study the behavior of spiral waves interacting with obstacles and their dynamics under the influences of simple periodic mechanical deformation (PMD). Depending on the characteristics of the obstacles, i.e., size and excitability, the rotation of a pinned spiral wave shows different scenarios, e.g., embedding into or anchoring on an obstacle. Three different drift phenomena induced by PMD are observed: scattering on small partial-excitable obstacles, meander-induced unpinning on big partial-excitable obstacles, and drifting around small unexcitable obstacles. Their underlying mechanisms are discussed. The dependence of the threshold amplitude of PMD on the characteristics of the obstacles to successfully remove pinned spiral waves on big partial-excitable obstacles is studied. PMID:25273183

  1. Morphological changes of the spiral vessel after rock music exposure.

    PubMed

    Okada, H; Yamane, H; Nakai, Y

    1991-01-01

    Morphological changes of the spiral vessels of guinea pig after rock music exposure (110-120 dB SPL, 1-3 h) were investigated. Characteristic of rock music is an almost incessant sound production with narrow dynamic range, and high energy in the low tone area. Morphometrical study showed that the lumina of the spiral vessels have a tendency to dilate at all turns in 1-2-h-exposure groups, but tended to constrict, through only at the 2nd turn, in the group of 3-h exposure. This finding that early dilatation of the spiral vessels later turns into constriction may be one of the causes of noise induced temporary threshold shifts.

  2. Parallel-sequencing of early-type and spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Since Edwin Hubble introduced his famous tuning fork diagram more than 70 years ago, spiral galaxies and early-type galaxies (ETGs) have been regarded as two distinct families. The spirals are characterized by the presence of disks of stars and gas in rapid rotation, while the early-types are gas poor and described as spheroidal systems, with less rotation and often non-axisymmetric shapes. The separation is physically relevant as it implies a distinct path of formation for the two classes of objects. I will give an overview of recent findings, from independent teams, that motivated a radical revision to Hubble's classic view of ETGs. These results imply a much closer link between spiral galaxies and ETGs than generally assumed.

  3. Spiral Bevel Gear Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rigs. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when pitting damage occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears.

  4. Protoplanetary Disk Heating and Evolution Driven by Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-11-01

    Scattered light imaging of protoplanetary disks often reveals prominent spiral arms, likely excited by massive planets or stellar companions. Assuming that these arms are density waves, evolving into spiral shocks, we assess their effect on the thermodynamics, accretion, and global evolution of the disk. We derive analytical expressions for the direct (irreversible) heating, angular momentum transport, and mass accretion rate induced by disk shocks of arbitrary amplitude. These processes are very sensitive to the shock strength. We show that waves of moderate strength (density jump at the shock ΔΣ/Σ ∼ 1) result in negligible disk heating (contributing at the ∼1% level to the energy budget) in passive, irradiated protoplanetary disks on ∼100 au scales, but become important within several au. However, shock heating is a significant (or even dominant) energy source in disks of cataclysmic variables, stellar X-ray binaries, and supermassive black hole binaries, heated mainly by viscous dissipation. Mass accretion induced by the spiral shocks is comparable to (or exceeds) the mass inflow due to viscous stresses. Protoplanetary disks featuring prominent global spirals must be evolving rapidly, in ≲0.5 Myr at ∼100 au. A direct upper limit on the evolution timescale can be established by measuring the gravitational torque due to the spiral arms from the imaging data. We find that, regardless of their origin, global spiral waves must be important agents of the protoplanetary disk evolution. They may serve as an effective mechanism of disk dispersal and could be related to the phenomenon of transitional disks.

  5. A spiral wave front beacon for underwater navigation: basic concept and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Brian T; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R

    2011-06-01

    A spiral wave front source produces an acoustic field that has a phase that is proportional to the azimuthal angle about the source. The concept of a spiral wave front beacon is developed by combining this source with a reference source that has a phase that is constant with the angle. The phase difference between these sources contains information about the receiver's azimuthal angle relative to the beacon and can be used for underwater navigation. To produce the spiral wave front, two sources are considered: a "physical-spiral" source, which produces the appropriate phase by physically deforming the active element of the source into a spiral, and a "phased-spiral" source, which uses an array of active elements, each driven with the appropriate phase, to produce the spiral wave front. Using finite element techniques, the fields produced by these sources are examined in the context of the spiral wave front beacon, and the advantages of each source are discussed.

  6. Spiral-pacemaker interactions in a mathematical model of excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajahan, T. K.; Borek, Bartłomiej; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Interactions of a spiral wave with a pacemaker is studied in a mathematical model of two dimensional excitable medium. Faster pacemakers emitting target waves can abolish spirals by driving them to the border of the medium. Our study shows that a slower pacemaker can modify spiral wave behavior by changing the motion of the spiral core. We analyze the dynamics of the spiral wave near the spiral core and away from the core as a function of size and period of the pacemaker. The pacemaker can cause the spiral wave to drift towards it, and either speed up or slow down the reentrant activity. Furthermore, the drift induced by the pacemaker can result in irregular or quasiperiodic dynamics even at sites away from the pacemaker. These results highlight the influence of pacemakers on complex spiral wave dynamics.

  7. Self-catalyzed anisotropic growth of GaN spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsha, Avinash; Sahoo, Prasana; Dhara, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    GaN spirals with homogeneous size are grown using chemical-vapor-deposition technique in a self catalytic process. Raman and photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal wurtzite GaN phase. Nucleation of GaN sphere takes place with the agglomeration Ga clusters and simultaneous reaction with NH3. A growth mechanism involving diffusion limited aggregation process initiating supersaturation and subsequent neck formation along with possible role of thermodynamic fluctuation in different crystalline facets of GaN, is described for the anisotropic spiral structures. Temperature dependent PL spectra show strong excitonic emissions along with the presence of free-to-bound transition.

  8. Spiral Orbit Tribometry I: Description of the Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Kingsbury, Edward P.; Kiraly, Louis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new rolling contact tribometer based on a planar thrust bearing geometry is described. The bearing 'races' are flat plates that drive a ball into a near-circular, spiral path. The spiraling ball is returned to its initial radius each revolution around the race by a 'guide plate' backed by a force transducer. The motions of the ball are analyzed and the force exerted by the ball on the guide plate is related to the friction coefficient of the system. The experimental characteristics of the system are presented and the system is shown to exhibit the behavior expected for a tribometer.

  9. Spiral waves and instability in magnetized astrophysical disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tagger, M.; Henriksen, R.N.; Sygnet, J.F.; Pellat, R. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau )

    1990-04-01

    It is shown that an ionized disk in a vertical magnetic field (e.g., the dipole field of the central object for an accretion or planetary disk) is subject to spiral instabilities of low azimuthal wavenumber, driven by differential rotation. The amplification is due to the Swing mechanism already known for the spiral instability of galactic disks, with self-gravity replaced by magnetic forces. In realistic cases the growth time is a few tens of rotation periods. Such instabilities, or waves driven by irregularities in the ambient magnetic field, might be important in particular for accretion disks, and to explain the spokes in Saturn's rings. 11 refs.

  10. Spiral fracture of the humerus in a ball thrower.

    PubMed

    Reed, W J; Mueller, R W

    1998-05-01

    Spiral fractures of the humerus in ball throwers are rare clinical entities that can be confused with pathologic fractures. These fractures have been reported in various throwing sports, arm wrestling, and hand grenade throwing. They most commonly occur in the distal third of the humerus in young, active individuals. They are often preceded by throwing arm pain. Neurologic sequelae are rare. Herein, a case is presented of spiral fracture of the humerus in a softball player, and the assessment and management of these fractures, as well as their etiologic contrast to stress and pathologic fractures, are reviewed.

  11. Recent Advances in the Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent progress for the analysis of spiral bevel gears will be described. The foundation of this work relies on the description of the gear geometry of face-milled spiral bevel gears via the approach developed by Litvin. This methodology was extended by combining the basic gear design data with the manufactured surfaces using a differential geometry approach, and provides the data necessary for assembling three-dimensional finite element models. The finite element models have been utilized to conduct thermal and structural analysis of the gear system. Examples of the methods developed for thermal and structural/contact analysis are presented.

  12. A-PHOENIX, an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Spiral 2 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2006-03-15

    Spiral 2, the radioactive ion-beam facility of GANIL, will start its commissioning in 2009. After a brief recall of Spiral 2 beam requirements, emittance measurements of preliminary 1 mA O{sup 6+} test beams, done with the PHOENIX source for Spiral 2, are shown and discussed. The 28 GHz A-PHOENIX source, designed to better meet the Spiral 2 requirements, is presented and a progress report of its construction is proposed.

  13. 21 CFR 884.2675 - Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and... Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2675 Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator. (a) Identification. A fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator is a device used to obtain a...

  14. 21 CFR 884.2675 - Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and... Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2675 Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator. (a) Identification. A fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator is a device used to obtain a...

  15. 21 CFR 884.2675 - Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and... Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2675 Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator. (a) Identification. A fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator is a device used to obtain a...

  16. 21 CFR 884.2675 - Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and... Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2675 Fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator. (a) Identification. A fetal scalp circular (spiral) electrode and applicator is a device used to obtain a...

  17. Pyogenic myositis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Butler, G.J.; Maguire, J.H.; Nagel, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    Computed tomography and gallium scintigraphy uncovered clinically occult muscle infection in eight patients. The CT findings included enlargement of the muscle, effacement of the intramuscular fat planes, fluid density, rim enhancement, and involvement of the underlying bone. Computed tomography suggested the diagnosis in seven of eight cases. Gallium scintigraphy was positive in all seven cases in which it was performed.

  18. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  19. Vertically Conductive MoS2 Spiral Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Zhao, Jiong; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Nam, Honggi; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-09-01

    MoS2 spirals grown by the chemical vapor deposition method, driven by a threading dislocation, has a peculiar rhombohedral-like structure. This threading dislocation can carry helical current in the vertical direction and greatly enhances the vertical conductance in the MoS2 multilayer samples.

  20. Characterization of crystal growth using a spiral nucleation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P. M.; Rocha, F.

    2007-08-01

    Classical concepts of two-dimensional nucleation and spiral growth are used together with recent findings on the dynamics of dislocation spirals to derive a new crystal growth model. Initial growth nuclei result from the organization of adsorbed molecules in spirals around surface dislocations. The energetic barrier for the activation of the spiral nuclei is considerably lower than the admitted by classical two dimensional nucleation models. Stable nuclei evolve into bigger growth hillocks in supersaturated media through the incorporation of adsorbed units into their steps. The displacement velocity of steps during solution and vapour growth is calculated by different kinetic approaches, taking into consideration the distinct role of surface diffusion in each process, and avoiding known limitations of conventional theories. A generalized expression is obtained relating the crystal growth rate with main variables such as supersaturation, temperature, crystal size, surface topology and interfacial properties. At the end of the paper, the crystallization kinetics of sucrose measured at 40 °C is interpreted in the light of the new perspectives resulting from the proposed model. The application example illustrates how to estimate interfacial and topological properties from the experimental crystal growth results.

  1. Spiral magnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction containing defect bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utesov, O. I.; Sizanov, A. V.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We present a theory describing spiral magnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) subject to bond disorder at small concentration c of defects. It is assumed that both DMI and exchange coupling are changed on imperfect bonds. Qualitatively the same physical picture is obtained in two models which are considered in detail: B20 cubic helimagnets and layered magnets in which DMI leads to a long-period spiral ordering perpendicular to layers. We find that the distortion of the spiral magnetic ordering around a single imperfect bond is long range: values of additional turns of spins decay with the distance r to the defect as 1 /r2 being governed by the Poisson's equation for electric dipole. At finite concentration of randomly distributed imperfect bonds, we calculate correction to the spiral vector. We show that this correction can change the sign of spin chirality even at c ≪1 if defects are strong enough. It is demonstrated that impurities lead to a diffuse elastic neutron scattering which has power-law singularities at magnetic Bragg peaks positions. Then, each Bragg peak acquires power-law decaying tails. Corrections are calculated to the magnon energy and to its damping caused by scattering on impurities.

  2. Deceptively Simple Harmonic Motion: A Mass on a Spiral Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, F. Alan

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the oscillatory motion of a mass on a spiral (nonhelical) spring, and calculates the lowest eigenfrequency and the associated effective spring mass for a range of values of the attached mass. Analytic and numerical comparisons are made to the helical spring problem. (HM)

  3. 4. NORTH END OF TERMINAL ROOM, SHOP LEVEL SHOWING SPIRAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. NORTH END OF TERMINAL ROOM, SHOP LEVEL SHOWING SPIRAL STAIR TO CABLE RACK. Looking north. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Spiral profile design and parameter analysis of flexure spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.; Chen, X.; Wu, Y. N.; Yang, C. G.; Xu, L.

    2006-06-01

    Universal design method of spiral flexure spring has been generalized firstly. Through adjusting the space location of spiral arms together with parameters of individual spiral profile including base radius, involute pitch, involute angle, start angle of involute, width of slot, various spiral flexure springs with different performances can be obtained respectively. Then the finite element program, whose validity has been verified by experimental data, is used to analyze the performance of the flexure spring. Furthermore experimental study of the spring assembly reveals the superimposed effect of stiffness and the antitorque characteristic of spring stack, which had been ignored previously. Finally, in order to get the general relation between the axial stiffness, natural frequency of flexure spring and its geometry parameters, the theoretical model, which is based on the mechanics of material and vibration, has been set up and subsequently solved. The validity of derived expressions has been proved by finite element program and published experiment data respectively. Those induced expressions are more convenient and direct than finite element method and can be served as the guide to designation of flexure spring.

