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Sample records for 16b kepler 34b

  1. HOW NOT TO BUILD TATOOINE: THE DIFFICULTY OF IN SITU FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS KEPLER 16b, KEPLER 34b, AND KEPLER 35b

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Baruteau, Clement; Leinhardt, Zoee M.; Thebault, Philippe

    2012-07-20

    We study planetesimal evolution in circumbinary disks, focusing on the three systems Kepler 16, 34, and 35 where planets have been discovered recently. We show that for circumbinary planetesimals, in addition to secular forcing, eccentricities evolve on a dynamical timescale, which leads to orbital crossings even in the presence of gas drag. This makes the current locations of the circumbinary Kepler planets hostile to planetesimal accretion. We then present results from simulations including planetesimal formation and dust accretion, and show that even in the most favorable case of 100% efficient dust accretion, in situ growth starting from planetesimals smaller than {approx}10 km is difficult for Kepler 16b, Kepler 34b, and Kepler 35b. These planets were likely assembled further out in the disk, and migrated inward to their current location.

  2. KEPLER-16b: SAFE IN A RESONANCE CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Elena A.; Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2013-06-01

    The planet Kepler-16b is known to follow a circumbinary orbit around a system of two main-sequence stars. We construct stability diagrams in the ''pericentric distance-eccentricity'' plane, which show that Kepler-16b is in a hazardous vicinity to the chaos domain-just between the instability ''teeth'' in the space of orbital parameters. Kepler-16b survives, because it is close to the stable half-integer 11/2 orbital resonance with the central binary, safe inside a resonance cell bounded by the unstable 5/1 and 6/1 resonances. The neighboring resonance cells are vacant, because they are ''purged'' by Kepler-16b, due to overlap of first-order resonances with the planet. The newly discovered planets Kepler-34b and Kepler-35b are also safe inside resonance cells at the chaos border.

  3. Discovery of Kepler-16b

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Kepler mission has turned fiction into fact. A world with a double sunset that was first imagined in "Star Wars" over 30 years ago in a galaxy far, far away has become scientific reality. ...

  4. Transiting circumbinary planets Kepler-34 b and Kepler-35 b.

    PubMed

    Welsh, William F; Orosz, Jerome A; Carter, Joshua A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Lissauer, Jack J; Prša, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N; Ragozzine, Darin; Short, Donald R; Torres, Guillermo; Winn, Joshua N; Doyle, Laurance R; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Bloemen, Steven; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Caroline; Caldwell, Douglas A; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Klaus, Todd C; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Mazeh, Tsevi; Quintana, Elisa V; Robertson, Paul; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Windmiller, Gur; Koch, David G; Borucki, William J

    2012-01-11

    Most Sun-like stars in the Galaxy reside in gravitationally bound pairs of stars (binaries). Although long anticipated, the existence of a 'circumbinary planet' orbiting such a pair of normal stars was not definitively established until the discovery of the planet transiting (that is, passing in front of) Kepler-16. Questions remained, however, about the prevalence of circumbinary planets and their range of orbital and physical properties. Here we report two additional transiting circumbinary planets: Kepler-34 (AB)b and Kepler-35 (AB)b, referred to here as Kepler-34 b and Kepler-35 b, respectively. Each is a low-density gas-giant planet on an orbit closely aligned with that of its parent stars. Kepler-34 b orbits two Sun-like stars every 289 days, whereas Kepler-35 b orbits a pair of smaller stars (89% and 81% of the Sun's mass) every 131 days. The planets experience large multi-periodic variations in incident stellar radiation arising from the orbital motion of the stars. The observed rate of circumbinary planets in our sample implies that more than ∼1% of close binary stars have giant planets in nearly coplanar orbits, yielding a Galactic population of at least several million.

