Science.gov

Sample records for 1625-aa01 anchorage regulations

  1. 75 FR 76275 - Anchorage Regulations; Long Island Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Long Island Sound AGENCY: Coast... grounds in Long Island Sound. These anchorages are located in Connecticut and New York State waters. This..., particularly deep draft vessels, transiting Long Island Sound or awaiting entry to a port or facility in...

  2. 75 FR 22323 - Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York AGENCY: Coast... New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. (4) Hand Delivery: Same as mail address above...-mail Mr. Jeff Yunker, Coast Guard Sector New York, Waterways Management Division; telephone...

  3. 78 FR 9811 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA... anchorages in Puget Sound and decreases the size of five general anchorage areas. These administrative... predictability within the anchorages of the Captain of the Port (COTP) Puget Sound zone. DATES: This rule...

  4. 77 FR 60081 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA... of the Port (COTP) Puget Sound zone. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the... Service Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, Sector Puget Sound, Coast Guard; telephone...

  5. 78 FR 12234 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA Correction In rule document 2013-03121, appearing on pages 9811-9814 in the issue of Tuesday, February...

  6. 78 FR 51061 - Special Anchorage Areas; Port of New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Special Anchorage Areas; Port of New York, NY AGENCY... convenient access to public transportation, onshore shopping and amenities which facilitate interstate...

  7. 77 FR 25587 - Anchorage Regulations; Wells, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... correct. However, in this case, the Coast Guard directed the mariner to plot the coordinates in a clockwise direction. When the mariner plots the anchorage as directed, the lines will cross and an...

  8. 76 FR 76295 - Anchorage Regulations; Wells, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... rule, call or email Mr. John J. Mauro, Waterways Management Branch Chief, First Coast Guard District; telephone (617) 223-8355, email John.J.Mauro@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or submitting... placed well within the anchorage areas so that no portion of the hull or rigging will at any time...

  9. 76 FR 78185 - Anchorage Regulations: Subpart A-Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ..., California, to encompass and replace temporary anchorage grounds C-1 and C-2, and anchorage ground C-3. This... health or risk to safety that might disproportionately affect children. Indian Tribal Governments This... with Indian Tribal Governments, because it would not have a substantial direct effect on one or...

  10. 77 FR 22489 - Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... special anchorage areas in Newport Bay Harbor, California, to encompass and replace temporary anchorage... safety that might disproportionately affect children. Indian Tribal Governments This rule does not have tribal implications under Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian...

  11. 78 FR 44917 - Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Anchorage Ground No. 27(iii) Flynns Knoll, near Sandy Hook, NJ are not used because their locations leave... Sandy Hook Light 15, which was used as a reference point. We would update the other anchorage ground...(iii) Flynns Knoll, near Sandy Hook, NJ. The irregular shaped area of Anchorage Ground No. 27(ii)...

  12. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area: All waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake...

  13. 77 FR 45988 - Anchorage Regulations; Great Chebeague Island, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... 12630, Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property Rights. Civil... Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden... any time extend outside of the anchorage. Note: All anchoring in the areas is under the supervision...

  14. 78 FR 67300 - Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ..., go to http://www.regulations.gov , type the docket number USCG-2012-0967 in the ``SEARCH'' box and...'' box and click ``SEARCH.'' Click on Open Docket Folder on the line associated with this rulemaking. You... Beach and the explosives safety arc around the Barge Pier at Daytona Beach (see figure 2 located in...

  15. Horizontal lifelines - review of regulations and simple design method considering anchorage rigidity.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bertrand; Lan, André

    2017-03-28

    Among the many occupational risks construction workers encounter every day falling from a height is the most dangerous. The objective of this article is to propose a simple analytical design method for horizontal lifelines (HLLs) that considers anchorage flexibility. The article presents a short review of the standards and regulations/acts/codes concerning HLLs in Canada the USA and Europe. A static analytical approach is proposed considering anchorage flexibility. The analytical results are compared with a series of 42 dynamic fall tests and a SAP2000 numerical model. The experimental results show that the analytical method is a little conservative and overestimates the line tension in most cases with a maximum of 17%. The static SAP2000 results show a maximum 2.1% difference with the analytical method. The analytical method is accurate enough to safely design HLLs and quick design abaci are provided to allow the engineer to make quick on-site verification if needed.

  16. Impact of a new gasoline benzene regulation on ambient air pollutants in Anchorage, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yuriko; Morris, Stephen S.; Salerno, Christopher; Schlapia, Anne M.; Stichick, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard that limits the amount of benzene allowed in gasoline on ambient benzene concentrations. This new standard, together with two companion regulations that limit cold-temperature automotive emissions and the permeability of portable fuel containers, was expected to lower the levels of ambient benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nationwide. In this study the impact of the gasoline benzene standard was evaluated in Anchorage, Alaska in a two-phase ambient air monitoring study conducted before and after the new gasoline standard was implemented. Gasoline sold by Anchorage retailers was also evaluated in each phase to determine the content of benzene and other gasoline components. The average benzene content in Anchorage gasoline was reduced by 70%, from 5.05% (w/w) to 1.53% (w/w) following the implementation of the standard. The annual mean ambient benzene concentration fell by 51%, from 0.99 ppbv in Phase 1 to 0.49 ppbv in Phase 2. Analysis suggests the change in gasoline benzene content alone reduced benzene emissions by 46%. The changes in toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene content in gasoline between Phase 1 and 2 were relatively small and the differences in the mean ambient concentrations of these compounds between phases were modest. Our results suggest that cold winter communities in high latitude and mountainous regions may benefit more from the gasoline benzene standard because of high benzene emissions resulting from vehicle cold start and a tendency to develop atmospheric stagnation conditions in the winter.

  17. Proepithelin Regulates Prostate Cancer Cell Biology by Promoting Cell Growth, Migration, and Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Giada; Emiliozzi, Velia; Bitto, Alessandro; Lovat, Francesca; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Goldoni, Silvia; Fassan, Matteo; Serrero, Ginette; Gomella, Leonard G.; Baffa, Raffaele; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The growth factor proepithelin has recently emerged as an important regulator of transformation in several physiological and pathological systems. In this study, we determined the biological roles of proepithelin in prostate cancer cells using purified human recombinant proepithelin as well as proepithelin-depletion strategies. Proepithelin promoted the migration of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells; androgen-independent DU145 cells were the more responsive. In these cells, proepithelin additionally stimulated wound closure, invasion, and promotion of cell growth in vitro. These effects required the activation of both the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have analyzed proepithelin expression levels in different available prostate cancer microarray studies using the Oncomine database and found a statistically significant increase in proepithelin mRNA expression levels in prostate cancers compared with nonneoplastic controls. Notably, depletion of endogenous proepithelin by siRNA and antisense strategies impaired the ability of DU145 cells to grow and migrate after serum withdrawal and inhibited anchorage-independent growth. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of proepithelin in stimulating the migration, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This study supports the hypothesis that proepithelin may play a critical role as an autocrine growth factor in the establishment and initial progression of prostate cancer. Furthermore, proepithelin may prove to be a useful clinical marker for the diagnosis of prostate tumors. PMID:19179604

  18. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels... Sound that under current informal practice is routinely used by mariners as an anchorage while...

  19. Anchorage, AK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Anchorage, Alaska and Cook Inlet are seen in this 30 by 30 km (19 by 19 miles) sub-image, acquired May 12, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Orbiting at an altitude of 705 km (430 miles) on board NASA's Terra satellite, ASTER provides data at a resolution of 15 m (47 feet) and allows creation of this simulated natural color image. At the center of the image is the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport; in the upper right corner is Elmendorf Air Force Base. Dark green coniferous forests are seen in the northwest part of the image. A golf course, with its lush green fairways, is just south of the Air Force Base.

    The image covers an area of 30 by 30 km, was acquired May 12, 2000, and is located at 61.2 degrees north latitude and 149.9 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and

  20. 76 FR 35742 - Superfund Site, New Bedford Harbor, New Bedford, MA: Anchorage Ground and Regulated Navigation Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    .... SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is amending an existing anchorage ground which currently overlaps a pilot underwater cap (``pilot cap'') in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) New Bedford Harbor... minimize the potential for human exposure to contamination and to help protect the integrity of the...

  1. 76 FR 20287 - Superfund Site, New Bedford Harbor, New Bedford, MA: Anchorage Ground and Regulated Navigation Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... which currently overlaps a pilot underwater cap (``pilot cap'') in the U.S. Environmental Protection... is to minimize the potential for human exposure to contamination and to help protect the integrity of... anchorage ground so that it no longer overlaps the pilot cap, and by placing the pilot cap in a RNA...

  2. Regulation of the Low Dose Radiation Paracrine-Specific Anchorage-Independent Growth Response by Annexin A2

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Opresko, Lee K.; Waisman, David M.; Newton, Gregory J.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bollinger, Nikki; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-07-13

    ABSTRACT-Here we identify release of annexin A2 into the culture medium in response to low dose X-ray radiation exposure and establish functional linkages to an established paracrine factor-mediated anchorage-independent growth response. Using a standard bicameral coculture model, we observe that annexin A2 levels associated with non-irradiated neighboring cells seeded in the lower chamber (annexin A2 silenced [shRNA] JB6 cells) are increased upon coculture with irradiated (10-50 cGy) JB6 cells seeded in the upper chamber, relative to coculture with sham exposed JB6 cells seeded in the upper chamber, suggesting that annexin A2 released into the medium is capable of communicating in a paracrine fashion. Using a previously established coculture model, we observed that the paracrine factor-mediated anchorage-independent growth response to low dose X-ray radiation is markedly reduced when irradiated annexin A2 silenced (shRNA) JB6 cells are used, relative to coculture with irradiated annexin A2 competent vector control counterparts. These observations suggest that annexin A2 is functionally linked to the radiation paracrine factor-specific anchorage-independent growth response in JB6 cells.

  3. 33 CFR 110.237 - Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage. 110.237 Section 110.237 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.237 Pacific Ocean at...

  4. 33 CFR 110.237 - Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage. 110.237 Section 110.237 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.237 Pacific Ocean at...

  5. 33 CFR 110.237 - Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage. 110.237 Section 110.237 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.237 Pacific Ocean at...

  6. 33 CFR 110.237 - Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage. 110.237 Section 110.237 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.237 Pacific Ocean at...

  7. 33 CFR 110.237 - Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Waimea, Hawaii, Naval Anchorage. 110.237 Section 110.237 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.237 Pacific Ocean at...

  8. Anchorage mediated by integrin alpha6beta4 to laminin 5 (epiligrin) regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of a membrane-associated 80-kD protein

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Detachment of basal keratinocytes from basement membrane signals a differentiation cascade. Two integrin receptors alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 mediate adhesion to laminin 5 (epiligrin), a major extracellular matrix protein in the basement membrane of epidermis. By establishing a low temperature adhesion system at 4 degrees C, we were able to examine the exclusive role of alpha6beta4 in adhesion of human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK) and the colon carcinoma cell LS123. We identified a novel 80-kD membrane-associated protein (p80) that is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to dissociation of alpha6beta4 from laminin 5. The specificity of p80 phosphorylation for laminin 5 and alpha6beta4 was illustrated by the lack of regulation of p80 phosphorylation on collagen, fibronectin, or poly-L-lysine surfaces. We showed that blocking of alpha3beta1 function using inhibitory mAbs, low temperature, or cytochalasin D diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase but not p80 phosphorylation. Therefore, under our assay conditions, p80 phosphorylation is regulated by alpha6beta4, while motility via alpha3beta1 causes phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Consistent with a linkage between p80 dephosphorylation and alpha6beta4 anchorage to laminin 5, we found that phosphatase inhibitor sodium vanadate, which blocked the p80 dephosphorylation, prevented the alpha6beta4-dependent cell anchorage to laminin 5 at 4degreesC. In contrast, adhesion at 37 degrees C via alpha3beta1 was unaffected. Furthermore, by in vitro kinase assay, we identified a kinase activity for p80 phosphorylation in suspended HFKs but not in attached cells. The kinase activity, alpha6beta4, and its associated adhesion structure stable anchoring contacts were all cofractionated in the Triton- insoluble cell fraction that lacks alpha3beta1. Thus, regulation of p80 phosphorylation, through the activities of p80 kinase and phosphatase, correlates with alpha6beta4-SAC anchorage to laminin 5 at 4

  9. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.755 Column anchorage. (a... field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of record. (2) Prior to the erection of a column, the controlling contractor shall provide written notification to the steel erector...

  10. Alarm in Anchorage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Larry

    1991-01-01

    A possible sex scandal involving a teacher and a teenage student rocked the community in Anchorage, Alaska. Privacy and labor laws and union contract forbade board members from discussing the retirement deal that had been negotiated with the accused teacher. Hindsight suggests board members should have shared what information they could with the…

  11. Doxycycline-Regulated p16(MTS1) Expression Suppresses the Anchorage-Independence and Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cell Lines that Lack Endogenous p16.

    PubMed

    Todd, Maria C; Langan, Thomas A; Sclafani, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The RB pathway controls the critical transition from G1 into S phase of the mammalian cell cycle. Deregulation of the RB pathway by means of RB or p16 inactivation has been implicated in the development of virtually all human cancers. Such findings have led to the view that the loss of RB-mediated regulation at the G1/S checkpoint is a precondition for human malignancy. Our analysis of the RB-positive MCF-7 and ZR75.1 breast cancer cell lines revealed a lack of endogenous p16 protein expression as a result of the homozygous deletion and methylation of the p16 gene at the CDKN2A locus, respectively. We employed the TET-OFF inducible expression system to investigate the effects of non-growth inhibitory levels of functional p16 protein upon the in vitro and in vivo transformed properties of the MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cell lines. Stable transfectants of MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells were isolated that expressed different levels of p16 protein in the absence of doxycycline (DOX) but continued to proliferate in culture. Transfectants that expressed modest levels of p16 (relative to SV40 T antigen-transformed HBL-100 breast epithelial cells) demonstrated a marked suppression of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Further, the induction of moderate and high levels of p16 (relative to HBL-100) resulted in the suppression of tumorigenicity of both MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells as assayed by injection into nude mice. From these data, we concluded that RB pathway restoration by non-growth inhibitory levels of p16 protein was sufficient to revert breast cancer cells to a non-transformed and non-tumorigenic state.

  12. Doxycycline-Regulated p16MTS1 Expression Suppresses the Anchorage-Independence and Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cell Lines that Lack Endogenous p16

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Maria C; Langan, Thomas A; Sclafani, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The RB pathway controls the critical transition from G1 into S phase of the mammalian cell cycle. Deregulation of the RB pathway by means of RB or p16 inactivation has been implicated in the development of virtually all human cancers. Such findings have led to the view that the loss of RB-mediated regulation at the G1/S checkpoint is a precondition for human malignancy. Our analysis of the RB-positive MCF-7 and ZR75.1 breast cancer cell lines revealed a lack of endogenous p16 protein expression as a result of the homozygous deletion and methylation of the p16 gene at the CDKN2A locus, respectively. We employed the TET-OFF inducible expression system to investigate the effects of non-growth inhibitory levels of functional p16 protein upon the in vitro and in vivo transformed properties of the MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cell lines. Stable transfectants of MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells were isolated that expressed different levels of p16 protein in the absence of doxycycline (DOX) but continued to proliferate in culture. Transfectants that expressed modest levels of p16 (relative to SV40 T antigen-transformed HBL-100 breast epithelial cells) demonstrated a marked suppression of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Further, the induction of moderate and high levels of p16 (relative to HBL-100) resulted in the suppression of tumorigenicity of both MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells as assayed by injection into nude mice. From these data, we concluded that RB pathway restoration by non-growth inhibitory levels of p16 protein was sufficient to revert breast cancer cells to a non-transformed and non-tumorigenic state. PMID:28243323

  13. 33 CFR 110.189a - Key West Harbor, Key West, Fla., naval explosives anchorage area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Key West, Fla., naval explosives anchorage area. (a) The anchorage ground. A circular area with its center at latitude 24°30′50.6″, longitude 81°50′31.6″ with a radius of 300 yards, for use for ammunition exceeding the prescribed limits for pier-side handling. (b) The regulations. (1) When occupied by a...

  14. Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Anchorage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Scott; Frazier, Rosyland

    In the spring of 2001, the mayor of Anchorage (Alaska) created a task force to develop recommendations to help heal racism in Anchorage. A series of focus groups were held throughout the community to obtain an assessment of attitudes and opinions about the quality of life in Anchorage from the perspective of different racial groups and to solicit…

  15. [Different orthodontic anchorage systems. A critical examination].

    PubMed

    Diedrich, P

    1993-08-01

    Every orthodontic measure requires a detailed analysis of the individual anchorage situation in order to absorb (stationary anchorage) or control (reciprocal anchorage) the reactive forces and moments. Basically, an anchorage is oriented to the quality of the biological anchorage of the teeth. This is influenced by a number of factors: size of root surface, attachment level, density and structure of alveolar bone, periodontal reactivity, muscular activity, occlusal forces, craniofacial morphology and the nature of the tooth movement resulting from the planned correction. The quality of the biological anchorage may be enhanced by selective modification of the position of the anchor teeth: cortical anchorage of the first molar (Ricketts), distal inclination of the molars (Tweed, Begg) and differential torque control (Burstone). In this context, undesired anchorage effects also need to be discussed, for example interaction between the teeth being corrected and compact bone structures (symphysis menti, floor of the maxillary sinus) or the loss of anchorage by periodontal hyalinization or excessive friction within the bracket slot. In addition, the anchorage situation of ankylosed teeth and endosseous implants, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of additional mechanical anchorage aids (head-gear, Nance holding arch, lingual arch) are discussed. On the basis of the complexity of the individual biological and biomechanical aspects, guidelines are derived with which to establish anchorage control matched to the specific situation.

  16. Temporary anchorage devices – Mini-implants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamlesh; Kumar, Deepak; Jaiswal, Raj Kumar; Bansal, Amol

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontists are accustomed to using teeth and auxiliary appliances, both intraoral and extraoral, to control anchorage. These methods are limited in that it is often difficult to achieve results commensurate with our idealistic goals. Recently, a number of case reports have appeared in the orthodontic literature documenting the possibility of overcoming anchorage limitations via the use of temporary anchorage devices—biocompatible devices fixed to bone for the purpose of moving teeth, with the devices being subsequently removed after treatment. Although skeletal anchorage is here to stay in orthodontics, there are still many unanswered questions. This article describes the development of skeletal anchorage and provides an overview of the use of implants for orthodontic anchorage. PMID:22442547

  17. 76 FR 52599 - Anchorage Regulations; Wells, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... have questions on this proposed rule, call or e-mail Mr. John J. Mauro, Waterways Management Branch, First Coast Guard District; telephone 617-223-8355, e-mail John.J.Mauro@uscg.mil . If you have questions... have questions concerning its provisions or options for compliance, please contact Mr. John J....

  18. 76 FR 59596 - Anchorage Regulations; Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... cruise ship visits to Newport and to improve navigation safety. DATES: Comments and related material..., Rhode Island, to better accommodate increasing cruise ship visits to Newport, and to improve navigation... nautical miles that can safely accommodate only two cruise ships simultaneously. Over the past...

  19. 77 FR 6010 - Anchorage Regulations; Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ....mil or Lieutenant Junior Grade Isaac M. Slavitt, Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard First... (adjusted for inflation) or more in any one year. Though this rule does not result in such an...

  20. 33 CFR 401.65 - Communication-ports, docks and anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.65 Communication—ports, docks and anchorages. (a) Every vessel entering or leaving a lake port shall... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Communication-ports, docks...

  1. 33 CFR 401.65 - Communication-ports, docks and anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.65 Communication—ports, docks and anchorages. (a) Every vessel entering or leaving a lake port shall... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication-ports, docks...

  2. Performance of Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System

    SciTech Connect

    Fanous, F.; Greimann, L.; Wassef, W.; Bluhm, D.

    1993-01-01

    Deformation of a steel containment anchorage system during a severe accident may result in a leakage path at the containment boundaries. Current design criteria are based on either ductile or brittle failure modes of headed bolts that do not account for factors such as cracking of the containment basemat or deformation of the anchor bolt that may affect the behavior of the containment anchorage system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of a typical ice condenser containment`s anchorage system. This was accomplished by analyzing the Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System. Based on a strength of materials approach and assuming that the anchor bolts are resisting the uplift caused by the internal pressure, one can estimate that the failure of the anchor bolts would occur at a containment pressure of 79 psig. To verify these results and to calibrate the strength of materials equation, the Sequoyah containment anchorage system was analyzed with the ABAQUS program using a three-dimensional, finite-element model. The model included portions of the steel containment building, shield building, anchor bolt assembly, reinforced concrete mat and soil foundation material.

  3. PEM Anchorage on Titanium Using Catechol Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Hélène; Barrere, Amélie; Schoentstein, Frédérique; Chavanne, Marie-Hélène; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Mora, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background This study deals with the anchorage of polyelectrolyte films onto titanium surfaces via a cathecol-based linker for biomedical applications. Methodology The following study uses a molecule functionalized with a catechol and a carboxylic acid: 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid. This molecule is anchored to the TiO2 substrate via the catechol while the carboxylic acid reacts with polymers bearing amine groups. By providing a film anchorage of chemisorption type, it makes possible to deposit polyelectrolytes on the surface of titanium. Principal Findings Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the different steps of grafting have been successfully performed. Conclusions This method based on catechol anchorage of polyelectrolytes open a window towards large possibilities of clinical applications. PMID:23226262

  4. 66. Detail view inside Manhattan anchorage showing connection between cable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Detail view inside Manhattan anchorage showing connection between cable and anchorage eyebars. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  5. Comparison of temporary anchorage devices and transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction

    PubMed Central

    Kecik, Defne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the dental and skeletal effects of canine retraction using conventional anchorage reinforcement systems and comparing them with the usage of TADs. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 50 patients having Class I malocclusions with bimaxillary protrusion indicated for first premolar extraction, and allocated into two groups. The first group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 18,7 years (min:14, max:22 years, 16 girls and 9 boys) that TADs were applied as an anchorage mechanic between attached gingiva of upper second premolar and first molar teeth. The second group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 19,4 years (min:15, max:23 years, 14 girls and 11 boys) that conventional molar anchorage with Transpalatal arch (TPA) was applied for the anchorage mechanics against canine retraction. Results: The results showed that mean mesial movement and the tipping of the first molars in TAD group between T0 - T1 were insignificant (P > 0,05), however in the TPA group were significant (P<0,01). Vertical movement of the molars were not significant when two groups were compared (P>0,05). Conclusion: Although TPA is a useful appliance, it doesn't provide an effective anchorage control on anteroposterior movement maxillary first molar teeth concerning first premolar extraction treatment. TADs are more convenient to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction in contrast to transpalatal arch. PMID:28042267

  6. Enhanced MET translation and signaling sustains K-Ras driven proliferation under anchorage-independent growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Sato, Saori; Galeas, Jacqueline; Truitt, Morgan; Pitt, Cameron; Urisman, Anatoly; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Ruggero, Davide; McCormick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic K-Ras mutation occurs frequently in several types of cancers including pancreatic and lung cancers. Tumors with K-Ras mutation are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs as well as molecular targeting agents. Although numerous approaches are ongoing to find effective ways to treat these tumors, there are still no effective therapies for K-Ras mutant cancer patients. Here we report that K-Ras mutant cancers are more dependent on K-Ras in anchorage independent culture conditions than in monolayer culture conditions. In seeking to determine mechanisms that contribute to the K-Ras dependency in anchorage independent culture conditions, we discovered the involvement of Met in K-Ras-dependent, anchorage independent cell growth. The Met signaling pathway is enhanced and plays an indispensable role in anchorage independent growth even in cells in which Met is not amplified. Indeed, Met expression is elevated under anchorage-independent growth conditions and is regulated by K-Ras in a MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)-dependent manner. Remarkably, in spite of a global down-regulation of mRNA translation during anchorage independent growth, we find that Met mRNA translation is specifically enhanced under these conditions. Importantly, ectopic expression of an active Met mutant rescues K-Ras ablation-derived growth suppression, indicating that K-Ras mediated Met expression drives “K-Ras addiction” in anchorage independent conditions. Our results indicate that enhanced Met expression and signaling is essential for anchorage independent growth of K-Ras mutant cancer cells and suggests that pharmacological inhibitors of Met could be effective for K-Ras mutant tumor patients. PMID:25977330

  7. Anchorage Dependent Cells Attached to a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Anchorage dependent cells on STS-95 will be grown on beads similar to these cells produced during previous investigations. Recombinant proteins may offer the possibility of reducing or eliminating transplant rejections. Research by Synthecon, Inc. using the BioDyn Bioreactor will focus on the preliminary process for growing a proprietary recombinant protein that can decrease rejection of transplanted tissue. The cells producing this protein are anchorage dependent, meaning that they must attach to something to grow. These cells will be cultured in the bioreactor in a medium containing polymer microbeads. Synthecon hopes that the data from this mission will lead to the development of a commercial protein that will aid in prevention of transplant rejection.

  8. Anchorage Dependent Cells Attached to a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Anchorage dependent cells on STS-95 will be grown on beads, similar to these cells produced during previous investigations. Recombinant proteins may offer the possibility of reducing or eliminating transplant rejections. Research by Synthecon, Inc. using the BioDyn Bioreactor will focus on the preliminary process for growing a proprietary recombinant protein that can decrease rejection of transplanted tissue. The cells producing this protein are anchorage dependent, meaning that they must attach to something to grow. These cells will be cultured in the bioreactor in a medium containing polymer microbeads. Synthecon hopes that the data from this mission will lead to the development of a commercial protein that will aid in prevention of transplant rejection.

  9. 77 FR 50914 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ..., Columbia River, Oregon and Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On..., Oregon and Washington. (a) * * * (10) Cottonwood Island Anchorage. The waters of the Columbia...

  10. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study , we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA – mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. PMID:26780400

  11. 75 FR 38465 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to the Port of Anchorage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Fisheries Service (NMFS) has issued a Letter of Authorization (LOA) to the Port of Anchorage (POA) and the U..., 2010, through July 14, 2011. ADDRESSES: The LOA and supporting documentation are available for review... received a request for an LOA renewal pursuant to the aforementioned regulations that would authorize,...

  12. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart E of... - Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart E of... - Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart E of... - Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart E of... - Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart E of... - Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchorage, Matanuska-Susitna, and Kenai Rural and Non-Rural Areas 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Subpart E of Part...

  17. Anchorage Arrival Scheduling Under Off-Nominal Weather Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon; Chan, William N.; Mukherjee, Avijit

    2012-01-01

    Weather can cause flight diversions, passenger delays, additional fuel consumption and schedule disruptions at any high volume airport. The impacts are particularly acute at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Anchorage, Alaska due to its importance as a major international portal. To minimize the impacts due to weather, a multi-stage scheduling process is employed that is iteratively executed, as updated aircraft demand and/or airport capacity data become available. The strategic scheduling algorithm assigns speed adjustments for flights that originate outside of Anchorage Center to achieve the proper demand and capacity balance. Similarly, an internal departure-scheduling algorithm assigns ground holds for pre-departure flights that originate from within Anchorage Center. Tactical flight controls in the form of airborne holding are employed to reactively account for system uncertainties. Real-world scenarios that were derived from the January 16, 2012 Anchorage visibility observations and the January 12, 2012 Anchorage arrival schedule were used to test the initial implementation of the scheduling algorithm in fast-time simulation experiments. Although over 90% of the flights in the scenarios arrived at Anchorage without requiring any delay, pre-departure scheduling was the dominant form of control for Anchorage arrivals. Additionally, tactical scheduling was used extensively in conjunction with the pre-departure scheduling to reactively compensate for uncertainties in the arrival demand. For long-haul flights, the strategic scheduling algorithm performed best when the scheduling horizon was greater than 1,000 nmi. With these long scheduling horizons, it was possible to absorb between ten and 12 minutes of delay through speed control alone. Unfortunately, the use of tactical scheduling, which resulted in airborne holding, was found to increase as the strategic scheduling horizon increased because of the additional uncertainty in the arrival times

  18. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF ANCHORAGE LOOKING EAST, (Wire rope manufactured ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF ANCHORAGE LOOKING EAST, (Wire rope manufactured by Roebling and Son, Trenton, New Jersey) - Corbin Bridge, 2 miles Southeast of Huntingdon on road to Raystown Dam, Huntingdon, Huntingdon County, PA

  19. 65. Detail view inside Manhattan anchorage of splayed cable strands. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Detail view inside Manhattan anchorage of splayed cable strands. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  20. 75 FR 3641 - Television Broadcasting Services; Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Anchorage, AK AGENCY: Federal Communications... broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission amends 47...

  1. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  2. RadNet Air Data From Anchorage, AK

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Anchorage, AK from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  3. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  4. Prevalence of the use of anchorage miniscrews among French orthodontists.

    PubMed

    Barthelemi, Stéphane; Beauval, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    Since always, anchorage has raised frequent problems for orthodontists. Since the early 2000s, the use of anchorage miniscrews has spread on a vast scale among practitioners. For the first time, a broad epidemiological survey (733 exploitable responses) has looked into the habits of French orthodontists regarding the use of anchorage miniscrews. The survey reveals that the majority of French practitioners have adopted miniscrews in their daily practice (66%), particularly among those using the lingual technique. However, the number of patients concerned still remains small for most practitioners (fewer than 10 patients for 65% of users). Seventy-four percent of users are satisfied with their experience with miniscrews although a majority uses them exclusively in adults (64%). The movements most sought by miniscrew users are mesialization/distalization and intrusion/extrusion. Among non-users, 60% have never placed an anchorage miniscrew but are thinking about doing so, whereas 20% of practitioners have used them but have since abandoned them. Finally, 20% of non-users have never used anchorage miniscrews and do not intend to do so.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of anchorage zones by ultrasonics techniques.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, M; Gaillet, L

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of two Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods for damage assessment in bridges' anchorages. The Acousto-Ultrasonic (AU) technique is compared to classical Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in terms of defect detection and structural health classification. The AU technique is firstly used on single seven-wire strands damaged by artificial defects. The effect of growing defects on the waves traveling through the strands is evaluated. Thereafter, three specimens of anchorages with unknown defects are inspected by the AU and UT techniques. Damage assessment results from both techniques are then compared. The structural health conditions of the specimens can be then classified by a damage severity criterion. Finally, a damaged anchorage socket with mastered defects is controlled by the same techniques. The UT allows the detection and localization of damaged wires. The AU technique is used to bring out the effect of defects on acoustic features by comparing a healthy and damaged anchorage sockets. It is concluded that the UT method is suitable for local and crack-like defects, whereas the AU technique enables the assessment of the global structural health of the anchorage zones.

  6. On the biomechanics of seedling anchorage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, Benoît; Edmaier, Katharina; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a minimal model for the response of vegetation to pullout constraints at early development stage. We try to capture both the average mechanical properties of the root system and the stochastic component of the uprooting process of seedlings. We identify a minimal set of relevant physical components in the purpose of quantifying the uprooting process: length of the root fibres, elastic response of the fibres and adhesion between the roots and the soil matrix. We present for validation a dataset extracted from Edmaier et al. (under revision), accounting for 98 uprooting experiments using Avena sativa L. seedlings (common oat), growing in non-cohesive sediment under controlled conditions. The corresponding root system has a very simple architecture, with three root fibres of different lengths. The response of the system to the constraint is however complex: the stress-strain signal presents sudden jumps followed by partial elastic recoveries. The analysis of the jumps and partial recoveries gives an insight into the resilience of the system. The anchorage of less mature seedlings rapidly collapses after the peak force has been reached, while more mature seedlings usually recover from partial failures. We explore this crossover with our validation dataset. The type of seedlings we study has been used in flume experiments investigating the feedbacks between the vegetation and the river morphodynamics (see for example Perona et al. (2012)). An understanding of the characteristics of the uprooting curve (maximal uprooting force and total uprooting work) of such vegetation reveals the ability of seedlings to withstand environmental constraints in terms of duration or intensity (see Edmaier et al., under revision), and is therefore helpful for planning future experiments. REFERENCES - P. Perona, P. Molnar, B. Crouzy, E. Perucca, Z. Jiang, S. McLelland, D. Wüthrich, K. Edmaier, R. Francis, C. Camporeale, et al., Biomass selection by floods and related timescales

  7. Effects of the zygoma anchorage system on canine retraction.

    PubMed

    Cetinsahin, Alev; Dinçer, Müfide; Arman-Ozçirpici, Ayça; Uçkan, Sina

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Gjessing (PG) retraction spring used with and without the zygoma anchorage system (ZAS) on canine retraction. Thirty patients, with an Angle Class I or Class II malocclusion, whose upper first premolars were scheduled for extraction, were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 comprised maximum anchorage cases (nine females and six males with a mean age of 16 years 8 months) in which the ZAS was used to improve posterior anchorage and the PG retraction springs for canine retraction. Moderate anchorage cases (10 females and 5 males with a mean age of 15 years 5 month) were included in group 2 and canine retraction was achieved using only PG retraction springs. Study models and lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained at the initial and final stages of canine retraction were used for comparison of the groups to determine the effects of zygoma anchorage on canine retraction. All measurements were evaluated statistically using a Student's t-test, 2 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance, Bonferroni-adjusted t-test, and Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests according to the normality of the distribution of the variables. Mesial crown movement of the molars was 0.63 mm (P < 0.05) in group 1 and 1.50 mm (P < 0.001) in group 2. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the groups. No significant difference was observed between the groups for the rate of canine retraction or sagittal and vertical movement of the canines. The ZAS is a reliable and successful anchorage reinforcement method for canine retraction in extraction cases.

  8. 78 FR 11097 - Artificial Island Anchorage No. 2 Partial Closure, Delaware River; Salem, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ..., Delaware River; Salem, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...-0032 Safety Zone Within the Lower Portion of Anchorage 2, Artificial Island Anchorage; Salem, NJ....

  9. Miniscrew implants as temporary anchorage devices in orthodontics: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Jasoria, Gaurav; Shamim, Wamiq; Rathore, Saurabh; Kalra, Amit; Manchanda, Mona; Jaggi, Nitin

    2013-09-01

    In recent times, the use of miniscrew implants to obtain absolute anchorage has gained momentum in clinical orthodontics as rigid anchorage modality. Miniscrew implants offers many advantages when used as temporary anchorage devices like, easy placement and removal, immediate loading, can be used in a variety of locations, provide absolute anchorage, economic and requires less patient cooperation. This makes them as a necessary treatment option in cases with critical anchorage that would have otherwise resulted in anchorage loss if treated with conventional means of anchorage. The aim of this comprehensive review is to highlight the gradual evolution, clinical use, advantages and disadvantages of the miniscrew implants when used to obtain a temporary but absolute skeletal anchorage for orthodontic applications.