  5. Dynamical effect of gas on spiral pattern speed in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumavo; Jog, Chanda J.

    2016-07-01

    In the density wave theory of spiral structure, the grand-design two-armed spiral pattern is taken to rotate rigidly in a galactic disc with a constant, definite pattern speed. The observational measurement of the pattern speed of the spiral arms, though difficult, has been achieved in a few galaxies such as NGC 6946, NGC 2997, and M 51 which we consider here. We examine whether the theoretical dispersion relation permits a real solution for wavenumber corresponding to a stable wave, for the observed rotation curve and the pattern speed values. We find that the disc when modelled as a stars-alone case, as is usually done in literature, does not generally give a stable density wave solution for the observed pattern speed. Instead the inclusion of the low velocity dispersion component, namely, gas, is essential to obtain a stable density wave. Further, we obtain a theoretical range of allowed pattern speeds that correspond to a stable density wave at a certain radius, and check that for the three galaxies considered, the observed pattern speeds fall in the respective prescribed range. The inclusion of even a small amount (˜15 per cent) of gas by mass fraction in the galactic disc is shown to have a significant dynamical effect on the dispersion relation and hence on the pattern speed that is likely to be seen in a real, gas-rich spiral galaxy.

  6. METHODS FOR THE SPIRAL SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAY INCLUDING SPECIALIZED APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    An automated approach to bacterial mutagenicity testing--the spiral Salmonella assay--was developed to simplify testing and to reduce the labor and materials required to generate dose-responsive mutagenicity information. This document provides the reader with an ...

  7. Star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Woo-Young

    2015-08-01

    Barred-spiral galaxies contain star-forming nuclear rings at their centers. Some rings show a well-defined azimuthal age gradient of star clusters along a ring, while others do not. Using hydrodynamic simulations with the prescriptions of star formation and feedback included, we study what control star formation occurring in the nuclear rings. In models without spiral arms, the star formation rate (SFR) in a ring exhibits a strong burst at early time and declines to small values at late time. The early burst is caused by a rapid gas infall along due to the bar growth, consuming most of the gas inside the bar region. On the other hand, models with spiral arms outside the bar region show multiple starburst activities at late time caused by arm-induced gas inflows, provided that the arm pattern speed is slower than that of the bar. The SFR in models with spirals is larger by a factor of ~ 1.4-4.0 than that in the bar-only models, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. In all models, young star clusters in nuclear ring show an azimuthal age gradient only when the SFR is small, such that younger clusters tend to locate closer to the contact points, since star formation occurs preferentially in the contact points between a ring and dust lanes.

  8. SPIRAL (Sandia's Program for Information Retrieval and Listing)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Leslie E.

    The general scope of SPIRAL is storage of free-flowing text information into a machine-readable library and recall of any portions of this stored information that are relevant to an inquiry. The major objectives in the design of the system were (1) to make it easy to use by persons unfamiliar with computer systems; and (2) to make it efficient, in…

  9. Crowds as an Excitable Medium for Spiral Wave Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Andrea; Greco, Edwin; Fenton, Flavio

    Spiral wave (SW) patterns are studied in many physical, biological, and chemical excitable systems. Of particular importance are SW of electrical activity that develop in the heart and give rise to arrhythmias such as tachycardia (single SW) and fibrillation (multiple SWs). We investigate if a crowd of people given simple rules for activation and deactivation, modeled on cardiac cells, can act as a living simulation for SW dynamics. For group sizes ranging from 50 to 650 people we demonstrate, experimentally, the existence of stable spiral waves and of spiral wave breakup leading to chaotic dynamics. Numerical simulation predicts the simple rules lead to well define wave fronts. People, however, respond with various degrees of anticipation and misinformation. This human behavior can lead to smoothed fronts or even lead to spiral wave breakup and chaos. We present a new cell model that includes variations in reaction to account for the observed behavior in crowds. This model may be useful in the study of coupling and decoupling of cardiac cells that lead to arrhythmic behavior. Supported by NSF.

  10. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2012-03-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 ± 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  11. Association of tightly spiraled bacterial infection and gastritis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Lee, B J; Lee, Y S; Park, J H

    2000-07-01

    Tightly spiral bacteria were observed only in the pyloric mucosa of 4 (8.0%) of 50 swine stomachs, mainly in the surface of epithelia, the gastric pits and the lumen of gastric glands. The presence of the spiral bacteria was significantly associated with chronic pyloric gastritis (p<0.05). Mean gastritis score of the bacteria-positive pyloric mucosa was 3.25 +/- 0.25, whereas that of the bacteria-negative pyloric mucosa was 2.37 +/- 0.12. Parakeratosis and hyperkeratosis were spontaneously seen in the mucosa layer of pars oesophagea, regardless of the bacterial infection. Marked infiltration of mononuclear cells and granulocytes were seen in the cardiac mucosa, regardless of the bacterial infection. Mean gastritis score of the bacteria-positive cardiac mucosa was 3.27 +/- 0.32, whereas that of the bacteria-negative cardiac mucosa was 2.84 +/- 0.13. There was no significant difference between the bacteria-positive and negative cardiac mucosa (p>0.05). Inflammatory response in the fundic mucosa was rare (gastritis score=0.75 +/- 0.08). The tightly spiraled bactera were not cultured with various culture media. These results suggest that the presence of tightly spiraled bacteria is associated with only the pyloric gastritis in pigs.

  12. ROD MILL ROOM, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING DENVER SPIRAL CLASSIFIER, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ROD MILL ROOM, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING DENVER SPIRAL CLASSIFIER, WITH DOMINION ROD MILL IN LEFT BACKGROUND. WATER WAS ADDED TO ORE IN ROD MILL TO MAKE A SLURRY CALLED SLIME. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  13. Gas dynamics of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3359

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed study was conducted of the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen gas in the bright northern barred spiral galaxy NGC 3359. Observations of the 21 cm line at the Very Large Array were reduced to give single-channel maps with spatial resolution of 18'', and a velocity resolution of 25 km/s. The acquisition, calibration, and reduction of the data are discussed in some detail. Maps of the integrated column density and mean velocity of the atomic hydrogen, derived from the channel maps, provide the principal data for an investigation of the dynamics associated with the spiral structure of the galaxy. On scales comparable to the resolution of this survey, approximately 1 kpc at the distance of NGC 3359, the gas is broken up into a somewhat chaotic distribution of local maxima and minima. However, on larger scales the column density shows a smooth, grand design spiral pattern with two principal spiral arms. The extent and density of these two arms are roughly equal in the 21 cm map, unlike the optical image. These neutral hydrogen arms are very well correlated with the position of H II regions.

  14. A Parallax-based Distance Estimator for Spiral Arm Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.

    2016-06-01

    The spiral arms of the Milky Way are being accurately located for the first time via trigonometric parallaxes of massive star-forming regions with the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy Survey, using the Very Long Baseline Array and the European VLBI Network, and with the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry project. Here we describe a computer program that leverages these results to significantly improve the accuracy and reliability of distance estimates to other sources that are known to follow spiral structure. Using a Bayesian approach, sources are assigned to arms based on their (l, b, v) coordinates with respect to arm signatures seen in CO and H i surveys. A source's kinematic distance, displacement from the plane, and proximity to individual parallax sources are also considered in generating a full distance probability density function. Using this program to estimate distances to large numbers of star-forming regions, we generate a realistic visualization of the Milky Way's spiral structure as seen from the northern hemisphere.

  15. Molecular Distribution in the Spiral Arm of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Sorai, Kazuo; Ueda, Junko; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    Molecular line images of 13CO, C18O, CN, CS, CH3OH, and HNCO are obtained toward the spiral arm of M51 at a 7\\prime\\prime × 6\\prime\\prime resolution with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. Distributions of the molecules averaged over a 300 pc scale are found to be almost similar to one another and to essentially trace the spiral arm. However, the principal component analysis shows a slight difference of distributions among molecular species, particularly for CH3OH and HNCO. These two species do not correlate well with the star formation rate, implying that they are not enhanced by local star formation activities but by galactic-scale phenomena such as spiral shocks. Furthermore, the distributions of HNCO and CH3OH are found to be slightly different, and their origins deserve further investigation. The present results provide us with an important clue for understanding the 300 pc scale chemical composition in the spiral arm and its relation to galactic-scale dynamics.

  16. Fingerprints of nucleosynthesis in the local spiral arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoedlseder, J.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.; Oberlack, U.; Ryan, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; vonBallmoos, P.

    1997-01-01

    The local spiral arm with its inherent massive star population is a natural site of recent nucleosynthesis activity. The features found in 1.8 MeV observation of candidate Al-26 sources situated in this structure are discussed. The emphasis is on Loop 1, a nearby superbubble which is possibly the site of a recent supernova explosion.

  17. Geometrical analysis of circular-cut spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Geometrical studies of circular cut spiral bevel gears are reported. Tooth profile changes heel to toe are studied in the transverse plane. Pressure angle changes are determined. The radiuses of curvature of the tooth surfaces generated by various cutter profiles are also determined. The consequences of cutter profile changes are explored. Crown gears are emphasized and the implications for conical gears are discussed.

  18. Inferring Planet Mass from Spiral Structures in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of protoplanetary disk have reported spiral structures that are potential signatures of embedded planets, and modeling efforts have shown that a single planet can excite multiple spiral arms, in contrast to conventional disk-planet interaction theory. Using two and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations to perform a systematic parameter survey, we confirm the existence of multiple spiral arms in disks with a single planet, and discover a scaling relation between the azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary arm, {φ }{{sep}}, and the planet-to-star mass ratio q: {φ }{{sep}}=102^\\circ {(q/0.001)}0.2 for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses around a 1 solar mass star, and {φ }{{sep}}=180^\\circ for brown dwarf mass companions. This relation is independent of the disk’s temperature, and can be used to infer a planet’s mass to within an accuracy of about 30% given only the morphology of a face-on disk. Combining hydrodynamics and Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we verify that our numerical measurements of {φ }{{sep}} are accurate representations of what would be measured in near-infrared scattered light images, such as those expected to be taken by Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/SPHERE, or Subaru/SCExAO in the future. Finally, we are able to infer, using our scaling relation, that the planet responsible for the spiral structure in SAO 206462 has a mass of about 6 Jupiter masses.

  19. 61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter building no. 102 mezzanine level; note elevator door on right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Star formation regions in galaxies: Star complexes and spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Iurii N.

    This book describes observational data on star formation regions (from young star clusters to spiral arms) in the Milky Way and other galaxies. It is concluded that not only high-luminosity stars but also star clusters and associations are forming together in vast complexes. It is claimed that these complexes are the primary, fundamental entities of star formation.

  1. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  2. Technical aspects of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S

    1978-01-01

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) has initiated a technological revolution which continues to the present time. A brief review of basic principles of CT scanning is presented, and the evolution of modern CT scanner systems is traced. Some early indications of future trends are also presented.

  3. Evolution of Gas Across Spiral Arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Melissa Nicole

    To investigate the dynamic evolution of gas across spiral arms, we conducted a detailed study of the gas and star formation along the spiral arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51. This nearby, face-on spiral galaxy provides a unique laboratory to study the relationship between gas dynamics and star formation. The textbook picture of interstellar medium (ISM) evolution is rapidly changing. Molecular gas was once believed to form along spiral arms from the diffuse atomic gas in the inter-arm regions. Star formation occurs within giant molecular clouds during spiral arm passage. Lastly, the molecular gas is photo-dissociated back into atomic gas by massive stars on the downstream side of the spiral arm. Recent evidence, however, is revealing a new picture of the interstellar medium and the process of star formation. We seek development of a new picture by studying the development and evolution of molecular gas and the role of large scale galactic dynamics in organizing the interstellar medium. This thesis begins by presenting work measuring the geometrical offsets between interstellar gas and recent star formation. Interstellar gas is traced by atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO). Star formation is traced by ionized hydrogen recombination lines and infrared emission from dust warmed by young bright stars. Measuring these offsets can help determine the underlying large scale galactic dynamics. Along the spiral arms in M51, offsets between CO and the star formation tracers suggest that gas is flowing through the spiral arms, but the offsets do not show the expected signature of a single pattern speed and imply a more complicated pattern. This thesis also examines the intermediate stages of gas evolution, by studying a denser component of the ISM closer to which stars will form. Only a small percent of the bulk molecular gas will become dense enough to form stars. HCN and HCO+ probe densities ˜104 cm-3, where as the bulk gas is 500 cm-3. This thesis looks at HCN and

  4. Model for Simulating a Spiral Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Curley, Charles; Nayak, Umanath

    2010-01-01

    A discrete-event simulation model, and a computer program that implements the model, have been developed as means of analyzing a spiral software-development process. This model can be tailored to specific development environments for use by software project managers in making quantitative cases for deciding among different software-development processes, courses of action, and cost estimates. A spiral process can be contrasted with a waterfall process, which is a traditional process that consists of a sequence of activities that include analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, and support. A spiral process is an iterative process that can be regarded as a repeating modified waterfall process. Each iteration includes assessment of risk, analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, delivery, and evaluation. A key difference between a spiral and a waterfall process is that a spiral process can accommodate changes in requirements at each iteration, whereas in a waterfall process, requirements are considered to be fixed from the beginning and, therefore, a waterfall process is not flexible enough for some projects, especially those in which requirements are not known at the beginning or may change during development. For a given project, a spiral process may cost more and take more time than does a waterfall process, but may better satisfy a customer's expectations and needs. Models for simulating various waterfall processes have been developed previously, but until now, there have been no models for simulating spiral processes. The present spiral-process-simulating model and the software that implements it were developed by extending a discrete-event simulation process model of the IEEE 12207 Software Development Process, which was built using commercially available software known as the Process Analysis Tradeoff Tool (PATT). Typical inputs to PATT models include industry-average values of product size (expressed as number of lines of code

  5. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy study of spiral Ca2+ waves in single heart cell.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Tang, A; Wang, S; Zhu, X

    2008-03-01

    Spiral wave phenomena exist in many scales of nature and have attracted the attention of scientists from different fields. Although much work has been done on qualitative analysis of spiral waves, the mechanism of spiral waves' spontaneous formation and termination in living systems is still not clear. Here, by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show the spiral waves of calcium signals in single rat cardiac myocytes and the simulation of the waves comprising calcium sparks. The mechanism of the formation and termination of spiral waves is attributable to the calcium release channels' refractory resulting from their stochastic release. We suggest that this mechanism can be adapted to other living systems.