  5. On the Orbit of the Circumbinary Planet Kepler-16b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Leung, C. K.

    2012-05-01

    The orbit of the circumbinary planet Kepler-16b is significantly non-Keplerian because of the large secondary-to-primary mass ratio (0.29) and orbital eccentricity (0.15) of the binary, as well as the proximity of the planet to the binary (orbital period ratio 5.6). We present an analytic theory which models the motion of the planet (treated as a test particle) by the superposition of the circular motion of a guiding center, the forced oscillations due to the non-axisymmetric components of the binary's potential, the epicyclic motion, and the vertical motion. In this analytic theory, the periapse and ascending node of the planet precess at nearly equal rates in opposite directions, and the largest forced oscillation term corresponds to a forced eccentricity of 0.035. The nodal precession period (42 years) found in direct numerical orbit integration is in excellent agreement with the analytic theory, while the periapse precession period (49 years) and forced eccentricity (0.038) are slightly larger than the analytic values. The comparison with direct numerical orbit integration also shows that the planet's orbit has a nonzero epicyclic (or free) eccentricity of 0.027. This work is supported in part by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7034/09P.

  6. Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was arguably the most innovative astronomical theorist in the millennium and a half from Claudius PTOLEMY's Almagest (c. AD 150) to Isaac NEWTON's Principia (1687). Before Kepler, planetary and lunar theory had consisted in combining circular motions, either strictly uniform or angularly uniform about an off-center `equant' point, so as to `save the appearances'. T...

  7. Kepler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Kepler mission recently announced over 1200 exoplanet candidates. While some are common Hot Jupiters, a large number are Neptune size and smaller, transit depths suggest sizes down to the radius of Earth. The Kepler project has a fairly high confidence that most of these candidates are real exoplanets. Many analysis steps and lessons learned from Kepler light curves are used during the vetting process. This talk will cover some new results in the areas of stellar variability, solar systems with multiple planets, and how transit-like signatures are vetted for false positives, especially those indicative of small planets.

  8. CIRCUMBINARY PLANET FORMATION IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM. I. N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano

    2012-06-10

    The recently discovered circumbinary planets (Kepler-16 b, Kepler 34-b, Kepler 35-b) represent the first direct evidence of the viability of planet formation in circumbinary orbits. We report on the results of N-body simulations investigating planetesimal accretion in the Kepler-16 b system, focusing on the range of impact velocities under the influence of both stars' gravitational perturbation and friction from a putative protoplanetary disk. Our results show that planet formation might be effectively inhibited for a large range in semimajor axis (1.75 {approx}< a{sub P} {approx}< 4 AU), suggesting that the planetary core must have either migrated from outside 4 AU or formed in situ very close to its current location.

  9. Kepler's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kepler does not orbit the Earth, rather it orbits the Sun in concert with the Earth, slowly drifting away from Earth. Every 61 Earth years, Kepler and Earth will pass by each other. Throughout the ...

  10. Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Volker

    Johannes Kepler (1571 - 1630) gilt zurecht als einer der bedeutendsten Mathematiker und Astronomen der frühen Neuzeit, doch wurde das Philosophische in seinem Werk bislang kaum in angemessener Weise gewürdigt. Volker Bialas legt eine fundierte und anregende Einführung in Leben, Werk und Weltanschauung Keplers vor und setzt dabei durch die Akzentuierung des philosophisch-ganzheitlichen Denkens bewußt einen Kontrapunkt zum herkömmlichen Kepler-Bild.

  11. Kepler's cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Martin

    1998-05-01

    Copernicus's system of the Universe was revolutionary but his method of representing it on paper was anything but. It was left to Kepler to apply Renaissance techniques of spatial visualization to make the theory come alive.

  12. Kepler Orrery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation showing all the multiple-planet systems discovered by Kepler as of 2/2/2011; orbits go through the entire mission (3.5 years). Hot colors to cool colors (Red to yellow to green to cyan to...

  13. 17 CFR 240.16b-8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voting trusts. 240.16b-8... Exchange Act of 1934 Exemption of Certain Transactions from Section 16(b) § 240.16b-8 Voting trusts. Any... deposit or withdrawal from a voting trust or deposit agreement shall be exempt from section 16(b) of...