  10. 76 FR 20524 - Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... operating in the area as well as to provide for the overall safe and efficient flow of commerce. DATES: This... Hudson River, and based upon changing economic conditions, demand for home heating oil, etc, the USCG may..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices)...

  11. Osteosynthesis of the proximal femur anchorage of a cervical nail.

    PubMed

    el Banna, S; Burny, F; Bourgois, R; Donkerwolcke, M; Moulart, F

    1994-01-01

    One of the factors determining the stability of osteosynthesis is the mechanical strength of the bone fragments required for the anchorage of the implant. The aim is to study the driving of a Thornton nail in the proximal epiphysis of a human femur as a way to measure the strength of the trabecular bone and to predict the stability of the implanted system.

  12. 77 FR 54493 - Special Anchorage Area; Stockton Springs, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... federalism. 6. Protest Activities The Coast Guard respects the First Amendment rights of protesters... Springs, and the number of vessels using the anchorage is limited due to depth (less than or equal to 15... limited due to depth (less than or equal to 15 feet). If you think that your business, organization,...

  13. Allergenic airborne pollen and spores in Anchorage, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.

    1985-05-01

    Major aeroallergens in Anchorage are birch, alder, poplar, spruce, grass pollen, Cladosporium, and unspecified fungus spores. Lesser pollens are sorrel, willow, pine, juniper, sedge, lamb's-quarters, wormwood, plantain, and others. The aero-flora is discussed in terms of the frequency of allergenically significant events and within-season and year-to-year dynamics.

  14. Uvulo-glossopharyngeal dimensions in non-extraction, extraction with minimum anchorage, and extraction with maximum anchorage.

    PubMed

    Germec-Cakan, Derya; Taner, Tulin; Akan, Seden

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate upper respiratory airway dimensions in non-extraction and extraction subjects treated with minimum or maximum anchorage. Lateral cephalograms of 39 Class I subjects were divided into three groups (each containing 11 females and 2 males) according to treatment procedure: group 1, 13 patients treated with extraction of four premolars and minimum anchorage; group 2, 13 cases treated non-extraction with air-rotor stripping (ARS); and group 3, 13 bimaxillary protrusion subjects treated with extraction of four premolars and maximum anchorage. The mean ages of the patients were 18.1 ± 3.7, 17.8 ± 2.4, and 15.5 ± 0.88 years, respectively. Tongue, soft palate, hyoid position, and upper airway measurements were made on pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalograms and the differences between the mean measurements were tested using Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. Superior and middle airway space increased significantly (P < 0.05) in group 1. In group 2, none of the parameters showed a significant change, while in group 3, middle and inferior airway space decreased (P < 0.01). The findings show that extraction treatment using maximum anchorage has a reducing effect on the middle and inferior airway dimensions.

  15. 33 CFR 110.72aa - Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia. 110.72aa Section 110.72aa Navigation and... Anchorage Areas § 110.72aa Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia. (a) Special Anchorage Areas. (1) The waters of the Elizabeth River bounded by the shore and...

  16. Molar distalization with the assistance of Temporary Anchorage Devices.

    PubMed

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes efficient techniques for distalization of maxillary and mandibular molars with the assistance of Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs). There are numerous occasions where the distalization of molars is required in lieu of the odontectomy of bicuspids. In the past, extra-oral force has been used, (i.e. Cervical or Combination Head Gear, or intra-oral force, i.e. Posterior Sagittal Appliance, Modified Greenfield Appliance, Williams DMJ 20001, CD Distalizer, Magill Sagittal, Pendulum Appliance, etc.). All the intra-oral appliances have a common denominator the orthodontic clinician has to deal with, the undesirable expression of the Third Law of Newton. The utilization of TADs allows us to circumvent this shortcoming, establishing an absolute anchorage, and thus completely negate the expression of the Third Law of Newton.

  17. GM3 suppresses anchorage-independent growth via Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta in melanoma B16 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Xu, Su; Wang, Yinan; Wu, Peixing; Zhang, Jinghai; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2011-08-01

    Ly-GDI, Rho GTPase dissociation inhibitor beta, was found to be expressed parallel to the GM3 level in mouse B16 cells whose GM3 contents were modified by B4galt6 sense, B4galt6 antisense cDNA, or St3galt5 siRNA transfection. Ly-GDI expression was increased on GM3 addition to these cells and decreased with D-PDMP treatment, a glucosylceramide synthesis inhibitor. Suppression of GM3 or Ly-GDI by RNAi was concomitantly associated with an increase in anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. These results clearly indicate that GM3 suppresses anchorage-independent growth through Ly-GDI. GM3 signals regulating Ly-GDI expression was inhibited by LY294002, siRNA against Akt1 and Akt2 and rapamycin, showing that GM3 signals are transduced via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Either siRNA towards Rictor or Raptor suppressed Ly-GDI expression. The Raptor siRNA suppressed the effects of GM3 on Ly-GDI expression and Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) , suggesting GM3 signals to be transduced to mTOR-Raptor and Akt-Thr(308) , leading to Ly-GDI stimulation. siRNA targeting Pdpk1 reduced Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) and rendered the cells insensitive to GM3 stimulation, indicating that Akt-Thr(308) plays a critical role in the pathway. The components aligned in this pathway showed similar effects on anchorage-independent growth as GM3 and Ly-GDI. Taken together, GM3 signals are transduced in B16 cells through PI3K, Pdpk1, Akt(Thr308) and the mTOR/Raptor pathway, leading to enhanced expression of Ly-GDI mRNA, which in turn suppresses anchorage-independent growth in melanoma B16 cells.

  18. 33 CFR 110.166 - York River, Va., naval anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... anchorage grounds. Between Yorktown and the Naval Mine Depot, beginning at latitude 37°15′34″, longitude 76°31′25″; thence to latitude 37°15′25″, longitude 76°31′39.5″; thence to latitude 37°16′21.5″, longitude 76°32′46″; thence to latitude 37°17′07.5″, longitude 76°34′17″; thence to latitude...

  19. 33 CFR 110.166 - York River, Va., naval anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... anchorage grounds. Between Yorktown and the Naval Mine Depot, beginning at latitude 37°15′34″, longitude 76°31′25″; thence to latitude 37°15′25″, longitude 76°31′39.5″; thence to latitude 37°16′21.5″, longitude 76°32′46″; thence to latitude 37°17′07.5″, longitude 76°34′17″; thence to latitude...

  20. 33 CFR 110.166 - York River, Va., naval anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... anchorage grounds. Between Yorktown and the Naval Mine Depot, beginning at latitude 37°15′34″, longitude 76°31′25″; thence to latitude 37°15′25″, longitude 76°31′39.5″; thence to latitude 37°16′21.5″, longitude 76°32′46″; thence to latitude 37°17′07.5″, longitude 76°34′17″; thence to latitude...

  1. 33 CFR 110.166 - York River, Va., naval anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... anchorage grounds. Between Yorktown and the Naval Mine Depot, beginning at latitude 37°15′34″, longitude 76°31′25″; thence to latitude 37°15′25″, longitude 76°31′39.5″; thence to latitude 37°16′21.5″, longitude 76°32′46″; thence to latitude 37°17′07.5″, longitude 76°34′17″; thence to latitude...

  2. 33 CFR 110.166 - York River, Va., naval anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchorage grounds. Between Yorktown and the Naval Mine Depot, beginning at latitude 37°15′34″, longitude 76°31′25″; thence to latitude 37°15′25″, longitude 76°31′39.5″; thence to latitude 37°16′21.5″, longitude 76°32′46″; thence to latitude 37°17′07.5″, longitude 76°34′17″; thence to latitude...

  3. A new non-metallic anchorage system for post-tensioning applications using CFRP tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mahmoud Reda

    The objective of the work described in this thesis is to design, develop and test a new non-metallic anchorage system for post-tensioning applications using CFRP tendons. The use of a non-metallic anchorage system should eliminate corrosion and deterioration concerns in the anchorage zone. The development of a reliable non-metallic anchorage would provide an important contribution to this field of knowledge. The idea of the new anchorage is to hold the tendon through mechanical gripping. The anchorage consists of a barrel with a conical housing and four wedges. The anchorage components are made of ultra high performance concrete (UHPC) specially developed for the anchorage. Sixteen concrete mixtures with different casting and curing regimes were examined to develop four UHPC mixtures with compressive strengths in excess of 200 MPa. The UHPC mixtures showed very dense microstructures with some unique characteristics. To enhance the fracture toughness of the newly developed UHPC, analytical and experimental analyses were performed. Using 3 mm chopped carbon fibres, a significant increase in the fracture toughness of UHPC was achieved. The non-metallic anchorage was developed with the UHPC with enhanced fracture toughness. The barrel required careful wrapping with CFRP sheets to provide the confinement required to utilize the strength and toughness of the UHPC. Thirty-three anchorages were tested under both static and dynamic loading conditions. The non-metallic anchorage showed excellent mechanical performance and fulfilled the different requirements of a post-tensioning anchorage system. The development of the new non-metallic anchorage will widen the inclusion of CFRP tendons in post-tensioned concrete/masonry structures. The new system will offer the opportunity to exploit CFRP tendons effectively creating an innovative generation of corrosion-free, smart structures.

  4. Synergetic material and structure optimization yields robust spider web anchorages.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-08-26

    Millions of years of evolution have adapted spider webs to achieve a range of properties, including the well-known capture of prey, with efficient use of materials. One feature that remains poorly understood is the attachment disc, a network of silk fibers that mechanically anchors a web to its environment. Experimental observations suggest that one possible attachment disc adheres to a substrate through multiple symmetrically branched structures composed of sub-micrometer scale silk fibers. Here, a theoretical model is used to explore the adaptation of the strength of attachment of such an anchorage, and complementary mesoscale simulations are applied to demonstrate a novel mechanism of synergetic material and structural optimization, such that the maximum anchorage strength can be achieved regardless of the initial anchor placement or material type. The optimal delamination (peeling) angle is facilitated by the inherent extensibility of silk, and is attained automatically during the process of delamination. This concept of self-optimizing peeling angle suggests that attachment discs do not require precise placement by the spider, irrespective of adhesion strength. Additional hierarchical branching of the anchorage increases efficiency, where both the delamination force and toughness modulus increase with a splitting of the cross-sectional area.

  5. Optimizing Anterior En Masse Retraction with Miniscrew Anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2011-01-01

    In severely protrusive patients, skeletal anchorage from miniscrew is often used to avoid anchorage loss with preferred miniscrew location near centre of resistance (Cres) of posterior teeth. Biomechanical requirement for directing retraction force towards Cres of posterior teeth demands the insertion of miniscrew in loose mucosa, where risk of infection and failure increases. In addition, undesirable biomechanical side effects on anterior and posterior segments may be possible in all three planes, when continuous arch sliding mechanics are installed with miniscrew anchorage. This paper describes technique of molar-stabilizing power arm (MSPA) for simultaneous intrusion and retraction of anteriors with miniscrew placement at attached gingiva between 1st molar and 2nd premolar. Advantages of this technique include (i) the need of miniscrews placement in loose mucosa apically near the Cres of the posterior teeth is eliminated, (ii) the risk of infection and miniscrew failure is lowered since the miniscrew is placed in attached gingiva rather than the loose mucosa, and (iii) by adjusting vertical length or replacing MSPA, alteration of the retraction force vector is possible in all three planes; thus, need of removal and repositioning of the miniscrew (e.g., in correction of occlusal cant) can be eliminated. PMID:22567438

  6. CFRP Mechanical Anchorage for Externally Strengthened RC Beams under Flexure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Alnadher; Abdalla, Jamal; Hawileh, Rami; Galal, Khaled

    De-bonding of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) sheets and plates from the concrete substrate is one of the major reasons behind premature failures of beams that are externally strengthened with such CFRP materials. To delay or prevent de-bonding and therefore enhancing the load carrying capacity of strengthened beams, several anchorage systems were developed and used. This paper investigates the use of CFRP mechanical anchorage of CFRP sheets and plates used to externally strengthen reinforced concrete beams under flexure. The pin-and-fan shape CFRP anchor, which is custom-made from typical rolled fiber sheets and bundles of loose fiber is used. Several reinforced concrete beams were casted and tested in standard four-point bending scheme to study the effectiveness of this anchorage system. The beams were externally strengthened in flexure with bonded CFRP sheets and plates and then fastened to the soffit of the beams' using various patterns of CFRP anchors. It is observed that the CFRP plates begins to separate from the beams as soon as de-bonding occurs in specimens without CFRP anchors, while in beams with CFRP anchors de-bonding was delayed leading to increase in the load carrying capacity over the un-anchored strengthened beams.

  7. Barium promotes anchorage-independent growth and invasion of human HaCaT keratinocytes via activation of c-SRC kinase.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ohnuma, Shoko; Yanagishita, Takeshi; Hayashi, Rumiko; Shekhar, Hossain U; Watanabe, Daisuke; Kato, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Explosive increases in skin cancers have been reported in more than 36 million patients with arsenicosis caused by drinking arsenic-polluted well water. This study and previous studies showed high levels of barium as well as arsenic in the well water. However, there have been no reports showing a correlation between barium and cancer. In this study, we examined whether barium (BaCl(2)) may independently have cancer-related effects on human precancerous keratinocytes (HaCaT). Barium (5-50 µM) biologically promoted anchorage-independent growth and invasion of HaCaT cells in vitro. Barium (5 µM) biochemically enhanced activities of c-SRC, FAK, ERK and MT1-MMP molecules, which regulate anchorage-independent growth and/or invasion. A SRC kinase specific inhibitor, protein phosphatase 2 (PP2), blocked barium-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth and invasion with decreased c-SRC kinase activity. Barium (2.5-5 µM) also promoted anchorage-independent growth and invasion of fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and immortalized nontumorigenic melanocytes (melan-a), but not transformed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HSC5 and A431) and malignant melanoma (Mel-ret) cells, with activation of c-SRC kinase. Taken together, our biological and biochemical findings newly suggest that the levels of barium shown in drinking well water independently has the cancer-promoting effects on precancerous keratinocytes, fibroblast and melanocytes in vitro.

  8. Barium Promotes Anchorage-Independent Growth and Invasion of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes via Activation of c-SRC Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y.; Ohnuma, Shoko; Yanagishita, Takeshi; Hayashi, Rumiko; Shekhar, Hossain U.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Kato, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Explosive increases in skin cancers have been reported in more than 36 million patients with arsenicosis caused by drinking arsenic-polluted well water. This study and previous studies showed high levels of barium as well as arsenic in the well water. However, there have been no reports showing a correlation between barium and cancer. In this study, we examined whether barium (BaCl2) may independently have cancer-related effects on human precancerous keratinocytes (HaCaT). Barium (5–50 µM) biologically promoted anchorage-independent growth and invasion of HaCaT cells in vitro. Barium (5 µM) biochemically enhanced activities of c-SRC, FAK, ERK and MT1-MMP molecules, which regulate anchorage-independent growth and/or invasion. A SRC kinase specific inhibitor, protein phosphatase 2 (PP2), blocked barium-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth and invasion with decreased c-SRC kinase activity. Barium (2.5–5 µM) also promoted anchorage-independent growth and invasion of fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and immortalized nontumorigenic melanocytes (melan-a), but not transformed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HSC5 and A431) and malignant melanoma (Mel-ret) cells, with activation of c-SRC kinase. Taken together, our biological and biochemical findings newly suggest that the levels of barium shown in drinking well water independently has the cancer-promoting effects on precancerous keratinocytes, fibroblast and melanocytes in vitro. PMID:22022425

  9. Arsenite-Induced Pseudo-Hypoxia Results in Loss of Anchorage-Dependent Growth in BEAS-2B Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Malm, Scott W.; Hinchman, Alyssa N.; Li, Hui; Beeks, Connor G.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology studies have established a strong link between lung cancer and arsenic exposure. Currently, the role of disturbed cellular energy metabolism in carcinogenesis is a focus of scientific interest. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1A) is a key regulator of energy metabolism, and it has been found to accumulate during arsenite exposure under oxygen-replete conditions. We modeled arsenic-exposed human pulmonary epithelial cells in vitro with BEAS-2B, a non-malignant lung epithelial cell line. Constant exposure to 1 µM arsenite (As) resulted in the early loss of anchorage-dependent growth, measured by soft agar colony formation, beginning at 6 weeks of exposure. This arsenite exposure resulted in HIF-1A accumulation and increased glycolysis, similar to the physiologic response to hypoxia, but in this case under oxygen-replete conditions. This “pseudo-hypoxia” response was necessary for the maximal acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in arsenite-exposed BEAS-2B. The HIF-1A accumulation and induction in glycolysis was sustained throughout a 52 week course of arsenite exposure in BEAS-2B. There was a time-dependent increase in anchorage-independent growth during the exposure to arsenite. When HIF-1A expression was stably suppressed, arsenite-induced glycolysis was abrogated, and the anchorage-independent growth was reduced. These findings establish that arsenite exerts a hypoxia-mimetic effect, which plays an important role in the subsequent gain of malignancy-associated phenotypes. PMID:25513814

  10. Comparative photoelastic study of dental and skeletal anchorages in the canine retraction

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Chagas, Rosana Villela; Neves, Ana Christina Elias Claro; da Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare dental and skeletal anchorages in mandibular canine retraction by means of a stress distribution analysis. Methods A photoelastic model was produced from second molar to canine, without the first premolar, and mandibular canine retraction was simulated by a rubber band tied to two types of anchorage: dental anchorage, in the first molar attached to adjacent teeth, and skeletal anchorage with a hook simulating the mini-implant. The forces were applied 10 times and observed in a circular polariscope. The stresses located in the mandibular canine were recorded in 7 regions. The Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the stress in each region and between both anchorage systems. The stresses in the mandibular canine periradicular regions were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Stresses were similar in the cervical region and the middle third. In the apical third, the stresses associated with skeletal anchorage were higher than the stresses associated with dental anchorage. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the highest stresses were identified in the cervical-distal, apical-distal, and apex regions with the use of dental anchorage, and in the apical-distal, apical-mesial, cervical-distal, and apex regions with the use of skeletal anchorage. Conclusions The use of skeletal anchorage in canine retraction caused greater stress in the apical third than the use of dental anchorage, which indicates an intrusive component resulting from the direction of the force due to the position of the mini-implant and the bracket hook of the canine. PMID:24713566

  11. Leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly inhibits the anchorage-independent growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hino, Satoshi; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Uchida, Daisuke; Begum, Nasima-Mila; Yoshida, Hideo; Sato, Mitsunobu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    Several investigators have demonstrated that TGF-beta stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) regulates cell growth and differentiation, and cell death. TSC-22 is a putative transcriptional regulator containing a leucine zipper-like structure and a nuclear export signal. We previously showed the cytoplasmic localization of TSC-22 and the nuclear translocation of TSC-22 concomitant with induction of apoptosis in salivary gland cancer cells. In the present study, we attempted to identify the active domain of TSC-22 protein that regulated the biological functions of TSC-22. We constructed three mammalian expression vectors, which could produce full length TSC-22 only in cytoplasm, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and the leucine zipper structure only in nucleus. Then, we transfected a salivary gland cancer cell line, HSG with these expression vectors, and investigated the growth profile of the transfectants. None of the TSC-22 constructs inhibited the monolayer growth and the anchorage-dependent colony formation of HSG cells. However, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 markedly inhibited the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells (p<0.001; one way ANOVA). Full length TSC-22 also suppressed the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells, although the effect of full length TSC-22 was much lower than those of the leucine zipper constructs. These observations suggest that the leucine zipper structure in TSC-22 protein is an active domain that negatively regulates the growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

  12. Phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation of keratinocyte transglutaminase in the membrane anchorage region.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, R; Rong, X H; Rice, R H

    1990-01-01

    The membrane-bound transglutaminase of cultured keratinocytes became radioactively labelled upon addition of [32P]Pi to the medium. Transglutaminase phosphorylation was also demonstrable using particulate material isolated from cell homogenates. Compatible with mediation of the labelling by protein kinase C, the degree of phosphorylation in intact cells was stimulated approx. 5-fold in 4 h on treatment with the tumour-promoting phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by phorbol. The extent of labelling was virtually unaffected by cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis, indicating that it arose primarily through turnover of phosphate in the membrane-bound enzyme. Phosphoamino acid analysis detected labelling only of serine residues. Most of the label was removed by trypsin release of the enzyme from the particulate fraction of cell homogenates, which deletes a membrane anchorage region of approximately 10 kDa. Upon trypsin treatment of the enzyme after immunoprecipitation, the phosphate label was recovered in soluble peptide material with a size of several thousand Da or less. Indicative of fragmentation of the membrane anchorage region, this material was separable by h.p.l.c. into two equally labelled peptides. Moreover, when the enzyme was labelled with [3H]palmitate or [3H]myristate, the fatty-acid-labelled peptide material required non-ionic detergent for solubilization and was separable from the phosphate-labelled material by gel filtration. Phorbol ester treatment of cultured keratinocytes in high- or low- Ca2(+)-containing medium was not accompanied by an appreciable protein-synthesis-independent change in transglutaminase activity. Independent of possible alteration of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the enzyme, phosphorylation may well modulate its interaction with substrate proteins, a potential site for physiological regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1977383

  13. 78 FR 48299 - Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF, Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF, Anchorage... establishes Class D airspace at Bryant Army Airfield (AAF), Anchorage AK. This action provides controlled... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish Class D airspace at Bryant...

  14. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted area....

  15. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1)...

  16. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1)...

  17. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1)...

  18. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1)...

  19. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses... the driver's seat and seat belt assembly anchorages that conform to the location and...

  20. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses... the driver's seat and seat belt assembly anchorages that conform to the location and...

  1. Transalveolar screw: a new concept for orthodontic anchorage.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Egio, Elisabeth; Ruiz, Vanessa

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the use of a new trans-alveolar screw (TAS) as a temporary orthodontic anchorage device for the posterior maxilla, to intrude overerupted maxillary molars. To date, five consecutive patients have been treated with these newly designed screws. Intrusions achieved ranged from 2.1 and 6mm (mean 4.7 mm). The TAS is cheap, easy to place and remove by the orthodontist, has bicortical anchorage, and is loaded on both sides. The main advantage of TAS is that when placed in the maxilla to intrude upper molars, it allows application of intrusive force from both buccal and palatal aspects simultaneously, so that the line of force in relation to the center of resistance of the posterior segment, permits an in-mass intrusion, avoiding buccal tipping or rotations. Moreover the surgical procedure for inserting and removing the bicortical screw is simple and does not require any surgical flap, so complications are minimal and screws can be loaded immediately, without requiring any waiting healing period of time.

  2. Summary of Quaternary geology of the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoll, H.R.; Yehle, L.A.; Updike, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    Quaternary geology of the Upper Cook Inlet region is dominated by deposits of glacier retreats that followed repeated advances from both adjacent and more distant mountains. At several levels high on the mountains, there are remnant glacial deposits and other features of middle or older Pleistocene age. Late Pleistocene lateral moraines along the Chugach Mountain front represent successively younger positions of ice retreat from the last glacial maximum. As the trunk glacier retreated northeastward up the Anchorage lowland, Cook Inlet transgressed the area, depositing the Bootlegger Cove Formation and Tudor Road deposits. The glacier then readvanced to form the latest Pleistocene Elmendorf Moraine, a prominent feature that trends across the Anchorage lowland. Extensive alluvium was deposited both concurrently and somewhat later as Cook Inlet regressed. Mountain valleys contain (1) locally preserved moraines possibly of early Holocene age; (2) poorly preserved moraine remnants of older late Holocene age; and (3) well-preserved moraines formed mainly during the Little Ice Age. Glaciers still occupy large parts of the mountains, the upper ends of some mountain valleys, and small cirques. Holocene landslide deposits, including those formed during the great Alaska earthquake of 1964, occur throughout the area, especially along bluffs containing the Bootlegger Cove Formation.

  3. Mini-Implants in the Anchorage Armamentarium: New Paradigms in the Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaru; Inami, Toshihiro; Ito, Ko; Kasai, Kazutaka; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Paradigms have started to shift in the orthodontic world since the introduction of mini-implants in the anchorage armamentarium. Various forms of skeletal anchorage, including miniscrews and miniplates, have been reported in the literature. Recently, great emphasis has been placed on the miniscrew type of temporary anchorage device (TAD). These devices are small, are implanted with a relatively simple surgical procedure, and increase the potential for better orthodontic results. Therefore, miniscrews not only free orthodontists from anchorage-demanding cases, but they also enable clinicians to have good control over tooth movement in 3 dimensions. The miniplate type also produces significant improvements in treatment outcomes and has widened the spectrum of orthodontics. The purpose of this paper is to update clinicians on the current concepts and versatile uses and clinical applications of skeletal anchorage in orthodontics. PMID:22719763

  4. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Gravesend Bay Anchorage, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.

    1996-09-01

    The Gravesend Bay Anchorage was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in February 1994. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses to provide baseline sediment chemistry data on the Gravesend Bay Anchorage. Individual sediment core samples collected at the Gravesend Bay Anchorage were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two samples, one of composited sediment cores representing the southeast corner of the anchorage (COMP GR), and one sediment core representing the northeast corner of the anchorage (Station GR-1 0), were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

  5. 77 FR 30440 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . (2) Fax: 202-493-2251. (3) Mail: Docket Management Facility (M-30...Phillips, Waterways Management Branch, Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Portland; telephone 503-240-9319... having been received by the Coast Guard when it is received at the Docket Management Facility....

  6. 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake: a photographic tour of Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thoms, Evan E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history, struck southcentral Alaska (fig. 1). The Great Alaska Earthquake (also known as the Good Friday Earthquake) occurred at a pivotal time in the history of earth science, and helped lead to the acceptance of plate tectonic theory (Cox, 1973; Brocher and others, 2014). All large subduction zone earthquakes are understood through insights learned from the 1964 event, and observations and interpretations of the earthquake have influenced the design of infrastructure and seismic monitoring systems now in place. The earthquake caused extensive damage across the State, and triggered local tsunamis that devastated the Alaskan towns of Whittier, Valdez, and Seward. In Anchorage, the main cause of damage was ground shaking, which lasted approximately 4.5 minutes. Many buildings could not withstand this motion and were damaged or collapsed even though their foundations remained intact. More significantly, ground shaking triggered a number of landslides along coastal and drainage valley bluffs underlain by the Bootlegger Cove Formation, a composite of facies containing variably mixed gravel, sand, silt, and clay which were deposited over much of upper Cook Inlet during the Late Pleistocene (Ulery and others, 1983). Cyclic (or strain) softening of the more sensitive clay facies caused overlying blocks of soil to slide sideways along surfaces dipping by only a few degrees. This guide is the document version of an interactive web map that was created as part of the commemoration events for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. It is accessible at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center website: http://alaska.usgs.gov/announcements/news/1964Earthquake/. The website features a map display with suggested tour stops in Anchorage, historical photographs taken shortly after the earthquake, repeat photography of selected sites, scanned documents

  7. G1/S control of anchorage-independent growth in the fibroblast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methodology to identify the block to anchorage- independent growth and position it within the fibroblast cell cycle. Results with NRK fibroblasts show that mitogen stimulation of the G0/G1 transition and G1-associated increases in cell size are minimally affected by loss of cell anchorage. In contrast, the induction of G1/S cell cycle genes and DNA synthesis is markedly inhibited when anchorage is blocked. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anchorage-dependent transition maps to late G1 and shortly before activation of the G1/S p34cdc2-like kinase. The G1/S block was also detectable in NIH-3T3 cells. Our results: (a) distinguish control of cell cycle progression by growth factors and anchorage; (b) indicate that anchorage mediates G1/S control in fibroblasts; and (c) identify a physiologic circumstance in which the phenotype of mammalian cell cycle arrest would closely resemble Saccharomyces cerevisiae START. The close correlation between anchorage independence in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo emphasizes the key regulatory role for G1/S control in mammalian cells. PMID:1955482

  8. Skeletal Class lll severe openbite treatment using implant anchorage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuichi; Kuroda, Shingo; Murshid, Sakhr A; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2008-01-01

    A female patient with a skeletal Class III severe anterior openbite was treated using miniplates as the anchorage. The patient was 15 years and 10 months of age when she reported to our university hospital with a chief complaint of anterior openbite and reversed occlusion. The patient had an anterior openbite with an overjet of -3.0 mm and overbite of -5.0 mm and a Class III molar relationship. The cephalometric analysis showed a skeletal Class III relationship (ANB 0 degrees ). After the extraction of the bilateral mandibular third molars, miniplates were placed in the mandibular external oblique line. The mandibular dentition was retracted using elastic chain and miniplates. After treatment, an Angle Class I molar relationship was achieved and overjet and overbite had become 2.0 mm and 1.5 mm. A good facial appearance and occlusal relationship were obtained. The total active orthodontic treatment period was 23 months. Wrap-around type retainers were placed on both jaws and a lingual bonded retainer was also attached in the mandibular incisors. After 1 year of retention, the occlusion was stable, and a good facial profile was also retained. The mandibular deviation to the left was improved and the strain in the circumoral musculature during lip closure disappeared. An appropriate interincisal relationship was achieved by the uprighting of mandibular dentition without changing the vertical intermaxillary relationship. A panoramic radiograph showed no marked root resorption. Our results suggest that implant anchorage is useful for correction of skeletal Class III severe anterior openbite cases.

  9. Comparison of Anchorage Pattern under Two Types of Orthodontic Mini- Implant Loading During Retraction in Type A Anchorage Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, B. Imran; Mandava, Prasad; Reddy, G. Vivek; Nettam, Venkatesh; Bhavikati, Venkat Naidu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The orthodontic mini-screws are the mainstay of direct skeletal anchorage which requires minimal compliance and provides maximal anchorage control. However, the timing of initiation of orthodontic loading of these mini-screws is not clearly established in the available studies. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the reciprocal effects on mini-screw implant with immediate loading in comparison to that of delayed loading during retraction. Materials and Methods The prospective clinical study included a sample of 25 orthodontic patients in the age range of 18-25 years. All the cases were of bi-maxillary proclination with Type-A anchorage demands. All the first premolars were indicated for extraction. A split mouth technique for each patient was utilized by loading mini-implant immediately after its placement on one side and the opposite side implant was loaded after a time lag of two weeks post-insertion. Retraction force of 150g was applied for three months on each side. The displacement of the head and tail of the implant, molar anterior tooth retraction was measured on Orthopantomograph (OPG) taken at T1 (initial) and T2 (after three months). A grid method with each 1mm magnified to 500 pixels was superimposed on OPG and the relative displacements were evaluated. Student’s unpaired ‘t’ test was used for comparison between left and right side and paired ‘t’ test for the parameters on the same side. The p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results The mean displacement of head of the implant on the immediate loading is 0.57mm where as the tail exhibited 0.75 mm. The head and tail of the implant on the delayed loading displaced by 0.35mm and 0.38mm respectively, on an average when data was analysed. Significant difference between the two types of loading was noted. Conclusion Delayed loading is beneficial as compared to immediate loading during extraction space closure. PMID:27891469

  10. Factors Predisposing to Maxillary Anchorage Loss: A Retrospective Study of 1403 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong; Han, Bing; Li, Sa; Na, Bin; Ma, Wen; Xu, Tian-Min

    2014-01-01

    Anchorage loss is very disturbing for orthodontists and patients during orthodontic treatment, which usually results in bad treatment effects. Despite the same treatment strategy, different patients show different tendencies toward anchorage loss, which influences the treatment results and should preferably be predicted before the treatment is begun. However, relatively little research has been conducted on which patients are more likely to lose anchorage. The mesial tipping of the first molar marks the onset of anchorage loss, and changes in the angulation of the first molar are closely related to anchorage loss. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine how the mesiodistal angulation of the upper first molars changes during general orthodontic treatment and to identify the individual physiologic factors leading to these changes in a large sample of 1403 patients with malocclusion. The data indicate that the upper first molars tend to be tipped mesially during orthodontic treatment, and this constitutes a type of anchorage loss that orthodontists should consider carefully. Compared to treatment-related factors, patients' physiologic characteristics have a greater influence on changes in the angulation of the upper first molars during orthodontic treatment. The more distally tipped the upper first molars are before treatment, the more they will tip mesially during treatment. Mesial tipping of the upper first molars, and therefore, anchorage loss, is more likely to occur in adolescents, males, patients with class II malocclusion and patients who have undergone maxillary premolar extraction. This finding is of clinical significance to orthodontists who wish to prevent iatrogenic anchorage loss by tipping originally distally tipped upper molars forward, and provides a new perspective on anchorage during orthodontic treatment planning. PMID:25299164

  11. A Preliminary Evaluation of Child Restraints and Anchorage Systems for an Australian Car

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Judith L.; Fildes, Brian; Laemmle, Ronald; Smith, Stuart; Douglas, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the performance of three rear-facing and two forward-facing child restraints (CRS) with three anchorage systems: standard seatbelt, LATCH (flexible) and ISOFIX (rigid). Frontal (64 km/h) and side impact (15 km/h) HyGe sled tests were conducted using a sedan buck. Overall, the preliminary findings suggested superior performance of rigid over seatbelt and flexible anchorages, particularly in side impacts. The results also suggest a need for design improvement for CRS with flexible anchorages to increase stability in side impacts. The findings have important implications for the proposed introduction of changes to Australian Standards for CRS to permit both flexible and rigid systems to coexist with conventional seatbelt anchorage systems. PMID:15319118

  12. EFFECT OF STRENGTHENING AT EXPECTED DAMAGING ZONE OF A RC MEMBER WITH DAMAGED ANCHORAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chijiwa, Nobuhiro; Kawanaka, Isao; Maekawa, Koichi

    When a reinforced concrete member having cracks at the anchorage zones is loaded, diagonal crack is formed from the tip of the exsisting crack, and it lead s to brittle shaer failure. A reinforced concrete beam containing corrosion cracks at the anchorage zone were strengthened with sheets at the expected damaging zones, and tested in 3-point loading. Th e test result shows that the load capacity of the strengthened beam was the same to that of the repli cate beam with no damage at the anchorage zones and contained enough shear reinforcement to develop flexural failure. It means that strenghtneing at the expected damaging zone with keeping corrosion cr acks along to the tensile reinforcements at the anchorage zones may improve the load capacity of the damaged reinforced concrete.