  6. SU-E-I-26: The CT Compatibility of a Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Ravi, A; Song, WY; Kager, P; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine CT metal image artifact from a novel direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator (95% tungsten) for cervical cancer using a commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. Comparison to a conventional stainless steel applicator is also performed. Methods: Each applicator was placed in a water-filled phantom resembling the female pelvis and scanned in a Philips Brilliance 16-slice CT scanner using two pelvis protocols: a typical clinical protocol (120kVp, 16×0.75mm collimation, 0.692 pitch, 1.0s rotation, 350mm field of view (FOV), 600mAs, 1.5mm slices) and a protocol with a higher kVp and mAs setting useful for larger patients (140kVp, 16×0.75mm collimation, 0.688 pitch, 1.5s rotation, 350mm FOV, 870mAs, 1.5mm slices). Images of each tandem were acquired with and without the application of the O-MAR algorithm. Baseline scans of the phantom (no applicator) were also collected. CT numbers were quantified at distances from 5 to 30 mm away from the applicator’s edge (in increments of 5mm) using measurements at eight angles around the applicator, on three consecutive slices. Results: While the presence of both applicators degraded image quality, the DMBT applicator resulted in larger streaking artifacts and dark areas in the image compared to the stainless steel applicator. Application of the O-MAR algorithm improved all acquired images, both visually and quantitatively. The use of low and high kVp and mAs settings (120 kVp/600mAs and 140 kVp/870mAs) in conjunction with the O-MAR algorithm lead to similar CT numbers in the vicinity of the applicator and a similar reduction of the induced metal artifact. Conclusion: This work indicated that metal artifacts induced by the DMBT and the stainless steel applicator are greatly reduced when using the O-MAR algorithm, leading to better quality phantom images. The use of a high dose protocol provided similar improvements in metal artifacts compared to the

  7. Spiral- and bar-driven peculiar velocities in Milky Way-sized galaxy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Bovy, Jo; Kawata, Daisuke; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud; Monari, Giacomo; Cropper, Mark

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the kinematic signatures induced by spiral and bar structure in a set of simulations of Milky Way-sized spiral disc galaxies. The set includes test particle simulations that follow a quasi-stationary density wave-like scenario with rigidly rotating spiral arms, and N-body simulations that host a bar and transient, corotating spiral arms. From a location similar to that of the Sun, we calculate the radial, tangential and line-of-sight peculiar velocity fields of a patch of the disc and quantify the fluctuations by computing the power spectrum from a two-dimensional Fourier transform. We find that the peculiar velocity power spectrum of the simulation with a bar and transient, corotating spiral arms fits very well to that of APOGEE red clump star data, while the quasi-stationary density wave spiral model without a bar does not. We determine that the power spectrum is sensitive to the number of spiral arms, spiral arm pitch angle and position with respect to the spiral arm. However, it is necessary to go beyond the line-of-sight velocity field in order to distinguish fully between the various spiral models with this method. We compute the power spectrum for different regions of the spiral discs, and discuss the application of this analysis technique to external galaxies.

  8. Quantification of the drawing of an Archimedes spiral through the analysis of its digitized picture.

    PubMed

    Miralles, F; Tarongí, S; Espino, A

    2006-04-15

    We have developed a new quantitative analysis of spiral drawing that is able to evaluate any spiral execution and it has not temporal or spatial limitations in the obtaining of specimens. Thirty-one patients with action tremor and 24 control subjects were asked to draw an Archimedes spiral over a print template. Specimens were scanned and then treated through a semiautomatic computer program that reconstructs the temporal sequence of the spiral drawing by the subject. The spirals were first analysed by means of the cross-correlation coefficient with the spiral template. Secondly, the mean and the standard deviation of the distance between each point of the spiral drawing and the corresponding point of the spiral model were determined. Finally, the reconstructed spiral was analysed using the Fourier Transform. Its results were interpreted with the aid of a computer model of a tremulous spiral. The experimental variables were greater in the patients group respect to age-matched controls. There was also a high linear correlation between them and the clinical score given by three neurologists. Finally, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves analysis shown that the method classified the spirals better than human ratters.

  9. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF GALACTIC LOGARITHMIC SPIRAL ARM PITCH ANGLE USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Puerari, Ivanio

    2012-04-01

    A logarithmic spiral is a prominent feature appearing in a majority of observed galaxies. This feature has long been associated with the traditional Hubble classification scheme, but historical quotes of pitch angle of spiral galaxies have been almost exclusively qualitative. We have developed a methodology, utilizing two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies, in order to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms. Our technique provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature. This will allow comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. In this work, we detail our image processing and analysis of spiral galaxy images and discuss the robustness of our analysis techniques.

  11. Magnetostrictive hypersound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Igor V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work we have investigated magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition from spiral to collinear state. We found that such magnets may generate transverse sound waves with the wavelength equal to the spiral period. We have examined two types of spiral magnetic structures: with inhomogeneous exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Frequency of the waves from exchange-caused spiral magnetic structure may reach some THz, while in case of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction-caused spiral it may reach some GHz. These waves will be emitted like a sound pulses. Amplitude of the waves is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. Some aspects of microwaves to hypersound transformation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of phase transition have been investigated as well. Results of the work may be interesting for investigation of phase transition kinetics as well, as for various hypersound applications.

  12. Allosaurus, crocodiles, and birds: evolutionary clues from spiral computed tomography of an endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1999-10-15

    Because the brain does not usually leave direct evidence of its existence in the fossil record, our view of this structure in extinct species has relied upon inferences drawn from comparisons between parts of the skeleton that do fossilize or with modern-day relatives that survived extinction. However, soft-tissue structure preservation may indeed occasionally occur, particularly in the endocranial space. By applying modern imaging and analysis methods to such natural cranial "endocasts," we can now learn more than ever thought possible about the brains of extinct species. I will discuss one such example in which spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning analysis has been successfully applied to reveal preserved internal structures of a naturally occurring endocranial cast of Allosaurus fragilis, the dominant carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period. The ability to directly examine the neuroanatomy of an extinct dinosaur, whose modern-day relatives are birds and crocodiles, has exciting implications about Allosaurus' behavior, its adaptive responses to its environment, and its eventual extinction. PMID:10597341

  13. Allosaurus, crocodiles, and birds: evolutionary clues from spiral computed tomography of an endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1999-10-15

    Because the brain does not usually leave direct evidence of its existence in the fossil record, our view of this structure in extinct species has relied upon inferences drawn from comparisons between parts of the skeleton that do fossilize or with modern-day relatives that survived extinction. However, soft-tissue structure preservation may indeed occasionally occur, particularly in the endocranial space. By applying modern imaging and analysis methods to such natural cranial "endocasts," we can now learn more than ever thought possible about the brains of extinct species. I will discuss one such example in which spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning analysis has been successfully applied to reveal preserved internal structures of a naturally occurring endocranial cast of Allosaurus fragilis, the dominant carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period. The ability to directly examine the neuroanatomy of an extinct dinosaur, whose modern-day relatives are birds and crocodiles, has exciting implications about Allosaurus' behavior, its adaptive responses to its environment, and its eventual extinction.

  14. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Krystal; Quillen, A. C.; LaPage, Amanda; Rieke, George H.

    2004-07-01

    We compare the soft diffuse X-ray emission from Chandra images of 12 nearby intermediate-inclination spiral galaxies to the morphology seen in Hα, molecular gas, and mid-infrared emission. We find that diffuse X-ray emission is often located along spiral arms in the outer parts of spiral galaxies but tends to be distributed in a more nearly radially symmetric morphology in the center. The X-ray morphology in the spiral arms matches that seen in the mid-infrared or Hα and thus implies that the X-ray emission is associated with recent active star formation. In the spiral arms there is a good correlation between the level of diffuse X-ray emission and that in the mid-infrared in different regions. The correlation between X-ray and mid-IR flux in the galaxy centers is less strong. We also find that the central X-ray emission tends to be more luminous in galaxies with brighter bulges, suggesting that more than one process is contributing to the level of central diffuse X-ray emission. We see no strong evidence for X-ray emission trailing the location of high-mass star formation in spiral arms. However, population synthesis models predict a high mechanical energy output rate from supernovae for a time period that is about 10 times longer than the lifetime of massive ionizing stars, conflicting with the narrow appearance of the arms in X-rays. The fraction of supernova energy that goes into heating the interstellar medium must depend on environment and is probably higher near sites of active star formation. The X-ray estimated emission measures suggest that the volume filling factors and scale heights are low in the outer parts of these galaxies but higher in the galaxy centers. The differences between the X-ray properties and morphology in the centers and outer parts of these galaxies suggest that galactic fountains operate in outer galaxy disks but that winds are primarily driven from galaxy centers.

  15. Star Formation in Partially Gas-Depleted Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, James A.; Robertson, Paul; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza

    2010-02-01

    Broadband B and R and Hα images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of Hα flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the Hα disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the Hα disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both phenomena are found to

  16. Dynamical trigger of star formation in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    The relationship between dynamical phenomena and starbursts in spiral galaxies is discussed. It is noted that interactions between galaxies or the presence of a bar in the center of a spiral can induce two-arm density waves in a galactic disk. It is suggested that the increase in interstellar cloud collisions, the formation of giant molecular clouds giving birth to stars, and the formation of rings by angular momentum transfer which result from these waves could explain the starburst phenomenon. NIR and mm CO observations of Arp 299, NGC 3628, ring galaxies, and barred galaxies are examined to determine the location of starbursts within a galaxy. It is concluded that a passing-by companion which reinforces bar action might play an important role in starburst galaxies.

  17. Far-infrared emission and star formation in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Bandiera, R.

    1989-01-01

    The correlations between the emission in the far-IR, H-alpha, and blue in a sample of normal spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that the luminosities in these three bands are all tightly correlated, although both the strength of the correlations and their functional dependencies are a function of the galaxies' morphological types. The best-fit power laws to these correlations are different for the comparison of different quantities and deviate significantly from linearity in some cases, implying the presence of additional emission mechanisms not related to the general increase of luminosity with galactic mass. Clear evidence is found of two independent effects in the incidence of warm far-IR emission in late-type spirals. One is a luminosity effect shown by the presence of excess far-IR relative to H-alpha or optical emission in the more luminous galaxies. The other is a dependence on widespread star-formation activity.

  18. Development of spiral-groove self-acting face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental evaluation and a 100-hour endurance test were performed on a spiral groove geometry, self-acting face seal. The seal was tested and operated successfully at maximum conditions of 243.8 m/s surface speed, 199.9 N/sq cm air pressure, and 645.4K (702 F) air temperature. The maximum speed condition of 243.8 m/s was obtained at a shaft speed of 72,500 rpm. Seal wear, gas leakage, and sealing element temperature were monitored during the test. Condition of the seal at the completion of the test was documented and found acceptable for further use. The spiral groove wear rate measured during the endurance test indicates a minimum potential seal life of over 2700 hours. Seal air leakage measured during the test program is within the range considered acceptable for consideration for use in a small gas turbine engine.

  19. Charge breeder for the SPIRAL1 upgrade: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Angot, J.; Sole, P.; Bajeat, O.; Barton, C.; Frigot, R.; Jeanne, A.; Jardin, P.; Kamalou, O.; Lecomte, P.; Osmond, B.; Peschard, G.; Lamy, T.; Savalle, A.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of the SPIRAL1 upgrade under progress at the GANIL lab, the charge breeder based on a LPSC Phoenix ECRIS, first tested at ISOLDE has been modified to benefit of the last enhancements of this device from the 1+/n+ community. The modifications mainly concern the 1 + optics, vacuum techniques, and the RF—buffer gas injection into the charge breeder. Prior to its installation in the midst of the low energy beam line of the SPIRAL1 facility, it has been decided to qualify its performances and several operation modes at the test bench of LPSC lab. This contribution shall present preliminary results of experiments conducted at LPSC concerning the 1 + to n+ conversion efficiencies for noble gases as well as for alkali elements and the corresponding transformation times.