  14. Modelling circumbinary protoplanetary disks. II. Gas disk feedback on planetesimal dynamical and collisional evolution in the circumbinary systems Kepler-16 and 34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Baruteau, C.; Paardekooper, S.-J.; Carter, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the feasibility of planetesimal growth in circumbinary protoplanetary disks around the observed systems Kepler-16 and Kepler-34 under the gravitational influence of a precessing eccentric gas disk. Methods: We embed the results of our previous hydrodynamical simulations of protoplanetary disks around binaries into an N-body code to perform 3D, high-resolution, inter-particle gravity-enabled simulations of planetesimal growth and dynamics that include the gravitational force imparted by the gas. Results: Including the full, precessing asymmetric gas disk generates high eccentricity orbits for planetesimals orbiting at the edge of the circumbinary cavity, where the gas surface density and eccentricity have their largest values. The gas disk is able to efficiently align planetesimal pericenters in some regions leading to phased, non-interacting orbits. Outside of these areas eccentric planetesimal orbits become misaligned and overlap leading to crossing orbits and high relative velocities during planetesimal collisions. This can lead to an increase in the number of erosive collisions that far outweighs the number of collisions that result in growth. Gravitational focusing from the static axisymmetric gas disk is weak and does not significantly alter collision outcomes from the gas free case. Conclusions: Due to asymmetries in the gas disk, planetesimals are strongly perturbed onto highly eccentric orbits. Where planetesimals orbits are not well aligned, orbit crossings lead to an increase in the number of erosive collisions. This makes it difficult for sustained planetesimal accretion to occur at the location of Kepler-16b and Kepler-34b and we therefore rule out in situ growth. This adds further support to our initial suggestions that most circumbinary planets should form further out in the disk and migrate inwards.

  15. 17 CFR 240.16b-6 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16b-6 Section 240.16b-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  16. 17 CFR 240.16b-6 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16b-6 Section 240.16b-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  17. 17 CFR 240.16b-6 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16b-6 Section 240.16b-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  18. 17 CFR 240.16b-6 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16b-6 Section 240.16b-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  19. 17 CFR 240.16b-6 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16b-6 Section 240.16b-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  20. Kepler's Third Law and NASA's Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Alan; Komatsu, Toshi; DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Koch, David

    2015-04-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission (Fig. 1) has been wildly successful in discovering exoplanets. This paper summarizes the mission goals, briefly explains the transit method of finding exoplanets and design of the mission, provides some key findings, and describes useful education materials available at the Kepler website.

  1. Kepler's Third Law and NASA's "Kepler Mission"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Alan; Komatsu, Toshi; DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Koch, David

    2015-01-01

    NASA's "Kepler Mission" has been wildly successful in discovering exoplanets. This paper summarizes the mission goals, briefly explains the transit method of finding exoplanets and design of the mission, provides some key findings, and describes useful education materials available at the "Kepler" website.

  2. Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first step in discovering, the extent of life in our galaxy is to determine the number of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ). The Kepler Mission is a 0.95 m aperture photometer scheduled to be launched in 2006. It is designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. The depth and repetition time of transits provide the size of the planet relative to the star and its orbital period. When combined with ground-based spectroscopy of these stars to fix the stellar parameters, the true planet radius and orbit scale, hence the relation to the HZ are determined. These spectra are also used to discover the relationships between the characteristics of planets and the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. Based on the results of the current Doppler - velocity discoveries, over a thousand giant planets will be found. Information on the albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of terrestrial planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ occur in less than 1% of the stars and that life might be quite rare.