  13. The most appropriate position and number for absolute anchorages for orthodontic tooth movements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Takakuda, Kazuo; Miyairi, Hiroo; Soma, Kunimichi

    2003-04-01

    Absolute anchorages proved to be very effective for orthodontic tooth movements. We used a 3D digitizer to record each tooth on pre-treatment diagnostic and post-treatment predictive setup models and then 3D coordinate system conversion was performed to make the coordinate values comparable. An arithmetic calculation of vector and moment based on the orthodontic forces and the tooth displacement under preliminary premises undertaken to decide the most favorable position and number for absolute anchorages. Position--For two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, the most appropriate positions for absolute anchorages should theoretically be on the line of resultant force (2D) and the plane (3D) where the total moment effect tends to be zero. Number--As for the number of the absolute anchorages needed, it depends on the number of target teeth. Different combinations of target teeth provide different sets of results.

  14. 33 CFR 110.72d - Ashley River anchorage areas, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Channel. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 1983. (b) Ashley River Anchorage 2. The waters lying... southwest boundary of the Ashley River Channel. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 1983....

  15. Hydrologic conditions in the Klatt Bog area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Klatt Bog is a 2.3 sq mi wetland in Anchorage, Alaska which provides habitat for many wildlife species but also offers potential sites for residential, commercial, and agricultural developments. Precipitation, the main source of water for the area, averages 15 in/yr; during the 1983 study period, precipitation was 12.16 inches. Estimates of evapotranspiration, considered to be the major component of water outflow, range from 10 to 20 inches. Surface runoff and groundwater outflow during 1983 are estimated to be 2.8 and < 0.2 inches, respectively. During summer, most of the runoff is derived from groundwater discharge near the upgradient eastern edge of the wetland. The wetland 's aquifer system is composed of fibrous peat which overlies a poorly permeable layer of silt and clay. The aquifer is recharged by infiltration of precipitation and inflow of groundwater from upland areas east of the wetland. During 1983 the water table was at or within 3 ft of land surface in most areas and its seasonal fluctuation was < 2 feet. Water collected from four shallow observation wells, two ponds, and two sites on a stream had concentrations of dissolved iron ranging from 2,300 to 6,100 micrograms/L. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Maps Showing Seismic Landslide Hazards in Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.; Michael, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The devastating landslides that accompanied the great 1964 Alaska earthquake showed that seismically triggered landslides are one of the greatest geologic hazards in Anchorage. Maps quantifying seismic landslide hazards are therefore important for planning, zoning, and emergency-response preparation. The accompanying maps portray seismic landslide hazards for the following conditions: (1) deep, translational landslides, which occur only during great subduction-zone earthquakes that have return periods of =~300-900 yr; (2) shallow landslides for a peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.69 g, which has a return period of 2,475 yr, or a 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr; and (3) shallow landslides for a PGA of 0.43 g, which has a return period of 475 yr, or a 10 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr. Deep, translational landslide hazard zones were delineated based on previous studies of such landslides, with some modifications based on field observations of locations of deep landslides. Shallow-landslide hazards were delineated using a Newmark-type displacement analysis for the two probabilistic ground motions modeled.

  17. Maps showing seismic landslide hazards in Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    The devastating landslides that accompanied the great 1964 Alaska earthquake showed that seismically triggered landslides are one of the greatest geologic hazards in Anchorage. Maps quantifying seismic landslide hazards are therefore important for planning, zoning, and emergency-response preparation. The accompanying maps portray seismic landslide hazards for the following conditions: (1) deep, translational landslides, which occur only during great subduction-zone earthquakes that have return periods of =300-900 yr; (2) shallow landslides for a peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.69 g, which has a return period of 2,475 yr, or a 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr; and (3) shallow landslides for a PGA of 0.43 g, which has a return period of 475 yr, or a 10 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr. Deep, translational landslide hazards were delineated based on previous studies of such landslides, with some modifications based on field observations of locations of deep landslides. Shallow-landslide hazards were delineated using a Newmark-type displacement analysis for the two probabilistic ground motions modeled.

  18. Treatability Study in Support of Intrinsic Remediation for the Hangar 10 Site. Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    ANCHORAGE , ALASKA March 1995 D Prepared for: I * AIR FORCE CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER DIVISION BROOKS AIR FORCE BASE SAN...ANTONIO, TEXAS AND ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE ANCHORAGE , ALASKA I Prepared by: I Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. 1700 Broadway, Suite 900 Denver, Colorado...Wnrinsic Remediation TS Elmendorf Air Force Base Anchorage . Alaska 0 125250 500 1000 MENARSNSEIGUINE N FEET Denver, Colorado 5-31

  19. Hydrologic conditions in Connors Bog Area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Connors Bog is a wetland in Anchorage, Alaska, which provides a habitat for many wildlife species and is a popular area for driving off-road vehicles. A landfill, and residential and commercial developments are present in areas which were once wetland. The main source of water is precipitation, which averages about 15 in/yr. Estimates of evapotranspiration, which is the main component of water outflow, range from 10 to 20 in/yr. Minor amounts of groundwater and surface runoff flow into the area from the northeast and southwest and flow out of the area to the northwest and south. Within the wetland, water in peat and sand is unconfined and becomes more mineralized with depth. A leachate beneath and near an abandoned landfill is characterized by concentrations of dissolved solids, dissolved chloride, and total organics that are higher than those of the area 's natural water. The maximum lateral extent of detectable contamination in 1984 was < 500 ft from the landfill 's edge. Water in glacial deposits that underlie a poorly permeable layer of silt and clay is confined. A well completed in this confined aquifer yielded water that had a low concentration of dissolved solids, 150 mg/L. The potentiometric surface of this aquifer was about 20 ft lower than the water table during 1984. Connors Lake occupies a depression that extends below adjacent groundwater levels. The 40-acre lake has a maximum depth of about 9 ft and a low rate of biological production. The quality of water in the lake has not been adversely impacted by nearby residential development or landfill operations. Lake levels appear to be influenced by precipitation and adjacent groundwater levels. (Author 's abstract)

  20. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  1. The use of implants for anchorage in the correction of unilateral crossbites.

    PubMed

    Alani, Aws; Bishop, Karl; Knox, Jeremy; Gravenor, Colin

    2010-09-01

    The provision of orthodontic anchorage in the adult patient can be compromised due to reduced periodontal support, insufficient number of teeth and limited supra-gingival tooth tissue. Where tooth borne anchorage is unavailable for significant orthodontic movement implants represent a viable alternative. This paper describes the use of dental implants for orthodontic anchorage in a partially dentate patient with a severe unilateral cross-bite where orthognathic surgery was the only other realistic option. The implants were successfully engaged using a composite bridge and a modified quad helix appliance for correction of the malocclusion. Once orthodontics was completed the patient was restored using highly sintered ceramic crowns and bridges. This paper highlights the importance of the multi-disciplinary team and the close liaison between the restorative dentist, orthodontist and technician in treatment planning and provision.

  2. Ground Water in the Anchorage Area, Alaska--Meeting the Challenges of Ground-Water Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Edward H.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2006-01-01

    Ground water is an important component of Anchorage's water supply. During the 1970s and early 80s when ground water extracted from aquifers near Ship Creek was the principal source of supply, area-wide declines in ground-water levels resulted in near record low streamflows in Ship Creek. Since the importation of Eklutna Lake water in the late 1980s, ground-water use has been reduced and ground water has contributed 14-30 percent of the annual supply. As Anchorage grows, given the current constraints on the Eklutna Lake water availability, the increasing demand for water could place an increasing reliance on local ground-water resources. The sustainability of Anchorage's ground-water resources challenges stakeholders to develop a comprehensive water-resources management strategy.

  3. Temporary anchorage device usage: a survey among Swiss orthodontists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the survey was to obtain information on the treatment plan preferences, mechanics and characteristics of temporary anchorage device (TAD) application using a single case presented to orthodontists in Switzerland. Methods A structured questionnaire to be completed by all study participants with case-specific (treatment plan including mechanics and TAD usage) and general questions (general fixed appliance and TAD usage as well as professional, educational and demographic questions) together with an orthodontic borderline case was utilised. The case was a female adult with dental Class II/2, deep bite and maxillary anterior crowing, who had been treated in childhood with extraction of four premolars and fixed appliance followed by wisdom tooth extraction. Results The response rate was 24.4% (108 out of 443). The majority (96.3%, 104) proposed comprehensive treatment, while 3.7% (4) planned only alignment of maxillary teeth. 8.3% (9) included a surgical approach in their treatment plan. An additional 0.9% (1) combined the surgical approach with Class II mechanics. 75.1% (81) decided on distalization on the maxilla using TADs, 7.4% (8) planned various types of Class II appliances and 3.7% (4) combined distalization using TADs or headgear with Class II appliances and surgery. Palatal implants were the most popular choice (70.6%, 60), followed by mini-screws (22.4%, 19) and mini-plates on the infrazygomatic crests (7.0%, 6). The preferred site of TAD insertion showed more variation in sagittal than in transversal dimension, and the median size of mini-screws used was 10.0-mm long (interquartile range (IQR) 2.3 mm) and 2.0-mm wide (IQR 0.3 mm). Conclusions Distalization against palatal implants and then distalization against mini-screws were the most popular treatment plans. Preferred site for TAD insertion varied depending on type and size but varied more widely in the sagittal than in the transversal dimension. PMID:24935644

  4. Aberrant methylation-mediated silencing of microRNAs contributes to HPV-induced anchorage independence

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; Boon, Debby; Sørgård, Hanne; Lando, Malin; Snoek, Barbara C.; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Lyng, Heidi; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer and a subset of anogenital and head-and-neck carcinomas are caused by high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (hrHPV). During hrHPV-induced malignant transformation keratinocytes become able to grow anchorage independently, a tumorigenic trait at least partly associated with inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. We used hrHPV-containing keratinocytes to investigate the role of DNA methylation-mediated silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the acquisition of anchorage independence. Anchorage dependent (n=11) and independent passages (n=19) of 4 hrHPV-immortalized keratinocyte cell lines were treated with 2′-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC). Genome-wide miRNA expression profiles before and after treatment were compared to identify miRNAs silenced by methylation. Bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR showed increased methylation of hsa-mir-129-2/-137/-935/-3663/-3665 and -4281 in anchorage independent HPV-transformed keratinocytes and cervical cancer cell lines. Mature miRNAs derived from hsa-mir-129-2/-137/-3663 and -3665 showed functional relevance as they decreased anchorage independence in cervical cancer cell lines. Cervical (pre)cancerous lesions demonstrated increased methylation of hsa-mir-129-2/-935/-3663/-3665 and -4281, underlining the clinical relevance of our findings. In conclusion, methylation-mediated silencing of tumor suppressive miRNAs contributes to acquisition of an anchorage independent phenotype. This study further substantiates the importance of miRNAs during early stages of carcinogenesis and underlines their potential as both disease markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27270309

  5. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  6. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  7. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  8. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  9. MEDIA ADVISORY: EPA Region 10 Administrator McLerran speaks at Alaska Forum on the Environment today in Anchorage

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Anchorage - February 8, 2016) Today, U.S. EPA Region 10 Administrator Dennis McLerran will give a keynote address opening the 2016 Alaska Forum on the Environment, in Anchorage, focusing on EPA's work in rural Alaska and ongoing federal commitments highli

  10. 77 FR 66942 - Anchorages; Lower Mississippi River, Above Head of Passes, Convent, LA and Point Pleasant, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... Passes, Convent, LA and Point Pleasant, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., above the Head of Passes (AHP). The first would be located at the Belmont Light extending from Mile... above Head of Passes. The width of the anchorage is 300 feet. The inner boundary of the anchorage is...

  11. Use of miniplates as a method for orthodontic anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Fernando Gianzanti; Padovan, Luis Eduardo Marques; Kluppel, Leandro Eduardo; Albuquerque, Gustavo Calvalcanti; de Souza, Paulo Cesar Ulson; Claudino, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) have been developed to be used as direct adjuncts in orthodontic treatment and have facilitated treatment of more complex orthodontic cases, including patients with dental impaction. Objectives: This clinical case reports the applicability of TADs in the orthodontic treatment of a patient with impacted mandibular second molars. Surgical and orthodontic procedures related to the use of miniplates were also discussed in this study. Conclusions: The use of temporary anchorage devices, such as miniplates, can be suggested as an alternative to treat patients with impacted mandibular second molars. PMID:27901235

  12. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 suppresses invasion and anchorage-independent growth of astrocytic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockbill, Louisa M. R.; Murk, Kai; Love, Seth; Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors are the most common form of primary brain tumor. Astrocytic tumor cells infiltrate the surrounding CNS tissue, allowing them to evade removal upon surgical resection of the primary tumor. Dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton are crucial to cancer cell invasion, but the specific mechanisms that underlie the particularly invasive phenotype of astrocytic tumor cells are unclear. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) is a PDZ and BAR domain–containing protein that inhibits actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization and is involved in regulating the trafficking of a number of cell-surface receptors. Here we report that, in contrast to other cancers, PICK1 expression is down-regulated in grade IV astrocytic tumor cell lines and also in clinical cases of the disease in which grade IV tumors have progressed from lower-grade tumors. Exogenous expression of PICK1 in the grade IV astrocytic cell line U251 reduces their capacity for anchorage-independent growth, two-dimensional migration, and invasion through a three-dimensional matrix, strongly suggesting that low PICK1 expression plays an important role in astrocytic tumorigenesis. We propose that PICK1 negatively regulates neoplastic infiltration of astrocytic tumors and that manipulation of PICK1 is an attractive possibility for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26466675

  13. 77 FR 5743 - Special Anchorage Areas; Port of New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... guest mooring options maintained by the Sheepshead Bay boating clubs under the authority of NYC Parks... should contact the NYC Parks Brooklyn Permit Office at (718) 965-8975. For guest moorings and access to... at (718) 965-8975. For guest moorings and access to and from the anchorage areas described...

  14. Anchorage School District Profile of Performance 1996-97. Assessment and Evaluation Report #97-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Ray

    This report focuses on student achievement across the Anchorage (Alaska) school district and within its individual programs. It does not include information on the social and physical wellness of the district's students. The first section of the report provides an overview of district performance on critical achievement indicators, and the second…

  15. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... River, vessels shall be anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses. Note: There is an authorized anchorage in Canadian waters just above Fighting Island and an authorized... anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses....

  16. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... River, vessels shall be anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses. Note: There is an authorized anchorage in Canadian waters just above Fighting Island and an authorized... anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses....

  17. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... River, vessels shall be anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses. Note: There is an authorized anchorage in Canadian waters just above Fighting Island and an authorized... anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses....

  18. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... River, vessels shall be anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses. Note: There is an authorized anchorage in Canadian waters just above Fighting Island and an authorized... anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses....

  19. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... River, vessels shall be anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses. Note: There is an authorized anchorage in Canadian waters just above Fighting Island and an authorized... anchored so as not to swing into the channel or across steering courses....

  20. A Manual for the Anchorage School District Bilingual Education Program Revised Scope and Sequence, K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrich, Maria Nieves Bumanlag Lilagan

    The manual offers a systematic set of procedures and relevant information to facilitate effective use of the Anchorage school district (ASD) bilingual education program (BEP). The historical background of the program's development is presented, available manuals for teaching English to limited English proficiency (LEP) students and related…

  1. 49 CFR 571.210 - Standard No. 210; Seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vehicle structure, including, but not limited to, the attachment hardware, seat frames, seat pedestals, the vehicle structure itself, and any part of the vehicle whose failure causes separation of the belt... belt bears upon the seat frame, the seat belt anchorage, if not on the seat structure, shall be aft...

  2. 49 CFR 571.210 - Standard No. 210; Seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., other than the webbing or straps, involved in transferring seat belt loads to the vehicle structure, including, but not limited to, the attachment hardware, seat frames, seat pedestals, the vehicle structure... frame, the seat belt anchorage, if not on the seat structure, shall be aft of the rearmost belt...

  3. 49 CFR 571.225 - Standard No. 225; Child restraint anchorage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... van-type vehicles, vehicles manufactured to be sold exclusively to the U.S. Postal Service, shuttle..., other than Type I or Type II seat belts, that is involved in transferring loads generated by a child restraint system to the vehicle structure. Child restraint anchorage system means a vehicle system that...

  4. 49 CFR 571.210 - Standard No. 210; Seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vehicle structure, including, but not limited to, the attachment hardware, seat frames, seat pedestals, the vehicle structure itself, and any part of the vehicle whose failure causes separation of the belt... belt bears upon the seat frame, the seat belt anchorage, if not on the seat structure, shall be aft...

  5. Evaluating School Wellness Policy in Curbing Childhood Obesity in Anchorage, Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Wendy G.; Garcia, Gabriel M.; Hoffman, Pamela K.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Anchorage School District implemented a school wellness policy to address the problem of obesity among its elementary-aged students. We assessed whether the addition of this policy is effective in protecting or preventing students from becoming overweight/obese over time. The methods involved following two cohorts of students for 5…

  6. Characterization of ambient fine particles in the northwestern area and Anchorage, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene; Hopke, Philip K

    2008-10-01

    Ambient PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) in the northwestern United States and Alaska is dominated by carbonaceous compounds associated with wood burning and transportation sources. PM2.5 source characterization studies analyzing recent PM2.5 speciation data have not been previously reported for these areas. In this study, ambient PM2.5 speciation samples collected at two monitoring sites located in the northwestern area, Olympic Peninsula, WA, and Portland, OR, and one monitoring site located in Anchorage, AK, were characterized through source apportionments. Gasoline vehicle, secondary sulfate, and wood smoke were the largest sources of PM2.5 collected at the Anchorage, Olympic, and Portland monitoring sites, respectively. Secondary sulfates showed an April peak at Anchorage and a November peak at Portland that are likely related to the increased photochemical reaction and long-range transport in Anchorage and meteorological stagnation in Portland. Secondary nitrate at the Olympic site showed a weak summer high peak that could be caused by seasonal tourism in the national park. Backward trajectories suggested that the elevated aged sea salt concentrations at the Portland monitoring site could be regional transport of sea salt that passed through other contaminated air sheds along the coast. Oil combustion emissions that might originate from ships and ferries were observed at the Olympic monitoring site.

  7. 77 FR 50646 - Proposed Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF, Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF... (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish Class D airspace at Bryant Army Airfield (AAF... 71 by establishing Class D airspace extending upward from the surface at Bryant AAF, Anchorage...

  8. Elderly Alaskan Natives in Anchorage: A Needs-Assessment for Social Services Program Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Charles; And Others

    Eighty-five elderly Alaskan Natives living in Anchorage were interviewed to determine if their needs were being met by programs designed for the elderly on a national level. Agencies serving the elderly were also questioned. Age, sex, and ethnic background of the respondents were compared with the variables of degree of education, marital status,…

  9. 78 FR 58158 - Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF, Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class D Airspace; Bryant AAF, Anchorage... action corrects a final rule published in the Federal Register August 8, 2013 that establishes Class D... description for Bryant AAF, in that the language indicating Class D airspace as part time was left out....

  10. 33 CFR 110.230 - Anchorages, Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Puget Sound Zone, WA. 110.230 Section 110.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Port Puget Sound Zone, WA. (a) Anchorage grounds. All coordinates are expressed in North American Datum... Traffic Service Puget Sound is designated as the COTP's authorized representative. All vessels should...

  11. 33 CFR 110.230 - Anchorages, Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Puget Sound Zone, WA. 110.230 Section 110.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Port Puget Sound Zone, WA. (a) Anchorage grounds. All coordinates are expressed in North American Datum... Traffic Service Puget Sound is designated as the COTP's authorized representative. All vessels should...

  12. Management of post midface distraction occlusal discrepancy using temporary anchorage devices in a cleft patient

    PubMed Central

    Koteswara Prasad, N. K.; Hussain, Syed Altaf; Chitharanjan, Arun B.; Murthy, Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Open bite deformity following a successful midface advancement by distraction osteogenesis is a common complication. Temporary anchorage devices can be deployed during the distraction and post-distraction settling phases for restoring the occlusion even in severe cases. The following report describes the management of severe anterior open bite following maxillary distraction. PMID:25991895

  13. Competing effects of buckling and anchorage strength on optimal wheat stalk geometry.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Tony; Zhou, Jiang; Wood, William H

    2002-08-01

    We seek the ideal wheat stalk, which minimizes the structural mass required to support a fixed grain load in the presence of gravity and wind. The optimization search is restricted to stepped cylindrical stems of known moduli and density but unknown dimension. Stem buckling and root anchorage strength are assumed to place restrictions on the permissible stalk resonant frequency in the presence of a specified wind forcing frequency. These effects are described mathematically, and the penalty parameter method is used to find stem mass minima for various stalk heights. In general, there are two alternative solution branches. The lower solution is the global minimum but it is probably impractical for field crops exposed to natural wind. The upper minimum is more conservative and therefore requires more stem mass. Due to the competing requirements of buckling versus anchorage strength, the parameter study shows that optimal wheat stem geometry has a nonlinear dependence on the intensity of gravity and the frequency spectra of the wind.

  14. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ray, Robert P; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-08-10

    How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape.

  15. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Robert P.; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape. PMID:26190146

  16. Lower incisor intrusion with intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-chao; Huang, Ji-na; Lin, Xin-ping

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential use of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires as anchorage for intrusion of the lower incisors using a rabbit model. Placement of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires around incisors is similar to that of intraoral transosseous wiring of edentulous mandibular fractures. Ten male New Zealand rabbits, 9 +/- 1.5 months of age, average weight 1.8 +/- 0.3 kg, were used in this study. One lower incisor was intruded with a 50 g bilateral force using a coil spring for 10 weeks, while the other incisor served as the control. Clinical measurements of the distances between the occlusal edges of the incisors (EE) were performed weekly with a calliper. In addition to standard descriptive statistical calculations, a paired Student's t-test was used for comparison of the two groups. All surgical sites healed uneventfully after insertion of the wires. Significant differences were found in the change of EE between the experimental and control sides from 4 weeks onwards. Intrusion of the incisor, 4 +/- 0.58 mm, was seen on the test side, while EE on the control side remained unchanged. Within the limits of this animal study, it is concluded that the intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage system is a cost-effective method for intrusion of lower incisors when the use of other anchorage system is not possible.

  17. Impedance monitoring at tendon-anchorage via mountable PZT interface and temperature-effect compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Choi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the pre-stress force in pre-stressed concrete (PSC) girders is monitored via mountable PZT interface under varying temperature. Firstly, an impedance-based technique using mountable PZT interface is proposed for pre-stress-loss monitoring in tendon-anchorage systems. A cross correlation-based temperature-effect compensation algorithm using an effective frequency shift (EFS) of impedance signatures is visited. Secondly, lab-scale experiments are performed on a PSC girder instrumented with a mountable PZT interface at tendon-anchorage. A series of temperature variation and pre-stress-loss events are simulated for the lab-scale PSC girder. Thirdly, the feasibility of the mountable PZT interface for pre-stress-loss monitoring in tendon-anchorage is experimentally verified under constant temperature conditions. Finally, the PZT interface device is examined for pre-stress-loss monitoring under temperature changes to validate its applicability. The temperature effect on impedance signatures is compensated by minimizing cross-correlation deviation between impedance patterns of the mountable PZT interface.

  18. Strontium ranelate improved tooth anchorage and reduced root resorption in orthodontic treatment of rats.

    PubMed

    Kirschneck, Christian; Wolf, Michael; Reicheneder, Claudia; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Proff, Peter; Roemer, Piero

    2014-12-05

    The anchorage mechanisms currently used in orthodontic treatment have various disadvantages. The objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the osteoporosis medication strontium ranelate in pharmacologically induced orthodontic tooth anchorage. In 48 male Wistar rats, a constant orthodontic force of 0.25 N was reciprocally applied to the upper first molar and the incisors by means of a Sentalloy(®) closed coil spring for two to four weeks. 50% of the animals received strontium ranelate at a daily oral dosage of 900 mg per kilogramme of body weight. Bioavailability was determined by blood analyses. The extent of tooth movement was measured both optometrically and cephalometrically (CBCT). Relative alveolar gene expression of osteoclastic markers and OPG-RANKL was assessed by qRT-PCR and root resorption area and osteoclastic activity were determined in TRAP-stained histologic sections of the alveolar process. Compared to controls, the animals treated with strontium ranelate showed up to 40% less tooth movement after four weeks of orthodontic treatment. Gene expression and histologic analyses showed significantly less osteoclastic activity and a significantly smaller root resorption area. Blood analyses confirmed sufficient bioavailability of strontium ranelate. Because of its pharmacologic effects on bone metabolism, strontium ranelate significantly reduced tooth movement and root resorption in orthodontic treatment of rats. Strontium ranelate may be a viable agent for inducing tooth anchorage and reducing undesired root resorption in orthodontic treatment. Patients under medication of strontium ranelate have to expect prolonged orthodontic treatment times.

  19. 77 FR 43514 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is removing an obsolete... Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels waiting to enter Narragansett Bay... Rhode Island Sound, RI,'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 15246). We received nine comments on...

  20. 78 FR 4785 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... navigation regulations by removing the Decker Island restricted anchorage. V. Regulatory Analyses We... required for this rule. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 162 Navigation (water) and Waterways. For...

  1. Effectiveness of interceptive treatment of class III malocclusions with skeletal anchorage: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez de Guzmán-Barrera, Jorge; Sáez Martínez, Carla; Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Gandía-Franco, José Luís; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Recently, new strategies for treating class III malocclusions have appeared. Skeletal anchorage appears to reduce the dentoalveolar effects while maximising the orthopaedic effect in growing patients. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to examine the effectiveness of bone anchorage devices for interceptive treatment of skeletal class III malocclusions. Searches were made in the Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane databases, as well as in a grey literature database, and were complemented by hand-searching. The criteria for eligibility were: patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage (miniplates and miniscrews). Patients with syndromes or craniofacial deformities or who had undergone maxillofacial surgery were excluded. The following variables were recorded for each article: author, year of publication, type of study, sample size, dropouts, demographic variables, treatment carried out, radiographic study (2D or 3D), follow-up time, and quality of the articles on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The means and confidence intervals of the following variables were employed: Wits, overjet, ANB, SNA and SNB. Initially, 239 articles were identified. After removing the duplicates and applying the selection criteria, 9 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 7 in the quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). It may be concluded that skeletal anchorage is an effective treatment for improving skeletal Class III malocclusion, but when compared with other traditional treatments such as disjunction and face mask, there is no clear evidence that skeletal anchorage improves the results. PMID:28328995

  2. Hybrid SHM of cable-anchorage system in cable-stayed bridge using smart sensor and interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khac-Duy; Ho, Duc-Duy; Hong, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2012-04-01

    Cable force is one of the most important parameters of cable-stayed bridge. Since cable system carries most of selfweight of the bridge, the loss of cable force could significantly reduce load carrying capacity of the bridge. This study presents a hybrid structural health monitoring (SHM) method for cable-anchorage system of cable-stayed bridge using smart sensor and interface. The following approaches are carried out to achieve the objective. Firstly, a hybrid SHM method is newly designed for tension force monitoring in cable-anchorage system. In the method, vibration response of cable is utilized for tension force monitoring of global cable, and impedance response of anchorage is utilized to detect tension force change of local tendon. A smart PZT-interface is also designed for sensitively monitoring of electromechanical impedance changes in tendon-anchorage subsystem. Secondly, wireless vibration and impedance sensor network working on Imote2 platform are outlined with regarding to hardware design and embedded software. Finally, an experiment on lab-scale cable-anchorage system is performed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed SHM method.

  3. Effects of urbanization on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in streams, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ourso, Robert T.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of urbanization on stream macroinvertebrate communities was examined by using data gathered during a 1999 reconnaissance of 14 sites in the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska. Data collected included macroinvertebrate abundance, water chemistry, and trace elements in bed sediments. Macroinvertebrate relative-abundance data were edited and used in metric and index calculations. Population density was used as a surrogate for urbanization. Cluster analysis (unweighted-paired-grouping method) using arithmetic means of macroinvertebrate presence-absence data showed a well-defined separation between urbanized and nonurbanized sites as well as extracted sites that did not cleanly fall into either category. Water quality in Anchorage generally declined with increasing urbanization (population density). Of 59 variables examined, 31 correlated with urbanization. Local regression analysis extracted 11 variables that showed a significant impairment threshold response and 6 that showed a significant linear response. Significant biological variables for determining the impairment threshold in this study were the Margalef diversity index, Ephemeroptera-Plecoptera-Trichoptera taxa richness, and total taxa richness. Significant thresholds were observed in the water-chemistry variables conductivity, dissolved organic carbon, potassium, and total dissolved solids. Significant thresholds in trace elements in bed sediments included arsenic, iron, manganese, and lead. Results suggest that sites in Anchorage that have ratios of population density to road density greater than 70, storm-drain densities greater than 0.45 miles per square mile, road densities greater than 4 miles per square mile, or population densities greater than 125-150 persons per square mile may require further monitoring to determine if the stream has become impaired. This population density is far less than the 1,000 persons per square mile used by the U.S. Census Bureau to define an urban area.

  4. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  5. Elmendorf AFB, Anchorage, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-17

    These is no objection to unlimited distribution of this report to the public at large, or by DDC to the National Technical V Information Service (NTIS...11 93 . ?. o’~ *r7~ L DATA PROCESSING BRANCH 2 USAF TAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY!, AIR WEATER SERVICE /MAC 6401 ELt4ENDORF AFB ALASKA/ANCHORAGE M- AAR...Air Weather Service ( MAC ) E-EM0RF AFB ALASKA/AllCHORAGE WI3AI Y 26401 N 61 15 W149 48 ELD ELEV 212 FT EDF V81O # 70272 POR: FROM- BOUBLY 035 JUN, 66

  6. Ground-water quality beneath solid-waste disposal sites at anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zenone, Chester; Donaldson, D.E.; Grunwaldt, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    Studies at three solid-waste disposal sites in the Anchorage area suggest that differences in local geohydrologic conditions influence ground-water quality. A leachate was detected in ground water within and beneath two sites where the water table is very near land surface and refuse is deposited either at or below the water table in some parts of the filled areas. No leachate was detected in ground water beneath a third site where waste disposal is well above the local water table.

  7. Concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria in creeks, Anchorage, Alaska, August and September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorava, Joseph M.; Love, Andra

    1999-01-01

    Water samples were collected from five creeks in undeveloped, semi-developed, and developed areas of Anchorage, Alaska, during August and September 1998 to determine concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria. In undeveloped areas of Ship, Chester, and Campbell Creeks, and the semi-developed area of Rabbit Creek, concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria ranged from less than 1 to 16 colonies per 100 milliliters of water. In the semi-developed area of Little Rabbit Creek, concentrations ranged from 30 to 860 colonies per 100 milliliters of water. In developed areas of the creeks, concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria ranged from 6 to 80 colonies per 100 milliliters of water.

  8. Spatial dynamics of the invasive defoliator amber-marked birch leafminer across the Anchorage landscape.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, J E; Reich, R M; Tuffly, M

    2012-10-01

    The amber-marked birch leafminer (Profenusa thomsoni [Konow]) (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) has caused severe infestations of birch species in Anchorage, AK, since 2002. Its spatial distribution has been monitored since 2006 and summarized using interpolated surfaces based on simple kriging. Results indicate that this insect pest is unevenly distributed, occurring in multineighborhood sized patches that migrate from year to year. Patches showing heavy infestation one year are followed by light infestations the following year. In this study, we developed methods of assessing and describing spatial distributions of P. thomsoni as they vary from year to year, and speculate on potential causes of these trends in landscape patterns.

  9. Patients’ and orthodontists’ perceptions of miniplates used for temporary skeletal anchorage: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marie A.; Scheffler, Nicole R.; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine; De Clerck, Hugo J.; Tulloch, J. F. Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Temporary skeletal anchorage is a relatively recent addition to orthodontic treatment. Surgical miniplates, modified with intraoral attachments, provide an alternative to miniscrews for skeletal anchorage. In this study, we wanted to determine patients’ and providers’ perceptions of miniplate use during orthodontic treatment. Methods Consecutive patients having miniplates placed as part of their treatment completed questionnaires about their experiences during surgery and orthodontic treatment. A total of 200 miniplates were placed for 97 patients. The 30 orthodontists treating these patients also completed questionnaires concerning miniplate success, handling complexity, and whether these devices simplified treatment. Results The success rate was 92.5%. The devices were well tolerated by the patients. After a year, 72% of the patients reported that they did not mind having the implant, and 82% said that the surgical experience was better than expected, with little or no pain. The most frequent problems were postsurgical swelling, lasting 5 days on average, and cheek irritation experienced initially by more than a third of the patients, but it lessened over time. The clinicians reported that these devices were easy to use and greatly simplified orthodontic treatment. Conclusions Miniplates are well accepted by patients and providers and are a safe and effective adjunct for complex orthodontic treatments. PMID:18174066

  10. Skeletal anchorage for orthodontic correction of severe maxillary protrusion after previous orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Nishi-Sasaki, Akiko; Hasegawa, Takuro; Nishio, Clarice; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Tanne, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    The correction of a severe maxillary protrusion in an adult by distal movement of the maxillary molars has been one of the most difficult biomechanical problems in orthodontics. This article reports on the treatment of an adult case of severe maxillary protrusion and a large overjet treated with a skeletal anchorage system. A female patient, age 22 years and 3 months, complained of the difficulty of lip closure due to severe maxillary protrusion with a gummy smile. Overjet and overbite were +7.6 mm and -0.9 mm, respectively. She had a history of orthodontic treatment in which her maxillary first premolars were extracted. In order to conduct distal movement of the maxillary molars, anchor plates were placed in the zygomatic process. After achieving a Class I molar relationship, retraction and intrusion of the maxillary incisors were performed. After a 2-year treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship. Her convex facial profile with upper lip protrusion was considerably improved, and the lips showed less tension in lip closure. After a 2-year retention period, an acceptable occlusion was maintained without recurrence of maxillary protrusion, indicating a stability of the occlusion. The result of this treatment indicated that skeletal anchorage is of great importance as a remedy for achieving intrusion and retraction of the maxillary incisors in cases of severe maxillary protrusion with a patient who had previous orthodontic treatment.