  20. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a spiral startup staged sequence

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Miller, David Scott

    2009-12-15

    Methods for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include treating a first zone of the formation. Treatment of a plurality of zones of the formation may be begun at selected times after the treatment of the first zone begins. The treatment of at least two successively treated zones may begin at a selected time after treatment of the previous zone begins. At least two of the successively treated zones may be adjacent to the zone treated previously. The successive treatment of the zones proceeds in an outward, substantially spiral sequence from the first zone so that the treatment of the zones may move substantially spirally outwards towards a boundary of the treatment area.

  1. Charge breeder for the SPIRAL1 upgrade: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Maunoury, L; Delahaye, P; Dubois, M; Angot, J; Sole, P; Bajeat, O; Barton, C; Frigot, R; Jeanne, A; Jardin, P; Kamalou, O; Lecomte, P; Osmond, B; Peschard, G; Lamy, T; Savalle, A

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of the SPIRAL1 upgrade under progress at the GANIL lab, the charge breeder based on a LPSC Phoenix ECRIS, first tested at ISOLDE has been modified to benefit of the last enhancements of this device from the 1+/n+ community. The modifications mainly concern the 1 + optics, vacuum techniques, and the RF-buffer gas injection into the charge breeder. Prior to its installation in the midst of the low energy beam line of the SPIRAL1 facility, it has been decided to qualify its performances and several operation modes at the test bench of LPSC lab. This contribution shall present preliminary results of experiments conducted at LPSC concerning the 1 + to n+ conversion efficiencies for noble gases as well as for alkali elements and the corresponding transformation times. PMID:26932061

  2. Study of surface plasmon chirality induced by Archimedes' spiral grooves.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tomoki; Miyanishi, Shintaro

    2006-06-26

    A chirality of surface plasmons excited on a silver film with Archimedes' spiral grooves during incidence of a circularly polarized light is analytically and numerically studied by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling method. We found that the surface of a plasmon has selective chirality, which is given by the sum of the chiralities of the incident light and the spiral structure. The surface plasmons with the chirality lead to zero-order, first-order, and high-order evanescent Bessel beams with electric charge distributions on the film. This selectivity could be widely applied for chiral detection of the incident light and chiral excitation of several optical modes in nanophotonics.

  3. Spiral and croissant crack in drying thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joel; Roman, Benoit; Bico, Jose; Barthel, Etienne; Teisseire, Jeremie; Dalmas, Davy; Melo, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    Drying mud or crazing in ceramics glaze leads to familiar hierarchical cracks network where a new crack connects perpendicularly to older ones. We report unusual spirals and croissants crack patterns in methylsiloxane drying thin films moderately adhering on a substrate. Such cracks are also observed in a very different situation when magnetron sputtering multilayers are under external tension. The amplitude and wavelength of the pattern are robusts and are orders of magnitude larger than the thickness of the layer. The propagation of the spiral and croissant cracks occurs in a narrow range of adhesion energy between the film and the substrate and strain in the film. We will show how the propagation is driven by a cooperation between fracture and adhesion.

  4. Study of spiral flow generated through an annular slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hun; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy-Dong

    2005-06-01

    The effect of pressurized air inlets in the reservoir upstream of the annular slit on characteristics of the axial and tangential velocity components is investigated numerically, and the mechanism of occurrence of spiral nozzle flow is clarified. In simulations, Unified Platform for Aerospace Computational Simulation (UPACS) is used. The governing equations under consideration are the unsteady compressible Navier - Stokes. A second-order finite volume scheme with MUSCL (Roe scheme) is used to discretize the spatial derivatives, and a second order-central difference scheme for the viscous terms, and a MFGS (Matrix Free Gauss Seidel) is employed for time integration. Spalart-Allmaras model was used as a turbulence model. The results obtained are compared with velocity distributions in the experiment measured by the two-component fiber optic laser Doppler velocimeter system. The existence of discrete pressurized air inlets that leads to the occurrence of asymmetrical characteristics is a very important factor for the formation of spiral flow.

  5. Spiral and never-settling patterns in active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Marenduzzo, D.; Marchetti, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined numerical and analytical study of pattern formation in an active system where particles align, possess a density-dependent motility, and are subject to a logistic reaction. The model can describe suspensions of reproducing bacteria, as well as polymerizing actomyosin gels in vitro or in vivo. In the disordered phase, we find that motility suppression and growth compete to yield stable or blinking patterns, which, when dense enough, acquire internal orientational ordering to give asters or spirals. We predict these may be observed within chemotactic aggregates in bacterial fluids. In the ordered phase, the reaction term leads to previously unobserved never-settling patterns which can provide a simple framework to understand the formation of motile and spiral patterns in intracellular actin systems.

  6. Design Approach for Spiral Milling Parts Using Knowledge Based Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpa, M.; Köhler, P.

    2014-07-01

    From the engineering point of view there are still problems regarding geometry modelling that cannot be satisfactorily solved despite efficient CAD systems. This applies in particular to virtual models when they are meant to match with the resulting manufacturing geometry of components as closely as possible. In this paper, relationships between modelling and manufacturing strategies are discussed. The focus is directed to the relationship between the modelling strategy and the manufacturing process by spiral milling with a ball cutter, whereby especially the influence of the tool geometry and the tool paths for the modelling strategy will be investigated. By means of an appropriate example of a design of spiral mandrel die from the field of plastics processing an approach will show how functional design and manufacturing-oriented design can be coupled and automated.

  7. Millimeter-wave generation with spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulke, B.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of using the interaction between a thin, solid, spiraling electron beam of 10 to 20 kV energy and a microwave cavity to generate watts of CW millimeter-wave power was investigated. Experimental results are given for several prototype devices operating at 9.4 GHz and at 94 GHz. Power outputs of 5 W, and electronic efficiencies near 3%, were obtained at X band, and moderate gain was obtained at 94 GHz. The small-signal theory gives a good fit to the X-band data, and the device behavior at 94 GHz is as expected from the given beam characteristics. The performance is limited chiefly by the velocity spread in the spiraling electron beam, and once this can be brought under control, high-power generation of millimeter waves appears quite feasible with this type of device.

  8. Mass extinctions and the sun's encounters with spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, Erik M.; Vasisht, Gautam

    1998-02-01

    The terrestrial fossil record shows that the exponential rise in biodiversity since the Precambrian period has been punctuated by large extinctions, at intervals of 40 to 140 Myr. These mass extinctions represent extremes over a background of smaller events and the natural process of species extinction. We point out that the non-terrestrial phenomena proposed to explain these events, such as boloidal impacts (a candidate for the end-Cretaceous extinction) and nearby supernovae, are collectively far more effective during the solar system's traversal of spiral arms. Using the best available data on the location and kinematics of the Galactic spiral structure (including distance scale and kinematic uncertainties), we present evidence that arm crossings provide a viable explanation for the timing of the large extinctions.

  9. Spectral Line Survey Toward Spiral Arm of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Sakai, N.; Sorai, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out a spectral line survey toward the spiral arm of M51 with the IRAM 30 m telescope, and have detected 13 molecular species. The excitation temperatures of the molecules are evaluated to be less than 10 K. This observation delineates the chemical compositions averaged over GMCs in the spiral arm for the first time. Based on this spectral line survey, we have conducted imaging observations of CH3OH, CS, CN, HNCO, C18O and 13CO with the CARMA interferometer. Distributions of molecules are found to be different from molecule to molecule at the 6” scale, although the different two positions observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope (20”-30” have very similar chemical compositions.

  10. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  11. Golden spiral photonic crystal fiber: polarization and dispersion properties.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Arti; Kejalakshmy, N; Chen, J; Rahman, B M A; Grattan, K T V

    2008-11-15

    A golden spiral photonic crystal fiber (GS-PCF) design is presented in which air holes are arranged in a spiral pattern governed by the golden ratio, where the design has been inspired by the optimal arrangement of seeds found in nature. The birefringence and polarization properties of this fiber are analyzed using a vectorial finite-element method. The fiber that is investigated shows a large modal birefringence peak value of 0.016 at an operating wavelength of 1.55 microm and exhibits highly tuneable dispersion with multiple zero dispersion wavelengths and also large normal dispersion. The GS-PCF design has identical circular air holes that potentially simplify fabrication. In light of its properties, the GS-PCF could have application as a highly birefringent fiber and in nonlinear optics, and moreover the 2D chiral nature of the pattern could yield exotic properties.

  12. Spiral-Bevel-Gear Damage Detected Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Helicopter transmission integrity is critical to helicopter safety because helicopters depend on the power train for propulsion, lift, and flight maneuvering. To detect impending transmission failures, the ideal diagnostic tools used in the health-monitoring system would provide real-time health monitoring of the transmission, demonstrate a high level of reliable detection to minimize false alarms, and provide end users with clear information on the health of the system without requiring them to interpret large amounts of sensor data. A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. (Spiral bevel gears are used in helicopter transmissions to transfer power between nonparallel intersecting shafts.) Data fusion was used to integrate two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, into a health-monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on the gears.

  13. Analysis of the vibratory excitation arising from spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Tools required to understand and predict in terms of its underlying causes the vibratory excitation arising from meshing spiral bevel gears are developed. A generalized three component transmission error of meshing spiral bevel gears is defined. Equations are derived that yield the three components of the generalized transmission error in terms of deviations of tooth running surfaces from equispaced perfect spherical involute surfaces and tooth/gearbody elastic deformations arising from the three components of the generalized force transmitted by the meshing gears. A method for incorporating these equations into the equations of motion of a gear system is described. Equations are derived for the three components of the generalized force transmitted by the gears which are valid whenever inertial effects of the meshing gears and their supports are negligible. Bearing offsets from the positions occupied by the shaft centerlines of perfect spherical involute bevel gears and bearing/bearing support flexibilities enter into the computation of these forces.

  14. The generalized transmission error of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The traditional definition of the transmission error of parallel-axis gear pairs is reviewed and shown to be unsuitable for characterizing the deviation from conjugate action of bevel gear pairs for vibration excitation characterization purposes. This situation is rectified by generalizing the concept of the transmission error of parallel-axis gears to a three-component transmission error for spiral bevel gears of nominal spherical involute design. A general relationship is derived which expresses the contributions to the three-component transmission error from each gear of a meshing spiral bevel pair as a linear transformation of the six coordinates that describe the deviation of the shaft centerline position of each gear of the pair from the position of its rigid perfect involute counterpart.

  15. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Szilard N.; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2014-07-01

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00324a

  16. Fraunhofer diffraction of a partially blocked spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Don M; Davis, Jeffrey A; Hernandez, Travis J

    2011-07-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a partially blocked spiral phase plate (SPP) produces a partial vortex output pattern that is rotated by 90 degrees compared with the input. The rotation direction depends on whether the angular phase pattern increases in the clockwise or counterclockwise direction. In this work, we present an explanation of this effect based on careful examination of classical diffraction theory and show new experimental results. This approach is very convenient for easily determining the sign of the vortex charge.

  17. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  18. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields. PMID:26285181

  19. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Pinion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ural, Ani; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffe, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    This project investigates computational modeling of fatigue crack growth in spiral bevel gears. Current work is a continuation of the previous efforts made to use the Boundary Element Method (BEM) to simulate tooth-bending fatigue failure in spiral bevel gears. This report summarizes new results predicting crack trajectory and fatigue life for a spiral bevel pinion using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Predicting crack trajectories is important in determining the failure mode of a gear. Cracks propagating through the rim may result in catastrophic failure, whereas the gear may remain intact if one tooth fails and this may allow for early detection of failure. Being able to predict crack trajectories is insightful for the designer. However, predicting growth of three-dimensional arbitrary cracks is complicated due to the difficulty of creating three-dimensional models, the computing power required, and absence of closed- form solutions of the problem. Another focus of this project was performing three-dimensional contact analysis of a spiral bevel gear set incorporating cracks. These analyses were significant in determining the influence of change of tooth flexibility due to crack growth on the magnitude and location of contact loads. This is an important concern since change in contact loads might lead to differences in SIFs and therefore result in alteration of the crack trajectory. Contact analyses performed in this report showed the expected trend of decreasing tooth loads carried by the cracked tooth with increasing crack length. Decrease in tooth loads lead to differences between SIFs extracted from finite element contact analysis and finite element analysis with Hertz contact loads. This effect became more pronounced as the crack grew.