  3. DETAIL VIEW OF HYDRAULICS CONTROL PANEL IN ROOM 16B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF HYDRAULICS CONTROL PANEL IN ROOM 16B - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. K2-30 b and K2-34 b: Two inflated hot Jupiters around solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Demangeon, O.; Santerne, A.; Barros, S. C. C.; Barrado, D.; Hébrard, G.; Osborn, H. P.; Armstrong, D. J.; Almenara, J.-M.; Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Delgado Mena, E.; Díaz, R. F.; Kirk, J.; Lam, K. W. F.; McCormac, J.; Pollacco, D.; Rajpurohit, A.; Rey, J.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Wilson, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of the two hot Jupiters K2-30 b and K2-34 b. The two planets were detected during campaigns 4 and 5 of the extension of the Kepler mission, K2; they transit their main-sequence stars with periods of ~4.099 and ~2.996 days. Subsequent ground-based radial velocity follow-up with SOPHIE, HARPS-N, and CAFE established the planetary nature of the transiting objects. We analyzed the transit signal, radial velocity, and spectral energy distributions of the two systems to characterize their properties. Both planets (K2-30 b and K2-34 b) are bloated hot Jupiters (1.20 RJup and 1.22 RJup) around relatively bright (V = 13.5 and V = 11.5) slow rotating main-sequence (G8 and F9) stars. Thus, these systems are good candidates for detecting the Rossiter-MacLaughlin effect in order to measure their obliquity and for atmospheric studies. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A50

  5. The Habitable Zone of the Binary System Kepler-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Sarah; Cuntz, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    We report on the current results and envisioned future work from our study of the binary star system Kepler-16, which consists of a K-type main-sequence star and an M dwarf as well as a circumbinary Saturnian planet, Kepler-16b. We focus on the calculation of the location and extent of the habitable zone while considering several criteria for both the inner and outer boundaries previously given in the literature. In particular, we investigate the impact of the two stellar components (especially Kepler-16A) as well as of the system’s binarity regarding the provision of circumbinary habitability. Another aspect of our work consists in a careful assessment of how the extent of the system’s habitable zone is impacted by the relative uncertainties of the stellar and system parameters. Finally, we comment on the likelihood of habitable objects in the system by taking into account both radiative criteria and the need of orbital stability.

  6. Stabilization of Kepler's problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, A.

    1977-01-01

    A regularization of Kepler's problem due to Moser (1970) is used to stabilize the equations of motion. In other words, a particular solution of Kepler's problem is imbedded in a Liapunov stable system. Perturbations can be introduced into the stabilized equations.

  7. Kepler's mathematization of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Judith V.

    The paper concerns with mathematical knowledge of Johannes Kepler. A part of the paper describes the mathematical education of Kepler which includes the Euclidean geometry and texts by Ptolemy. The first He knew from the Proclus' Commentary which was published in 1533. The author is pointing out that Kepler's epistemology was close to Plato's. The "polyhedral archetype" is discussed in detail. The greatest error was in the case of Mercury (~20%) Kepler's reaction was otherwise absolutely what one would exopect of a theoretician in the twentieth century: he suggested that better observations would imoprouve matter. The author make an analogy with modern discussions on metal abundances in the outer layers of old stars. The author is mentioning also that the Kepler's version of Copernicus' system is noticeably different from Copernicus' original one, including important improvements.

  8. Kepler's "War on Mars"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, William; Orchiston, W.; Stephenson, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an interpretation of how Johannes Kepler changed the study of astronomy. We propose that in his metaphorical "War on Mars,” the Astronomia Nova, Kepler used a revolutionary rhetoric to bring about the usurpation of seventeenth-century astronomy. We discuss how Kepler approached the well-established conceptual framework within which the hypotheses of Ptolemy, Copernicus and Tycho Brahe functioned, and how he sought comprehensive physical principles that could determine the true cause and form of the known Universe. We examine Kepler's need to redefine reality and his use of rhetoric in shaping his astronomical argument for a new astronomy, and we show that his new `laws’ represent a fusion of physics and geometry based upon astronomical observations. We suggest that although Kepler may have believed in and defended some Copernican ideas, his innovative Astronomia Nova opened up a whole new vista for international astronomy.