  11. Cortical anchorages and cell type segregations of maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Paix, Alexandre; Yamada, Lixy; Dru, Philippe; Lecordier, Helene; Pruliere, Gerard; Chenevert, Janet; Satoh, Nori; Sardet, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Ascidian postplasmic/PEM RNAs constitute a large class of cortical maternal RNAs which include developmental determinants (macho-1 and pem-1). We have analyzed the localization, cortical anchorage and cell type segregation of postplasmic/PEM RNAs in Ciona intestinalis and Phallusia mammillata using very high-resolution fluorescent in situ hybridization. We also compared RNAs extracted from whole oocytes and from isolated cortices using microarrays and localized RNAs possessing clusters of xCACx motifs in their 3'UTRs. Based on these combined approaches we conclude that: (1) the vast majority of the 39 postplasmic/PEM RNAs (including vasa) are localized in the egg cortex. (2) Many postplasmic/PEM RNAs 3'UTR are enriched in xCACx motifs, allowing us to identify 2 novel postplasmic/PEM RNAs (PSD and MnK). (3) Postplasmic/PEM RNAs anchored to cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum (cER) and those associated with granules have different cell destinations. We propose that there are 2 distinct categories of postplasmic/PEM RNAs on the basis of their cortical anchorages and cell destinations: (1) macho-1-like postplasmic/PEM RNAs anchored to cER which segregate into somatic B8.11 cells. (2) vasa-like postplasmic/PEM RNAs associated with granules which in addition to B8.11 cells segregate into B8.12 germ cells.

  12. Palatal implant versus zygoma plate anchorage for distalization of maxillary posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Burçak; Sar, Cagla; Arman-Özçirpici, Ayça; Polat-Özsoy, Omür

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue effects of the implant-supported pendulum (ISP) and the zygoma anchorage system (ZAS) used for the distalization of maxillary posterior teeth. Among 30 patients showing Angle class II malocclusion, 15 patients with a mean age of 14.3±1.6 years and treated with ISP were included in the first group; 15 patients with a mean age of 14.7±2.5 years and treated with ZAS were included in the second group. The predistalization and postdistalization lateral cephalograms were analysed. Statistical evaluation was carried out using SPSS. Point A and upper incisors protruded in the ISP group, retruded in the ZAS group. Upper posterior teeth were distalized in both groups, but more in the ZAS group. Significant differences were observed between the groups for the sagittal movements of Point A, incisors, and posterior teeth. Overbite decreased in the ISP group, overjet decreased in the ZAS group, upper and lower lips retruded only in the ZAS group. Both methods provided absolute anchorage for distalization of posterior teeth, but the skeletal and soft tissue outcome and distalization obtained was greater in the ZAS group. Both methods can be used as alternatives to extraoral traction and conventional molar distalization appliances with different patient requirements.

  13. Damage detection using high order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) in the anchorage zone of stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-dong; Jin, Jian; Yang, Feng; Chen, Wei-zhen

    2017-02-01

    High order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) are studied for the damage detection in the anchorage zone of stayed cable through the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental validation. First, based on the theory of elastic wave propagation in cylinder, the dispersion curves of longitudinal modes were obtained and calculated analytically and the high-frequency such as 5MHz corresponding to the higher order longitudinal guided wave modes are identified for the damage detection. Then, the ultrasonic guided waves propagating in a steel wire with or without defects were simulated by using the finite element method and the effects of defect depth and length on the reflection coefficient are studied. Finally, the free wires and a tested cable were studied experimentally. The results show that the finite element method is able to model the high-order guided wave propagation in the steel wire. The agreement between the experiment and theory has demonstrated that the HOLGW is a potential candidate for the damage detection in anchorage zones of stayed-cables.

  14. Behaviour of Plate Anchorage in Plate-Reinforced Composite Coupling Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lam, W. Y.; Li, Lingzhi; Su, R. K. L.; Pam, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    As a new alternative design, plate-reinforced composite (PRC) coupling beam achieves enhanced strength and ductility by embedding a vertical steel plate into a conventionally reinforced concrete (RC) coupling beam. Based on a nonlinear finite element model developed in the authors' previous study, a parametric study presented in this paper has been carried out to investigate the influence of several key parameters on the overall performance of PRC coupling beams. The effects of steel plate geometry, span-to-depth ratio of beams, and steel reinforcement ratios at beam spans and in wall regions are quantified. It is found that the anchorage length of the steel plate is primarily controlled by the span-to-depth ratio of the beam. Based on the numerical results, a design curve is proposed for determining the anchorage length of the steel plate. The load-carrying capacity of short PRC coupling beams with high steel ratio is found to be controlled by the steel ratio of wall piers. The maximum shear stress of PRC coupling beams should be limited to 15 MPa. PMID:24288465

  15. Behaviour of plate anchorage in plate-reinforced composite coupling beams.

    PubMed

    Lam, W Y; Li, Lingzhi; Su, R K L; Pam, H J

    2013-01-01

    As a new alternative design, plate-reinforced composite (PRC) coupling beam achieves enhanced strength and ductility by embedding a vertical steel plate into a conventionally reinforced concrete (RC) coupling beam. Based on a nonlinear finite element model developed in the authors' previous study, a parametric study presented in this paper has been carried out to investigate the influence of several key parameters on the overall performance of PRC coupling beams. The effects of steel plate geometry, span-to-depth ratio of beams, and steel reinforcement ratios at beam spans and in wall regions are quantified. It is found that the anchorage length of the steel plate is primarily controlled by the span-to-depth ratio of the beam. Based on the numerical results, a design curve is proposed for determining the anchorage length of the steel plate. The load-carrying capacity of short PRC coupling beams with high steel ratio is found to be controlled by the steel ratio of wall piers. The maximum shear stress of PRC coupling beams should be limited to 15 MPa.

  16. Mechanistic insights into the anchorage of the contractile ring by anillin and Mid1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingfei; Guan, Ruifang; Lee, I-Ju; Liu, Yajun; Chen, Mengran; Wang, Jiawei; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Chen, Zhucheng

    2015-01-01

    Anillins and Mid1 are scaffold proteins that play key roles in anchorage of the contractile ring at the cell equator during cytokinesis in animals and fungi, respectively. Here, we report crystal structures and functional analysis of human anillin and S. pombe Mid1. The combined data show anillin contains a cryptic C2 domain and a Rho-binding domain. Together with the tethering PH domain, three membrane-associating elements synergistically bind to RhoA and phospholipids to anchor anillin at the cleavage furrow. Surprisingly, Mid1 also binds to the membrane through a cryptic C2 domain. Dimerization of Mid1 leads to high affinity and preference for PI(4,5)P2, which stably anchors Mid1 at the division plane, bypassing the requirement for Rho GTPase. These findings uncover the unexpected general machinery and the divergent regulatory logics for the anchorage of the contractile ring through the anillin/Mid1 family proteins from yeast to humans. PMID:25959226

  17. Lesson Plans Used with Housekeeping Employees of the Sheraton Anchorage Hotel. Conversation and Reading Skills Correlated with Skill Books 1-3 of the "Laubach Way to English." Workplace Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Polly; King, Richard

    This packet contains four sets of lesson plans designed for the workplace curriculum for housekeeping employees at the Sheraton Anchorage Hotel (Anchorage, Alaska), as part of the Anchorage Workplace Literacy Program. The lesson plans, which are correlated with Laubach literacy method skills books levels 1-3, include conversation (dialogue,…

  18. Cellular Dichotomy Between Anchorage-Independent Growth Responses to bFGF and TA Reflects Molecular Switch in Commitment to Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Tan, Ruimin; Opresko, Lee K.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Chrisler, William B.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated gene expression patterns underlying reversible and irreversible anchorage-independent growth (AIG) phenotypes to identify more sensitive markers of cell transformation for studies directed at interrogating carcinogenesis responses. In JB6 mouse epidermal cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induces an unusually efficient and reversible AIG response, relative to 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced AIG which is irreversible. The reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes are characterized by largely non-overlapping global gene expression profiles. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes were identified as common to reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes, including genes regulated in a reciprocal fashion. Hepatic leukemia factor (HLF) and D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (DBP) were increased in both bFGF and TPA soft agar colonies and selected for functional validation. Ectopic expression of human HLF and DBP in JB6 cells resulted in a marked increase in TPA- and bFGF-regulated AIG responses. HLF and DBP expression were increased in soft agar colonies arising from JB6 cells exposed to gamma radiation and in a human basal cell carcinoma tumor tissue, relative to paired non-tumor tissue. Subsequent biological network analysis suggests that many of the differentially expressed genes that are common to bFGF- and TPA-dependent AIG are regulated by c-Myc, SP-1 and HNF-4 transcription factors. Collectively, we have identified a potential molecular switch that mediates the transition from reversible to irreversible AIG.

  19. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 interacts with adhesion complexes and promotes cell migration, survival, and anchorage independent growth.

    PubMed

    Frisan, Teresa; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Dryselius, Rikard; Masucci, Maria G

    2012-12-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme of unknown function that is highly expressed in neurons and overexpressed in several human cancers. UCH-L1 has been implicated in the regulation of phenotypic properties associated with malignant cell growth but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. By comparing cells expressing catalytically active or inactive versions of UCH-L1, we found that the active enzyme enhances cell adhesion, spreading, and migration; inhibits anoikis; and promotes anchorage independent growth. UCH-L1 accumulates at the motile edge of the cell membrane during the initial phases of adhesion, colocalizes with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p120-catenin, and vinculin, and enhances the formation of focal adhesions, which correlates with enhanced FAK activation. The involvement of UCH-L1 in the regulation of focal adhesions and adherens junctions is supported by coimmunoprecipitation with key components of these complexes, including FAK, paxillin, p120-catenin, β-catenin, and vinculin. UCH-L1 stabilizes focal adhesion signaling in the absence of adhesion, as assessed by reduced caspase-dependent cleavage of FAK following cell detachment and sustained activity of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings offer new insights on the molecular interactions through which the deubiquitinating enzyme regulates the survival, proliferation, and metastatic potential of malignant cells.

  20. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) lacking RING domain localizes to the nuclear and promotes cancer cell anchorage-independent growth by targeting the E2F1/Cyclin E axis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zipeng; Li, Xueyong; Li, Jingxia; Luo, Wenjing; Huang, Chuanshu; Chen, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is a well-documented protein that is located in cytoplasm acting as a potent regulator of cell apoptosis. Here, we showed that expressing XIAP with RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain deletion (XIAPΔRING) in cancer cells promoted cancer cell anchorage-independent growth and G1/S phase transition companied with increasing cyclin e transcription activity and protein expression. Further studies revealed that XIAPΔRING was mainly localized in nuclear with increased binding with E2F1, whereas XIAP with BIR (Baculoviral IAP Repeat) domains deletion (XIAPΔBIRs) was entirely presented in cytoplasma with losing its binding with E2F1, suggesting that RING domain was able to inhibit BIR domains nuclear localization, by which impaired BIRs binding with E2F1 in cellular nucleus in intact cells. These studies identified a new function of XIAP protein in cellular nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity by binding with E2F1 in cancer cells. Our current finding of an effect of XIAPΔRING expression on cancer cell anchorage-independent growth suggests that overexpression of this protein may contribute to genetic instability associated with cell cycle and checkpoint perturbations, in addition to its impact on cellular apoptosis. PMID:25216527

  1. Comparison of anchorage loss following initial leveling and aligning using ROTH and MBT Prescription – A clinical prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, M; Kishore, MSV; Shetty, K Sadashiva

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the amount and percentage of anchor loss after initial leveling and aligning using a ROTH and MBT prescription. Materials & Methods: Pre and post alignment lateral cephalograms & dental casts of 10 ROTH & 10 MBT patients. Results: In the study, it was found that the amount of anchor loss is greater in the ROTH group than the MBT group. This could be due to the increased anterior tip in the ROTH prescription, compared to MBT. The total anterior tip in ROTH is 270 and in MBT is 200. The additional tip of 70 in ROTH prescription itself would have resulted in forward thrust of the anteriors. Conclusion: The use of laceback and cinchbacks creates a statistically and clinically significant increase in the anchorage loss specifically when the posterior anchorage is not enhanced. In this study TPA was not used but studies have shown that passive TPA has almost no effect on the clinician's need to preserve anchorage in the correction of malocclusion. On the other hand, the TPA is an excellent way to prevent molar rotation and maintain the original vertical and transverse dimension when desired. How to cite the article: Rajesh M, Kishore MS, Shetty KS. Comparison of anchorage loss following initial leveling and aligning using ROTH and MBT Prescription – A clinical prospective study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):16-21. PMID:24876697

  2. 33 CFR 110.236 - Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages. 110.236 Section 110.236 Navigation and... Grounds § 110.236 Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline...

  3. 33 CFR 110.236 - Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages. 110.236 Section 110.236 Navigation and... Grounds § 110.236 Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline...

  4. 76 FR 36157 - In the Matter of Alaska Industrial X-Ray, Inc., Anchorage, AK; Confirmatory Order Modifying...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Alaska Industrial X-Ray, Inc., Anchorage, AK; Confirmatory Order Modifying License; Effective Immediately I Alaska Industrial X-Ray, Inc. (AIX or Licensee) is the holder of Materials License 50-16084-01... Industrial X-Ray, Inc. (AIX) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relating to the NRC's letter...

  5. "How Will I Sew My Baskets?" Women Vendors, Market Art, and Incipient Political Activism in Anchorage, Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Molly

    2003-01-01

    In this article the author examines the multifaceted role of the Alaska Federation of Natives crafts fair in the lives of Alaska Native women who have left their home villages and moved into Anchorage, Alaska's largest city. At the same time, this discussion raises broader issues such as the evolving politicization of women traders and the growing…

  6. 78 FR 11745 - Anchorages; Lower Mississippi River, Above Head of Passes, Convent, LA and Point Pleasant, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Passes, Convent, LA and Point Pleasant, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The... Passes (AHP), located at the Belmont Light extending from Mile Marker (MM) 152.9 to 154 on the Left... needs of facilities along the river, and vessel traffic can pass safely around the anchorage....

  7. The human leukemia oncogene bcr-abl abrogates the anchorage requirement but not the growth factor requirement for proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, M W; McWhirter, J R; Wang, J Y

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of normal cells in a multicellular organism requires not only growth factors but also the proper attachment to the extracellular matrix. A hallmark of neoplastic transformation is the loss of anchorage dependence which usually accompanies the loss of growth factor requirement. The Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase of human leukemias is shown here to abrogate only the anchorage, not the growth factor, requirement. Bcr-Abl-transformed cells grow in soft agar but do not proliferate in serum-free media. Bcr-Abl does not activate the mitogenic pathway, as indicated by its inability to induce enhancers such as the serum response element or the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate response element (TRE). However, Bcr-Abl can alleviate the anchorage requirement for the induction of the TRE enhancer; i.e., it allows serum to activate the TRE in detached cells. This activity is dependent on the association of an active Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase with the actin filaments. Despite its association with the adapter protein Grb2, Bcr-Abl's effect on the TRE enhancer is not blocked by dominant negative Ras or Raf. The finding that Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase abrogates only anchorage dependence may have important implications on the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. PMID:7862122

  8. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas... ahead and one mile astern, and 500 yards on each side of any liquefied natural gas carrier (LNGC)...

  9. 33 CFR 110.236 - Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages. 110.236 Section 110.236 Navigation and... Grounds § 110.236 Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline...

  10. 33 CFR 110.236 - Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages. 110.236 Section 110.236 Navigation and... Grounds § 110.236 Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline...

  11. 76 FR 39386 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to the Port of Anchorage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... issued a Letter of Authorization (LOA) to the Port of Anchorage (POA) and the U.S. Department of.... ADDRESSES: The LOA and supporting documentation are available for review by writing to P. Michael Payne... during the specified activity. Summary of Request On May 6, 2011, NMFS received a request for an...

  12. v-src transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts. Inefficient conversion to anchorage-independent growth involves heterogeneity of primary cultures

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To clarify whether a single oncogene can transform primary cells in culture, we compared the transforming effect of a recombinant retrovirus (ZSV) containing the v-src gene in rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) to that in the rat cell line 3Y1. In the focus assay, REFs exhibited resistance to transformation as only six foci were observed in the primary cultures as opposed to 98 in 3Y1 cells. After G418 selection, efficiency of transformation was again somewhat lower with REFs compared to that with 3Y1 cells, but the number of G418-resistant REF colonies was much greater than the number of foci in REF cultures. Furthermore, while 98% of G418-resistant colonies of ZSV-infected REFs were morphologically transformed, only 25% were converted to anchorage- independent growth, as opposed to 100% conversion seen in ZSV-infected 3Y1 cells. The poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation did not involve differences in expression and subcellular distribution of p60v-src, or its kinase activity in vitro and in vivo. It rather reflected a property of the primary cultures, as cloning of REFs before ZSV infection demonstrated that only 2 out of 6 REF clones tested were permissive for anchorage-independent growth. The nonpermissive phenotype was dominant over the permissive one in somatic hybrid cells, and associated with organized actin filament bundles and a lower growth rate, both before and after ZSV infection. These results indicate that the poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation by p60v-src reflects the heterogeneity of the primary cultures. REFs can be morphologically transformed by p60v-src with high efficiency but only a small fraction is convertible to anchorage- independent growth. REF resistance seems to involve the presence of a suppressor factor which may emerge from REF differentiation during embryonic development. PMID:8034746

  13. Assessing Posidonia oceanica Seedling Substrate Preference: An Experimental Determination of Seedling Anchorage Success in Rocky vs. Sandy Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alagna, Adriana; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Anna, Giovanni D; Magliola, Carlo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock) and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks). Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg), which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have influenced P

  14. Evaluating school wellness policy in curbing childhood obesity in Anchorage, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Wendy G; Garcia, Gabriel M; Hoffman, Pamela K

    2014-10-01

    In 2006, the Anchorage School District implemented a school wellness policy to address the problem of obesity among its elementary-aged students. We assessed whether the addition of this policy is effective in protecting or preventing students from becoming overweight/obese over time. The methods involved following two cohorts of students for 5 years, a cohort not exposed and a cohort exposed to the policy. The results show that exposure to the policy does not significantly protect or prevent students from becoming overweight/obese. However, we found that regardless of being exposed to the policy, boys (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12), ethnic minorities, (OR = 1.18), and students from low socioeconomic backgrounds (OR = 1.44) were more likely to remain or become overweight/obese. Our findings suggest that factors outside the school may be impacting students' overweight/obese status. Efforts to curb the problem of childhood obesity should extend to the children's communities and homes.

  15. Germination and anchorage of Enteromorpha spp. in sediments of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schories, D.; Reise, K.

    1993-10-01

    Large quantities of filamentous green algae ( Enteromorpha spp.) have regularly occurred on muddy and sandy tidal flats in Königshafen, on the island of Sylt (North Sea), since 1979 — covering the sediments in thick mats during the summer months. While spores of Enteromorpha were encountered in both mud and sand, germling formation was restricted to sand. However, mud snails ( Hydrobia ulvae Pennant) were overgrown with small Enteromorpha filaments in both habitats, about 50% of them at a muddy site and 20% at a sandy one. Filaments, several cm in length and still adhering to the snails, became tangled into clusters. At the sandy site, with abundant Arenicola marina L., these clusters slid into the feeding funnels of lugworm burrows; the importance of this secondary anchorage is demonstrated by a field experiment. We suggest that the primary and secondary attachment of Enteromorpha filaments provided by benthic fauna is an essential step in the development of green algal mats on sedimentary tidal flats.

  16. A mini-implant for orthodontic anchorage in a deep overbite case.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hidetake; Yagi, Takakazu; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Takada, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 19-year-old female patient with anterior crowding. There was a moderate arch length discrepancy in the lower dental arch, a significant deep overbite, and a "gummy smile." We inserted an orthodontic mini-implant as anchorage for the intrusion of the upper incisor segment, followed by alignment of the upper and lower dental arches with an edgewise appliance without tooth extraction. The overbite was corrected from +7.2 mm to +1.7 mm by upper incisor intrusion, and the gummy smile was improved. Good occlusion and facial esthetics were achieved, and these results have been maintained for two years after completion of the active treatment.

  17. Orthodontic retreatment using anchorage with miniplate to camouflage a Class III skeletal pattern

    PubMed Central

    Farret, Marcel Marchiori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This manuscript describes the treatment of a 27-year-old patient who was previously treated with two maxillary first premolar extractions. The patient had skeletal Class III malocclusion, Class III canine relationship, anterior crossbite, and a concave profile. As the patient refused orthognathic surgery, a miniplate was used on the right side of the lower arch as an anchorage unit after the extraction of mandibular first premolars, aiding the retraction of anterior teeth. At the end of treatment, anterior crossbite was corrected, in which first molars and canines were in a Class I relationship, and an excellent intercuspation was reached. Furthermore, patient's profile remarkably improved as a result of mandibular incisor retraction. A 30-month follow-up showed good stability of the results obtained. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as one of the requirements to become diplomate by the BBO. PMID:27409659

  18. The failure behavior of the anchorage of hairs during slow extraction.

    PubMed

    Roersma, M E; Douven, L F; Lefki, K; Oomens, C W

    2001-03-01

    Treatment of excessive hair growth is an important issue in both dermatological and cosmetic practice. In contrast to treatments with medication, most physical methods are treatments that focus on the hair follicle. To obtain insight in the failure behavior of the anchorage of hairs, hairs were extracted (in vitro) from pig skin at a speed of 0.1mm/s, one at a time. The pulling force and tweezers displacement were recorded. The extracted hairs were classified with respect to the phase in the growing cycle: anagen (growing phase), telogen (resting phase) or other (catagen phase or unable to determine). The anagen hairs showed a different relation between the tweezers displacement and the pulling force than the telogen hairs. Moreover, the maximum force that could be applied before a hair was extracted proved to be lower for anagen hairs than for telogen hairs (0.36N, 1.8N, respectively). The extracted hair length, defined as the part of the hair that had been embedded in the skin which was extracted, was higher for anagen hairs than for telogen hairs (4.8mm, 3.0mm, respectively). Removing proximal skin tissue and the embedded parts of the anagen hair (root) resulted in a change of the extraction curves. The results indicate that two phenomena play a role in the anchorage of anagen hairs. We have proposed a model for the extraction of an anagen hair that has been based on these results: first the interface between hair and skin that is located around the inner root sheath (IRS) starts to fail, followed by failing of the hair itself in the region where the hair keratinizes.

  19. Comparison of the zygoma anchorage system with cervical headgear in buccal segment distalization.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Burçak; Arman, Ayça; Uçkan, Sina; Yazici, Ayşe Canan

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the effects of the zygoma anchorage system (ZAS) in buccal segment distalization in comparison with cervical headgear (CH). Thirty patients with Class II dental malocclusions were included in the study and were divided into two equal groups: the first group (10 females and 5 males, mean age 14.74 years at T1) received buccal segment distalization with ZAS and the second group (8 females and 7 males, mean age 15.26 years at T1) with CH. The skeletal, dental, and soft tissue changes were measured on cephalograms obtained before (T1) and after (T2) distalization, and these changes were statistically evaluated using a repeated measures analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Wilcoxon test. The Class II buccal segment relationship was corrected to a Class I in an average period of 9.03 +/- 0.62 months in the ZAS group and 9.00 +/- 0.76 months in the CH group. Significant distalization was observed for the posterior teeth in both groups (P < 0.001). Distal tipping of all posterior teeth occurred in the CH group (P < 0.001), but only for the molars in the ZAS group (P < 0.001). The upper incisors retroclined, overjet decreased, and the upper and lower lips retruded in both groups. The ZAS provided absolute anchorage for distalization of the maxillary posterior teeth and can be used as an aesthetic and non-compliant alternative to extraoral traction in the treatment of Class II malocclusions.

  20. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  1. Geology and ground-water resources of the Anchorage area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrom, Dagfin John; Trainer, Frank W.; Waller, Roger Milton

    1964-01-01

    The Anchorage area, at the head of Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska, occupies 150 square miles of a glaciated lowland and lies between two estuaries and the Chugach Mountains. Two military bases are in the area; Anchorage is the largest city in Alaska and the chief transportation center for this part of the State. The bedrock in the Anchorage area is chiefly Tertiary shale in the lowland and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age beneath the adjacent mountain slopes. Glacial drift which underlies nearly the entire area has an average thickness of several hundred feet and appears to include at least five sheets of deposits, two of which are exposed. The drift consists of till, outwash stream and lake deposits (sand and gravel), and estuarine (and lake) deposits (clay and silt). The stratigraphy and lateral distribution of the deposits are complex, but data at hand s, how that the thickest deposits, including all the estuarine and lake sediment and most of the stream-deposited sediment, are beneath the lowland away from the mountain wall, and that the deposits near the mountains are till and subordinate outwash sediments. Deposits of sand and gravel laid down by outwash streams in channels and on outwash plains are the most important aquifers, and the only ones which yield large quantities of ground water from single beds. Thin layers of sandy or gravelly material in till are also important aquifers although they yield relatively small quantities of water. Bedded sand and silt associated with the estuarine and lake(?) clay commonly becomes unstable during drilling and pumping, and has been successfully developed in only a few wells. Unconfined aquifers are extensive, but permeable saturated material is thin in many places and water supplies available from them are small or undependable in those places. The most important aquifers are confined or artesian. Clay and till form the confining beds: the till is somewhat 'leaky' in many places. Near Anchorage the buried water

  2. Transdisciplinary treatment of Class III malocclusion using conventional implant-supported anchorage: 10-year posttreatment follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Mariana Roennau Lemos; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Polido, Waldemar Daudt; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli Santayanna

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Combined treatment offers advantages for partially edentulous patients. Conventional implants, used as orthodontic anchorage, enable previous orthodontic movement, which provides appropriate space gain for crown insertion. OBJECTIVE: This case report describes the treatment of a 61-year and 10-month-old patient with negative overjet which made ideal prosthetic rehabilitation impossible, thereby hindering dental and facial esthetics. CASE REPORT: After a diagnostic setup, conventional implants were placed in the upper arch to anchor intrusion and retract anterior teeth. Space gain for lateral incisors was achieved in the lower arch by means of an orthodontic appliance. CONCLUSIONS: Integrated planning combining Orthodontics and Implantology provided successful treatment by means of conventional implant-supported anchorage. The resulting occlusal relationship proved stable after 10 years. PMID:26154459

  3. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Anchorage, Alaska, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-04-14

    The Anchorage, Alaska Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 10:00 a.m., Thursday April 15th, at the downtown Anchorage Hilton. The meeting was held by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the Office of Indian Energy, and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy of the Office of Indian Energy, represented DOE. Approximately twenty-seven people attended the meeting, including representatives of three native Alaskan villages, four Alaskan tribal corporations representing more than 40 tribal governments, as well as representatives from tribal associations and conferences. Interested state, federal, and non-profit representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. The meeting was facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute).  

  4. Latest Pleistocene advance and collapse of the Matanuska - Knik glacier system, Anchorage Lowland, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopczynski, Sarah E.; Kelley, Samuel E.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Evenson, Edward B.; Applegate, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    At the end of the last ice age, glacier systems worldwide underwent dramatic retreat. Here, we document the advance and retreat of a glacier system with adjacent marine- and land-based components during the latter part of the Termination. We utilize three lines of evidence: lithologic provenance, geomorphic mapping, and radiocarbon ages derived from lake cores to reconstruct glacier extent and timing of advance and retreat within our study area centered at N 61.50°, W 149.50°, just north of Anchorage, Alaska. Two glaciers, sourced in the Talkeetna and Chugach Mountains, flowed down the Matanuska and Knik Valleys forming a coalesced lobe that advanced onto the Anchorage Lowlands and terminated at Elmendorf Moraine. We use the presence of lithologies unique to the Matanuska catchment in glacial drift to delineate the paleoflow lines and to estimate the suture line of the two glacier systems. The eastern side of the lobe, attributed to ice flow from the Knik Valley, was in contact with elevated marine waters within the Knik Arm fjord, and thus retreat was likely dominated by calving. Geomorphic evidence suggests the western side of the lobe, attributed to ice flow from Matanuska Valley, retreated due to stagnation. We constrain retreat of the combined Matanuska and Knik lobe with thirteen new radiocarbon ages, in addition to previously published radiocarbon ages, and with geomorphic evidence suggesting the retreat occurred in two phases. Retreat from the Elmendorf Moraine began between 16.8 and 16.4 ka BP. A second, faster retreat phase occurred later and was completed by 13.7 ka BP. With the 140 km of total retreat occurring over ∼3000 years or less. This pattern of glacial advance and retreats agrees well with the deglacial histories from the southern sectors of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, as well as many other alpine glacier systems in the western U.S. and northern Alaska. This consistent behavior of glacier systems may indicate that climate oscillated over

  5. Are temporary anchorage devices truly effective in the treatment of skeletal open bites?

    PubMed Central

    Turkkahraman, Hakan; Sarioglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of temporary anchorage devices (TADs) in the treatment of skeletal open bites and to compare the results with untreated controls. Materials and Methods: A total of forty patients with skeletal anterior open bites were assigned to two groups of twenty each. The mean chronological age for the treatment group (14 female, 6 male) was 16.68 ± 2.80 years old, compared with 16.63 ± 2.83 years old for the control group (11 female, 9 male). Titanium miniplates fixed bilaterally to the infrazygomatic crest area were used as TADs and intrusive forces were applied to the posterior teeth with Ni-Ti coil springs. The treatment and normal growth changes were evaluated using 24 measurements (2 angular, 22 linear). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the groups in Bx, By, Sn/GoGn, Ax-Bx, U6x, U6y, overjet, overbite, SN/OccP, N-Me, Ans-Me, S-Go/N-Me, interpremolar width, and intermolar width (P < 0.05). In the treatment group, statistically significant upper molar intrusion (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 3.59 ± 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.96–4.22), posterior rotation of the occlusal plane (mean ± SD, 3.42 ± 2.17; 95% CI, 2.39–4.43), anterior rotation of the mandible (mean ± SD, 2.25 ± 1.91; 95% CI, 1.36–3.14), and resultant overbite improvement (mean ± SD, 4.82 ± 1.53; 95% CI, 4.10–5.53) were found (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Mild to moderate skeletal anterior open bites could easily be treated with TADs without orthognathic surgery. With the rigid anchorage of miniplates, true molar intrusion of up to 4 mm was achieved. With molar intrusion, anterior rotation of the mandible and a significant reduction in anterior face height were determined. PMID:28042256

  6. A preparative suspension culture system permitting quantitation of anchorage-independent growth by direct radiolabeling of cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Assoian, R K; Boardman, L A; Drosinos, S

    1989-02-15

    We have developed a hybrid methylcellulose/agar suspension culture system which permits long-term colony formation of transformed mesenchymal cells. In contrast to traditional agar suspensions, our system allows for recovery of cells and direct biochemical analysis of anchorage-independent growth. The ability to readily radiolabel cellular macromolecules in these preparative cultures permits a quantitative and objective analysis of colony formation by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into newly synthesized DNA.

  7. Global effects of anchorage on gene expression during mammary carcinoma cell growth reveal role of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in anoikis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, G S; Jin, Z; Ichikawa, H; Naito, A; Ohki, M; El-Deiry, W S; Tsuda, H

    2001-02-15

    Anchorage-independent growth is a hallmark of tumor cells. We compared gene expression profiles of anchored and nonanchored human mammary carcinoma cells to study this phenomenon. In this study, we show that anchorage had striking effects on cell growth and morphology but altered transcript levels from a limited number of genes. Only about 1% of mRNA transcripts detected in these cells was altered by anchorage. These include genes related to amino acid and polyamine metabolism, apoptosis, ion channels, cytoskeletal and stress proteins, transcription factors, and growth factors. Some of these may be crucial for the survival of transformed cells. For example, clusterin and the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) were suppressed by anchorage, which could help prevent programmed cell death of these tumor cells. In addition to suppressing TRAIL expression, anchorage also decreased the susceptibility of these tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis as determined by poly(ADP-ribose) phosphorylase cleavage, annexin-V binding (P < 0.01), and cell cycle analysis (P < 0.0001). These data may help explain mechanisms by which anchorage prevents apoptosis of cells that would otherwise experience anoikis. Thus, genes found to be altered by this analysis could serve as potential targets for anticancer therapy. These findings suggest that TRAIL may be used as a means to target circulating epithelial tumor cells before their attachment and colonization at new sites.

  8. The N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain confers anchorage-independent growth and the loss of contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-20

    Tumor growth is characterized by anchorage independence and the loss of contact inhibition. Previously, we showed that either a red fluorescent protein (DsRed)-tagged N-cadherin or E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain (DNCT or DECT) could function as a dominant negative inhibitor by blocking the cell surface localization of endogenous E-cadherin and inducing cell dissociation. Here, we show that expression of DNCT abrogated contact inhibition of proliferation and conferred anchorage-independent growth. DNCT expression induced the relocation of the tumor suppressor Merlin from the cell surface to intracellular compartments. Although DNCT expression induced redistribution of TAZ from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, YAP/TAZ signaling was not activated. An E-cadherin-α-catenin chimera that functions as a β-catenin-independent cell adhesion molecule restored contact inhibition and anchorage-dependency of growth. Addition of the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal reversed the effects of DNCT expression, indicating that DNCT functioned outside of the nucleus.

  9. Mitochondrial anchorage and fusion contribute to mitochondrial inheritance and quality control in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Charalel, Joseph K; Viana, Matheus P; Garcia, Enrique J; Sing, Cierra N; Koenigsberg, Andrea; Swayne, Theresa C; Vevea, Jason D; Boldogh, Istvan R; Rafelski, Susanne M; Pon, Liza A

    2016-03-01

    Higher-functioning mitochondria that are more reduced and have less ROS are anchored in the yeast bud tip by the Dsl1-family protein Mmr1p. Here we report a role for mitochondrial fusion in bud-tip anchorage of mitochondria. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) and network analysis experiments revealed that mitochondria in large buds are a continuous reticulum that is physically distinct from mitochondria in mother cells. FLIP studies also showed that mitochondria that enter the bud can fuse with mitochondria that are anchored in the bud tip. In addition, loss of fusion and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by deletion of mitochondrial outer or inner membrane fusion proteins (Fzo1p or Mgm1p) leads to decreased accumulation of mitochondria at the bud tip and inheritance of fitter mitochondria by buds compared with cells with no mtDNA. Conversely, increasing the accumulation and anchorage of mitochondria in the bud tip by overexpression of MMR1 results in inheritance of less-fit mitochondria by buds and decreased replicative lifespan and healthspan. Thus quantity and quality of mitochondrial inheritance are ensured by two opposing processes: bud-tip anchorage by mitochondrial fusion and Mmr1p, which favors bulk inheritance; and quality control mechanisms that promote segregation of fitter mitochondria to the bud.