  20. Acute Atherosis of the Uterine Spiral Arteries: Clinicopathologic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-01-01

    Acute atherosis is unique vascular changes of the placenta associated with poor placentation. It is characterized by subendothelial lipid-filled foam cells, fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial wall, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, and it is histologically similar to early-stage atherosclerosis. Acute atherosis is rare in normal pregnancies, but is frequently observed in non- transformed spiral arteries in abnormal pregnancies, such as preeclampsia, small for gestational age (SGA), fetal death, spontaneous preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes. In preeclampsia, spiral arteries fail to develop physiologic transformation and retain thick walls and a narrow lumen. Failure of physiologic transformation of spiral arteries is believed to be the main cause of uteroplacental ischemia, which can lead to the production of anti-angiogenic factors and induce endothelial dysfunction and eventually predispose the pregnancy to preeclampsia. Acute atherosis is more frequently observed in the spiral arteries of the decidua of the placenta (parietalis or basalis) than in the decidual or myometrial segments of the placental bed. The presence and deeper location of acute atherosis is associated with poorer pregnancy outcomes, more severe disease, earlier onset of preeclampsia, and a greater frequency of SGA neonates in patients with preeclampsia. Moreover, the idea that the presence of acute atherosis in the placenta may increase the risk of future cardiovascular disease in women with a history of preeclampsia is of growing concern. Therefore, placental examination is crucial for retrospective investigation of pregnancy complications and outcomes, and accurate placental pathology based on universal diagnostic criteria in patients with abnormal pregnancies is essential for clinicopathologic correlation. PMID:26530045

  1. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  2. MOLECULAR GAS EVOLUTION ACROSS A SPIRAL ARM IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, Fumi; Scoville, Nick; Koda, Jin

    2011-01-10

    We present sensitive and high angular resolution CO(1-0) data obtained by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations toward the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51. The angular resolution of 0.''7 corresponds to 30 pc, which is similar to the typical size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and the sensitivity is also high enough to detect typical GMCs. Within the 1' field of view centered on a spiral arm, a number of GMC-scale structures are detected as clumps. However, only a few clumps are found to be associated with each giant molecular association (GMA) and more than 90% of the total flux is resolved out in our data. Considering the high sensitivity and resolution of our data, these results indicate that GMAs are not mere confusion with GMCs but plausibly smooth structures. In addition, we have found that the most massive clumps are located downstream of the spiral arm, which suggests that they are at a later stage of molecular cloud evolution across the arm and plausibly are cores of GMAs. By comparing with H{alpha} and Pa{alpha} images, most of these cores are found to have nearby star-forming regions. We thus propose an evolutionary scenario for the interstellar medium, in which smaller molecular clouds collide to form smooth GMAs at spiral arm regions and then star formation is triggered in the GMA cores. Our new CO data have revealed the internal structure of GMAs at GMC scales, finding the most massive substructures on the downstream side of the arm in close association with the brightest H II regions.

  3. Spirals and Skyrmions in Two Dimensional Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, W. Vincent; Balents, Leon

    2014-02-01

    We construct the general free energy governing long-wavelength magnetism in two dimensional oxide heterostructures, which applies irrespective of the microscopic mechanism for magnetism. This leads, in the relevant regime of weak but non-negligible spin-orbit coupling, to a rich phase diagram containing in-plane ferromagnetic, spiral, cone, and Skyrmion lattice phases, as well as a nematic state stabilized by thermal fluctuations.

  4. Spiral arms in scattered light images of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    In the past few years, resolved observations with high angular resolution have revealed rich structures in gaseous protoplanetary disks. Among all discoveries, one of the most prominent is the giant double-spiral structure, found in MWC 758, SAO 206462, and HD 100453. The NIR images of these disks taken by Subaru/HiCIAO, VLT/NACO, and VLT/SPHERE showed two spiral arms at tens of AU from the center. The arms are very open with large pitch angles, and are in a nearly m=2 rotational symmetry. Although planets are known to be able to excite density waves in protoplanetary disks, fitting observations with linear theory of the density wave demands unreasonably big scale height in the disk, thus temperature, in order to make the arms as open as observed (and no need to mention the coincidence that they all have two nearly m=2 arms). Using 3D hydro and radiative transfer simulations, we find that a massive perturber (giant planet, brown dwarf, or stellar mass companion) can excite multiple spiral arms in the density structure, and the arms inside the perturber's orbit are very prominent in NIR scattered light images, in striking similarity with observations. Very recently, the perturber was found for the first time in the HD 100453 disk, as a M dwarf companion. This gives us great confidence of our models, and suggests that the double spirals in the other two objects, MWC 758 and SAO 206462, are very likely to be excited in a similar way, by a currently unseen perturber outside the arms. In particular, by measuring the angular distance between the two arms and comparing it with our models, we determine that the perturber in SAO 206462 is about 6 Jupiter mass.

  5. Straddle Design Of Spiral Bevel And Hypoid Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.; Kuan, Chihping; Kieffer, Jonathan; Bossler, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Computer-assisted method of analysis of straddle designs for spiral bevel and hypoid gears helps prevent undercutting of gear shafts during cutting of gear teeth. Analytical method and computer program based on equations for surface traced out by motion of head cutter, equation for cylindrical surface of shaft, and equations expressing relationships among coordinate systems fixed to various components of gear-cutting machine tool and gear.

  6. A Survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    This is a continuation of a survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies. The main purpose is to search for evidence of collisions with small galaxies that show up in X-rays by the generation of hot shocked gas from the collision. Secondary objectives include study of the spatial distribution point sources in the galaxy and to detect evidence for a central massive blackhole. These are alternate targets.

  7. A Survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    This is a continuation of a survey of nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies. The main purpose is to search for evidence of collisions with small galaxies that show up in X-rays by the generation of hot shocked gas from the collision. Secondary objectives include study of the spatial distribution point sources in the galaxy and to detect evidence for a central massive blackhole.

  8. [Multislice spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Egorova, E A; Zorina, I S; Sangaeva, L M

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of a radiation study in 34 patients with the clinical manifestations of maxillofacial osteomyelitides. It describes the radiation semiotics of changes occurring in the bone and its surrounding soft tissues of the maxillofacial region in different phases of osteomyelitis. Comparative analysis of orthopantograms and images obtained by multislice spiral computed tomography revealed the benefits of the latter in detecting soft tissue changes and subtle bone alterations.

  9. Density wave triggered star formation in grand design spirals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepa, J.; Beckman, J. E.; Knapen, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In normal spiral galaxies the arms are the main sites for star formation. This is the cause of their optical contrast compared with the rest of the disc. The spiral structure can be observed as a higher concentration of H2 regions, neutral gas (both atomic and molecular via CO), dust and stars than in the interarm disc. It seens generally accepted that, at least in grand design spirals, there are density waves in the discs. However, several questions are not clear yet and still under discussion. An important question could be termed the triggering dilemma (by analogy with the 'winding dilemma' raised in the forties): Is the enhanced star formation in the spiral arms triggered by the passage of a system of density waves or is it simply due to the presence of a higher column density of gas there? In the present work, we use triggering in the same sense as the moderate to strong triggering defined by Elmegreen (1992), that is to say that star formation in the arms occurs at a rate faster than that in the interarm zone, relative to the available placental gas. Our group has designed several tests to elucidate whether or not star formation is triggered in the arms with respect to the interarm region and we summarize one of them, that of the ratio of the star formation efficiency in the arms divided by that of the interarm zone at the same galactocentric distance which we may call the relative massive star formation efficiency, where the efficiency is defined using the ratio of the mass of stars (evaluated via the H alpha flux) to the mass of neutral gas, atomic plus molecular (which must be measured with the adequate angular resolution). If the relative efficiency is of order unity, the star formation is proportional to the mass of gas, if some kind of induced star formation is present, the relative efficiency should be considerably larger than unity.

  10. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  11. Infrared emission and tidal interactions of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gene G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations of tidal interactions of spiral galaxies are used to attempt to understand recent discoveries about infrared (IR) emitting galaxies. It is found that the stronger tidal perturbation by a companion the more disk gas clouds are thrown into nucleus crossing orbits and the greater the velocity jumps crossing spiral arms. Both these tidally created characteristics would create more IR emission by high speed cloud collisions and more IR via effects of recently formed stars. This expectation at greater tidal perturbation matches the observation of greater IR emission for spiral galaxies with closer and/or more massive companions. The greater collision velocities found at stronger perturbations on the models will also result in higher dust temperature in the colliding clouds. In the IR pairs examined, most have only one member, the larger, detected and when both are detected, the larger is always the more luminous. In simulations and in a simple analytic description of the strong distance dependence of the tidal force, it is found that the big galaxy of a pair is more strongly affected than the small.

  12. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi.

    PubMed

    Karst, Nathaniel; Dralle, David; Thompson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of soil fungi form the annular patterns known as 'fairy rings' and provide one of the only means to observe spatio-temporal dynamics of otherwise cryptic fungal growth processes in natural environments. We present observations of novel spiral and rotor patterns produced by fairy ring fungi and explain these behaviors mathematically by first showing that a well known model of fairy ring fungal growth and the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model are mathematically equivalent. We then use bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations to identify the conditions under which spiral waves and rotors can arise. We demonstrate that the region of dimensionless parameter space supporting these more complex dynamics is adjacent to that which produces the more familiar fairy rings, and identify experimental manipulations to test the transitions between these spatial modes. These same manipulations could also feasibly induce fungal colonies to transition from rotor/spiral formation to a set of richer, as yet unobserved, spatial patterns. PMID:26934477

  13. Behavior of vacuum arcs between spiral contacts with reduced spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, M. B.

    1994-05-01

    The use of reduced gaps in applications of high-current vacuum arc devices presents a number of interesting challenges. Specifically, standard contact designs have been developed over several decades to achieve controlled motion of high-current ac arcs in vacuum interrupters. For medium-voltage applications, the optimal maximum contact gap can typically range from about 6 mm to about 2 cm. However, the influence of the contact design may be gap dependent, so additional research may be appropriate if the contacts are to be used at smaller gaps. For example, the current through spiral contacts produces a magnetic field perpendicular to the arc column, but this will force the arc to move outward and run along the periphery of the petals only if a threshold separation is achieved. In this investigation, a framing camera was used to record the appearance and motion of drawn vacuum arcs between spiral-petal contacts with final gaps of 2 to 3 mm. After the rupture of the molten bridge, a high-pressure arc column formed and expanded across the width of the spiral arm. At the reduced gap, an intense anode spot formed if the peak current exceeded approximately 15 kA. Compared to results previously obtained at larger gaps, the arc motion was greatly reduced, and severe contact damage was observed at lower currents.

  14. Role of gas in supporting grand spiral structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumavo; Jog, Chanda J.

    2015-08-01

    The density wave theory for the grand-design two-armed spiral pattern in galaxies is successful in explaining several observed features. However, the long-term persistence of this spiral structure is a serious problem since the group transport would destroy it within about a billion years as shown in a classic paper by Toomre. In this paper, we include the low-velocity dispersion component, namely gas, on an equal footing with stars in the formulation of the density wave theory, and obtain the dispersion relation for this coupled system. We show that the inclusion of gas makes the group transport slower by a factor of few, thus allowing the pattern to persist longer - for several billion years. Though still less than the Hubble time, this helps in making the spiral structure more long-lived. Further we show that addition of gas is essential to get a stable wave for the observed pattern speed for the Galaxy, which otherwise is not possible for a one-component stellar disc.

  15. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Erin; Chien, Li-Hsin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (H i) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We apply the statistical moments in three different methods—the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variation does not appear to trace any star-forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions that we are sensitive to greater than ∼700 pc. From comparison between the moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sampled galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis also shows that the Burkhart et al. methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but also to normal spiral galaxies.

  16. Computer experiments on the structure and dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of an initially balanced rotating disk of stars with an initial velocity dispersion given by Toomre's local criterion was investigated by means of a computer model for isolated disks of stars. It was found that the disk is unstable against very large scale modes. A stable axisymmetric disk with a velocity dispersion much larger than that given by Toomre's criterion was generated. The final mass distribution for the disk gives a high density central core and a disk population of stars that is closely approximated by an exponential variation. Various methods and rates of cooling the hot axisymmetric disks were investigated. It was found that the cooling resulted in the development of two-arm spiral structures which persisted as long as cooling continued. An experiment was performed to induce spiral structure in a galaxy by means of the close passage of a companion galaxy. Parameters similar to those expected for M51 and its companion were used. It was found that because of the high velocity dispersion of the disturbed disk galaxy, only a weak two-arm spiral structure appeared. The evolution of a uniformly rotating disk galaxy which is a stationary solution of the collisionless Boltzmann equation was investigated for various values of the initial rms velocity dispersion. It was found that the disk becomes stable at a value of the velocity dispersion predicted by theory.

  17. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ˜ 5-10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ˜0.1-0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  18. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of soil fungi form the annular patterns known as ‘fairy rings’ and provide one of the only means to observe spatio-temporal dynamics of otherwise cryptic fungal growth processes in natural environments. We present observations of novel spiral and rotor patterns produced by fairy ring fungi and explain these behaviors mathematically by first showing that a well known model of fairy ring fungal growth and the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model are mathematically equivalent. We then use bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations to identify the conditions under which spiral waves and rotors can arise. We demonstrate that the region of dimensionless parameter space supporting these more complex dynamics is adjacent to that which produces the more familiar fairy rings, and identify experimental manipulations to test the transitions between these spatial modes. These same manipulations could also feasibly induce fungal colonies to transition from rotor/spiral formation to a set of richer, as yet unobserved, spatial patterns. PMID:26934477

  19. A spiral microorganism in the stomach of pigs.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, D M; Rocha, G A; Mendes, E N; Lage, A P; Carvalho, A C; Barbosa, A J

    1990-08-01

    Light and electron microscopic and microbiologic evaluations were performed on mucosa of stomachs from 120 healthy slaughtered pigs. Helicobacter pylori was not found, but a tightly spiralled bacterium, not previously described, was seen in histological sections and/or in carbol fuchsin stained smears in 13 (10.8%) stomachs. In paraffin sections stained with carbol fuchsin, the bacteria were seen in the mucus of the lumen of the antral pits and in the mucosa surface within and beneath the mucus. In this sections of Polilyte embedded tissue the bacteria had three to eight spiral turns per cell (mean = five), flattened ends, a Gram-negative cell-wall structure and a sheathed flagella. The urease test was positive in gastric mucosa of 13 bacteria-positive pigs (10.8%). The microorganism was not cultured and did not cross-react with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits against H. pylori. Superficial chronic gastritis and "borderline" gastritis were observed in antral mucosa of 10 (76.9%) and of two (15.4%) spiral bacteria-positive pigs, respectively.