  9. Kepler Field of View

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Kepler mission will be looking continuously at over 100,000 stars in one region of the sky, in the Cygnus and Lyra constellations. The field of view is extremely large for an astronomical teles...

  10. Johannes Kepler on Christmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Kepler's interpretation of the supernova of 1604, De Stella Nova, interwove the science of astronomy with astrology and theology in an attempt to determine the correct birthdate of Jesus, explains Martin Kemp.

  11. KEPLER SCIENCE OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Michael R.; Bryson, Steve T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Koch, David G.; Smith, Marcie; Sobeck, Charles K.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Stober, Jeremy

    2010-04-20

    Kepler's mission design includes a comprehensive plan for commissioning and science operations. The commissioning phase completed all critical tasks and accomplished all mission objectives within a week of the pre-launch plan. Since the start of science data collection, the nominal timeline has been interrupted by two safe-mode events, several losses of fine point, and some small pointing adjustments. The most important anomalies are understood and mitigated, so Kepler's technical performance has improved significantly over this period, and the prognosis for mission success is excellent. The Kepler data archive is established and hosting data for the science team, guest observers, and the public. The first data to become publicly available include the monthly full-frame images and the light curves for targets that are dropped from the exoplanet program or released after publication. Data are placed in the archive on a quarterly basis; the Kepler Results Catalog will be released annually starting in 2011.

  12. Deciphering Kepler's Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithwick, Yoram

    The theory for how planetary systems form and achieve their final configuration remains highly uncertain. Until now, theories could only be tested against a single system -- the solar system. The Kepler mission, with its abundance of planetary systems, will likely prove to be a Rosetta stone. However, much remains to be deciphered. To help realize the potential of the Kepler mission, we propose to pursue the complementary tasks of characterizing the properties of the Kepler systems and developing theories to explain these properties: 1) Characterizing Kepler systems. We will characterize these planets using the transit-time-variation (TTV) signatures obtained by the mission. We have recently derived a simple expression for the TTV, and used it to derive the masses and eccentricities of a couple dozen Kepler planets. We will extend that work by applying it to many more planets, and by deriving higher-order TTV effects that will allow us to obtain more accurate measurements by breaking degeneracies. We will also use the TTV signals, as well as other observables, to infer the intrinsic orbital architecture of Kepler planets. This will form the basis for the following study. 2) Assembling Kepler systems. Informed by our above analysis, we will try to uncover how the Kepler planets were assembled onto their current orbits. Our recent work on the resonant repulsion mechanism suggests that the final assembly was shaped by a dissipative process, and we will explore that mechanism further. We will also run simulations to test the conjecture that planetesimals were the dissipative agent responsible for final assembly -- just as they are thought to be responsible for the assembly of the planets in the outer solar system

  13. Plasma sprayed Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) permanent magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, R. A.; Anderson, C. D.; Flanagan, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Thin coatings (0.16 mm) and thick coatings (0.50 mm) of Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) were deposited on stainless-steel substrates by low pressure plasma spraying. Microscopic examination of the coatings in a light microscope revealed excessive porosity, but good bonding to the substrate. Fracture cross sections examined in a scanning electron microscope showed the grains to be equiaxed and approximately 1 micron or less in diameter in the as-sprayed condition. The intrinsic coercivities of the as-sprayed coatings varied from 5.8 to 10.9 kOe. The effects of postspray heat treatments on the intrinsic coercivity are also given.

  14. Theological foundations of Kepler's astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Peter; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    We will briefly review the historical and intellectual background needed to situate Kepler's work in his time; we will then argue that Kepler's first book cannot be understood without acknowledging its religious dimensions and go on to show that similar issues underlie Kepler's demonstration that the orbit of the planet Mars is an ellipse.

  15. Optimized solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, J. M.; Layton, L.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of KEPLER, an IBM 360 computer program used for the solution of Kepler's equation for eccentric anomaly. The program KEPLER employs a second-order Newton-Raphson differential correction process, and it is faster than previously developed programs by an order of magnitude.