  10. Mitochondrial anchorage and fusion contribute to mitochondrial inheritance and quality control in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Charalel, Joseph K.; Viana, Matheus P.; Garcia, Enrique J.; Sing, Cierra N.; Koenigsberg, Andrea; Swayne, Theresa C.; Vevea, Jason D.; Boldogh, Istvan R.; Rafelski, Susanne M.; Pon, Liza A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher-functioning mitochondria that are more reduced and have less ROS are anchored in the yeast bud tip by the Dsl1-family protein Mmr1p. Here we report a role for mitochondrial fusion in bud-tip anchorage of mitochondria. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) and network analysis experiments revealed that mitochondria in large buds are a continuous reticulum that is physically distinct from mitochondria in mother cells. FLIP studies also showed that mitochondria that enter the bud can fuse with mitochondria that are anchored in the bud tip. In addition, loss of fusion and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by deletion of mitochondrial outer or inner membrane fusion proteins (Fzo1p or Mgm1p) leads to decreased accumulation of mitochondria at the bud tip and inheritance of fitter mitochondria by buds compared with cells with no mtDNA. Conversely, increasing the accumulation and anchorage of mitochondria in the bud tip by overexpression of MMR1 results in inheritance of less-fit mitochondria by buds and decreased replicative lifespan and healthspan. Thus quantity and quality of mitochondrial inheritance are ensured by two opposing processes: bud-tip anchorage by mitochondrial fusion and Mmr1p, which favors bulk inheritance; and quality control mechanisms that promote segregation of fitter mitochondria to the bud. PMID:26764088

  11. Identification of linear and threshold responses in streams along a gradient of urbanization in Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ourso, R.T.; Frenzel, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined biotic and physiochemical responses in urbanized Anchorage, Alaska, to the percent of impervious area within stream basins, as determined by high-resolution IKONOS satellite imagery and aerial photography. Eighteen of the 86 variables examined, including riparian and instream habitat, macroinvertebrate communities, and water/sediment chemistry, were significantly correlated with percent impervious area. Variables related to channel condition, instream substrate, water chemistry, and residential and transportation right-of-way land uses were identified by principal components analysis as significant factors separating site groups. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the macroinvertebrate communities responded to an urbanization gradient closely paralleling the percent of impervious area within the subbasin. A sliding regression analysis of variables significantly correlated with percent impervious area revealed 8 variables exhibiting threshold responses that correspond to a mean of 4.4-5.8% impervious area, much lower than mean values reported in other, similar investigations. As contributing factors to a subbasin's impervious area, storm drains and roads appeared to be important elements influencing the degradation of water quality with respect to the biota.

  12. Biomechanical comparison of four different miniscrew types for skeletal anchorage in the mandibulo-maxillary area.

    PubMed

    Mischkowski, R A; Kneuertz, P; Florvaag, B; Lazar, F; Koebke, J; Zöller, J E

    2008-10-01

    This study compared four miniscrew types for skeletal anchorage (Aarhus, FAMI, Dual Top and Spider) regarding their biomechanical properties contributing to primary stability. Insertion torque measurements and pull-out tests in axial (0 degrees ) as well as in the 20 degrees and 40 degrees direction were performed. Stiffness of the screw-bone construct was calculated from the load-displacement curve. Conic FAMI and Dual Top screws had higher insertion torques. Insertion torques were raised by drill-free insertion of FAMI and Dual Top screws. Statistically significant differences were found between the 4 screw types in pull-out tests. The highly significant differences between the four screws for peak load in the axial (0 degrees ) and 20 degrees direction were not apparent in 40 degrees angular loads. For the conical screws, peak load values increased in angular compared with axial load. The Dual Top screw achieved the highest values for peak load and stiffness. 12 Dual Top and 1 Spider screw heads fractured in the pull-out tests. A conical drill-free screw design achieves higher primary stability compared with cylindrical self-tapping screws. This effect was more obvious in insertion torque estimations rather than in pull-out tests. The Dual Top screws, although biomechanically superior to other screw types, were most prone to fractures.

  13. An Improved Mechanical Testing Method to Assess Bone-implant Anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Spencer; Ajami, Elnaz; Davies, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in material science have led to a substantial increase in the topographical complexity of implant surfaces, both on a micro- and a nano-scale. As such, traditional methods of describing implant surfaces - namely numerical determinants of surface roughness - are inadequate for predicting in vivo performance. Biomechanical testing provides an accurate and comparative platform to analyze the performance of biomaterial surfaces. An improved mechanical testing method to test the anchorage of bone to candidate implant surfaces is presented. The method is applicable to both early and later stages of healing and can be employed for any range of chemically or mechanically modified surfaces - but not smooth surfaces. Custom rectangular implants are placed bilaterally in the distal femora of male Wistar rats and collected with the surrounding bone. Test specimens are prepared and potted using a novel breakaway mold and the disruption test is conducted using a mechanical testing machine. This method allows for alignment of the disruption force exactly perpendicular, or parallel, to the plane of the implant surface, and provides an accurate and reproducible means for isolating an exact peri-implant region for testing. PMID:24561765

  14. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine) was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany) was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm) (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea). Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:27409657

  15. The uvomorulin-anchorage protein alpha catenin is a vinculin homologue.

    PubMed Central

    Herrenknecht, K; Ozawa, M; Eckerskorn, C; Lottspeich, F; Lenter, M; Kemler, R

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of the Ca(2+)-dependent cell-adhesion molecule (CAM) uvomorulin associates with distinct cytoplasmic proteins with molecular masses of 102, 88, and 80 kDa termed alpha, beta, and gamma catenin, respectively. This complex formation links uvomorulin to the actin filament network, which seems to be of primary importance for its cell-adhesion properties. We show here that antibodies against alpha catenin also immunoprecipitate complexes that contain human N-cadherin, mouse P-cadherin, chicken A-CAM (adherens junction-specific CAM; also called N-cadherin) or Xenopus U-cadherin, demonstrating that alpha catenin is complexed with other cadherins. In immunofluorescence tests, alpha catenin is colocalized with cadherins at the plasma membrane. However, in cadherin-negative Ltk- cells, alpha catenin is found uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm, suggesting some additional biological function(s). Expression of uvomorulin in these cells results in a concentration of alpha catenin at membrane areas of cell contacts. We also have cloned and sequenced murine alpha catenin. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals a significant homology to vinculin. Our results suggest the possibility of a new vinculin-related protein family involved in the cytoplasmic anchorage of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion molecules. Images PMID:1924379

  16. Treatment of a case of skeletal class II malocclusion with temporomandibular joint disorder using miniscrew anchorage.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Masato; Koseki, Hiroyuki; Kawazoe, Aki; Abedini, Sara; Kojima, Shunichi; Motokawa, Masahide; Ohtani, Junji; Fujita, Tadashi; Kawata, Toshitsugu; Tanne, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    At the present time, there are no reports in the literature on the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) by intrusion of molars using mini-screws. This case report describes the treatment for a female patient, aged 19 years seven months, with a TMD and an excessive lower anterior facial height. Overjet and overbite were +5.0 mm and +0.5 mm, respectively. The patient had a history of orthodontic treatment in which her first premolars were all extracted. During the first orthodontic treatment, a clockwise mandibular rotation was observed as a result of the increase of posterior dentoalveolar height. She had temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain during mouth opening and complained of difficulty in eating due to masticatory dysfunction. The pretreatment Schuller views of both TMJ showed a posterior condyle position. In order to correct the overjet, molar relationship and the mandibular condyle position, a miniscrew was inserted into the palatal region of the upper first molar to intrude the upper posterior teeth. As the upper molars were intruded, the overjet was decreased, and a class I molar relationship was achieved by a counterclockwise mandibular rotation. After one year of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved, and the condyle moved into centric position in the glenoid fossa. The patient's teeth continued to be stable, and she had no pain in TMJ after a retention period of three years. The result of this treatment showed that molar intrusion using miniscrew anchorage is effective for treatment of a TMD patient with a posterior condyle position.

  17. A Study of Success Rate of Miniscrew Implants as Temporary Anchorage Devices in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Yi Lin, Song; Mimi, Yow; Ming Tak, Chew; Kelvin Weng Chiong, Foong; Hung Chew, Wong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To find out the success rate of miniscrew implants in the National Dental Centre of Singapore (NDCS) and the impact of patient-related, location-related, and miniscrew implant-related factors. Materials and Methods. Two hundred and eighty-five orthodontic miniscrew implants were examined from NDCS patient records. Eleven variables were analysed to see if there is any association with success. Outcome was measured twice, immediately after surgery prior to orthodontic loading (T1) and 12 months after surgery (T2). The outcome at T2 was assessed 12 months after the miniscrew's insertion date or after its use as a temporary anchorage device has ceased. Results. Overall success rate was 94.7% at T1 and 83.3% at T2. Multivariate analysis revealed only the length of miniscrew implant to be significantly associated with success at both T1 (P = 0.002) and T2 (P = 0.030). Miniscrew implants with lengths of 10–12 mm had the highest success rate (98.0%) compared to other lengths, and this is statistically significant (P = 0.035). At T2, lengths of 10–12 mm had significantly (P = 0.013) higher success rates (93.5%) compared to 6-7 mm (76.7%) and 8 mm (82.1%) miniscrew implants. Conclusion. Multivariate statistical analyses of 11 variables demonstrate that length of miniscrew implant is significant in determining success. PMID:25861272

  18. Evaluation of the variable anchorage straightwire technique using Ricketts' growth prediction.

    PubMed

    Parikakis, Konstantinos A; Moberg, Svante; Hellsing, Eva

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the treatment effects of the variable anchorage straightwire technique (VAST) in Angle Class II patients using Ricketts' growth prediction analysis. The subjects belonged to two groups: a control, consisting of 30 untreated Class II Swedish individuals (20 girls, 10 boys) with a mean age of 11.2 years, and the other 29 Swedish patients (14 girls, 15 boys), mean age 12.6 years, post-normal and with an increased overbite (OB), treated with the VAST. Two lateral cephalograms were available for every individual. Growth prediction according to Ricketts' visual treatment objective (VTO) was used to estimate the expected growth increments for a 2-year period. It was first used in the control group to determine its validity and then applied to the treated group to evaluate the net effects of treatment. Cephalometric evaluation based on Ricketts' analysis and additional dentoalveolar variables were carried out. Statistical analysis was undertaken using a paired Student's t- and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. The method of predicting growth according to the VTO was, in general, valid in the untreated subjects, apart from the inclination of the lower incisors, where the proclination had been underestimated. In the treated group, the net effects of treatment were significant for the dentoalveolar variables: reduction of overjet (OJ) and OB, proclination and relative intrusion of the lower incisors, extrusion of the molars, and increase in lower face height. The growth prediction method according to VTO was found to be valid in a sample of Swedish post-normal children concerning skeletal and dentoalveolar variables. The VAST treatment net effects in these growing patients were achieved mainly by dentoalveolar changes.

  19. Life on the Edge: Holocene Tephra Stratigraphy of Tanginak Anchorage, Sitkalidak Island, Kodiak Archipelago, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, E.; Bourgeois, J.; Fitzhugh, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    Geologic hazards associated with volcanism in the North Pacific have profound if usually temporary effects on the environment and human populations. Ash falls associated with these events are often preserved across large areas providing time specific markers. In the past century, volcanic activity and its effects in the North Pacific have been recorded, but much of the Holocene volcanic record in the Alaskan region is still being investigated. The Kodiak Archipelago, while not volcanic itself, is located near both Aleutian and Alaskan peninsula volcanoes. However, little has been published about the Holocene tephrochronology of the Kodiak region. This study focuses on the area around Tanginak Spring Site (KOD481). Located on Sitkalidak Island it is the earliest known human occupation in the Kodiak archipelago. We are documenting Holocene environmental changes on Sitkalidak Island and relating these changes to the archaeological record. As part of this work, we will establish a local tephrochronology using stratigraphy and geochemistry which will allow us to better correlate sedimentary changes across large areas as well as study human interaction with ashfall events. Herein we report a preliminary tephrochronology in peat excavations on Sitkalidak Island dating back to the earliest Holocene. Dates are radiocarbon years BP on peat directly below tephra. Marker tephra present in our reference sections are Katmai 1912, light gray (historic?), medium gray (3370), medium gray (3720), beige 1 (4340), apricot (5390), beige 3 (6790), black (9280), and white (11,520). Geochemical and petrographic analysis will help to determine with which volcanic events these tephra are associated. Establishing a local tephrochronology is important not only for local correlation but also to ascertain the tephra stratigraphy of the Kodiak Archipelago and beyond. The frequency of tephra in Tanginak Anchorage sections suggests that tephra will be a very useful stratigraphic tool in this

  20. Role of postreplication repair in transformation of human fibroblasts to anchorage independence

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.C.; Kaufmann, W.K.; Cordeiro-Stone, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Cellular capacity for postreplication repair (PRR) and sensitivity to transformation to anchorage independence (AI) were quantified in normal foreskin and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant fibroblasts after treatment with UV or benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide I (BPDE-I). PRR is defined here as a collection of pathways that facilitate the replication of DNA damaged by genotoxic agents. It is recognized biochemically as the process by which nascent DNA grows longer than the average distance between two lesions in the DNA template. PRR refers more directly to the elimination of gaps in the daughter-strand DNA by mechanisms which remain to be determined for human cells, but which may include translesion replication and recombination. PRR was measured in diploid human fibroblasts by analysis of the dose kinetics for inhibition of DNA strand growth in carcinogen-treated cells. Logarithmically growing foreskin fibroblasts (NHF1) displayed D0 values of 4.3 J/m{sup 2} and 0.14 microM for the inhibition of DNA synthesis in active replicons by UV and BPDE-I, respectively. XP variant cells (CRL1162) exhibited corresponding D0 values of 1.5 J/m{sup 2} and 0.16 microM. The increased sensitivity to inhibition of DNA replication by UV in these XP variant fibroblasts (2.9-fold greater than normal) was mirrored by an enhanced frequency of transformation to AI. XP variant fibroblasts (CRL1162) were 3.2 times more sensitive to transformation to AI by UV than were the normal foreskin fibroblasts. As predicted by the PRR studies, both cell types exhibited similar frequencies of AI colonies induced by BPDE-I. Apparent thresholds were observed for induction of AI by UV (normal fibroblasts, 2.7 J/m{sup 2}; XP variant fibroblasts, 0.3 J/m{sup 2}) and BPDE-I (both, 0.05 microM).

  1. Recorded earthquake responses from the integrated seismic monitoring network of the Atwood Building, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated seismic monitoring system with a total of 53 channels of accelerometers is now operating in and at the nearby free-field site of the 20-story steel-framed Atwood Building in highly seismic Anchorage, Alaska. The building has a single-story basement and a reinforced concrete foundation without piles. The monitoring system comprises a 32-channel structural array and a 21-channel site array. Accelerometers are deployed on 10 levels of the building to assess translational, torsional, and rocking motions, interstory drift (displacement) between selected pairs of adjacent floors, and average drift between floors. The site array, located approximately a city block from the building, comprises seven triaxial accelerometers, one at the surface and six in boreholes ranging in depths from 15 to 200 feet (???5-60 meters). The arrays have already recorded low-amplitude shaking responses of the building and the site caused by numerous earthquakes at distances ranging from tens to a couple of hundred kilometers. Data from an earthquake that occurred 186 km away traces the propagation of waves from the deepest borehole to the roof of the building in approximately 0.5 seconds. Fundamental structural frequencies [0.58 Hz (NS) and 0.47 Hz (EW)], low damping percentages (2-4%), mode coupling, and beating effects are identified. The fundamental site frequency at approximately 1.5 Hz is close to the second modal frequencies (1.83 Hz NS and 1.43 EW) of the building, which may cause resonance of the building. Additional earthquakes prove repeatability of these characteristics; however, stronger shaking may alter these conclusions. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  2. Nitrate source indicators in ground water of the Scimitar Subdivision, Peters Creek area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Strelakos, Pat M.; Jokela, Brett

    2000-01-01

    A combination of aqueous chemistry, isotopic measurement, and in situ tracers were used to study the possible nitrate sources, the factors contributing to the spatial distribution of nitrate, and possible septic system influence in the ground water in the Scimitar Subdivision, Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska. Two water types were distinguished on the basis of the major ion chemistry: (1) a calcium sodium carbonate water, which was associated with isotopically heavier boron and with chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) that were in the range expected from equilibration with the atmosphere (group A water) and (2) a calcium magnesium carbonate water, which was associated with elevated nitrate, chloride, and magnesium concentrations, generally isotopically lighter boron, and CFC's concentrations that were generally in excess of that expected from equilibration with the atmosphere (group B water). Water from wells in group B had nitrate concentrations that were greater than 3 milligrams per liter, whereas those in group A had nitrate concentrations of 0.2 milligram per liter or less. Nitrate does not appear to be undergoing extensive transformation in the ground-water system and behaves as a conservative ion. The major ion chemistry trends and the presence of CFC's in excess of an atmospheric source for group B wells are consistent with waste-water influences. The spatial distribution of the nitrate among wells is likely due to the magnitude of this influence on any given well. Using an expanded data set composed of 16 wells sampled only for nitrate concentration, a significant difference in the static water level relative to bedrock was found. Well water samples with less than 1 milligram per liter nitrate had static water levels within the bedrock, whereas those samples with greater than 1 milligram per liter nitrate had static water levels near or above the top of the bedrock. This observation would be consistent with a conceptual model of a low-nitrate fractured bedrock

  3. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Carroll Training Center, Installation 02045, Anchorage, Alaska. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krokosz, M.; Sefano, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Alaska Army National Guard property known as Camp Carroll Training Center, located on the Fort Richardson Army facility near Anchorage, Alaska. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for the completion of preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing, corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances used, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The primary environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) the Alaska Air National Guard storage area behind Building S57112 (Organizational Maintenance Shop [OMS] 6); (2) the state of Alaska maintenance facility and the soil/tar-type spill north of the state of Alaska maintenance facility; (3) the waste storage area adjacent to OMS 6; (4) the contaminated area from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) and the oil-water separator; and (5) soil staining in the parking area at the Camp Carroll Headquarters Building. Camp Carroll appears to be in excellent condition from an environmental standpoint, and current practices are satisfactory. Argonne recommends that the Alaska Department of Military Affairs consider remediation of soil contamination associated with all storage areas, as well as reviewing the practices of other residents of the facility. Argonne also recommends that the current methods of storing waste material behind Building S57112 (OMS 6) be reviewed for alternatives.

  4. Tongue resting pressure of the tongue anchorage pad in different body positions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, J; Xu, K; Gao, X; Xu, T

    2015-06-01

    We designed a modified transpalatal arch (tongue anchorage pad, TAP) to help control the vertical dimension. This study aimed to evaluate its efficiency by measuring the tongue resting pressure at different anteroposterior positions of the TAP in the upright and supine positions and to investigate the effect of changes in body position. Our study recruited 17 volunteers with individual normal occlusion (4 males, 13 females, age 22-33 years). An individualised TAP was designed for each subject. With a miniature sensor (FSS1500NS) installed in the device, we measured the pressure at the level of the distal second premolar (PM2), the first molar (M1) and the second molar (M2) in both the upright and supine positions. Nonparametric analysis was applied with the level of significance set at 0.05. In the upright position, tongue pressures obtained at PM2, M1 and M2 were 183.94, 130.81 and 113.07 Pa, respectively, with the maximum value detected at PM2 (P = 0.001). While in the supine position, pressures of 187.03, 156.87 and 201.69 Pa were detected at the same sites, with significantly higher values for M1 (P = 0.002) and M2 (P = 0.004). Tongue resting pressure decreases from the anterior aspect to the posterior aspect in the upright position. In the supine position, the pressure is consistent across the midline with pressure enhancement at M1 and M2. As many questions remain about this appliance and appropriate intruding force, further clinical and basic studies are required prior to its clinical implementation.

  5. A temporal study of urban development for the municipality of Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    2003-01-01

    A land use/land cover database was produced for a portion of the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska to document the temporal and spatial extent of urbanization to assist in the analysis of changes in impervious cover and water quality. Data were derived from black and white and color infrared aerial photography, and satellite imagery from the early 1970's to 2000 in roughly ten‐year increments. Aerial photographs and satellite data were manually interpreted to identify and map land use/land cover classes which were then entered into a geographic information system, attributed, and georeferenced to a U.S. Geological Survey topographic map base. The spatial extent of the study was 31,117 hectares. In the early 1970's, approximately 7,356 hectares (24%) of the study area were mapped as urban developed. During the 30‐year analysis period, the largest increase in urban development occurred between the late 1970's and early 1980's when urban area increased to 12,263 hectares (39%). Between 1980 and 1990, and 1990 and 2000, urban area increased to 12,762 hectares (41%), and 13,980 hectares (45%) respectively. Most development occurred in forested or tall shrub areas, although some also occurred in wetlands. Between 1970 and 2000, close to 1,300 hectares of wetlands were lost due to development. Contrary to this, the amount of lake and pond area increased slightly from 261 hectares in 1973 to 334 hectares in 1980, and reduced to 310 hectares by 2000. The increase was primarily due to the filling in of gravel pits with spring melt water.

  6. Preliminary three-dimensional analysis of tooth movement and arch dimension change of the maxillary dentition in Class II division 1 malocclusion treated with first premolar extraction: conventional anchorage vs. mini-implant anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Heon-Mook; Kim, Byoung-Ho; Yang, Il-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the effects of conventional and orthodontic mini-implant (OMI) anchorage on tooth movement and arch-dimension changes in the maxillary dentition in Class II division 1 (CII div.1) patients. Methods CII div.1 patients treated with extraction of the maxillary first and mandibular second premolars and sliding mechanics were allotted to conventional anchorage group (CA, n = 12) or OMI anchorage group (OA, n = 12). Pre- and post-treatment three-dimensional virtual maxillary models were superimposed using the best-fit method. Linear, angular, and arch-dimension variables were measured with software program. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were performed for statistical analysis. Results Compared to the CA group, the OMI group showed more backward movement of the maxillary central and lateral incisors and canine (MXCI, MXLI, MXC, respectively; 1.6 mm, p < 0.001; 0.9 mm, p < 0.05; 1.2 mm, p < 0.001); more intrusion of the MXCI and MXC (1.3 mm, 0.5 mm, all p < 0.01); less forward movement of the maxillary second premolar, first, and second molars (MXP2, MXM1, MXM2, respectively; all 1.0 mm, all p < 0.05); less contraction of the MXP2 and MXM1 (0.7 mm, p < 0.05; 0.9 mm, p < 0.001); less mesial-in rotation of the MXM1 and MXM2 (2.6°, 2.5°, all p < 0.05); and less decrease of the inter-MXP2, MXM1, and MXM2 widths (1.8 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, all p < 0.05). Conclusions In treatment of CII div.1 malocclusion, OA provided better anchorage and less arch-dimension change in the maxillary posterior teeth than CA during en-masse retraction of the maxillary anterior teeth. PMID:23323242

  7. 75 FR 10195 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Chester River, Chestertown, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... to establish special local regulations during the reenactment portion of the ``Chestertown Tea Party... later notice in the Federal Register. Background and Purpose On May 29, 2010, the Chestertown Tea Party... anchorage location, embarking and disembarking Tea Party actors by dinghy, and then returning to its...

  8. Preliminary tephra-fall records from three lakes in the Anchorage, Alaska area: advances towards a regional tephrochronostratigraphic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K. L.; Kaufman, D. S.; Schiff, C. J.; Kathan, K.; Werner, A.; Hancock, J.; Hagel, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment cores recovered from three kettle lakes, all within 10 km of Anchorage, Alaska contain a record of tephra fall from major eruptive events of Cook Inlet volcanoes during the past 11250 yr. Prominent tephra layers from multiple cores within each lake were first correlated within each basin using physical properties, major-oxide glass geochemistry, and constrained by bracketing radiocarbon age. Distinct tephra from each lake were then correlated among all three lakes using the same criteria to develop a composite tephrostratigraphic framework for the Anchorage area. Lorraine Lake, the northern-most lake contains 17 distinct tephra layers; Goose Lake, the eastern most lake contains 10 distinct tephra layers; and Little Campbell Lake, to the west, contains 7 distinct tephra layers. Thinner, less-prominent tephra layers, reflecting smaller or more distant eruptions, also occur but are not included as part of this study. Of the 33 tephra layers, only two could be confidently correlated among all three lakes, and four other correlative deposits were recognized in two of the three lakes. The minimum number of unique major tephra-fall events in the Anchorage area is 22 in the past 11200 years, or about 1 event every 500 years. This number underestimates the actual number of eruptions because not attempt was made to locate crypto-tephra. All but perhaps one tephra deposit originated from Cook Inlet volcanoes with the most prolific source being Mount Spurr/Crater Peak, which is accountable for at least 8 deposits. Combining radiocarbon ages to produce an independent age model for each lake is in progress and will aid in confirming correlations and assigning detailed modeled-tephra age and uncertainty to each tephra layer.

  9. The anchorage function of CipA (CelL), a scaffolding protein of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    SciTech Connect

    Kruus, K.; Wu, J.H.D.; Lua, A.C.

    1995-09-26

    Enzymatic cellulose degradation is a heterogeneous reaction requiring binding of soluble cellulase molecules to the solid substrate. Based on our studies of the cellulase complex of Clostridium thermocellum (the cellulosome), we have previously proposed that such binding can be brought about by a special {open_quotes}anchorage subunit.{close_quotes} In this {open_quotes}anchor-enzyme{close_quotes} model, CipA (a major subunit of the cellulosome) enhances the activity of CelS (the most abundant catalytic subunit of the cellulosome) by anchoring it to the cellulose surface. We have subsequently reported that CelS contains a conserved duplicated sequence at its C terminus and the CipA contains nine repeated sequences with a cellulose binding domain (CBD) in between the second and third repeats. In this work, we reexamined the anchor-enzyme mechanism by using recombinant CelS (rCelS) and various CipA domains, CBD, R3 (the repeat next to CBD), and CBD/R3, expressed in Escherichia coli. As analyzed by non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, rCelS, through its conserved duplicated sequence, formed a stable complex with R3 or CBD/R3 but not with CBD. Although R3 or CBD alone did not affect the binding of rCelS to cellulose, such binding was dependent on CBD/R3, indicating the anchorage role of CBD/R3. Such anchorage apparently increased the rCelS activity toward crystalline cellulose. These results substantiate the proposed anchor-enzyme model and the expected roles of individual CipA domains and the conserved duplicated sequence of CelS.

  10. The Transmembrane Domain of CEACAM1-4S Is a Determinant of Anchorage Independent Growth and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Erica L.; Mills, David R.; Brilliant, Kate E.; Hixson, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule expressed by epithelial cells in many organs. CEACAM1-4L and CEACAM1-4S, two isoforms produced by differential splicing, are predominant in rat liver. Previous work has shown that downregulation of both isoforms occurs in rat hepatocellular carcinomas. Here, we have isolated an anchorage dependent clone, designated 253T-NT that does not express detectable levels of CEACAM1. Stable transfection of 253-NT cells with a wild type CEACAM1-4S expression vector induced an anchorage independent growth in vitro and a tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. These phenotypes were used as quantifiable end points to examine the functionality of the CEACAM1-4S transmembrane domain. Examination of the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain showed N-terminal GXXXG dimerization sequences and C-terminal tyrosine residues shown in related studies to stabilize transmembrane domain helix-helix interactions. To examine the effects of transmembrane domain mutations, 253-NT cells were transfected with transmembrane domain mutants carrying glycine to leucine or tyrosine to valine substitutions. Results showed that mutation of transmembrane tyrosine residues greatly enhanced growth in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of transmembrane dimerization motifs, in contrast, significantly reduced anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity. 253-NT cells expressing CEACAM1-4S with both glycine to leucine and tyrosine to valine mutations displayed the growth-enhanced phenotype of tyrosine mutants. The dramatic effect of transmembrane domain mutations constitutes strong evidence that the transmembrane domain is an important determinant of CEACAM1-4S functionality and most likely by other proteins with transmembrane domains containing dimerization sequences and/or C-terminal tyrosine residues. PMID:22235309

  11. Moving Toward a Globally Harmonized Volcanic Ash Forecast System: Anchorage and Tokyo VAAC Best Practices on Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Moore, D.; Igarashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Since the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, there has been an increased awareness on the need for better collaboration between the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). Work through the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group (IAVWOPSG) and International Airways Volcano Task Force (IAVTF) brought increased awareness and focus to this challenge. A VAAC Best Practices group was formed out of these larger meetings and focused on VAAC specific issues of importance. Collaboration was one of the topics under consideration. Some ideas and procedures for an effective, yet easy, method for the VAACs to collaborate have been discussed. Implementation has been mainly on a VAAC to VAAC basis, however a more consolidated process needs to be developed and agreed upon between all VAACs in order to successfully move toward harmonization. Collaboration procedures and tools are being considered. The National Weather Service (NWS) Alaska Region has been looking at collaborative software to help the VAACs identify the presence of ash and forecast the plume both in the horizontal and vertical. Having an interactive graphical interface within the forecast operation may help to ensure consistency across VAAC boundaries. Existing chat software within NWS is being investigated to allow Tokyo and Anchorage VAAC to "chat" about forecast issues in real time. This capability is being tested through scenarios. The Anchorage and Tokyo VAACs participated in a series of meetings in Tokyo in March 2014. Collaboration was a major topic of discussion. This paper will outline some of the efforts being undertaken between the Anchorage and Tokyo VAACs as a result of these meetings and subsequent dialogue.

  12. Combining oxygen plasma treatment with anchorage of cationized gelatin for enhancing cell affinity of poly(lactide-co-glycolide).

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Hu, Xixue; Yang, Fei; Bei, Jianzhong; Wang, Shenguo

    2007-10-01

    Surface characteristics greatly influence attachment and growth of cells on biomaterials. Although polylactone-type biodegradable polymers have been widely used as scaffold materials for tissue engineering, lack of cell recognition sites, poor hydrophilicity and low surface energy lead to a bad cell affinity of the polymers, which limit the usage of polymers as scaffolds in tissue engineering. In the present study, surface of poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was modified by a method of combining oxygen plasma treatment with anchorage of cationized gelatin. Modification effect of the method was compared with other methods of oxygen plasma treatment, cationized gelatin or gelatin coating and combining oxygen plasma treatment with anchorage of gelatin. The change of surface property was compared by contact angles, surface energy, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement. The optimum oxygen pretreatment time determined by surface energy was 10 min when the power was 50 W and the oxygen pressure was 20 Pa. Analysis of the stability of gelatin and cationized gelatin anchored on PLGA by XPS, ATR-FTIR, contact angles and surface energy measurement indicated the cationized gelatin was more stable than gelatin. The result using mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts as model cells to evaluate cell affinity in vitro showed the cationized gelatin-anchored PLGA (OCG-PLGA) was more favorable for cell attachment and growth than oxygen plasma treated PLGA (O-PLGA) and gelatin-anchored PLGA (OG-PLGA). Moreover cell affinity of OCG-PLGA could match that of collagen-anchored PLGA (AC-PLGA). So the surface modification method combining oxygen plasma treatment with anchorage of cationized gelatin provides a universally effective way to enhance cell affinity of polylactone-type biodegradable polymers.

  13. Spheroid Culture of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Reveals an Important Role of EGFR Signalling in Anchorage Independent Survival

    PubMed Central

    Braunholz, Diana; Saki, Mohammad; Niehr, Franziska; Öztürk, Merve; Borràs Puértolas, Berta; Konschak, Robert; Budach, Volker; Tinhofer, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    In solid tumours millions of cells are shed into the blood circulation each day. Only a subset of these circulating tumour cells (CTCs) survive, many of them presumable because of their potential to form multi-cellular clusters also named spheroids. Tumour cells within these spheroids are protected from anoikis, which allows them to metastasize to distant organs or re-seed at the primary site. We used spheroid cultures of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines as a model for such CTC clusters for determining the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cluster formation ability and cell survival after detachment from the extra-cellular matrix. The HNSCC cell lines FaDu, SCC-9 and UT-SCC-9 (UT-SCC-9P) as well as its cetuximab (CTX)-resistant sub-clone (UT-SCC-9R) were forced to grow in an anchorage-independent manner by coating culture dishes with the anti-adhesive polymer poly-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (poly-HEMA). The extent of apoptosis, clonogenic survival and EGFR signalling under such culture conditions was evaluated. The potential of spheroid formation in suspension culture was found to be positively correlated with the proliferation rate of HNSCC cell lines as well as their basal EGFR expression levels. CTX and gefitinib blocked, whereas the addition of EGFR ligands promoted anchorage-independent cell survival and spheroid formation. Increased spheroid formation and growth were associated with persistent activation of EGFR and its downstream signalling component (MAPK/ERK). Importantly, HNSCC cells derived from spheroid cultures retained their clonogenic potential in the absence of cell-matrix contact. Addition of CTX under these conditions strongly inhibited colony formation in CTX-sensitive cell lines but not their resistant subclones. Altogether, EGFR activation was identified as crucial factor for anchorage-independent survival of HNSCC cells. Targeting EGFR in CTC cluster formation might represent an attractive anti

  14. Three-dimensional evaluation of tooth movement in Class II malocclusions treated without extraction by orthodontic mini-implant anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dler; Mohammed, Hnd; Koo, Seung-Hwan; Kang, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze tooth movement and arch width changes in maxillary dentition following nonextraction treatment with orthodontic mini-implant (OMI) anchorage in Class II division 1 malocclusions. Methods Seventeen adult patients diagnosed with Angle's Class II division 1 malocclusion were treated by nonextraction with OMIs as anchorage for distalization of whole maxillary dentition. Three-dimensional virtual maxillary models were superimposed with the best-fit method at the pretreatment and post-treatment stages. Linear, angular, and arch width variables were measured using Rapidform 2006 software, and analyzed by the paired t-test. Results All maxillary teeth showed statistically significant movement posteriorly (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the vertical position of the maxillary teeth, except that the second molars were extruded (0.86 mm, p < 0.01). The maxillary first and second molars were rotated distal-in (4.5°, p < 0.001; 3.0°, p < 0.05, respectively). The intersecond molar width increased slightly (0.1 mm, p > 0.05) and the intercanine, interfirst premolar, intersecond premolar, and interfirst molar widths increased significantly (2.2 mm, p < 0.01; 2.2 mm, p < 0.05; 1.9 mm, p < 0.01; 2.0 mm, p < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions Nonextraction treatment with OMI anchorage for Class II division 1 malocclusions could retract the whole maxillary dentition to achieve a Class I canine and molar relationship without a change in the vertical position of the teeth; however, the second molars were significantly extruded. Simultaneously, the maxillary arch was shown to be expanded with distal-in rotation of the molars. PMID:27668191

  15. Temporomandibular disorders with skeletal open bite treated with stabilization splint and zygomatic miniplate anchorage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; He, Shushu; Chen, Song

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and skeletal open bite. First, the patient was treated with a stabilization splint to stabilize the condyles in centric relation and to alleviate TMD signs and symptoms. After making a definitive diagnosis from postsplint records, orthodontic treatment was initiated. Titanium miniplates were placed at bilateral zygomatic buttresses and used as orthodontic anchorage for molar intrusion and distalization. The treatment was completed after 30 months. Satisfactory appearance and function were achieved for this patient.