  20. Characterization of Atmospheric Ekman Spirals at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysman, Jean-François; Lahellec, Alain; Vignon, Etienne; Genthon, Christophe; Verrier, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    We use wind speed and temperature measurements taken along a 45-m meteorological tower located at Dome C, Antarctica (75.06°S, 123.19°E) to highlight and characterize the Ekman spiral. Firstly, temperature records reveal that the atmospheric boundary layer at Dome C is stable during winter and summer nights (i.e., >85 % of the time). The wind vector, in both speed and direction, also shows a strong dependence with elevation. An Ekman model was then fitted to the measurements. Results show that the wind vector follows the Ekman spiral structure for more than 20 % of the year (2009). Most Ekman spirals have been detected during summer nights, that is, when the boundary layer is slightly stratified. During these episodes, the boundary-layer height ranged from 25 to 100 m, the eddy viscosity from 0.004 to 0.06 m^2 s^{-1}, and the Richardson number from zero to 1.6.

  1. Self-gravitating gas flow in barred spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntley, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional numerical experiments is performed in order to test the response of an isothermal, self-gravitating gas disk to a uniformly rotating, barlike gravitational potential. The barlike potential is an equilibrium stellar model from the n-body calculations of Miller and Smith (1979). In the bar-dominated, central regions of the disk, a gas bar whose phase depends primarily on the location of principal resonances in the disk is formed. This response can be understood in terms of orbit-crowding effects. In the gas-dominated outer regions of the disk, two-armed trailing spiral waves are formed. The local pitch angle of these waves increases with increasing fractional gas mass. These self-gravitating gas waves are not self-sustaining. They are driven from the ends of equilibrium stellar bars, and their phase does not depend on the location of resonances in the disk. The relevance of these self-gravitating waves to observations and models of barred spiral galaxies is discussed. It is concluded that these waves and their associated ringlike structures may be consistent with the morphological distribution of gas features in barred spiral galaxies.

  2. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ∼ 5–10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ∼0.1–0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  3. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2000-01-01

    The majority of helicopter transmission systems utilize spiral bevel gears to convert the horizontal power from the engine into vertical power for the rotor. Due to the cyclical loading on a gear's tooth, fatigue crack propagation can occur. In rotorcraft applications, a crack's trajectory determines whether the gear failure will be benign or catastrophic for the aircraft. As a result, the capability to predict crack growth in gears is significant. A spiral bevel gear's complex shape requires a three dimensional model of the geometry and cracks. The boundary element method in conjunction with linear elastic fracture mechanics theories is used to predict arbitrarily shaped three dimensional fatigue crack trajectories in a spiral bevel pinion under moving load conditions. The predictions are validated by comparison to experimental results. The sensitivity of the predictions to variations in loading conditions and crack growth rate model parameters is explored. Critical areas that must be understood in greater detail prior to predicting more accurate crack trajectories and crack growth rates in three dimensions are identified.

  4. Geometric error measurement of spiral bevel gears and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xue-mei; Cao, Qing-mei; Xu, Hao

    2008-12-01

    This paper calculates the theoretical tooth surface of spiral bevel gear and, using coordinate measuring machine, inspects the actual tooth surface, which provides an objective and quantitative method for inspecting the tooth surface of spiral bevel gears. For many reasons there are some deviations between the actual tooth surface and the theoretical tooth surface. Based on the differential geometry and space engagement theory, this paper deduces the analytical representation of theoretical tooth surface through the process of gear generation. After comparing the coordinates of the actual gear tooth surface and the theoretical tooth surface, a high-precision analysis graphics of tooth surface errors can be obtained by measuring date processing. A pair of aviation spiral bevel gears manufactured by Phoenix 800PG Grinding machine are inspected by Mahr measurement. The result of comparison of gear surface errors, inspected respectively by the method of this paper and by the Mahr's software, shows the consistency of the error distribution. The experiment verifies the validity and feasibility of the method presented in this paper.

  5. Nature of the wiggle instability of galactic spiral shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Jeong-Gyu E-mail: kimyh@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-01

    Gas in disk galaxies interacts nonlinearly with an underlying stellar spiral potential to form galactic spiral shocks. While numerical simulations typically show that spiral shocks are unstable to wiggle instability (WI) even in the absence of magnetic fields and self-gravity, its physical nature has remained uncertain. To clarify the mechanism behind the WI, we conduct a normal-mode linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations assuming that the disk is isothermal and infinitesimally thin. We find that the WI is physical, originating from the generation of potential vorticity at a deformed shock front, rather than Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as previously thought. Since gas in galaxy rotation periodically passes through the shocks multiple times, the potential vorticity can accumulate successively, setting up a normal mode that grows exponentially with time. Eigenfunctions of the WI decay exponentially downstream from the shock front. Both shock compression of acoustic waves and a discontinuity of shear across the shock stabilize the WI. The wavelength and growth time of the WI depend on the arm strength quite sensitively. When the stellar-arm forcing is moderate at 5%, the wavelength of the most unstable mode is about 0.07 times the arm-to-arm spacing, with the growth rate comparable to the orbital angular frequency, which is found to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  6. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  7. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  8. SU-E-J-207: Assessing the Validity of 4D-CT Based Target Volumes and Free Breathing CBCT Localization in Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy (SABR)

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Park, J; Wang, F; Kumar, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional-computed-tomography(4D-CT) imaging for target-volume delineation and cone-beam-tomography(CBCT) for treatment localization are widely utilized in lung-SABR.Aim of this study was to perform a quantitative-assessment and inter-comparison of Internal-targetvolumes( ITV) drawn on various phases of breathing-cycle 4D-CT-scans, Maximum-intensity-projection(MIP), average-intensity-projection(AIP)and static CT-scans of lung-motion-phantom to simulate lung-SABR patient geometry. We also analyzed and compared the ITVs drawn on freebreathing- CBCT. Materials and Methods: 4D-CT-scans were acquired on Philips big-bore 16slice CT and Bellows-respiratory monitoring-system using retrospective phase-binning method. Each respiratory cycle divided into 10-phases. Quasar-Phantom with lung-inserts and 3cm-diameter nylonball to simulate tumor and was placed on respiratory-motion-platform for 4D-CT and CBCT-acquisition. Amplitudes of motions: 0.5,1.0,2.0,3.0cm in superior-inferior direction with breathing-cycle time of 6,5,4,6sec, respectively used.4D-CTs with 10-phases(0%to90%)for each excursion-set and 3D-CT for static-phantom exported to iPlan treatment-planningsystem( TPS).Tumor-volumes delineated in all phases of 4D-CT, MIP,AIP,CBCT scans using fixed-HU-threshold(−500to1000)values automatically.For each 4D-dataset ITV obtained by unifying the tumorcontours on all phases.CBCT-ITV-volumes were drawn in Eclipse-TPS. Results: Mean volume of tumor contours for all phases compared with static 3D-CT were 0.62±0.08%, 1.67±0.26%, 4.77±0.54% and 9.27±1.23% for 0.5cm,1cm,2cm,3cm excursions respectively. Differences of mean Union-ITV with MIP-ITV were close(≤2.4%).Mean Union-ITV from expected-theoretical values differed from −4.9% to 3.8%.Union-ITV and MIP-ITV were closer within 2.3%. AIP-ITVs were underestimated from 14 to 32% compared to union-ITV for all motion datasets. Differences of −5.9% to −44% and −5% to 6.7% for CBCT-ITV from MIP-ITV and AIP

  9. 3D stereophotogrammetric image superimposition onto 3D CT scan images: the future of orthognathic surgery. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Khambay, Balvinder; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Bowman, Janet; Walker, Fraser; Hadley, Donald M; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to register and assess the accuracy of the superimposition method of a 3-dimensional (3D) soft tissue stereophotogrammetric image (C3D image) and a 3D image of the underlying skeletal tissue acquired by 3D spiral computerized tomography (CT). The study was conducted on a model head, in which an intact human skull was embedded with an overlying latex mask that reproduced anatomic features of a human face. Ten artificial radiopaque landmarks were secured to the surface of the latex mask. A stereophotogrammetric image of the mask and a 3D spiral CT image of the model head were captured. The C3D image and the CT images were registered for superimposition by 3 different methods: Procrustes superimposition using artificial landmarks, Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks, and partial Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks and then registration completion by HICP (a modified Iterative Closest Point algorithm) using a specified region of both images. The results showed that Procrustes superimposition using the artificial landmarks produced an error of superimposition on the order of 10 mm. Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks produced an error in the order of 2 mm. Partial Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks followed by HICP produced a superimposition accuracy of between 1.25 and 1.5 mm. It was concluded that a stereophotogrammetric and a 3D spiral CT scan image can be superimposed with an accuracy of between 1.25 and 1.5 mm using partial Procrustes analysis based on anatomic landmarks and then registration completion by HICP.

  10. Magnetic field sensor based on fiber Bragg grating with a spiral microgroove ablated by femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yutang; Yang, Minghong; Xu, Gang; Yuan, Yinquan

    2013-07-15

    A novel magnetic field sensor based on Terfenol-D coated fiber Bragg grating with spiral microstructure was proposed and demonstrated. Through a specially-designed holder, the spiral microstructure was ablated into the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) cladding by femtosecond laser. Due to the spiral microstructure, the sensitivity of FBG coated with magnetostrictive film was enhanced greatly. When the spiral pitch is 50 μm and microgroove depth is 13.5 μm, the sensitivity of the magnetic field sensor is roughly 5 times higher than that of non-microstructured standard FBG. The response to magnetic field is reversible, and could be applicable for magnetic field detection.

  11. Standing spin waves and solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional spiral structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V. V. Raskovalov, A. A.

    2013-02-15

    On the basis of the sine-Gordon model, we calculated the absorption spectrum for the external pump power in a quasi-one-dimensional spiral structure of easy-plane magnets without the inversion center in the presence of a static magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic spiral axis. It is shown that these data can be used for determining the material constants of the magnet and diagnostics of spin waves and solitons in its spiral structure. The possibility of using magnetooptical methods to observe local translations of the spiral structure during formation and motion of solitons in it is discussed.

  12. Instabilities of spiral shocks - I. Onset of wiggle instability and its mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Keiichi; Koda, Jin

    2004-03-01

    We found that loosely wound spiral shocks in an isothermal gas disc caused by a non-axisymmetric potential are hydrodynamically unstable, if the shocks are strong enough. High-resolution, global hydrodynamical simulations using three different numerical schemes, i.e. Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM), Cubic Interpolated Propagation (CIP) and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), show similarly that trailing spiral shocks with the pitch angle of larger than ~10° wiggle, and clumps are developed in the shock-compressed layer. The numerical simulations also show clear wave crests that are associated with ripples of the spiral shocks. The spiral shocks tend to be more unstable in a rigidly rotating disc than in a flat rotation. This instability could be an origin of the secondary structures of spiral arms, i.e. the spurs/fins, observed in spiral galaxies. In spite of this local instability, the global spiral morphology of the gas is maintained over many rotational periods. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability in a shear layer behind the shock is a possible mechanism for the wiggle instability. The Richardson criterion for the K-H stability is expressed as a function of the Mach number, the pitch angle and the strength of the background spiral potential. The criterion suggests that spiral shocks with smaller pitch angles and smaller Mach numbers would be more stable, and this is consistent with the numerical results.