  16. Combined maxillary and mandibular midline and mandibular ramus distraction osteogenesis for treatment of a Class II patient with implants as orthodontic anchorage.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ichiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2010-03-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a woman with severe mandibular retrusion and maxillomandibular transverse deficiency. Her malocclusion was characterized by a large overjet, a deep overbite, and a V-shaped dental arch, and she had a skeletal Class II profile. Treatement included combined maxillary and mandibular midline expansion, maxillary downward repositioning, and mandibular ramus lengthening with distraction osteogenesis with implants as orthodontic anchorage. During the postdistraction orthodontic treatment period, some skeletal relapse occurred. Implants provided absolute orthodontic anchorage to overcome the unexpected skeletal changes. Combined orthodontic treatment with implants for anchorage and distraction osteogenesis successfully expanded the maxilla and the mandible and corrected the mandibular deficiency. Two-year follow-up records show a morphologically and functionally stable result.

  17. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., longitude 075°48′36.5″ W, to position latitude 39°31′40.6″ N, longitude 075°48′43.3″ W. All coordinates...-2693 or by marine band radio on VHF-FM Channel 16 (156.8 MHz), from 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m. on the... be contacted on marine band radio VHF-FM Channel 16 (156.8 MHz). (3) The operator of any...

  18. Response of a 14-story Anchorage, Alaska, building in 2002 to two close earthquakes and two distant Denali fault earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2004-01-01

    The recorded responses of an Anchorage, Alaska, building during four significant earthquakes that occurred in 2002 are studied. Two earthquakes, including the 3 November 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake, with epicenters approximately 275 km from the building, generated long trains of long-period (>1 s) surface waves. The other two smaller earthquakes occurred at subcrustal depths practically beneath Anchorage and produced higher frequency motions. These two pairs of earthquakes have different impacts on the response of the building. Higher modes are more pronounced in the building response during the smaller nearby events. The building responses indicate that the close-coupling of translational and torsional modes causes a significant beating effect. It is also possible that there is some resonance occurring due to the site frequency being close to the structural frequency. Identification of dynamic characteristics and behavior of buildings can provide important lessons for future earthquake-resistant designs and retrofit of existing buildings. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  19. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  20. Water-Quality Conditions of Chester Creek, Anchorage, Alaska, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, Roy L.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    Between October 1998 and September 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program evaluated the water-quality conditions of Chester Creek, a stream draining forest and urban settings in Anchorage, Alaska. Data collection included water, streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and aquatic organisms samples from urban sites along the stream. Urban land use ranged from less than 1 percent of the basin above the furthest upstream site to 46 percent above the most downstream site. Findings suggest that water quality of Chester Creek declines in the downstream direction and as urbanization in the watershed increases. Water samples were collected monthly and during storms at a site near the stream's mouth (Chester Creek at Arctic Boulevard) and analyzed for major ions and nutrients. Water samples collected during water year 1999 were analyzed for selected pesticides and volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined monthly during calendar year 2000. During winter, spring, and summer, four water samples were collected at a site upstream of urban development (South Branch of South Fork Chester Creek at Tank Trail) and five from an intermediate site (South Branch of South Fork Chester Creek at Boniface Parkway). Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate in water increased in the downstream direction. Nitrate concentrations were similar at the three sites and all were less than the drinking-water standard. About one-quarter of the samples from the Arctic Boulevard site had concentrations of phosphorus that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guideline for preventing nuisance plant growth. Water samples collected at the Arctic Boulevard site contained concentrations of the insecticide carbaryl that exceeded the guideline for protecting aquatic life. Every water sample revealed a low concentration of volatile organic compounds, including benzene, toluene

  1. SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodelers contribute to DNA double-strand break perinuclear anchorage site choice.

    PubMed

    Horigome, Chihiro; Oma, Yukako; Konishi, Tatsunori; Schmid, Roger; Marcomini, Isabella; Hauer, Michael H; Dion, Vincent; Harata, Masahiko; Gasser, Susan M

    2014-08-21

    Persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recruited to the nuclear periphery in budding yeast. Both the Nup84 pore subcomplex and Mps3, an inner nuclear membrane (INM) SUN domain protein, have been implicated in DSB binding. It was unclear what, if anything, distinguishes the two potential sites of repair. Here, we characterize and distinguish the two binding sites. First, DSB-pore interaction occurs independently of cell-cycle phase and requires neither the chromatin remodeler INO80 nor recombinase Rad51 activity. In contrast, Mps3 binding is S and G2 phase specific and requires both factors. SWR1-dependent incorporation of Htz1 (H2A.Z) is necessary for break relocation to either site in both G1- and S-phase cells. Importantly, functional assays indicate that mutations in the two sites have additive repair defects, arguing that the two perinuclear anchorage sites define distinct survival pathways.

  2. Baseline channel morphology and bank erosion inventory of South Fork Campbell Creek at Campbell Tract, Anchorage, Alaska, 1999 and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2001-01-01

    South Fork Campbell Creek drains largely undeveloped land in Anchorage, Alaska, but supports heavy use near the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Campbell Tract facility for recreation and environmental education. To help assess the impacts of human activities in the basin on biological communities, particularly aquatic and terrestrial biota, morphological changes to the channel bed and banks were monitored for 2 years. Erosion conditions and rates of change were measured and 11 transects were surveyed in three reaches of Campbell Creek near the BLM Campbell Creek Science Center in 1999. Repeat measurements at these 33 transects in 2000 documented noticeable differences between horizontal or vertical channel position at eight transects. Repeat measurements of 51 erosion pins at the survey transects provided details of bank erosion between the 2 years. Annual erosion rates at the erosion pins ranged from 0.81 foot per year of erosion to 0.16 foot per year of deposition.

  3. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of S-91 Cloudman murine melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutzfeld, K.L.; Lei, K.Y.; Bregman, M.D.; Meyskens, F.L. Jr.

    1985-03-04

    Zinc inhibited the colony formation of Cloudman S-91 murine melanoma cells in a dose dependent manner with an ID/sub 50/ of 3.4 ..mu..g/ml. Total inhibition of the melanoma colony-forming units occurred at a zinc concentration of 4.42 ..mu..g/ml. In the presence of dexamethasone the ID/sub 50/ for zinc inhibition was reduced by 49% and total inhibition of anchorage-independent growth occurred at the achievable in vivo zinc concentration of 3.0 ..mu..g/ml. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination effected a greater than additive inhibition of the murine melanoma colony-forming units. Statistical evaluation of these results showed that zinc and dexamethasone interacted synergistically to inhibit the formation of murine melanoma colonies. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  4. Ground-water investigation at the alluvial fan of the South Fork River, Anchorage, Alaska: results of test drilling, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dearborn, Larry L.

    1977-01-01

    In late 1976, at Anchorage, Alaska, a ground-water exploration well was drilled to a depth of 487 feet on the South Fork Eagle River fan near the confluence with the mainstream. The well penetrated four sand and gravel strata of low water-yielding capacity and extended 37 ft into metamorphic bedrock. Earth water-bearing stratum was pumped for several hours, and the best aquifer yield was found to be 1.7 gal/min/ft of drawdown. These test results support the conclusion, previously inferred from drilling data at a nearby test hole drilled in 1973, that there are no confined aquifers of large yield in the subsurface at this locality. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Recombinant differential anchorage probes that tower over the spatial dimension of intracellular signals for high content screening and analysis.

    PubMed

    Schembri, Laura; Zanese, Marion; Depierre-Plinet, Gaelle; Petit, Muriel; Elkaoukabi-Chaibi, Assia; Tauzin, Loic; Florean, Cristina; Lartigue, Lydia; Medina, Chantal; Rey, Christophe; Belloc, Francis; Reiffers, Josy; Ichas, François; De Giorgi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant fluorescent probes allow the detection of molecular events inside living cells. Many of them exploit the intracellular space to provide positional signals and, thus, require detection by single cell imaging. We describe here a novel strategy based on probes capable of encoding the spatial dimension of intracellular signals into "all-or-none" fluorescence intensity changes (differential anchorage probes, DAPs). The resulting signals can be acquired in single cells at high throughput by automated flow cytometry, (i) bypassing image acquisition and analysis, (ii) providing a direct quantitative readout, and (iii) allowing the exploration of large experimental series. We illustrate our purpose with DAPs for Bax and the effector caspases 3 and 7, which are keys players in apoptotic cell death, and show applications in basic research, high content multiplexed library screening, compound characterization, and drug profiling.

  6. The use of cortical screw anchorage for closing a space resulting from the loss of a lower molar--a case report.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Socha, Alina; Bińczak, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Orthodontic microscrews are temporary implants providing skeletal anchorage, which may be used for en-masse incisor retraction, as well as for the protraction of posterior segments in order to close spaces without retracting anterior teeth. A patient, aged 16 was reported in whom a miniscrew of 9.5 mm length and 2 mm dimension was inserted distal to the lower left second premolar 2 months after extracting the first molar with periapical bone lesion after failed endodontic treatment. The lower third molar was mesialised using direct anchorage and a power arm to minimize mesial tipping. The space closed within 20 months, followed by a spontaneous eruption of the adjacent third molar. This treatment method constitutes a good alternative to third molar autotransplantation, allowing the avoidance of the risk of surgical procedure.

  7. Using Kettle Lake Records to Date and Interpret Holocene Ash Deposition in Upper Cook Inlet, Anchorage, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, A.; Kathan, K. M.; Kaufman, D. S.; Hancock, J. R.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.

    2004-12-01

    Fourteen sediment cores recovered from three kettle lakes (Goose, Little Campbell and Lorraine) near Anchorage, AK were used to document and date Holocene volcanic ash deposition in the upper Cook Inlet area. Small lakes (<0.5 km2) with small (<1.5 km2), low relief (<50 m), and well-vegetated drainage areas were selected in order to minimize ash remobilization by mass wasting and fluvial processes. The resulting stratigraphic records are interpreted as primary terpha-fall stratigraphies. Relative to the surrounding lacustrine sediments, the ash layers exhibit low organic-matter content (as determined by loss-on-ignition, LOI), high magnetic susceptibility (MS), increased density (X-radiographs), and bubble-wall glass shards. Some ash layers are up to 1 cm thick (macrotephra) consisting of pure glass, some occur as light bands, while others (microtephra) can only be located using non-visual techniques (MS, LOI and X-radiography). The thinnest microtephras observed occur either as discrete (1 mm) layers or diffuse laminations composed of tephra mixed with ambient lake sediment. Forty-five AMS C-14 dates on terrestrial macro fossils were used to constrain sedimentation-rate models for the cores, and to assign absolute ages to ash units. Comparison of inferred tephra ages corroborates our intra and inter basin stratigraphic correlations (+/- 200 yrs) based on physical and MS stratigraphy. Ten out of 12 macrotephras can be confidently correlated among all three lakes, whereas, two of the prominent tephras occur in one basin but not in the others. This suggests subtle differences in ash plume extents or differences in tephra preservation between lakes. A total of 24 Holocene ash units (12 macro and 12 micro) have been recognized and dated in the Anchorage area, suggesting an ash-fall frequency of about 2.4/1000 yrs. By comparison, historical records suggest more frequent ash-fall events (120/1000 yrs). Our data indicate that, either the ash layers are not consistently

  8. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Elina; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-10-15

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner.

  9. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Siljamäki, Elina

    2016-01-01

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner. PMID:27503857

  10. 77 FR 40358 - Federal Management Regulation; FMR Bulletin PBS-2012-03; Redesignations of Federal Buildings...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    .... Inadvertently, the two-letter State ``AL'' was incorrectly identified with the city of Anchorage. This document... and second columns, second entries, remove ``Anchorage, AL'' and add ``Anchorage, AK'' in their...

  11. Effects of artificial-recharge experiments at Ship Creek alluvial fan on water levels at Spring Acres Subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, William; Patrick, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the artificial recharge experiments on water levels at Spring Acres subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska, was evaluated using two digital models constructed to simulate groundwater movement and water-level rises induced by the artificial recharge. The models predicted that the artificial recharge would have caused water levels in the aquifer immediately underlying Spring Acres subdivision to rise 0.2 foot from May 20 to August 7, 1975. The models also predicted a total rise in groundwater levels of 1.1 feet at this location from July 16, 1973 to August 7, 1975, as a result of the artificial-recharge experiments. Water-level data collected from auger holes in March 1975 by a consulting firm for the contractor indicated a depth to water of 6-7 feet below land surface at Spring Acres subdivision at this time. Water levels measured in and near Spring Acres subdivision several years before and after the 1973-75 artificial-recharge experiments showed seasonal rises of 2 to 12.4 feet. A depth to water below land surface of 2.6 feet was measured 600 feet from the subdivision in 1971 and in the subdivision in 1977. Average measured depth to water in the area was 7.0 feet from early 1976 to September 1979. (USGS)

  12. fau and its ubiquitin-like domain (FUBI) transforms human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells to anchorage-independence.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Toby G; Visalli, Melissa A; Komissarova, Elena V

    2003-03-27

    Arsenite is the most likely carcinogenic form of arsenic in the environment. Previously, expression cloning for cDNAs whose overexpression confers arsenite-resistance in Chinese hamster V79 cells identified two genes: fau and a novel gene, asr2. The fau gene encodes a ubiquitin-like protein (here called FUBI) fused to the ribosomal S30 protein. Since the expression of the fox sequence (antisense to fau) increased the tumorigenicity of a mouse sarcoma virus, it was proposed that fau might be a tumor suppressor gene. We intended to test its ability to block arsenite-induced transformation of human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells to anchorage-independence. Instead, we found that overexpressing fau itself was able to transform HOS cells. When the two domains were expressed separately, only FUBI was transforming and only the S30 domain conferred arsenite resistance. An incidental finding was the transforming activity of the selectable marker, hyg. FUBI belongs to the ubiquitin-like protein group that is capable of forming conjugates to other proteins, although none have so far been identified. Alternatively, FUBI may act as a substitute or inhibitor of ubiquitin, to which it is most closely related, or to close ubiquitin-like relatives UCRP, FAT10, and/or Nedd8.

  13. [Indirect usage of miniscrew anchorage to intrude overerupted mandibular incisors in a Class II patient with a deep overbite].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Balam, Tarek A; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Vertical dentoalveolar discrepancies are a common problem in orthodontic patients but are often difficult to treat with traditional mechanics. This case report illustrates the successful treatment of overerupted mandibular incisors via the indirect use of miniscrew anchorage. A woman (age, 22 years 9 months) had chief complaints of maxillary incisor protrusion and crooked teeth. An excessive curve of Spee caused by elongation of the mandibular incisors was also found. The patient was diagnosed with a severe Class II Division 1 malocclusion and a deep overbite. After extraction of the mandibular first premolars and the subsequent leveling phase, the elongated incisors were intruded with a novel method, which involved the combined use of sectional archwires and miniscrews placed in the premolar areas. After the procedure, the mandibular incisors had been intruded by 6.5 mm with no undesirable side effects. The total active treatment period was 42 months. The resultant occlusion and satisfactory facial profile were maintained after 30 months of retention. Our novel intrusion approach shows potential for correcting a deep overbite.

  14. Anchorage performance of a high-pressure pre-tightening resin anchor with a compressed grouting body

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jiansheng; Hu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Supports for deep mine roadways located in soft surrounding rock face several problems: difficulty in applying pre-tightening force, low bearing capacity, and poor initial support. To solve these problems, this study proposes a high-pressure pre-tightening resin anchor with a compressed grouting body for use in soft and fractured rock surrounding a deep roadway. Using model experiments, we analyzed the anchorage performance of the proposed anchor and a conventional tensile-type anchor for three different values of the elastic modulus of the surrounding rock. The results showed that regardless of the surrounding rock type, the peak micro-strain (642–541) and displacement (6.09–6.5 mm) at the pull-out end of the proposed anchor were always smaller than the peak micro-strain (1433–1105) and displacement (8.77–9.2 mm) at the pull-out end of the conventional anchor. Furthermore, as the anchor’s pre-tightening force increased from 20 kN to 120 kN, the anchor’s strain remained concentrated over a length of 0.4 m from the bearing end. Compared with conventional tensile-type anchors, the proposed high-pressure pre-tightening resin anchor with a compressed grouting body has a higher ultimate bearing capacity, allows the grouting length to be decreased to 0.4 m, and provides initial support resistance. PMID:28196084

  15. Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Anchorage, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1965-01-01

    Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, is about 80 miles west-northwest of the epicenter of the March 27 earthquake. Because of its size, Anchorage bore the brunt of property damage from the quake; it sustained greater losses than all the rest of Alaska combined. Damage was caused by direct seismic vibration, by ground cracks, and by landslides. Direct seismic vibration affected chiefly multistory buildings and buildings having large floor areas, probably because of the long period and large amplitude of the seismic waves reaching Anchorage. Most small buildings were spared. Ground cracks caused capricious damage throughout the Anchorage Lowland. Cracking was mast prevalent near the heads or within landslides but was also widespread elsewhere. Landslides themselves caused the most devastating damage. Triggering of landslides by the earthquake was related to the physical-engineering properties of the Bootlegger Cove Clay, a glacial estuarine-marine deposit that underlies much of the Anchorage area. The Bootlegger Cove Clay contains zones of low shear strength, high water content, and high sensitivity that failed under the vibratory stress of the earthquake. Shear strength in sensitive zones ranged from less than 0.2 tsf to about 0.5 tsf; sensitivity ranged from about 10 to more than 40. Sensitive zones generally are centered about 10 to 20 feet above sea level, between zones of stiff insensitive clay. Many physical tests by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers were directed toward analyzing the causes of failure in the Bootlegger Cove Clay and finding possible remedies. Strengths and sensitivities were measured directly in the field by means of vane shear apparatus. A4tterberg limits, natural water contents, triaxial shear, sensitivity, dynamic modulus, consolidation strength, and other properties were measured in the laboratory. Pulsating-load tests simulated earthquake loading. Most of the destructive landslides in the Anchorage area moved primarily by translation rather

  16. CD45/CD11b Positive Subsets of Adult Lung Anchorage-Independent Cells Harness Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Yakov; Sen, Namita; Levantini, Elena; Keller, Steven; Ingenito, Edward P; Ciner, Aaron; Sackstein, Robert; Shapiro, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Compensatory growth is mediated by multiple cell types that interact during organ repair. To elucidate the relationship between the stem/progenitor cells that proliferate or differentiate and the somatic cells of lung, we utilized a novel ex vivo pneumoexplant system. Applying this technique, we identified a sustained culture of repopulating adult progenitors in the form of free floating anchorage-independent cells (AICs). AICs did not express integrin proteins α5, β3, and β7, and constituted 37% of the total culture at day 14, yielding a mixed yet conserved population that recapitulated RNA expression patterns of the healthy lung. AICs exhibited rapid proliferation manifested by a marked 60-fold increase in cell numbers by day 21. Over 50% of the AIC population was cKit+ or double-positive for CD45+ and CD11b+ antigenic determinants, consistent with cells of hematopoietic origin. The latter subset was found to be enriched with prosurfactant protein-C and SCGB1A1 expressing putative stem cells and with aquaporin-5 producing cells, characteristic of terminally differentiated alveolar epithelial type-1 pneumocytes. AICs undergo remodeling to form a cellular lining at the air/gel interface, and TGFβ1 treatment modifies protein expression, implying direct-differentiation of this population. These data confirm the active participation of clonogenic hematopietic stem cells in a mammalian model of lung repair and validate mixed stem/somatic cell cultures, which embrace sustained cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation, for use in studies of compensatory pulmonary growth. PMID:22585451

  17. Olanzapine inhibits proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent growth in human glioblastoma cell lines and enhances temozolomide's antiproliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Kast, Richard Eric; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Dwucet, Annika; Welscher, Nathalie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Hlavac, Michal; Siegelin, Markus David; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2015-03-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma fuels the search for more effective therapeutic compounds. We previously hypothesised that the neuroleptic olanzapine may enhance antineoplastic effects of temozolomide the standard chemotherapeutic agent used in this disease. This study tested this hypothesis. The anti-proliferative effect of olanzapine was examined by MTT assays and cell count analysis. Soft-agar assays were performed to examine colony-forming ability. In addition, the inhibitory effect of olanzapine on the migratory capacity of U87MG and A172 cells was analyzed by Transwell(®) assays. Moreover, staining for annexin V/propidium iodide or carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester was performed prior to flow cytometric analysis in order to better understand the subjacent cellular mechanism. Our initial hypothesis that olanzapine may enhance temozolomide's anti-tumor activity could be confirmed in U87MG and A172 glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, treatment with olanzapine alone resulted in a marked anti-proliferative effect on U87MG, A172 and two glioma stem-like cells with IC50 values ranging from 25 to 79.9 µM. In U87MG cells, anchorage-independent growth was dose-dependently inhibited. In A172 cells, migration was also shown to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, olanzapine was shown to exert a cell line-dependent pleomorphism with respect to the induction of apoptosis, necrosis and/or cytostasis. Our data show that the neuroleptic olanzapine enhances the anti-tumor activity of temozolomide against glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, this is the first study to show that olanzapine provides on its own anti-cancer activity in glioblastoma and thus may have potential for repurposing.

  18. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  19. A Component-Based Study of the Effect of Diameter on Bond and Anchorage Characteristics of Blind-Bolted Connections.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad Nasir; Zaheer, Salman; Alazba, Abdulrahman Ali; Saleem, Muhammad Umair; Niazi, Muhammad Umar Khan; Khurram, Nauman; Amin, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Structural hollow sections are gaining worldwide importance due to their structural and architectural advantages over open steel sections. The only obstacle to their use is their connection with other structural members. To overcome the obstacle of tightening the bolt from one side has given birth to the concept of blind bolts. Blind bolts, being the practical solution to the connection hindrance for the use of hollow and concrete filled hollow sections play a vital role. Flowdrill, the Huck High Strength Blind Bolt and the Lindapter Hollobolt are the well-known commercially available blind bolts. Although the development of blind bolts has largely resolved this issue, the use of structural hollow sections remains limited to shear resistance. Therefore, a new modified version of the blind bolt, known as the "Extended Hollo-Bolt" (EHB) due to its enhanced capacity for bonding with concrete, can overcome the issue of low moment resistance capacity associated with blind-bolted connections. The load transfer mechanism of this recently developed blind bolt remains unclear, however. This study uses a parametric approach to characterising the EHB, using diameter as the variable parameter. Stiffness and load-carrying capacity were evaluated at two different bolt sizes. To investigate the load transfer mechanism, a component-based study of the bond and anchorage characteristics was performed by breaking down the EHB into its components. The results of the study provide insight into the load transfer mechanism of the blind bolt in question. The proposed component-based model was validated by a spring model, through which the stiffness of the EHB was compared to that of its components combined. The combined stiffness of the components was found to be roughly equivalent to that of the EHB as a whole, validating the use of this component-based approach.

  20. Novel 3-D cell culture system for in vitro evaluation of anticancer drugs under anchorage-independent conditions.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Ayako; Abe, Natsuki; Saruhashi, Koichiro; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Nishino, Taito

    2016-12-01

    Anticancer drug discovery efforts have used 2-D cell-based assay models, which fail to forecast in vivo efficacy and result in a lower success rate of clinical approval. Recent 3-D cell culture models are expected to bridge the gap between 2-D and in vivo models. However, 3-D cell culture methods that are available for practical anticancer drug screening have not yet been fully attained. In this study, we screened several polymers for their ability to suspend cells or cell spheroids homogeneously in a liquid medium without changing the viscosity behavior, and identified gellan gum (FP001), as the most potent polymer. FP001 promoted cell dispersion in the medium and improved the proliferation of a wide range of cancer cell lines under low attachment conditions by inhibiting the formation of large-sized spheroids. In addition, cancer cells cultured with FP001-containing medium were more susceptible to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling than those cultured under attachment conditions. We also showed that ligands of the EGF receptor family clearly enhance proliferation of SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells under anchorage-independent conditions with FP001. Consistent with this result, the cells grown with FP001 showed higher EGF receptor content compared with cells cultured under attachment conditions. In conclusion, we developed a novel 3-D cell culture system that is available for high throughput screening of anticancer agents, and is suitable for evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer drugs. Three-dimensional cell culture using FP001 will be of value in the development of useful technologies for anticancer drug discovery.

  1. A Component-Based Study of the Effect of Diameter on Bond and Anchorage Characteristics of Blind-Bolted Connections

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhammad Nasir; Zaheer, Salman; Alazba, Abdulrahman Ali; Saleem, Muhammad Umair; Niazi, Muhammad Umar Khan; Khurram, Nauman; Amin, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Structural hollow sections are gaining worldwide importance due to their structural and architectural advantages over open steel sections. The only obstacle to their use is their connection with other structural members. To overcome the obstacle of tightening the bolt from one side has given birth to the concept of blind bolts. Blind bolts, being the practical solution to the connection hindrance for the use of hollow and concrete filled hollow sections play a vital role. Flowdrill, the Huck High Strength Blind Bolt and the Lindapter Hollobolt are the well-known commercially available blind bolts. Although the development of blind bolts has largely resolved this issue, the use of structural hollow sections remains limited to shear resistance. Therefore, a new modified version of the blind bolt, known as the “Extended Hollo-Bolt” (EHB) due to its enhanced capacity for bonding with concrete, can overcome the issue of low moment resistance capacity associated with blind-bolted connections. The load transfer mechanism of this recently developed blind bolt remains unclear, however. This study uses a parametric approach to characterising the EHB, using diameter as the variable parameter. Stiffness and load-carrying capacity were evaluated at two different bolt sizes. To investigate the load transfer mechanism, a component-based study of the bond and anchorage characteristics was performed by breaking down the EHB into its components. The results of the study provide insight into the load transfer mechanism of the blind bolt in question. The proposed component-based model was validated by a spring model, through which the stiffness of the EHB was compared to that of its components combined. The combined stiffness of the components was found to be roughly equivalent to that of the EHB as a whole, validating the use of this component-based approach. PMID:26901866

  2. Cellular tumorigenicity in nude mice. Test of associations among loss of cell-surface fibronectin, anchorage independence, and tumor-forming ability

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN; also called large external transformation-sensitive [LETS] protein or cell-surface protein [CSP]) is a large cell-surface glycoprotein that is frequently observed to be either absent or greatly reduced on the surfaces of malignant cells grown in vitro. Because FN may be a useful molecular marker of cellular malignancy, we have carried out an extensive screening to test the specific association among the degree of expression of FN, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity in the athymic nude mouse. A variety of diploid cell strains and established cell lines were tested for the expression of surface FN by indirect immunofluorescence using rabbit antisera against human cold insoluble globulin, rodent plasma FN, or chicken cell- surface FN. Concomitantly, the cells were assayed for tumor formation in nude mice and for the ability to form colonies in methylcellulose. Tumorigenic cells often showed very low surface fluorescence, confirming earlier reports. However, many highly tumorigenic fibroblast lines from several species stained strongly with all three antisera. In contrast, the anchorage-independent phenotype was nearly always associated with tumorigenicity in approximately 35 cell lines examined in this study. In another series of experiments, FN-positive but anchorage-independent cells were grown as tumors in nude mice and then reintroduced into culture. In five of the six tumor-derived cell lines, cell-surface FN was not significantly reduced; one such cell line showed very little surface FN. Our data thus indicate that the loss of cell-surface FN is not a necessary step in the process of malignant transformation and that the growth of FN-positive cells as tumors does not require a prior selection in vivo for FN-negative subpopulations. PMID:383723

  3. Thermal Pollution Mathematical Model. Volume 6: Verification of Three-Dimensional Free-Surface Model at Anclote Anchorage. [environment impact of thermal discharges from power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Tuann, S. Y.; Lee, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The free-surface model presented is for tidal estuaries and coastal regions where ambient tidal forces play an important role in the dispersal of heated water. The model is time dependent, three dimensional, and can handle irregular bottom topography. The vertical stretching coordinate is adopted for better treatment of kinematic condition at the water surface. The results include surface elevation, velocity, and temperature. The model was verified at the Anclote Anchorage site of Florida Power Company. Two data bases at four tidal stages for winter and summer conditions were used to verify the model. Differences between measured and predicted temperatures are on an average of less than 1 C.

  4. Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the Eklutna Hydroelectric Project, Anchorage, Alaska, with a section on television examination of earthquake damage to underground communication and electrical systems in Anchorage: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Logan, Malcolm H.; with a section on Television Examination of Earthquake Damage to Underground Communication and Electrical Systems in Anchorage by Burton, Lynn R.

    1967-01-01

    The March 27, 1964, Alaska earthquake and its associated aftershocks caused damage requiring several million dollars worth of repair to the Eklwtna Hydroelectric Project, 34 miles northeast of Anchorage. Electric service from the Eklutna powerplant was interrupted during the early phase of the March 27 earthquake, built was restored (intermittently) until May 9,1964, when the plant was closed for inspection and repair. Water for Eklutna project is transported from Eklutna Lake to the powerplant at tidewater on Knik Arm of Cook Inlet by an underwater intake connected to a 4.46-mile tunnel penstock. The primary damage caused by the earthquake was 1at the intake structure in Eklutna Lake. No damage to the power tunnel was observed. The piles-supported powerplant and appurtenant structures, Anchorage and Palmer substations, and the transmission lines suffered minor dammage. Most damage occurred to facilities constructed on un-consolidated sediments and overburden which densified and subsided during the earthquake. Structures built on bedrock experienced little or no damage. Underground communication and electrical systems in Anchorage were examined with a small-diameter television camera to locate damaged areas requiring repair. Most of the damage was concentrated at or near valley slopes. Those parts of the systems within the major slide areas of the city were destroyed.

  5. Phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate promotes anchorage-independent growth and survival of melanomas through MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Kjersti; Skrede, Martina; Cruciani, Veronique; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Slipicevic, Ana; Florenes, Vivi Ann . E-mail: v.a.florenes@labmed.uio.no

    2005-04-01

    The phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKCs, is known to stimulate the in vitro growth of monolayer cultures of normal human melanocytes whereas it inhibits the growth of most malignant melanoma cell lines. We examined the effect of PMA on proliferation and survival of melanoma cells grown as multicellular aggregates in suspension (spheroids), and aimed to elucidate downstream targets of PKC signaling. In contrast to monolayer cultures, PMA increased cell proliferation as well as protected melanoma cells from suspension-mediated apoptosis (anoikis). Supporting the importance of PKC in anchorage-independent growth, treatment of anoikis-resistant melanoma cell lines with antisense oligonucleotides against PKC-{alpha}, or the PKC inhibitor Goe6976, strongly induced anoikis. PMA induced activation of ERK1/2, but this effect was not prevented by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 or by U0126. Whereas PD98059 treatment alone led to marked activation of the pro-apoptotic Bim and Bad proteins and significantly increased anoikis, these effects were clearly reversed by PMA. In conclusion, our results indicate that the protective effect of PMA on anchorage-independent survival of melanoma cells at least partly is mediated by MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2 and inactivation of downstream pro-apoptotic effector proteins.

  6. Impact of bone quality, implant type, and implantation site preparation on insertion torques of mini-implants used for orthodontic anchorage.

    PubMed

    Wilmes, B; Drescher, D

    2011-07-01

    Mini-implants are widely used as skeletal anchorage in orthodontics. To reduce implant loss rate, sufficient primary stability is required. This study quantitatively analysed the impact of bone quality and pre-drilling diameter on the insertion torque of five different mini-implants. Twenty pig bone segments were dissected and embedded in resin. The insertion torques of two different mini-implant types (Tomas Pin, Dentaurum, Germany, 8 and 10 mm; and Dual Top, Jeil, Korea, 1.6 mm × 8 and 10 mm plus 2 mm×10 mm) were measured. After preparation of the implant sites using pilot drill diameters 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3mm, 30 implants were inserted into each bone segment. Five reference implants were inserted into each segment for comparison. Micro CT evaluated bone compacta thickness. Insertion moments of orthodontic mini-implants, and hence primary stability, varied strongly depending on compacta thickness, implant design, and pre-drilling at the implant site. The Dual Top consistently showed higher primary stability than the Tomas Pin. Insertion moments higher than 230 Nmm resulted in fractures in some cases. Compacta thickness, implant design and preparation of implant site affect the insertion torque of mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage. To avoid fractures and high bone stresses, optimum pre-drilling diameters should be chosen.

  7. Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of the Anchorage area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects hydrologic regimen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Roger M.

    1966-01-01

    The Anchorage hydrologic system was greatly affected by the seismic shock. Immediate but temporary effects included increased stream discharge, seiche action on lakes, and fluctuations in ground-water levels. Generally, ground-water levels were residually lowered after the initial period of fluctuation. This lowering is attributed either to changes in the discharge zones offshore or to a change in the permeability of the aquifers by seismically induced strain. Water supplies were disrupted temporarily by snowslides on streams and by sanding or turbidity in wells. Salt-water encroachment to wells on Fire Island seems to have increased. The approximate 3.7-foot lowering of land level and the diminished artesian head may permit further salt-water encroachment. Increased pore pressure in the Pleistocene Bootlegger Cove Clay led to liquefaction in silt and sand lenses that contributed to the disastrous bluff landslides. Measurements after the earthquake indicate that most pore pressures are declining, whereas some remain high or are increasing. Subsidence in the area was caused principally by tectonic readjustment, but differential compaction within the Bootlegger Cove Clay contributed to subsidences estimated to be as much as 0.6 foot beneath Anchorage.

  8. A role for Mfb1p in region-specific anchorage of high-functioning mitochondria and lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Wolfgang M; Vevea, Jason D; Pon, Liza A

    2016-02-03

    Previous studies indicate that replicative lifespan in daughter cells of Sacchraromyces cerevisiae depends on the preferential inheritance of young, high-functioning mitochondria. We report here that mitochondria are functionally segregated even within single mother cells in S. cerevisiae. A high-functioning population of mitochondria accumulates at the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. We find that the mitochondrial F-box protein (Mfb1p) localizes to mitochondria in the mother tip and is required for mitochondrial anchorage at that site, independent of the previously identified anchorage protein Num1p. Deletion of MFB1 results in loss of the mother-tip-localized mitochondrial population, defects in mitochondrial function and premature replicative ageing. Inhibiting mitochondrial inheritance to buds, by deletion of MMR1, in mfb1Δ cells restores mitochondrial distribution, promotes mitochondrial function and extends replicative lifespan. Our results identify a mechanism that retains a reservoir of high-functioning mitochondria in mother cells and thereby preserves maternal reproductive capacity.

  9. Sortilin Regulates Progranulin Action in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Morcavallo, Alaide; Terracciano, Mario; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Stefanello, Manuela; Buraschi, Simone; Lu, Kuojung G.; Bagley, Demetrius H.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Scotlandi, Katia; Belfiore, Antonino; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2015-01-01

    The growth factor progranulin is as an important regulator of transformation in several cellular systems. We have previously demonstrated that progranulin acts as an autocrine growth factor and stimulates motility, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, supporting the hypothesis that progranulin may play a critical role in prostate cancer progression. However, the mechanisms regulating progranulin action in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells have not been characterized. Sortilin, a single-pass type I transmembrane protein of the vacuolar protein sorting 10 family, binds progranulin in neurons and negatively regulates progranulin signaling by mediating progranulin targeting for lysosomal degradation. However, whether sortilin is expressed in prostate cancer cells and plays any role in regulating progranulin action has not been established. Here, we show that sortilin is expressed at very low levels in castration-resistant PC3 and DU145 cells. Significantly, enhancing sortilin expression in PC3 and DU145 cells severely diminishes progranulin levels and inhibits motility, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, sortilin overexpression negatively modulates Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) stability. These results are recapitulated by depleting endogenous progranulin in PC3 and DU145 cells. On the contrary, targeting sortilin by short hairpin RNA approaches enhances progranulin levels and promotes motility, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. We dissected the mechanisms of sortilin action and demonstrated that sortilin promotes progranulin endocytosis through a clathrin-dependent pathway, sorting into early endosomes and subsequent lysosomal degradation. Collectively, these results point out a critical role for sortilin in regulating progranulin action in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, suggesting that sortilin loss may contribute to prostate cancer progression

  10. Improved survival of anchorage-dependent cells in core-shell hydrogel microcapsules via co-encapsulation with cell-friendly microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Yong; Choi, Hyungsoo; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin

    2017-01-18

    In this study, we investigated the effect of intracapsular environment on the survival of anchorage-dependent cells (ADCs) encapsulated in alginate microcapsules with three different core structures, i.e., liquid, semi-liquid and microsphere-encapsulating semi-liquid core, using NIH 3T3 fibroblasts as an ADC model. For the latter, we fabricated poly (ε-caprolactone) microspheres and co-encapsulated them with the cells, to establish cell-substrate interactions in the capsule. The fibroblast cells co-encapsulated with the microspheres exhibited higher survival and growth than those without. This study provides a 'proof of concept' for employing microspheres as a cell-friendly surface to establish intracapsular cell-substrate interactions thus prolonging the survival of encapsulated therapeutic ADCs.

  11. Conditions of Proper Interaction of Low-Pressure Injection Piles (LIP) with Structure and Soil, Carrying Capacity of Pile Anchorage in Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachla, Henryk

    2016-12-01

    The formation of a pile in the existing foundation and soil creates a new foundation construction which has a structure of foundation-pile-soil. This construction must be able to transfer loads from the foundation to the pile and from the pile to the soil. The pile structure has to transfer an imposed load. From the point of view of continuum mechanics determination of the capacity of such a system is preceded by the analysis of contact problem of three contact surfaces. Each of these surfaces is determined by different pairs of materials. The pair which creates a pile anchorage is a material from which the foundation is built (structure of stone and grout, brick and grout, concrete or reinforced concrete and grout. The pile structure is formed by grout and steel rebar. The pile formed in soil is created by a pair of grout and soil. What is important is that on contact surfaces the materials adhering to one another are subjected to different deformation types that are controlled by mechanical properties and geometry of these surfaces. In the paper, additional conditions that should be fulfilled for the foundation-pile-soil system to make load transfer from foundation to soil possible and safe are presented. The results of research done by the author on foundation-pile contact surface are discussed. The tests were targeted at verifying the bearing capacity of anchorage and deformation of piles made of grout and other materials from which foundations are built. The specimens were tested in tension and compression. The experiments were conducted on the amount specimens which is regarded as small sample to enable the statistical analysis of the results.

  12. Nonlytic simian virus 40-specific 100K phosphoprotein is associated with anchorage-independent growth in simian virus 40-transformed and revertant mouse cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S; Verderame, M; Lo, A; Pollack, R

    1981-01-01

    Normal fibroblasts display two distinct growth controls which can be assayed as requirements for serum or for anchorage. Interaction of mouse 3T3 fibroblasts with simian virus 40 (SV40) thus generates four classes of transformed cells. We have examined viral gene expression in these four classes of cell lines. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled cell extracts with an antiserum obtained from tumor-bearing hamsters detected the SV40 large T and small t proteins (94,000 molecular weight [94K], 17K) and the nonviral host 54K protein in all cell lines tested. A tumor antigen with an apparent molecular weight of 100,000 was also found in some, but not all, lines. Similar "super T" molecules have been found by others in many rodent transformed lines. We carried out an analysis of the relation of phenotype to relative amounts of these proteins in cell lines of the four classes, using the Spearman rank correlation test. The amount of the 100K T antigen relative to the 94K T antigen or to total viral protein was well correlated with the ability to form colonies in semisolid medium. No significant correlation was found between quantities of labeled 94K T antigen, 54K host antigen, or 17K t antigen and either serum or anchorage independence. Mouse cells transformed with the small t SV40 deletion mutant 884 synthesized a 100K T antigen, suggesting that small t is not required for the production of this protein. The 100K T antigen migrated more slowly than lytic T. Since mixtures of extracts from cells expressing and lacking the 100K T antigen yielded the expected amount of this protein, it is unlikely that the 100K T derives from the 94K protein by a posttranslational modification. Images PMID:6287215

  13. Outcomes and stability in patients with anterior open bite and long anterior face height treated with temporary anchorage devices and a maxillary intrusion splint

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Nicole R.; Proffit, William R.; Phillips, Ceib

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary skeletal anchorage devices now offer the possibility of closing anterior open bites and decreasing anterior face height by intruding maxillary posterior teeth, but data for treatment outcomes are lacking. This article presents outcomes and posttreatment changes for consecutive patients treated with a standardized technique. Methods The sample included 33 consecutive patients who had intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth with a maxillary occlusal splint and nickel-titanium coil springs to temporary anchorage devices in the zygomatic buttress area, buccal and apical to the maxillary molars. Of this group, 30 had adequate cephalograms available for the period of treatment, 27 had cephalograms including 1-year posttreatment, and 25 had cephalograms from 2 years or longer. Results During splint therapy, the mean molar intrusion was 2.3 mm. The mean decrease in anterior face height was 1.6 mm, less than expected because of a 0.6-mm mean eruption of the mandibular molars. During the postintrusion orthodontics, the mean change in maxillary molar position was a 0.2-mm extrusion, and there was a mean 0.5-mm increase in face height. Positive overbite was maintained in all patients, with a slight elongation (<2 mm) of the incisors contributing to this. During the 1 year of posttreatment retention, the mean changes were a further eruption of 0.5 mm of the maxillary molars, whereas the mandibular molars intruded by 0.6 mm, and there was a small decrease in anterior face height. Changes beyond 1 year posttreatment were small and attributable to growth rather than relapse in tooth positions. Conclusions Intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth can give satisfactory correction of moderately severe anterior open bites, but 0.5 to 1.5 mm of reeruption of these teeth is likely to occur. Controlling the vertical position of the mandibular molars so that they do not erupt as the maxillary teeth are intruded is important in obtaining a decrease in face height

  14. Endothelial cell regulation of leukocyte infiltration in inflammatory tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, A.; Introna, M.; Dejana, E.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important, active role in the onset and regulation of inflammatory and immune reactions. Through the production of chemokines they attract leukocytes and activate their adhesive receptors. This leads to the anchorage of leukocytes to the adhesive molecules expressed on the endothelial surface. Leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is frequently followed by their extravasation. The mechanisms which regulate the passage of leukocytes through endothelial clefts remain to be clarified. Many indirect data suggest that leukocytes might transfer signals to endothelial cells both through the release of active agents and adhesion to the endothelial cell surface. Adhesive molecules (such as PECAM) on the endothelial cell surface might also ‘direct’ leukocytes through the intercellular junction by haptotaxis. The information available on the molecular structure and functional properties of endothelial chemokines, adhesive molecules or junction organization is still fragmentary. Further work is needed to clarify how they interplay in regulating leukocyte infiltration into tissues. PMID:18475659

  15. 33 CFR 110.194 - Mobile Bay, Ala., at entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.194 Mobile Bay, Ala., at entrance. (a) The anchorage grounds. The waters within a radius of 750 yards from a point located 1,000 yards true north from Fort... an anchorage. It may be used for a general anchorage when not required for vessels...

  16. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  17. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  18. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  19. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  20. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183 Section 110.183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A. (Upper Anchorage)...

  1. Exposure to cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) causes anchorage-independent growth and reduction of BRCA1 in non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Farasani, Abdullah; Darbre, Philippa D

    2017-04-01

    Dermal absorption of components of personal care products (PCPs) may contribute to breast cancer development. Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) are used widely in the formulation of PCPs, and their presence has been recently detected in human blood. The objectives of this study were to investigate any genotoxic effects after short- (1 week) or longer-term (30 weeks) exposure to hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) or decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) in MCF-10 A and MCF-10F immortalized non-transformed human breast epithelial cells. Genotoxic effects were assessed by an ability of cells to grow in suspension culture, from DNA damage measured by comet assays, and from a reduction in levels of DNA repair proteins measured by RT-PCR and western immunoblotting. Dose-dependent anchorage-independent growth in methocel culture was observed after exposure to D3 (10(-)(13)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4/D5 (10(-)(9)  M-10(-5)  M). DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after 1-h exposure to D3 (10(-)(6)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4 (10(-5)  M). BRCA1 mRNA and BRCA1 protein levels were reduced after 30-week exposure to 10(-5)  M D4 and D5 in both cell lines. Reduced levels of mRNAs for other DNA repair proteins (BRCA2, ATM, ATR, CHK1 and CHK2) were also observed after exposure to 10(-5)  M D5 in both cell lines, and some reductions after exposure to D3 and D4. If cVMS can not only enable anchorage-independent growth of non-transformed breast epithelial cells and damage DNA, but also compromise DNA repair systems, then there is the potential for them to impact on breast carcinogenesis. Further risk assessment now requires information concerning the extent to which cVMS may be present in human breast tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The effect of canine disimpaction performed with temporary anchorage devices (TADs) before comprehensive orthodontic treatment to avoid root resorption of adjacent teeth

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Shafaee, Hooman; Forouzanfar, Ali; Zarch, Seyed Hossein Hoseini; Merati, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the movement of impacted canines away from the roots of neighboring teeth before full-mouth bracket placement, performed by means of TADs to decrease undesired side effects on adjacent teeth. Methods: The study sample consisted of 34 palatally impacted canines, being 19 in the experimental group and 15 in the control group. In the experimental group, before placement of brackets, the impacted canine was erupted by means of miniscrews. In the control group, after initiation of comprehensive orthodontics, canine disimpaction was performed by means of a cantilever spring soldered to a palatal bar. At the end of treatment, volume of lateral incisors and canine root resorption were measured and compared by means of a CBCT-derived tridimensional model. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, bleeding on probing (BOP) and gingival index (GI) were recorded. Clinical success rate was also calculated. Results: The volume of root resorption of lateral teeth in the control group was significantly greater than in the experimental group (p < 0.001). At the end of treatment, VAS score, GI and BOP were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Based on our results, it seems that disimpaction of canines and moving them to the arch can be done successfully carried out with minimal side effects by means of skeletal anchorage. PMID:27275617

  3. A novel gelatin-based micro-cavitary hydrogel for potential application in delivery of anchorage dependent cells: A study with vasculogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wenyan; Fan, Changjiang; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogels have been widely regarded as promising tissue engineering scaffolds and cell delivery vehicles, however, their inherent submicron- or nano-scale polymer networks severely inhibit the settlement of anchorage dependent cells (ADCs). Here, using endothelial progenitor outgrowth cells (EPOCs) as the typical ADCs, a gelatin-based micro-cavitary gel (namely Gel-MCG) is developed with gelatin-methacrylate and gelatin microspheres as precursor and porogens, respectively, to promote cellular focal adhesion and functions. The introduction of micro-cavitary structures within the Gel-MCG improves its physical properties as well as creates numerous gel-microcavity interfaces within gel-based matrices. Compared with conventional gelatin gel (Gel-G) scaffold, the Gel-MCG provides more suitable microenvironments for EPOCs' attachment, spreading, and proliferation, and then which leads to enhanced endothelial differentiation and vascularization as demonstrated by higher expressions of endothelial markers. The Gel-MCG system shows great potential as vehicle for the delivery of ADCs in tissue engineering.

  4. Upregulation of DNA methyltransferase-mediated gene silencing, anchorage-independent growth, and migration of colon cancer cells by interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Foran, Eilis; Garrity-Park, Megan M; Mureau, Coralie; Newell, John; Smyrk, Thomas C; Limburg, Paul J; Egan, Laurence J

    2010-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by chronic inflammation which predisposes to colorectal cancer. The mechanisms by which inflammation promotes tumorigenesis are not fully known. We aimed to investigate the links between colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis via epigenetic gene silencing. Colon cancer specimens were assessed for the expression of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT-1) using immunohistochemistry. Colorectal carcinoma cell lines were assessed for DNMT1 expression, methylcytosine content, promoter methylation, gene expression, and tumorigenesis in response to interleukin (IL)-6. DNMT1 was expressed at higher levels in both the peritumoral stroma and tumor in inflammatory bowel disease-associated cancers compared with sporadic colon cancers. IL-6 treatment of colon cancer cells resulted in an increase in DNMT1 expression, independent of de novo gene expression. IL-6 increased the methylation of promoter regions of genes associated with tumor suppression, adhesion, and apoptosis resistance. Expression of a subset of these genes was downregulated by IL-6, an effect that was prevented by preincubation with 5-azadeoxycytidine, a DNMT1 inhibitor. Anchorage-independent growth and migration of colon cancer cells was also increased by IL-6 in a 5-azadeoxycytidine-sensitive manner. Our results indicate that DNMT-mediated gene silencing may play a role in inflammation-associated colon tumorigenesis.

  5. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone.

  6. TALEN mediated targeted editing of GM2/GD2-synthase gene modulates anchorage independent growth by reducing anoikis resistance in mouse tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Kundu, Manjari; Bandyopadhyay, Uday; Biswas, Kaushik

    2015-03-12

    Complex ganglioside expression is highly deregulated in several tumors which is further dependent on specific ganglioside synthase genes. Here, we designed and constructed a pair of highly specific transcription-activator like effector endonuclease (TALENs) to disrupt a particular genomic locus of mouse GM2-synthase, a region conserved in coding sequence of all four transcript variants of mouse GM2-synthase. Our designed TALENs effectively work in different mouse cell lines and TALEN induced mutation rate is over 45%. Clonal selection strategy is undertaken to generate stable GM2-synthase knockout cell line. We have also demonstrated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) mediated integration of neomycin cassette into the TALEN targeted GM2-synthase locus. Functionally, clonally selected GM2-synthase knockout clones show reduced anchorage-independent growth (AIG), reduction in tumor growth and higher cellular adhesion as compared to wild type Renca-v cells. Insight into the mechanism shows that, reduced AIG is due to loss in anoikis resistance, as both knockout clones show increased sensitivity to detachment induced apoptosis. Therefore, TALEN mediated precise genome editing at GM2-synthase locus not only helps us in understanding the function of GM2-synthase gene and complex gangliosides in tumorigenicity but also holds tremendous potential to use TALENs in translational cancer research and therapeutics.

  7. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  8. Selective blockade of cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth by Plk1 activity-dependent suicidal inhibition of its polo-box domain.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kyung S

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays a critical role in proper M-phase progression and cell proliferation. Plk1 is overexpressed in a broad spectrum of human cancers and is considered an attractive anticancer drug target. Although a large number of inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain of Plk1 have been developed, these inhibitors commonly exhibit a substantial level of cross-reactivity with other structurally related kinases, thus narrowing their applicable dose for patient treatment. Plk1 contains a C-terminal polo-box domain (PBD) that is essentially required for interacting with its binding targets. However, largely due to the lack of both specific and membrane-permeable inhibitors, whether PBD serves as an alternative target for the development of anticancer therapeutics has not been rigorously examined. Here, we used an intracellularly expressed 29-mer-long PBIP1-derived peptide (i.e., PBIPtide), which can be converted into a "suicidal" PBD inhibitor via Plk1-dependent self-priming and binding. Using this highly specific and potent system, we showed that Plk1 PBD inhibition alone is sufficient for inducing mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and that cancer cell-selective killing can occur regardless of the presence or absence of oncogenic RAS mutation. Intriguingly, PBD inhibition also effectively prevented anchorage-independent growth of malignant cancer cells. Thus, targeting PBD represents an appealing strategy for anti-Plk1 inhibitor development. Additionally, PBD inhibition-induced cancer cell-selective killing may not simply stem from activated RAS alone but, rather, from multiple altered biochemical and physiological mechanisms, which may have collectively contributed to Plk1 addiction in cancer cells.

  9. An hypothesis on the role of cellular colloid osmotic pressure in determining behavior of cells in vitro including anchorage dependency and maintenance of the differentiated state.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, C

    1984-12-21

    The osmotic problems involved when cells are isolated from tissues are analyzed. Evidence is considered which indicates that in vivo the Na pump is operating at maximal or near maximal rates and that this depends on low leak rates for salts and water due to various aspects of the tissues structure. Dispersion of the tissue results in breakdown of these barriers on free diffusion and the isolated cell is subjected to an enormous increase in passive influx due to colloid osmotic pressure without being able to increase its pumping rate to the extent needed to maintain volume control. It is proposed that the primary problem the cell faces in vitro is to compensate for the effective increase in its colloid pressure, e.g. the colloid osmotic pressure excess, emerging with the breakdown of the tissue structure. The finding that most normal cells have to adhere to a surface in order to grow or "anchorage dependency" is analyzed in terms of the way adhesion and spreading result in changes in ion and water movements into cells enabling them to achieve fluid balance in the face of the colloid pressure excess. It is also proposed that the differentiated state is more dependent on colloid osmotic balance than proliferation. The failure of conditions used in tissue culture to compensate adequately for the colloid pressure excess results in limiting the amount of protein which can be synthesized, dissipation of cellular energy, and changes in orientation of cellular components which contribute directly to the loss of differentiation which occurs during growth in vitro.

  10. Branching Out in Roots: Uncovering Form, Function, and Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Jonathan A.; Rasmussen, Amanda; Traini, Richard; Voß, Ute; Sturrock, Craig; Mooney, Sacha J.; Wells, Darren M.; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Root branching is critical for plants to secure anchorage and ensure the supply of water, minerals, and nutrients. To date, research on root branching has focused on lateral root development in young seedlings. However, many other programs of postembryonic root organogenesis exist in angiosperms. In cereal crops, the majority of the mature root system is composed of several classes of adventitious roots that include crown roots and brace roots. In this Update, we initially describe the diversity of postembryonic root forms. Next, we review recent advances in our understanding of the genes, signals, and mechanisms regulating lateral root and adventitious root branching in the plant models Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), maize (Zea mays), and rice (Oryza sativa). While many common signals, regulatory components, and mechanisms have been identified that control the initiation, morphogenesis, and emergence of new lateral and adventitious root organs, much more remains to be done. We conclude by discussing the challenges and opportunities facing root branching research. PMID:25136060

  11. Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases characteristics associated with maintenance of cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Patricio; Soto, Nicolás; Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Díaz, Natalia; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2015-08-21

    The early endosomal protein Rab5 is highly expressed in tumor samples, although a causal relationship between Rab5 expression and cell transformation has not been established. Here, we report the functional effects of targeting endogenous Rab5 with specific shRNA sequences in different tumor cell lines. Rab5 down-regulation in B16-F10 cells decreased tumor formation by subcutaneous injection into C57/BL6 mice. Accordingly, Rab5 targeting in B16-F10 and A549, but not MDA-MB-231 cells was followed by decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth. These findings suggest that Rab5 expression is required to maintain characteristics associated with cell transformation. - Highlights: • Rab5 is important to the maintenance of cell transformation characteristics. • Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in different cancer cells. • Rab5 is required for anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in-vivo.

  12. RhoG regulates anoikis through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Nao; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori . E-mail: hirokato@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-01

    In normal epithelial cells, cell-matrix interaction is required for cell survival and proliferation, whereas disruption of this interaction causes epithelial cells to undergo apoptosis called anoikis. Here we show that the small GTPase RhoG plays an important role in the regulation of anoikis. HeLa cells are capable of anchorage-independent cell growth and acquire resistance to anoikis. We found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RhoG promoted anoikis in HeLa cells. Previous studies have shown that RhoG activates Rac1 and induces several cellular functions including promotion of cell migration through its effector ELMO and the ELMO-binding protein Dock180 that function as a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. However, RhoG-induced suppression of anoikis was independent of the ELMO- and Dock180-mediated activation of Rac1. On the other hand, the regulation of anoikis by RhoG required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and constitutively active RhoG bound to the PI3K regulatory subunit p85{alpha} and induced the PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of Akt. Taken together, these results suggest that RhoG protects cells from apoptosis caused by the loss of anchorage through a PI3K-dependent mechanism, independent of its activation of Rac1.

  13. Hsa-mir-182 suppresses lung tumorigenesis through down regulation of RGS17 expression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yihua; Fang, Rong; Li, Chenguang; Li, Li; Li, Fei; Ye, Xiaolei; Chen, Haiquan

    2010-05-28

    Lung cancer is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. RGS17 is previously shown to be over-expressed in human lung adenocarcinomas and plays an important role in lung tumor growth. Here we have identified a miRNA, has-mir-182, involved in the regulation of RGS17 expression through two conserved sites located in its 3' UTR region. Consistently, endogenous RGS17 expression level is regulated by hsa-mir-182 in human lung cancer cell lines. Similar to the knockdown of RGS17, ectopic expression of hsa-mir-182 significantly inhibits lung cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth, which can be rescued by re-expression of RGS17. Taken together, these data have provided the first evidence of miRNA regulation of RGS17 expression in lung cancer.

  14. Abduction of Toe-excavation Induced Failure Process from LEM and FDM for a Dip Slope with Rock Anchorage in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-S.; Lin, M.-L.; Liu, H.-C.; Lin, H.-H.

    2012-04-01

    On April 25, 2010, without rainfall and earthquake triggering a massive landslide (200000 m3) covered a 200m stretch of Taiwan's National Freeway No. 3, killing 4 people, burying three cars and destroying a bridge. The failure mode appears to be a dip-slope type failure occurred on a rock anchorage cut slope. The strike of Tertiary sedimentary strata is northeast-southwest and dip 15˚ toward southeast. Based on the investigations of Taiwan Geotechnical Society, there are three possible factors contributing to the failure mechanism as follow:(1) By toe-excavation during construction in 1998, the daylight of the sliding layer had induced the strength reduction in the sliding layer. It also caused the loadings of anchors increased rapidly and approached to their ultimate capacity; (2) Although the excavated area had stabilized soon with rock anchors and backfills, the weathering and groundwater infiltration caused the strength reduction of overlying rock mass; (3) The possible corrosion and age of the ground anchors deteriorate the loading capacity of rock anchors. Considering the strength of sliding layer had reduced from peak to residual strength which was caused by the disturbance of excavation, the limit equilibrium method (LEM) analysis was utilized in the back analysis at first. The results showed the stability condition of slope approached the critical state (F.S.≈1). The efficiency reduction of rock anchors and strength reduction of overlying stratum (sandstone) had been considered in following analysis. The results showed the unstable condition (F.S. <1). This research also utilized the result of laboratory test, geological strength index(GSI) and finite difference method (FDM, FLAC 5.0) to discuss the failure process with the interaction of disturbance of toe-excavation, weathering of rock mass, groundwater infiltration and efficiency reduction of rock anchors on the stability of slope. The analysis indicated that the incremental load of anchors have

  15. Partially transformed, anchorage-independent human diploid fibroblasts result from overexpression of the c-sis oncogene: Mitogenic activity of an apparent monomeric platelet-derived growth factor 2 species

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.W.; Brondyk, W.H.; Burgess, J.A.; Manoharan, T.H.; Hane, B.G.; Fahl, W.E.

    1988-05-01

    A human c-sis cDNA in an expression vector was introduced into human diploid fibroblasts by transfection or electroporation. Fibroblast clones showing an aberrant, densely packed colony morphology were isolated and found to overexpress a 3.6-kilobase sis mRNA species and associated immunoprecipitable platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) 2 proteins. Parallel analyses in cell clones of sis mRNA expression and colony formation in agar indicated that, above a threshold, a linear, positive correlation existed between sis overexpression and acquired anchorage independence. The sis-overexpressing cells formed transient, regressing tumor nodules when injected into nude mice, consistent with the finite life span which they retained. Protein products generated from the transfected c-sis construct in two overexpressing clones were immunoprecipitated with anti-human PDGF antibodies. One clone contained an apparent PDGF dimer of 21 kilodaltons; the second clone contained only on apparent PDGF monomer of 12 kilodaltons, which was shown to account for all of the mitogenic activity present in the cells, essentially all of which was concentrated in the membrane fraction. The results demonstrate a clear link between sis overexpression and acquisition of a partially transformed, anchorage-independent phenotype, and when combined with previous observations of sis overexpression in human tumors, clearly implicate sis overexpression as a genetic mechanism which contributes to human cell transformation.

  16. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1)*

    PubMed Central

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S.; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  17. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    PubMed

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted.

  18. 33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... explosives anchorage off Port Tampa. A circular area with a radius of 200 yards with the point at latitude 27... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives anchorage east of Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

  19. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  20. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  1. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  2. The Long Noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY Regulates Cell Proliferation in Primary Human Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Mazar, Joseph; Lee, Bongyong; Sawada, Junko; Li, Jian-Liang; Shelley, John; Govindarajan, Subramaniam; Towler, Dwight; Mattick, John S; Komatsu, Masanobu; Dinger, Marcel E; Perera, Ranjan J

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY (formerly SPRY4-IT1), which lies within the intronic region of the SPRY4 gene, is up-regulated in human melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. SPRIGHTLY regulates a number of cancer hallmarks, including proliferation, motility, and apoptosis. To better understand its oncogenic role, SPRIGHTLY was stably transfected into human melanocytes, which resulted in increased cellular proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and development of a multinucleated dendritic-like phenotype. RNA sequencing and mass spectrometric analysis of SPRIGHTLY-expressing cells revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, chromosome organization, regulation of DNA damage responses, and cell cycle. The proliferation marker Ki67, minichromosome maintenance genes 2-5, antiapoptotic gene X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 7 were all up-regulated in SPRIGHTLY-expressing melanocytes, whereas the proapoptotic tumor suppressor gene DPPIV/CD26 was down-regulated, followed by an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting an increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Because down-regulation of DPPIV is known to be associated with malignant transformation in melanocytes, SPRIGHTLY-mediated DPPIV down-regulation may play an important role in melanoma pathobiology. Together, these findings provide important insights into how SPRIGHTLY regulates cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation in primary human melanocytes.

  3. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  4. Molecular mechanisms regulating protein kinase Czeta turnover and cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Le Good, J Ann; Brindley, David N

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of protein kinase C (PKC)zeta in relation to its turnover, cell growth and transformation was investigated in Rat2 fibroblasts by over-expressing wild-type or mutant forms of PKCzeta. Deletion of the pseudosubstrate site (PSS) produced the most active mutant (PKCzeta Delta PSS), but mutants designed to mimic phosphorylated PKCzeta had lower specific activities in an in vitro assay. The mutant lacking phosphorylation at the Thr-560 site (T560A) had similar specific activity to wild-type PKCzeta. The T560A mutant also protected PKCzeta against proteolysis, whereas phosphorylation at Thr-410 targeted it towards proteosomal degradation. Blocking proteosomal degradation with lactacystin caused the accumulation of full-length PKCzeta Delta PSS, T410E, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E, PKCzeta and T560A. Expressed PKCzeta activity was paralleled by extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation, increased cell division, serum-independent growth and focus formation. These foci were seen for cells expressing higher PKCzeta activity (PKCzeta Delta PSS, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E and T560A mutants), but these fibroblasts did not show significant anchorage-independent growth. This work provides novel information concerning the role of the PSS and phosphorylation sites in regulating the activity and turnover of an atypical PKC and shows how this activity can induce cell transformation with respect to focus formation. PMID:14580237

  5. The ERK signaling target RNF126 regulates anoikis resistance in cancer cells by changing the mitochondrial metabolic flux

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Seiko; Hara, Toshiro; Nakaoka, Hiroki J; Kanamori, Akane; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Loss of anchorage to the extracellular matrix leads to apoptosis (anoikis) in normal cells, but cancerous cells are usually resistant to such stress. Here we report the pivotal role of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ring-finger protein 126 (RNF126), in the resistance of cancer cells to the stress associated with non-adherent conditions. Non-adherent cancer cells exhibited increased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle via increased conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. RNF126 was found to act as a ubiquitin ligase for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), resulting in their proteasomal degradation. This decrease in PDK levels allowed pyruvate dehydrogenases to catalyze the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Moreover, depletion of RNF126 or increased expression of PDK1 in cancer cells suppressed colony formation in soft agar as well as tumorigenicity in mice. RNF126 expression in cancer cells was found to be under the control of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway, which is essential for anoikis resistance. Thus, RNF126 is an attractive molecule for treating cancer by selectively targeting anchorage-independent growth. PMID:27462466

  6. Fatty acid synthase regulates estrogen receptor-α signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, J A; Lupu, R

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for endogenous synthesis of fatty acids, is overexpressed and hyperactivated in a biologically aggressive subset of sex steroid-related tumors, including breast carcinomas. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we assessed the molecular relationship between FASN signaling and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in breast cancer. The small compound C75, a synthetic slow-binding inhibitor of FASN activity, induced a dramatic augmentation of estradiol (E2)-stimulated, ERα-driven transcription. FASN and ERα were both necessary for the synergistic activation of ERα transcriptional activity that occurred following co-exposure to C75 and E2: first, knockdown of FASN expression using RNAi (RNA interference) drastically lowered (>100 fold) the amount of E2 required for optimal activation of ERα-mediated transcriptional activity; second, FASN blockade synergistically increased E2-stimulated ERα-mediated transcriptional activity in ERα-negative breast cancer cells stably transfected with ERα, but not in ERα-negative parental cells. Non-genomic, E2-regulated cross-talk between the ERα and MAPK pathways participated in these phenomena. Thus, treatment with the pure antiestrogen ICI 182 780 or the potent and specific inhibitor of MEK/ERK, U0126, was sufficient to abolish the synergistic nature of the interaction between FASN blockade and E2-stimulated ERα transactivation. FASN inhibition suppressed E2-stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation while promoting the reduction of ERα protein. FASN blockade resulted in the increased expression and nuclear accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27Kip1, two critical mediators of the therapeutic effects of antiestrogen in breast cancer, while inactivating AKT, a key mediator of E2-promoted anchorage-independent growth. The ability of FASN to regulate E2/ERα signaling may represent a

  7. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  8. Profilin1 regulates invadopodium maturation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Iglesias, A; Sharma, V P; Beaty, B T; Ding, Z; Gutierrez-Millan, L E; Roy, P; Condeelis, J S; Bravo-Cordero, J J

    2015-02-01

    Invadopodia are actin-driven membrane protrusions that show oscillatory assembly and disassembly causing matrix degradation to support invasion and dissemination of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Profilin1, an actin and phosphoinositide binding protein, is downregulated in several adenocarcinomas and it is been shown that its depletion enhances invasiveness and motility of breast cancer cells by increasing PI(3,4)P2 levels at the leading edge. In this study, we show for the first time that depletion of profilin1 leads to an increase in the number of mature invadopodia and these assemble and disassemble more rapidly than in control cells. Previous work by Sharma et al. (2013a), has shown that the binding of the protein Tks5 with PI(3,4)P2 confers stability to the invadopodium precursor causing it to mature into a degradation-competent structure. We found that loss of profilin1 expression increases the levels of PI(3,4)P2 at the invadopodium and as a result, enhances recruitment of the interacting adaptor Tks5. The increased PI(3,4)P2-Tks5 interaction accelerates the rate of invadopodium anchorage, maturation, and turnover. Our results indicate that profilin1 acts as a molecular regulator of the levels of PI(3,4)P2 and Tks5 recruitment in invadopodia to control the invasion efficiency of invadopodia.