  13. Dosimetric and image quality assessment of different acquisition protocols of a novel 64-slice CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vite, Cristina; Mangini, Monica; Strocchi, Sabina; Novario, Raffaele; Tanzi, Fabio; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Conte, Leopoldo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-03-01

    Dose and image quality assessment in computed tomography (CT) are almost affected by the vast variety of CT scanners (axial CT, spiral CT, low-multislice CT (2-16), high-multislice CT (32-64)) and imaging protocols in use. Very poor information is at the moment available on 64 slices CT scanners. Aim of this work is to assess image quality related to patient dose indexes and to investigate the achievable dose reduction for a commercially available 64 slices CT scanner. CT dose indexes (weighted computed tomography dose index, CTDI w and Dose Length Product, DLP) were measured with a standard CT phantom for the main protocols in use (head, chest, abdomen and pelvis) and compared with the values displayed by the scanner itself. The differences were always below 7%. All the indexes were below the Diagnostic Reference Levels defined by the European Council Directive 97/42. Effective doses were measured for each protocol with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted in an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and compared with the same values computed by the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator software code and corrected by a factor taking in account the number of slices (from 16 to 64). The differences were always below 25%. The effective doses range from 1.5 mSv (head) to 21.8 mSv (abdomen). The dose reduction system of the scanner was assessed comparing the effective dose measured for a standard phantom-man (a cylinder phantom, 32 cm in diameter) to the mean dose evaluated on 46 patients. The standard phantom was considered as no dose reduction reference. The dose reduction factor range from 16% to 78% (mean of 46%) for all protocols, from 29% to 78% (mean of 55%) for chest protocol, from 16% to 76% (mean of 42%) for abdomen protocol. The possibility of a further dose reduction was investigated measuring image quality (spatial resolution, contrast and noise) as a function of CTDI w. This curve shows a quite flat trend decreasing the dose approximately to 90% and a

  14. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  15. Spectral, diffusive and convective properties of fractal and spiral fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angilella, J. R.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    1998-12-01

    Spectral, diffusive and convective properties of one-dimensional pulse fields displaying a well-defined Kolmogorov capacity D ε [0, 1] are investigated. The energy spectrum of fractal or spiral alternating pulse fields scales as k D. The energy spectrum of homogeneous fractal non-alternating pulse fields scales as k -D. Both these scaling laws hold in a range of wavenumbers between η -1 and L-1, where η is the smallest distance between pulses and L (≫ η) is a characteristic large scale of the structure. The space-filling geometry, which is quantified by the Kolmogorov capacity D, makes the field less autocorrelated (more singular) in the alternating case, whereas it makes it more autocorrelated (less singular) in the non-alternating case. Significant quantitative differences between the spectral properties of homogeneous fractals and of spirals exist. The energy spectrum of a spiral non-alternating pulse field scales as k-1 between x-1N and L-1, where x N ∼ η( L/η) D ≫ η characterizes the inhomogeneity of the structure. The spectrum is flat outside this wavenumber range. When submitted to the action of molecular diffusion (molecular diffusivity v) the energy of these fields decays as follows. Energy decay is accelerated in the case of fractal or spiral alternating pulse fields: E(t) (for{ηv≪t≪L/v and is delayed (“trapped”) in the case of non-alternating homogeneous fractal pulse fields: E(t) ( forη/v≪t≪L/v This energy trapping manifests itself in a different manner in the case of spiral non-alternating pulse fields. In this case energy decays only logarithmically for η 2/ v ≪ t ≪ x2N/ v, then decays like t-1/2 for longer times. When submitted to the combined action of convection and diffusion (Burgers equation) the energy of these fields of N pulses each of integral m ≫ v decays as follows. It is independent of D in the case of alternating pulse fields, and is delayed in the case of non-alternating pulse fields. For homogeneous

  16. Dynamics and morphology in the inner regions of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Kambiz

    The formation and evolution of galaxies represents one of the foremost questions in the understanding of the Universe. Galaxies are not static structures. They form at a certain time during the history of the Universe, and evolve with time. Given that galaxies are found in a variety of shapes and properties, studying the properties of galaxies is best carried out when they are sub-divided into different morphological types. In the 1920s, Edwin Hubble introduced the classification scheme illustrated which classifies most galaxies into categories of elliptical, normal spiral, barred spiral, and irregular galaxies, and then subdivided these categories with respect to properties such as the amount of flattening for elliptical galaxies and the size of the bulges and the nature of the arms for spiral galaxies. The Hubble sequence has often been interpreted as an evolutionary sequence with galaxies evolving from right to left. Recently there are more and more studies that find that some galaxies have undergone significant morphological transformation over cosmic time. It is found that, in the nearby Universe, more field disk galaxies are of earlier Hubble type than at higher redshift. Also a large number of faint blue galaxies have been detected at intermediate redshift, which are believed to have evolved by now to red dwarf ellipticals. Last but not least, it has been known for quite some time that spiral galaxies after merging can form elliptical galaxies. The interesting puzzle is now to use these transformations to learn more about what happens with these systems through mergers, interactions with companions, or by internal dynamical processes. Do galaxies evolve along the Hubble sequence, and if yes, in which direction? In this thesis, we focus on the inner regions of barred as well as unbarred spiral galaxies, and aim to better understand to what extent non-axisymmetric features such as bars determine the evolution of a galaxy. It is known that non-circular motions

  17. Stellar populations in spiral galaxies: broadband versus spectroscopic viewpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, Lauren Anne

    2006-06-01

    This thesis addresses the stellar population content in the bulges and disks of spiral galaxies using broad-band and spectroscopic data. The results can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation in addition to establishing a comprehensive, model-independent, picture of colour and line-index gradients in spiral galaxies. Building upon my Masters study of structural parameters in spiral galaxies, I use the largest collection of multi-band (optical and IR) surface brightness profiles for face-on and moderately-tilted galaxies to extract radial colour profiles. The colour gradients are then translated into age and metallicity gradients by comparison with stellar population synthesis (SPS) models considering a range of star formation histories, including recent bursts. Based on their integrated light, we find that high surface brightness (SB) regions of galaxies formed their stars earlier than lower SB ones, or at a similar epoch but on shorter timescale. At a given SB level, the star formation histories are modulated by the overall potential of the galaxy such that brighter/higher rotational velocity galaxies formed earlier. This formation "down-sizing" implied by our results is inconsistent with current implementations of semi-analytic structure formation models. In order to alleviate concerns that our colour gradients could be affected by dust reddening, we designed a similar spectroscopic investigation and explored the dust sensitivity of absorption-line indices. The latter test makes use of the latest SPS, models incorporating a multi-component model for the line and continuum attenuation due to dust. For quiescent stellar populations (e.g. spheroids and globular clusters), dust extinction effects are small for most indices with the exception of the 4000 Å break. For models with current star formation, many indices may suffer from dust reddening and any departures depend on age, dust distribution, and the effective optical depth. However, a number of useful

  18. Stellar populations in spiral galaxies: Broadband versus spectroscopic viewpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, Lauren Anne

    This thesis addresses the stellar population content in the bulges and disks of spiral galaxies using broad-band and spectroscopic data. The results can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation in addition to establishing a comprehensive, model-independent, picture of colour and line-index gradients in spiral galaxies. Building upon my Masters study of structural parameters in spiral galaxies, I use the largest collection of multi-band (optical and IR) surface brightness profiles for face-on and moderately-tilted galaxies to extract radial colour profiles. The colour gradients are then translated into age and metallicity gradients by comparison with stellar population synthesis (SPS) models considering a range of star formation histories, including recent bursts. Based on their integrated light, we find that high surface brightness (SB) regions of galaxies formed their stars earlier than lower SB ones, or at a similar epoch but on shorter timescale. At a given SB level, the star formation histories are modulated by the overall potential of the galaxy such that brighter/higher rotational velocity galaxies formed earlier. This formation "down-sizing" implied by our results is inconsistent with current implementations of semi-analytic structure formation models. In order to alleviate concerns that our colour gradients could be affected by dust reddening, we designed a similar spectroscopic investigation and explored the dust sensitivity of absorption-line indices. The latter test makes use of the latest SPS, models incorporating a multi-component model for the line and continuum attenuation due to dust. For quiescent stellar populations (e.g. spheroids and globular clusters), dust extinction effects are small for most indices with the exception of the 4000 Å break. For models with current star formation, many indices may suffer from dust reddening and any departures depend on age, dust distribution, and the effective optical depth. However, a number of useful

  19. Distribution de la matiere sombre dans les galaxies spirales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais-Ouellette, Sebastien

    Cette etude a pour objet central la distribution de la masse obscure dans les galaxies spirales. Utilisant l'exemple de NGC 5585, il est d'abord montre l'impact de la resolution spatiale insuffisante dans les observations radio en synthese d'ouverture, observations jusqu'a maintenant tenues pour suffisamment precises et fiables. A l'aide d'observations Fabry-Perot de haute resolution, nous observons une correction importante de la partie montante de la courbe de rotation et par consequence un changement majeur dans l'importance relative des composantes sombre et lumineuse dans la galaxie. A partir de ce resultat, une etude systematique d'une dizaine de galaxies spirales est faite en ajoutant des observations Fabry-Perot aux donnees radio existantes. Une technique d'une grande malleabilite permet de modeliser la masse dans ces galaxies en utilisant diverses formes de halo sombre en plus des composantes gazeuse et stellaires. Il apparait clairement que les halos predits par les simulations de l'evolution cosmologique de la masse sombre froide ne peuvent expliquer la dynamique actuelle des galaxies spirales tardives. En fait, la compatibilite cesse pour des galaxies ayant des vitesses de rotation inferieures a 100 km s-1 suggerant que les trop grandes densites centrales des simulations sont detruites par un phenomene inhibe par un grand potentiel gravitationel. Par ailleurs, une theorie alternative a la masse obscure, la gravite newtonienne modifiee, apparait incompatible avec les nouvelles donnees, ne pouvant expliquer les courbes de rotation de pres de la moitie des galaxies de l'echantillon. De plus, plusieurs correlations apparaissent entre les parametres de la modelisation de masse. Entre autres, il existe une relation directe entre la densite centrale des halos et leur rayon de coeur, deux parametres jusqu'alors consideres comme independants. La distribution de la masse sombre peut donc etre decrite par un seul parametre.

  20. Fundamental mass-spin-morphology relation of spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Obreschkow, D.; Glazebrook, K.

    2014-03-20

    This work presents high-precision measurements of the specific baryon angular momentum j {sub b} contained in stars, atomic gas, and molecular gas, out to ≳ 10 scale radii, in 16 nearby spiral galaxies of the THINGS sample. The accuracy of these measurements improves on existing studies by an order of magnitude, leading to the discovery of a strong correlation between the baryon mass M {sub b}, j {sub b}, and the bulge mass fraction β, fitted by β=−(0.34±0.03) lg (j{sub b}M{sub b}{sup −1}/[10{sup −7} kpc km s{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}{sup −1}])−(0.04±0.01) on the full sample range of 0 ≤ β ≲ 0.3 and 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} < M {sub b} < 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The corresponding relation for the stellar quantities M {sub *} and j {sub *} is identical within the uncertainties. These M-j-β relations likely originate from the proportionality between jM {sup –1} and the surface density of the disk that dictates its stability against (pseudo-)bulge formation. Using a cold dark matter model, we can approximately explain classical scaling relations, such as the fundamental plane of spiral galaxies, the Tully-Fisher relation, and the mass-size relation, in terms of the M-j(-β) relation. These results advocate the use of mass and angular momentum as the most fundamental quantities of spiral galaxies.

  1. A spiral model of musical decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, Daniel; Schubert, Emery; Fabian, Dorottya

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model of how musicians make decisions about performing notated music. The model builds on psychological theories of decision-making and was developed from empirical studies of Western art music performance that aimed to identify intuitive and deliberate processes of decision-making, a distinction consistent with dual-process theories of cognition. The model proposes that the proportion of intuitive (Type 1) and deliberate (Type 2) decision-making processes changes with increasing expertise and conceptualizes this change as movement along a continually narrowing upward spiral where the primary axis signifies principal decision-making type and the vertical axis marks level of expertise. The model is intended to have implications for the development of expertise as described in two main phases. The first is movement from a primarily intuitive approach in the early stages of learning toward greater deliberation as analytical techniques are applied during practice. The second phase occurs as deliberate decisions gradually become automatic (procedural), increasing the role of intuitive processes. As a performer examines more issues or reconsiders decisions, the spiral motion toward the deliberate side and back to the intuitive is repeated indefinitely. With increasing expertise, the spiral tightens to signify greater control over decision type selection. The model draws on existing theories, particularly Evans’ (2011) Intervention Model of dual-process theories, Cognitive Continuum Theory Hammond et al. (1987), Hammond (2007), Baylor’s (2001) U-shaped model for the development of intuition by level of expertise. By theorizing how musical decision-making operates over time and with increasing expertise, this model could be used as a framework for future research in music performance studies and performance science more generally. PMID:24795673

  2. Star Formation in the Outer Disk of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kate L.; van Zee, Liese; Côté, Stéphanie; Schade, David

    2012-09-01

    We combine new deep and wide field of view Hα imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d ≈ 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of ~10-5 to 10-6 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically gsim85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of ~2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  3. The relation between infrared and radio emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George

    1991-01-01

    A remarkable correlation between the far infrared and the radio continuum emission of star forming galaxies was one of the early results based on IRAS data, and has remained one of the most intriguing. Recent work has extended the correlation to early type galaxies, revealing a slightly different ratio in lenticulars. When radio and infrared maps of disk galaxies are compared, the radio disks appear systematically more diffuse. This has been interpreted as a manifestation of the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons, and has allowed a fresh look at the behavior of magnetic fields and cosmic rays in spiral galaxies, and at their relation to the rest of the interstellar medium.

  4. Molecular gas temperature and density in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. F.; Jaffe, D. T.; Bash, F. N.; Israel, F. P.; Maloney, P. R.; Baas, F.

    1993-01-01

    We combine beam-matched CO-13, CO-12 J = 3 yields 2 and J = 2 yields 1 line data to infer the molecular gas excitation conditions in the central 500 to 1600 pc diameters of a small sample of infrared-bright external galaxies: NGC253, IC342, M 83, Maffei 2, and NGC6946. Additional observations of the J = 1 yields 0 lines of C-18O and CO-13 set limits on the opacity of the CO-13 J = 1 yields 0 line averaged over the central kiloparsec of these spiral galaxies.