  9. Temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M

    1975-01-01

    The general way of looking at short-term temperature regulation has not fundamentaly changed since 1968. Some points nevertheless have been developed and deserve special attention: 1. The influence of water on the skin surface inhibits sweat secretion (55, 106). This fact may be the explanation of sweating fatigue and of discordant conclusions regarding the functioning of the regulator, particularly during exercise in man. 2. Since a large number of studies have shown that appropriate behaviors occur in response to all the stimuli that activate autonomic responses, behavior itself should be considered as an integral part of the thermoregulatory system (1, 2, 16, 18, 19, 21, 23, 25, 31, 32, 34-36, 48, 88, 89, 98, 99, 122, 126, 127, 137). 3. The description of the peripheral input for the control of sweating with regard to mean skin temperature (104) and time dependence (159) has been improved. Among internal temperature sensors those of the spinal cord have been extensively studies (25, 27, 32, 36, 42, 59-63, 71-75, 82, 83, 86, 113-115, 121, 150, 158) and demonstrated to have a sensitivity equal to that of the hypothalamic sensors (73, 75). 4. New hypotheses have been proposed describing the overall mechanism responsible for a constant temperature in the core (58, 96, 97, 135). These stimulating theories have been discussed briefly herein. Mechanisms for the defense against heat and against cold can be dissociated completely from one another. In the same way the control of autonomic responses can be dissociated from the control of behavioral responses. This suggests that temperature regulation is brought about by multiple independent feedback loops. The overall system is well described, in the author's opinion, by the theory of the adjustable set point with proportional control (47).

  10. Tetraspanin 8 is a novel regulator of ILK-driven β1 integrin adhesion and signaling in invasive melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    El Kharbili, Manale; Robert, Clément; Witkowski, Tiffany; Danty-Berger, Emmanuelle; Barbollat-Boutrand, Laetitia; Masse, Ingrid; Gadot, Nicolas; de la Fouchardière, Arnaud; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Le Naour, François; Degoul, Françoise; Berthier-Vergnes, Odile

    2017-02-04

    Melanoma is well known for its propensity for lethal metastasis and resistance to most current therapies. Tumor progression and drug resistance depend to a large extent on the interplay between tumor cells and the surrounding matrix. We previously identified Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) as a critical mediator of melanoma invasion, whose expression is absent in healthy skin. The present study investigated whether Tspan8 may influence cell-matrix anchorage and regulate downstream molecular pathways leading to an aggressive behavior. Using silencing and ectopic expression strategies, we showed that Tspan8-mediated invasion of melanoma cells resulted from defects in cell-matrix anchorage by interacting with β1 integrins and by interfering with their clustering, without affecting their surface or global expression levels. These effects were associated with impaired phosphorylation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and its downstream target Akt-S473, but not FAK. Specific blockade of Akt or ILK activity strongly affected cell-matrix adhesion. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative form of ILK reduced β1 integrin clustering and cell-matrix adhesion. Finally, we observed a tumor-promoting effect of Tspan8 in vivo and a mutually exclusive expression pattern between Tspan8 and phosphorylated ILK in melanoma xenografts and human melanocytic lesions. Altogether, the in vitro, in vivo and in situ data highlight a novel regulatory role for Tspan8 in melanoma progression by modulating cell-matrix interactions through β1 integrin-ILK axis and establish Tspan8 as a negative regulator of ILK activity. These findings emphasize the importance of targeting Tspan8 as a means of switching from low- to firm-adhesive states, mandatory to prevent tumor dissemination.

  11. Regulated Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. PSD Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  13. 33 CFR 110.205 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chicago Harbor, Ill. 110.205... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.205 Chicago Harbor, Ill. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...) Anchorage D, Chicago Harbor Lock South. Beginning at a point 35.5 feet South (16 feet South of the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  15. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  16. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  17. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  18. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  19. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  20. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  2. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  3. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  4. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  5. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  6. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  7. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  8. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  9. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  10. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  11. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  12. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  13. 33 CFR 110.232 - Southeast Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.232 Southeast Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Hassler Harbor—explosives anchorage. The waters of Hassler Harbor within a circular area with a radius of 1,500...) Except in an emergency, only a vessel that is transporting, loading or discharging explosives may...

  14. 33 CFR 110.239 - Island of Tinian, CNMI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Island of Tinian, CNMI. 110.239 Section 110.239 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.239 Island of Tinian, CNMI. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  15. 33 CFR 110.239 - Island of Tinian, CNMI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Island of Tinian, CNMI. 110.239 Section 110.239 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.239 Island of Tinian, CNMI. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  16. 33 CFR 110.239 - Island of Tinian, CNMI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Island of Tinian, CNMI. 110.239 Section 110.239 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.239 Island of Tinian, CNMI. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  17. 33 CFR 110.239 - Island of Tinian, CNMI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Island of Tinian, CNMI. 110.239 Section 110.239 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.239 Island of Tinian, CNMI. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  18. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude...

  19. 33 CFR 110.146 - Long Island Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Island Sound. 110.146... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.146 Long Island Sound. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Bridgeport Anchorage Ground. That portion of Long Island Sound enclosed by a line connecting the following...

  20. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150 Section 110.150 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A...

  1. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  2. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude...

  3. 33 CFR 110.146 - Long Island Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Island Sound. 110.146... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.146 Long Island Sound. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Bridgeport Anchorage Ground. That portion of Long Island Sound enclosed by a line connecting the following...

  4. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150 Section 110.150 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A...

  5. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150 Section 110.150 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A...

  6. 33 CFR 110.146 - Long Island Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Long Island Sound. 110.146... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.146 Long Island Sound. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Bridgeport Anchorage Ground. That portion of Long Island Sound enclosed by a line connecting the following...

  7. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  8. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude...

  9. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150 Section 110.150 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A...

  10. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude...

  11. 33 CFR 110.150 - Block Island Sound, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Block Island Sound, N.Y. 110.150 Section 110.150 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.150 Block Island Sound, N.Y. (a) The anchorage ground. A...

  12. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude...

  13. 33 CFR 110.146 - Long Island Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Island Sound. 110.146... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.146 Long Island Sound. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Bridgeport Anchorage Ground. That portion of Long Island Sound enclosed by a line connecting the following...

  14. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  15. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  16. 33 CFR 110.238 - Apra Harbor, Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a radius of 350 yards and located at: Latitude Longtitude 13°26′54.0″ N 144°37′53.5″ E (3) Naval Explosives Anchorage 702. The waters in the General Anchorage bounded by the arc of a circle with a radius of... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.238 Apra Harbor, Guam. (a) The anchorage grounds (Datum:...

  17. Evaluation of Bridges Subjected to Military Loading and Dynamic Hydraulic Effects: Review of Design Regulations, Selection Criteria, and Inspection Procedures for Bridge Railing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Standard Plans Plan Title Precast Concrete F-Shape Barrier Std Drawing for Two Tube Rail was not available. Plan No. G-46.10 End Treatments Plan...Anchorage Type 1 Guardrail Anchorage Type 5 and 6 - Guardrail Attachment to Columns, Piers, Walls Guardrail Anchorage Type 12 Concrete Barrier...inspection of the bridge railings. Railings Concrete Railings Vertical Concrete Parapet New Jersey Barrier Tall Wall F Shape Barrier

  18. INPP4B is an oncogenic regulator in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S T; Chi, M N; Yang, R H; Guo, X Y; Zan, L K; Wang, C Y; Xi, Y F; Jin, L; Croft, A; Tseng, H-Y; Yan, X G; Farrelly, M; Wang, F H; Lai, F; Wang, J F; Li, Y P; Ackland, S; Scott, R; Agoulnik, I U; Hondermarck, H; Thorne, R F; Liu, T; Zhang, X D; Jiang, C C

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and is a tumor suppressor in some types of cancers. However, we have found that it is frequently upregulated in human colon cancer cells. Here we show that silencing of INPP4B blocks activation of Akt and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3), inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and retards colon cancer xenograft growth. Conversely, overexpression of INPP4B increases proliferation and triggers anchorage-independent growth of normal colon epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effect of INPP4B on Akt and SGK3 is associated with inactivation of phosphate and tensin homolog through its protein phosphatase activity and that the increase in INPP4B is due to Ets-1-mediated transcriptional upregulation in colon cancer cells. Collectively, these results suggest that INPP4B may function as an oncogenic driver in colon cancer, with potential implications for targeting INPP4B as a novel approach to treat this disease. PMID:26411369

  19. Contact with fibrillar collagen inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by up-regulating p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Henriet, Patrick; Zhong, Zhi-Duan; Brooks, Peter C.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2000-01-01

    It is known that the extracellular matrix regulates normal cell proliferation, and it is assumed that anchorage-independent malignant cells escape this regulatory function. Here we demonstrate that human M24met melanoma cells remain responsive to growth regulatory signals that result from contact with type I collagen and that the effect on proliferation depends on the physical structure of the collagen. On polymerized fibrillar collagen, M24met cells are growth arrested at the G1/S checkpoint and maintain high levels of p27KIP1 mRNA and protein. In contrast, on nonfibrillar (denatured) collagen, the cells enter the cell cycle, and p27KIP1 is down-regulated. These growth regulatory effects involve contact between type I collagen and the collagen-binding integrin α2β1, which appears restricted in the presence of fibrillar collagen. Thus melanoma cells remain sensitive to negative growth regulatory signals originating from fibrillar collagen, and the proteolytic degradation of fibrils is a mechanism allowing tumor cells to escape these restrictive signals. PMID:10944199

  20. Anchorage Land Conveyance Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Murkowski, Lisa [R-AK

    2013-01-30

    12/10/2014 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 629. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3979, which became Public Law 113-291 on 12/19/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Anchorage Land Conveyance Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Young, Don [R-AK-At Large

    2013-02-06

    12/16/2013 Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 216. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3979, which became Public Law 113-291 on 12/19/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Multimedia regulated chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.; Mao, Y.L.

    1999-10-01

    This article examines those chemicals that are listed in either environmental laws or regulations. Its objective is to help readers determine which laws regulate what types of chemicals and which types of chemicals are regulated by what laws. It is multimedia in scope, describing the various chemicals that are regulated in the different media (i.e., air, water, or land).

  3. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  4. Rap2b, a novel p53 target, regulates p53-mediated pro-survival function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; He, Yunlong; Lee, Kyoung-Hwa; Dubois, Wendy; Li, Ziqing; Wu, Xiaolin; Kovalchuk, Alexander; Zhang, Weimin; Huang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest/pro-survival. Upon DNA damage, p53 evokes both cell cycle arrest/pro-survival and apoptosis transcriptional programs. The ultimate cellular outcome depends on the balance of these two programs. However, the p53 downstream targets that mediate this cell fate decision remain to be identified. Using an integrative genomic approach, we identify Rap2b as a conserved p53-activated gene that counters p53-mediated apoptosis after DNA damage. Upon DNA damage, p53 directly binds to the promoter of Rap2b and activates its transcription. The reduction of Rap2b levels by small interference RNA sensitizes cells to DNA damage-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-survival function, analysis of cancer genomic data reveals that Rap2b is overexpressed in many types of tumors. Anchorage-independent growth assays show that Rap2b has only weak transformation activity, suggesting that it is not an oncogene by itself. Together, our results identify Rap2b as a new player in the pro-survival program conducted by p53 and raise the possibility that targeting Rap2b could sensitize tumor cells to apoptosis in response to DNA damage. PMID:23535297

  5. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  6. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  7. Cholesterol segregates into submicrometric domains at the living erythrocyte membrane: evidence and regulation.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Conrard, Louise; Pollet, Hélène; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Cominelli, Antoine; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2015-12-01

    Although cholesterol is essential for membrane fluidity and deformability, the level of its lateral heterogeneity at the plasma membrane of living cells is poorly understood due to lack of appropriate probe. We here report on the usefulness of the D4 fragment of Clostridium perfringens toxin fused to mCherry (theta*), as specific, non-toxic, sensitive and quantitative cholesterol-labeling tool, using erythrocyte flat membrane. By confocal microscopy, theta* labels cholesterol-enriched submicrometric domains in coverslip-spread but also gel-suspended (non-stretched) fresh erythrocytes, suggesting in vivo relevance. Cholesterol domains on spread erythrocytes are stable in time and space, restricted by membrane:spectrin anchorage via 4.1R complexes, and depend on temperature and sphingomyelin, indicating combined regulation by extrinsic membrane:cytoskeleton interaction and by intrinsic lipid packing. Cholesterol domains partially co-localize with BODIPY-sphingomyelin-enriched domains. In conclusion, we show that theta* is a useful vital probe to study cholesterol organization and demonstrate that cholesterol forms submicrometric domains in living cells.

  8. Airborne particulate matter from primarily geologic, non-industrial sources at levels below National Ambient Air Quality Standards is associated with outpatient visits for asthma and quick-relief medication prescriptions among children less than 20 years old enrolled in Medicaid in Anchorage, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Chimonas, Marc-Andre R; Gessner, Bradford D

    2007-03-01

    In Anchorage, Alaska, particulates with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 micro m (PM(10)) arise primarily from natural, geologic sources, and particulates with aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 micro m (PM(2.5)) arise primarily from automobile emissions. The current study used a population-based time-series analysis design to evaluate the effects of daily and weekly PM(10) and PM(2.5) on respiratory health outcomes among children <20 years of age residing in Anchorage enrolled in Medicaid. All generated estimating equations models were adjusted for season, year, weekends, temperature, wind speed, and precipitation. Relative to the days with PM(10) mass concentration < or = 13 micro g/m(3), a significant 9.3% increase (RR: 1.093, 95% CI: 1.004-1.191) in the rate of outpatient visits for asthma occurred during days with PM(10) of 20-33 micro g/m(3). No further dose-response occurred for days with PM(10) > or = 34 micro g/m(3). A significant 18.1% increase (RR: 1.181, 95% CI: 1.010-1.381) in the rate of quick-relief medication prescriptions occurred during days with PM(10) of 34-60 micro g/m(3), and a 28.8% increase (RR: 1.288, 95% CI: 1.026-1.619) occurred during days with PM(10) > or = 61 micro g/m(3). Similar results for outpatient asthma visits and quick-relief medication occurred in weekly models. There were no significant associations with PM(2.5) in either daily or weekly models. These subtle but statistically significant associations suggest that non-industrial, geologic sources of PM(10) may have measurable health effects at levels below current national standards.

  9. 33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port... regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth Inlet awaiting berthing space at the Port...

  10. 33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port... regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth Inlet awaiting berthing space at the Port...

  11. 33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port... regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth Inlet awaiting berthing space at the Port...

  12. 33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port... regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth Inlet awaiting berthing space at the Port...

  13. 33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port... regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth Inlet awaiting berthing space at the Port...

  14. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D.; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S.; Garrison, Carly B.; Walser, Tonya C.; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C.; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R.; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O’Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  15. Nicastrin regulates breast cancer stem cell properties and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Ylenia; Filipović, Aleksandra; Molyneux, Gemma; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Giamas, Georgios; Hu, Yunhui; Trivedi, Pritesh S; Wang, Jayson; Yagüe, Ernesto; Michel, Loren; Coombes, R Charles

    2012-10-09

    Nicastrin (NCT) is a crucial component of the γ-secretase (GS) enzyme, which prompted investigations into its biological role in cancer. We have previously shown that nicastrin is overexpressed in breast cancer (BC), conferring worse overall survival in invasive, ERα negative patients. Here, we used 2D and 3D Matrigel, anchorage-independent growth conditions and a breast cancer xenograft mouse model to assess the impact of nicastrin on breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) propagation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Stable knockdown of nicastrin in HCC1806 breast cancer cells reduced cell invasion by 51.4 ± 1.7%, accompanied by a morphological change to a rounded cell phenotype and down-regulation of vimentin, Snail, Twist, MMP2, and MMP9. We observed a reduction of the pool of CD44(+)/CD24(-) and ALDH1 high breast cancer stem cells by threefold and twofold, respectively, and a reduction by 2.6-fold of the mammospheres formation. Nicastrin overexpression in nontransformed MCF10A cells caused an induction of epithelial to mesenchymal regulators, as well as a fivefold increased ALDH1 activity, a threefold enrichment for CD44(+)/CD24(-) stem cells, and a 3.2-fold enhanced mammosphere-forming capacity. Using the γ-sescretase inhibiton, Notch1/4 siRNA, and Akt inhibition, we show that nicastrin regulates breast cancer stem cells partly through Notch1 and the Akt pathway. Exploiting serial dilution transplantation of the HCC1806 cells expressing nicastrin and HCC1806 stably depleted of nicastrin, in vivo, we demonstrate that nicastrin inhibition may be relevant for the reduced tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells. These data could serve as a benchmark for development of nicastrin-targeted therapies in breast cancer.

  16. cIAP1 regulates TNF-mediated cdc42 activation and filopodia formation.

    PubMed

    Marivin, A; Berthelet, J; Cartier, J; Paul, C; Gemble, S; Morizot, A; Boireau, W; Saleh, M; Bertoglio, J; Solary, E; Dubrez, L

    2014-11-27

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a cytokine endowed with multiple functions, depending on the cellular and environmental context. TNF receptor engagement induces the formation of a multimolecular complex including the TNFR-associated factor TRAF2, the receptor-interaction protein kinase RIP1 and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis cIAP1, the latter being essential for NF-κB activation. Here, we show that cIAP1 also regulates TNF-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization through a cdc42-dependent, NF-κB-independent pathway. Deletion of cIAP1 prevents TNF-induced filopodia and cdc42 activation. The expression of cIAP1 or its E3-ubiquitin ligase-defective mutant restores the ability of cIAP1(-/-) MEFs to produce filopodia, whereas a cIAP1 mutant unable to bind TRAF2 does not. Accordingly, the silencing of TRAF2 inhibits TNF-mediated filopodia formation, whereas silencing of RIP1 does not. cIAP1 directly binds cdc42 and promotes its RhoGDIα-mediated stabilization. TNF decreases cIAP1-cdc42 interaction, suggesting that TNF-induced recruitment of cIAP1/TRAF2 to the receptor releases cdc42, which in turn triggers actin remodeling. cIAP1 also regulates cdc42 activation in response to EGF and HRas-V12 expression. A downregulation of cIAP1 altered the cell polarization, the cell adhesion to endothelial cells and cell intercalation, which are cdc42-dependent processes. Finally, we demonstrated that the deletion of cIAP1 regulated the HRas-V12-mediated transformation process, including anchorage-dependent cell growth, tumour growth in a xenograft model and the development of experimental metastasis in the lung.

  17. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Ryan P.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Somasundaram, Agila; Simpson, Cory L.; Prakriya, Murali; Denning, Mitchell F.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2011-01-01

    Darier's disease (DD) is an inherited autosomal-dominant skin disorder characterized histologically by loss of adhesion between keratinocytes. DD is typically caused by mutations in sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), a major regulator of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in the skin. However, a defined role for SERCA2 in regulating intercellular adhesion remains poorly understood. We found that diminution of SERCA2 function by pharmacological inhibition or siRNA silencing in multiple human epidermal-derived cell lines was sufficient to disrupt desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength. Specifically, SERCA2-deficient cells exhibited up to a 60% reduction in border translocation of desmoplakin (DP), the desmosomal cytolinker protein necessary for intermediate filament (IF) anchorage to sites of robust cell-cell adhesion. In addition, loss of SERCA2 impaired the membrane translocation of protein kinase C α (PKCα), a known regulator of DP-IF association and desmosome assembly, to the plasma membrane by up to 70%. Exogenous activation of PKCα in SERCA2-deficient cells was sufficient to rescue the defective DP localization, desmosome assembly, and intercellular adhesive strength to levels comparable to controls. Our findings indicate that SERCA2-deficiency is sufficient to impede desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength via a PKCα-dependent mechanism, implicating SERCA2 as a novel regulator of PKCα signaling.—Hobbs, R. P., Amargo, E. V., Somasundaram, A., Simpson, C. L., Prakriya, M., Denning, M. F., Green, K. J. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling. PMID:21156808

  18. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  19. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  20. 76 FR 34197 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... west-southwest of Longview, WA at latitude 46 05' 56.83'' N longitude 122 56' 53.22'' W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46 05' 14.02'' N longitude 122 54' 45.75'' W; thence continuing east-southeasterly to latitude 46 04' 57.08'' N longitude 122 54' 12.46'' W; thence continuing southeasterly...

  1. Emotion Regulation in Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Helena J.V.; Wallace, Norah S.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation, defined as the capacity to influence one’s experience and expression of emotion, is a complex skill now recognized to evolve throughout the lifetime. Here we examine the role of emotion regulation in parenthood, and propose that regulatory function during this period is distinct from the emotion regulation skills acquired and implemented during other periods of life. In this review, we consider the unique demands of caring for a child and recognize that parents have to maintain a regulated state as well as facilitate regulation in their child, especially early in development. We examine neurobiological, hormonal and behavioral shifts during the transition to parenthood that may facilitate parental regulation in response to infant cues. Furthermore, we consider how parents shape emotion regulation in their child, and the clinical implications of regulatory functioning within the parent-child relationship. PMID:26085709

  2. Antitumorigenic effect of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge on human colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Sp1 transcription factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Duksun; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Bang, Woong; Park, Kyungho; Kim, Minseok S.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il; Moon, Se Youn

    2017-02-01

    Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were exposed to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure to investigate the anticancer capacity of the plasma. The dose- and time-dependent effects of DBDP on cell viability, regulation of transcription factor Sp1, cell-cycle analysis, and colony formation were investigated by means of MTS assay, DAPI staining, propidium iodide staining, annexin V–FITC staining, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and anchorage-independent cell transformation assay. By increasing the duration of plasma dose times, significant reductions in the levels of both Sp1 protein and Sp1 mRNA were observed in both cell lines. Also, expression of negative regulators related to the cell cycle (such as p53, p21, and p27) was increased and of the positive regulator cyclin D1 was decreased, indicating that the plasma treatment led to apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In addition, the sizes and quantities of colony formation were significantly suppressed even though two cancer promoters, such as TPA and epidermal growth factor, accompanied the plasma treatment. Thus, plasma treatment inhibited cell viability and colony formation by suppressing Sp1, which induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in these two human colorectal cancer cell lines.

  3. Antitumorigenic effect of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge on human colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Sp1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Duksun; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Bang, Woong; Park, Kyungho; Kim, Minseok S.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il; Moon, Se Youn

    2017-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were exposed to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure to investigate the anticancer capacity of the plasma. The dose- and time-dependent effects of DBDP on cell viability, regulation of transcription factor Sp1, cell-cycle analysis, and colony formation were investigated by means of MTS assay, DAPI staining, propidium iodide staining, annexin V–FITC staining, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and anchorage-independent cell transformation assay. By increasing the duration of plasma dose times, significant reductions in the levels of both Sp1 protein and Sp1 mRNA were observed in both cell lines. Also, expression of negative regulators related to the cell cycle (such as p53, p21, and p27) was increased and of the positive regulator cyclin D1 was decreased, indicating that the plasma treatment led to apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In addition, the sizes and quantities of colony formation were significantly suppressed even though two cancer promoters, such as TPA and epidermal growth factor, accompanied the plasma treatment. Thus, plasma treatment inhibited cell viability and colony formation by suppressing Sp1, which induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in these two human colorectal cancer cell lines. PMID:28225083

  4. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L) overhead power line crossing). (4) Passing Lane and Anchorage Basin... Buoy 56 (LL 30830) and approximately 590 feet downstream of the CP&L overhead power line...

  5. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L) overhead power line crossing). (4) Passing Lane and Anchorage Basin... Buoy 56 (LL 30830) and approximately 590 feet downstream of the CP&L overhead power line...

  6. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L) overhead power line crossing). (4) Passing Lane and Anchorage Basin... Buoy 56 (LL 30830) and approximately 590 feet downstream of the CP&L overhead power line...

  7. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L) overhead power line crossing). (4) Passing Lane and Anchorage Basin... Buoy 56 (LL 30830) and approximately 590 feet downstream of the CP&L overhead power line...

  8. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  9. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  10. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  11. Up-regulation of miR-187 modulates the advances of oral carcinoma by targeting BARX2 tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Chun; Kao, Shou-Yen; Chang, Jennifer Chen-Yu; Liu, Ying-Chieh; Yu, En-Hao; Tseng, Ssu-Hsueh; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Aberrations in miRNA regulation are known to play important roles in OSCC pathogenesis. miR-187 was shown to be up-regulated in head and neck malignancies in our previous screening. This study further investigated the oncogenic potential, clinical implications, and targets of miR-187 in OSCC. We observed that miR-187 increased oncogenicity, particularly migration, of OSCC cells. miR-187 expression increased the xenografic tumorigenicity and metastasis in mice. In addition, metastatic human OSCC had higher miR-187 expression than did non-metastatic tumors. Through vigorous screening, we confirmed BarH-like Homeobox 2 (BARX2) gene as an miR-187 target. BARX2 expression suppressed the migration, invasion, anchorage-independent colony formation, and orthotopic tumorigenesis of OSCC cells. The migratory phenotype and neck metastasis induced by miR-187 was rescued by BARX2 expression. BARX2 expression was down-regulated in the vast majority of OSCC, and this down-regulation was particularly conspicuous in tumors with advanced nodal metastasis. In addition, plasma miR-187 was significantly higher in OSCC patients than in normal individuals. This study highlights the roles of miR-187-BARX2 in driving the carcinogenesis of OSCC. The results suggest that miR-187 is a potential serological marker for OSCC and that targeting of miR-187 might prove effective in attenuating nodal metastasis. PMID:27542258

  12. Novel regulators of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fok, Kin Lam; Chen, Hao; Ruan, Ye Chun; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a multistep process that supports the production of millions of sperm daily. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate spermatogenesis has been a major focus for decades. Yet, the regulators involved in different cellular processes of spermatogenesis remain largely unknown. Human diseases that result in defective spermatogenesis have provided hints on the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. In this review, we have summarized recent findings on the function and signaling mechanisms of several genes that are known to be associated with disease or pathological processes, including CFTR, CD147, YWK-II and CT genes, and discuss their potential roles in regulating different processes of spermatogenesis.

  13. Federal, State, and Local regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Brandenburg, B.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This article is a review of federal, state, and local regulations pertinent treatment of leachate from hazardous materials landfills in California. The topics covered include under federal regulations: pretreatment, whole-effluent toxicity, hazardous waste regulation; under state regulations: hazardous waste regulations, air toxics, environmental quality act; under local regulations: local limits, toxicity-regional water quality board, air emissions and district code.

  14. 33 CFR 110.70 - Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of Courthouse Point, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of Courthouse Point, Md. 110.70 Section 110.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.70 Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of...

  15. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black Rock Channel opposite foot..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84 Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black...

  16. 33 CFR 110.170 - Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. 110.170 Section 110.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.170 Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. (a)...

  17. 33 CFR 110.170 - Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. 110.170 Section 110.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.170 Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. (a)...

  18. 33 CFR 110.170 - Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. 110.170 Section 110.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.170 Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. (a)...

  19. 33 CFR 110.170 - Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. 110.170 Section 110.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.170 Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. (a)...

  20. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  1. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  2. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  3. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  4. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  5. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a...

  6. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  7. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  8. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  9. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at...

  10. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at...

  11. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at...

  12. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at...

  13. 33 CFR 110.182 - Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla. 110.182 Section 110.182 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.182 Atlantic...

  14. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at...

  15. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  16. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  17. 33 CFR 110.182 - Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla. 110.182 Section 110.182 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.182 Atlantic...

  18. 33 CFR 110.182 - Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla. 110.182 Section 110.182 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.182 Atlantic...

  19. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at...

  20. 33 CFR 110.179 - Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.179 Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. (a) The... such a position as not to interfere with the free navigation of the channel nor obstruct the...

  1. 33 CFR 110.179 - Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.179 Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. (a) The... such a position as not to interfere with the free navigation of the channel nor obstruct the...

  2. 33 CFR 110.179 - Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.179 Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. (a) The... such a position as not to interfere with the free navigation of the channel nor obstruct the...

  3. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  4. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  5. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  6. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  7. 33 CFR 110.45 - Onset Bay, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Onset Bay, Mass. 110.45 Section 110.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.45 Onset Bay, Mass. Northerly of a line extending...

  8. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  9. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  10. 33 CFR 110.45 - Onset Bay, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Onset Bay, Mass. 110.45 Section 110.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.45 Onset Bay, Mass. Northerly of a line extending...

  11. 33 CFR 110.45 - Onset Bay, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Onset Bay, Mass. 110.45 Section 110.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.45 Onset Bay, Mass. Northerly of a line extending...

  12. 33 CFR 110.45 - Onset Bay, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Onset Bay, Mass. 110.45 Section 110.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.45 Onset Bay, Mass. Northerly of a line extending...

  13. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  15. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  16. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  17. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  18. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  19. 33 CFR 110.45 - Onset Bay, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Onset Bay, Mass. 110.45 Section 110.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.45 Onset Bay, Mass. Northerly of a line extending...

  20. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  1. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  2. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  3. 33 CFR 110.179 - Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. 110.179 Section 110.179 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.179 Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. (a)...

  4. 33 CFR 110.179 - Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. 110.179 Section 110.179 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.179 Skidaway River, Isle of Hope, Ga. (a)...

  5. 33 CFR 110.81a - Lake Betsie, Frankfort, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.81a Lake Betsie, Frankfort, MI. The area...; thence to latitude 44°37′51.4″ North, longitude 86°13′49″ West; thence to latitude 44°37′46.4″...

  6. 33 CFR 110.80 - Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.80 Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis. (a) McKinley Park. The water area east of McKinley Park enclosed by a line beginning at McKinley Park Jetty.... The water area northeast of South Shore Park enclosed by a line beginning at the northeast corner...

  7. 33 CFR 110.51 - Groton, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Groton, Conn. 110.51 Section 110.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.51 Groton, Conn. The waters between an unnamed cove and Pine...

  8. 33 CFR 110.81a - Lake Betsie, Frankfort, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.81a Lake Betsie, Frankfort, MI. The area...; thence to latitude 44°37′51.4″ North, longitude 86°13′49″ West; thence to latitude 44°37′46.4″...

  9. 33 CFR 110.80 - Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.80 Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis. (a) McKinley Park. The water area east of McKinley Park enclosed by a line beginning at McKinley Park Jetty.... The water area northeast of South Shore Park enclosed by a line beginning at the northeast corner...

  10. 33 CFR 110.77b - Madeline Island, Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Madeline Island, Wisconsin. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.77b Madeline Island, Wisconsin. The waters off of La Pointe Harbor, Madeline Island, Wisconsin, encompassed by the following: starting at...

  11. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island,...

  12. 33 CFR 110.74 - Marco Island, Marco River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marco Island, Marco River, Fla. 110.74 Section 110.74 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74 Marco Island, Marco River, Fla....

  13. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island,...

  14. 33 CFR 110.77b - Madeline Island, Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Madeline Island, Wisconsin. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.77b Madeline Island, Wisconsin. The waters off of La Pointe Harbor, Madeline Island, Wisconsin, encompassed by the following: starting at...

  15. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay....

  16. 33 CFR 110.77b - Madeline Island, Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Madeline Island, Wisconsin. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.77b Madeline Island, Wisconsin. The waters off of La Pointe Harbor, Madeline Island, Wisconsin, encompassed by the following: starting at...

  17. 33 CFR 110.77b - Madeline Island, Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Madeline Island, Wisconsin. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.77b Madeline Island, Wisconsin. The waters off of La Pointe Harbor, Madeline Island, Wisconsin, encompassed by the following: starting at...

  18. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay....

  19. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  20. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay....

  1. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay....

  2. 33 CFR 110.77b - Madeline Island, Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Madeline Island, Wisconsin. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.77b Madeline Island, Wisconsin. The waters off of La Pointe Harbor, Madeline Island, Wisconsin, encompassed by the following: starting at...

  3. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N... available, may be assigned to any vessel by the Captain of the Port of Long Island Sound. (2) The Captain...

  4. 33 CFR 110.74 - Marco Island, Marco River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marco Island, Marco River, Fla. 110.74 Section 110.74 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74 Marco Island, Marco River, Fla....

  5. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N... available, may be assigned to any vessel by the Captain of the Port of Long Island Sound. (2) The Captain...

  6. 33 CFR 110.74 - Marco Island, Marco River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marco Island, Marco River, Fla. 110.74 Section 110.74 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74 Marco Island, Marco River, Fla....

  7. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay....

  8. 33 CFR 110.74 - Marco Island, Marco River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marco Island, Marco River, Fla. 110.74 Section 110.74 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74 Marco Island, Marco River, Fla....

  9. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.156 Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N... available, may be assigned to any vessel by the Captain of the Port of Long Island Sound. (2) The Captain...

  10. 33 CFR 110.74 - Marco Island, Marco River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marco Island, Marco River, Fla. 110.74 Section 110.74 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74 Marco Island, Marco River, Fla....

  11. 33 CFR 110.196 - Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass, Tex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass, Tex. 110.196 Section 110.196 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.196 Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass,...

  12. 33 CFR 110.115 - Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.115 Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. North of the Santa Barbara breakwater; seaward of the line of mean high water; and southwest of a line bearing...

  13. 33 CFR 110.196 - Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass, Tex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass, Tex. 110.196 Section 110.196 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.196 Sabine Pass Channel, Sabine Pass,...

  14. 33 CFR 110.229 - Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. 110.229 Section 110.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.229 Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 110.229 - Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. 110.229 Section 110.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.229 Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. (a)...

  16. 33 CFR 110.48 - Thompson Cove on east side of Pawcatuck River below Westerly, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thompson Cove on east side of..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.48 Thompson... channelward end of Thompson Dock at the northern end of Thompson Cove 184° to the shore at the southern end...

  17. 33 CFR 110.71 - Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.71 Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md. The water area of Jacobs Nose Cove, on the west side of the mouth of Elk River, Maryland, comprising the...

  18. 33 CFR 110.71 - Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.71 Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md. The water area of Jacobs Nose Cove, on the west side of the mouth of Elk River, Maryland, comprising the...

  19. 33 CFR 110.71 - Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.71 Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md. The water area of Jacobs Nose Cove, on the west side of the mouth of Elk River, Maryland, comprising the...

  20. 33 CFR 110.71 - Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.71 Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md. The water area of Jacobs Nose Cove, on the west side of the mouth of Elk River, Maryland, comprising the...

  1. 33 CFR 110.71 - Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.71 Jacobs Nose Cove, Elk River, Md. The water area of Jacobs Nose Cove, on the west side of the mouth of Elk River, Maryland, comprising the...

  2. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  3. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  4. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  5. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  6. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  7. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  8. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  9. 33 CFR 110.182 - Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla. 110.182 Section 110.182 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.182 Atlantic...

  10. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at...

  11. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at...

  12. 33 CFR 110.182 - Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Fort George Inlet, near Mayport, Fla. 110.182 Section 110.182 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.182 Atlantic...

  13. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at...

  14. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at...

  15. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor,...

  16. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor,...

  17. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor,...

  18. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor,...

  19. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor,...

  20. 33 CFR 110.27 - Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. 110.27 Section 110.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.27 Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. North...