  5. Confinement stabilizes a bacterial suspension into a spiral vortex.

    PubMed

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G; Dunkel, Jörn; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-06-28

    Confining surfaces play crucial roles in dynamics, transport, and order in many physical systems, but their effects on active matter, a broad class of dynamically self-organizing systems, are poorly understood. We investigate here the influence of global confinement and surface curvature on collective motion by studying the flow and orientational order within small droplets of a dense bacterial suspension. The competition between radial confinement, self-propulsion, steric interactions, and hydrodynamics robustly induces an intriguing steady single-vortex state, in which cells align in inward spiraling patterns accompanied by a thin counterrotating boundary layer. A minimal continuum model is shown to be in good agreement with these observations.

  6. Finite difference time domain modeling of spiral antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Christopher W.; Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives outlined in the original proposal for this project were to create a well-documented computer analysis model based on the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) method that would be capable of computing antenna impedance, far-zone radiation patterns, and radar cross-section (RCS). The ability to model a variety of penetrable materials in addition to conductors is also desired. The spiral antennas under study by this project meet these requirements since they are constructed of slots cut into conducting surfaces which are backed by dielectric materials.

  7. The Maximum Disk Hypothesis and 2-D Spiral Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palunas, P.; Williams, T. B.

    1995-12-01

    We present an analysis of two-dimensional \\ha\\ velocity fields and I-band surface photometry for spiral galaxies taken from the southern sky Fabry-Perot Tully-Fisher survey (Schommer et al., 1993, AJ 105, 97). We construct axi-symmetric maximum disk mass models for 75 galaxies and examine in detail the deviations from axi-symmetry in the surface brightness and kinematics for a subsample of these galaxies. The luminosity profiles and rotation curves are derived using consistent centers, position angles, and inclinations. The disk and bulge are deconvolved by fitting an exponential disk and a series expansion of Gaussians for the bulge directly to the I-band images. This helps constrain the deconvolution by exploiting geometric information as well as the distinct disk and bulge radial profiles. The final disk model is the surface brightness profile of the bulge-subtracted image. The photometric model is fitted to the rotation curve assuming a maximum disk and constant M/L's for the disk and bulge components. The overall structure of the photometric models reproduces the structure in the rotation curves in the majority of galaxies spanning a large range of morphologies and rotation widths from 120 \\kms\\ to 680 \\kms. The median I-band M/L in solar units is 2.8, consistent with normal stellar populations. These results make the disk-halo conspiracy even more puzzling. The degree to which spiral galaxy mass models can reproduce small-scale structure in rotation curves is often used as evidence to support or refute the maximum disk hypothesis. However, single-slit rotation curves sample the velocity distribution only along the major axis, and photometric profiles for inclined galaxies are also sampled most heavily near the major axis. The small-scale structure can be due to local perturbations, such as spiral arms and spiral-arm streaming motions, rather than variations in the global mass distribution. We test this hypothesis by analysing azimuthal correlations in

  8. Kinematic Mass Measurements of Inner and Outer Spiral Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, R.

    2010-01-01

    Our knowledge of the structure and kinematics of galactic disks and halos is quite limited. While integrated light spectroscopy has provided a large amount of information on inner disks, once outside 2.5 disk scale lengths, almost nothing is known. Does the mass-to-light ratio (M/L) stay constant in the outer regions? Does the stellar scale height stay constant or do disks flare? Are galactic disks really maximal and could there be any trends with Hubble type? Are dark matter halos fit better by NFW or pseudo-isothermal models? We have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to probe the kinematic structure of face-on spiral disks by identifying large ( 100) samples of these objects via narrow-band imaging, and then measuring their radial velocities with follow-up, high-precision ( 5 km/s) spectroscopy. Our results for IC 342, M74, M83, M94, and M101 are quite interesting. With one exception (M101) the z-velocity dispersion (sigmaz) of galactic disks declines exponentially with the light out to 3 disk scale lengths. This is exactly as expected for a constant M/L, constant scale height disk. However, in the two galaxies with significant data past this radius, the values of sigmaz asymptote out at 20 km/s. Moreover, our analysis finds kinematic evidence for significant flaring in the outer regions, especially in M94. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions derived from models of disk heating by halo substructure, and demonstrate how kinematic surveys in the outer disks of spirals can be used to test hierarchical models of galaxy formation. We also find that the disks of late-type galaxies are far from maximal, that the disks of early type spirals have higher M/L ratios than the disks of later-type objects, and that the unseen inner halos of spiral galaxies are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  9. Spirals and skyrmions in two dimensional oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, W. Vincent; Balents, Leon

    2014-03-01

    A symmetry-based general free energy governing long-wavelength magnetism in two-dimensional oxide heterostructures will be presented. This leads, in the relevant regime of weak but non-negligible spin-orbit coupling, to a rich phase diagram containing in-plane ferromagnetic, spiral, cone, and skyrmion lattice phases, as well as a nematic state stabilized by thermal fluctuations. The general conclusions are vetted by a microscopic derivation for a simple model with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. NSF PHY11-25915, NSF DMR-06809, ARO (W911NF-11-1-0230.

  10. Optical induction scheme for assembling nondiffracting aperiodic Vogel spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Diebel, Falko Rose, Patrick; Boguslawski, Martin; Denz, Cornelia

    2014-05-12

    We introduce an experimental approach to realize aperiodic photonic lattices based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams. This holographic optical induction scheme takes advantage of the well localized Bessel beam as a basis to assemble two-dimensional photonic lattices. We present the realization of an optically induced two-dimensional golden-angle Vogel spiral lattice, which belongs to the family of deterministic aperiodic structures. With our technique, a very broad class of photonic refractive index landscapes now becomes accessible to optical induction, which could not be realized with established distributed holographic techniques.

  11. Unstable spiral modes in disk-shaped galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Y. Y.; Lin, C. C.; Mark, James W.-K.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the maintenance and the excitation of trailing spiral modes of density waves in diskshaped galaxies, as proposed by Lin in 1969 and by Mark recently, are substantiated by an analysis of the gas-dynamical model of the galaxy. The self-excitation of the unstable mode in caused by waves propagating outwards from the corotation circle, which carry away angular momentum of a sign opposite to that contained in the wave system inside that circle. Specifically, a simple dispersion relationship is given as a definite integral, which allows the immediate determination of the pattern frequency and the amplification rate, once the basic galactic model is known. PMID:16592313

  12. Optical induction scheme for assembling nondiffracting aperiodic Vogel spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebel, Falko; Rose, Patrick; Boguslawski, Martin; Denz, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    We introduce an experimental approach to realize aperiodic photonic lattices based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams. This holographic optical induction scheme takes advantage of the well localized Bessel beam as a basis to assemble two-dimensional photonic lattices. We present the realization of an optically induced two-dimensional golden-angle Vogel spiral lattice, which belongs to the family of deterministic aperiodic structures. With our technique, a very broad class of photonic refractive index landscapes now becomes accessible to optical induction, which could not be realized with established distributed holographic techniques.

  13. Transverse instability of line defects of period-2 spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Kyoung J

    2004-08-27

    Spiral waves that arise in period-2 oscillatory media extended in space generically bear "line defects" along which the local kinetics exhibits a period-1 oscillation. Locally, these defect structures can be viewed as a front separating two period-2 oscillatory domains oscillating 2pi out of phase. Here we show that their shape can become sinusoidal with a transverse instability as in bistable fronts. This instability eventually leads to a line-defect filled spatiotemporal chaotic state having erratic proliferations, annihilations, and regenerations of line defects. The same sequence of phenomena is observed in a model reaction-diffusion system as well as in an experimental system.

  14. Tooth Contact Shift in Loaded Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  15. Straddle design of spiral bevel and hypoid pinions and gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Kuan, Chihping; Kieffer, Jonathan; Bossler, Robert; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The design of spiral bevel and hypoid gears that have a shaft extended from both sides of the cone apex (straddle design) is considered. A main difficulty of such a design is determining the length and diameter of the shaft that might be undercut by the head cutter during gear tooth generation. A method that determines the free space available for the gear shaft is proposed. The approach avoids collision between the shaft being designed and the head cutter during tooth generation. The approach is illustrated with a numerical example.

  16. Tooth contact shift in loaded spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  17. Digitalized accurate modeling of SPCB with multi-spiral surface based on CPC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhua; Gu, Lizhi

    2015-09-01

    The main methods of the existing multi-spiral surface geometry modeling include spatial analytic geometry algorithms, graphical method, interpolation and approximation algorithms. However, there are some shortcomings in these modeling methods, such as large amount of calculation, complex process, visible errors, and so on. The above methods have, to some extent, restricted the design and manufacture of the premium and high-precision products with spiral surface considerably. This paper introduces the concepts of the spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface and spatially parallel coupling body. The typical geometry and topological features of each spiral surface forming the multi-spiral surface body are determined, by using the extraction principle of datum point cluster, the algorithm of coupling point cluster by removing singular point, and the "spatially parallel coupling" principle based on the non-uniform B-spline for each spiral surface. The orientation and quantitative relationships of datum point cluster and coupling point cluster in Euclidean space are determined accurately and in digital description and expression, coupling coalescence of the surfaces with multi-coupling point clusters under the Pro/E environment. The digitally accurate modeling of spatially parallel coupling body with multi-spiral surface is realized. The smooth and fairing processing is done to the three-blade end-milling cutter's end section area by applying the principle of spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface, and the alternative entity model is processed in the four axis machining center after the end mill is disposed. And the algorithm is verified and then applied effectively to the transition area among the multi-spiral surface. The proposed model and algorithms may be used in design and manufacture of the multi-spiral surface body products, as well as in solving essentially the problems of considerable modeling errors in computer graphics and

  18. Signal displacement in spiral-in acquisitions: simulations and implications for imaging in SFG regions.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kimberly D; Rioux, James A; Klassen, Martyn; Bowen, Chris V; Beyea, Steven D

    2012-07-01

    Susceptibility field gradients (SFGs) cause problems for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in regions like the orbital frontal lobes, leading to signal loss and image artifacts (signal displacement and "pile-up"). Pulse sequences with spiral-in k-space trajectories are often used when acquiring fMRI in SFG regions such as inferior/medial temporal cortex because it is believed that they have improved signal recovery and decreased signal displacement properties. Previously postulated theories explain differing reasons why spiral-in appears to perform better than spiral-out; however it is clear that multiple mechanisms are occurring in parallel. This study explores differences in spiral-in and spiral-out images using human and phantom empirical data, as well as simulations consistent with the phantom model. Using image simulations, the displacement of signal was characterized using point spread functions (PSFs) and target maps, the latter of which are conceptually inverse PSFs describing which spatial locations contribute signal to a particular voxel. The magnitude of both PSFs and target maps was found to be identical for spiral-out and spiral-in acquisitions, with signal in target maps being displaced from distant regions in both cases. However, differences in the phase of the signal displacement patterns that consequently lead to changes in the intervoxel phase coherence were found to be a significant mechanism explaining differences between the spiral sequences. The results demonstrate that spiral-in trajectories do preserve more total signal in SFG regions than spiral-out; however, spiral-in does not in fact exhibit decreased signal displacement. Given that this signal can be displaced by significant distances, its recovery may not be preferable for all fMRI applications.

  19. Spiral-wave dynamics depend sensitively on inhomogeneities in mathematical models of ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajahan, T. K.; Sinha, Sitabhra; Pandit, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Every sixth death in industrialized countries occurs because of cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). There is growing consensus that VT is associated with an unbroken spiral wave of electrical activation on cardiac tissue but VF with broken waves, spiral turbulence, spatiotemporal chaos and rapid, irregular activation. Thus spiral-wave activity in cardiac tissue has been studied extensively. Nevertheless, many aspects of such spiral dynamics remain elusive because of the intrinsically high-dimensional nature of the cardiac-dynamical system. In particular, the role of tissue heterogeneities in the stability of cardiac spiral waves is still being investigated. Experiments with conduction inhomogeneities in cardiac tissue yield a variety of results: some suggest that conduction inhomogeneities can eliminate VF partially or completely, leading to VT or quiescence, but others show that VF is unaffected by obstacles. We propose theoretically that this variety of results is a natural manifestation of a complex, fractal-like boundary that must separate the basins of the attractors associated, respectively, with spiral breakup and single spiral wave. We substantiate this with extensive numerical studies of Panfilov and Luo-Rudy I models, where we show that the suppression of spiral breakup depends sensitively on the position, size, and nature of the inhomogeneity.

  20. The study of the structural stability of the spiral laser beams propagation through inhomogeneous phase medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental results of the investigation of light beams that retain their intensity structure during propagation and focusing. Spiral laser beams are a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotation with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Functionality laser manipulators can be significantly enhanced by using spiral beams whose intensity remains invariable. It is well known, that these beams has non-zero orbital angular momentum. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. In this paper we investigate the structural stability of the laser beams having a spiral phase structure by passing them through an inhomogeneous phase medium. Laser beam is passed through a medium is characterized by a random distribution of phase in the range 0..2π. The modeling was performed using VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH). Compared the intensity distribution of the spiral and ordinary laser beam after the passage of the inhomogeneous medium. It is shown that the spiral beams exhibit a significantly better structural stability during the passage phase heterogeneous environments than conventional laser beams. The results obtained in the simulation are tested experimentally. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results.