  16. Kepler's First Rocky Planet: Kepler-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Ciardi, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Fressin, Francois; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Basri, Gibor S.; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie; Clarke, Bruce; Cochran, William D.; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fischer, Debra; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan; Girouard, Forrest R.; Holman, Matthew J.; Johnson, John; Isaacson, Howard; Klaus, Todd C.; Machalek, Pavel; Moorehead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph; Quinn, Samuel; VanCleve, Jeffrey; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Welsh, William F.; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan

    2011-03-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission uses transit photometry to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in or near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The mission reached a milestone toward meeting that goal: the discovery of its first rocky planet, Kepler-10b. Two distinct sets of transit events were detected: (1) a 152 ± 4 ppm dimming lasting 1.811 ± 0.024 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454964.57375+0.00060 -0.00082 + N*0.837495+0.000004 -0.000005 days and (2) a 376 ± 9 ppm dimming lasting 6.86 ± 0.07 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454971.6761+0.0020 -0.0023 + N*45.29485+0.00065 -0.00076 days. Statistical tests on the photometric and pixel flux time series established the viability of the planet candidates triggering ground-based follow-up observations. Forty precision Doppler measurements were used to confirm that the short-period transit event is due to a planetary companion. The parent star is bright enough for asteroseismic analysis. Photometry was collected at 1 minute cadence for >4 months from which we detected 19 distinct pulsation frequencies. Modeling the frequencies resulted in precise knowledge of the fundamental stellar properties. Kepler-10 is a relatively old (11.9 ± 4.5 Gyr) but otherwise Sun-like main-sequence star with T eff = 5627 ± 44 K, M sstarf = 0.895 ± 0.060 M sun, and R sstarf = 1.056 ± 0.021 R sun. Physical models simultaneously fit to the transit light curves and the precision Doppler measurements yielded tight constraints on the properties of Kepler-10b that speak to its rocky composition: M P = 4.56+1.17 -1.29 M ⊕, R P = 1.416+0.033 -0.036 R ⊕, and ρP = 8.8+2.1 -2.9 g cm-3. Kepler-10b is the smallest transiting exoplanet discovered to date. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Validating Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Torres, G.; Marcy, G.; Brown, T.; Gilliland, R.; Gautier, T. N.; Isaacson, H.; Dupree, A.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Science Team has identified more than 700 transit-like signatures in the first 43 days of data returned from the spacecraft (Borucki et al. 2010, arXiv1006.2799B). However, only 7 of these candidates have been confirmed as planets as of late September 2010. The number of true planets in this sample is clearly far larger than 7, but the sample is also 'contaminated' with false-positives, including many from eclipsing binary stars. Separating the wheat from the chaff requires a careful study of individual candidates using both Kepler photometry and spectroscopic and imaging data from the ground. Techniques that the Science Team is developing to address these issues, which include detailed analysis of the photometric data and follow-up observations with ground-based telescopes, will be presented. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  18. Kepler and Mach's Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Julian

    The definitive ideas that led to the creation of general relativity crystallized in Einstein's thinking during 1912 while he was in Prague. At the centenary meeting held there to mark the breakthrough, I was asked to talk about earlier great work of relevance to dynamics done at Prague, above all by Kepler and Mach. The main topics covered in this chapter are: some little known but basic facts about the planetary motions; the conceptual framework and most important discoveries of Ptolemy and Copernicus; the complete change of concepts that Kepler introduced and their role in his discoveries; the significance of them in Newton's work; Mach's realization that Kepler's conceptual revolution needed further development to free Newton's conceptual world of the last vestiges of the purely geometrical Ptolemaic world view; and the precise formulation of Mach's principle required to place GR correctly in the line of conceptual and technical evolution that began with the ancient Greek astronomers.

  19. Johannes Kepler's Intelligent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Paul M.

    2006-12-01

    In the last decade, the theory labeled "Intelligent Design" has exacerbated long-standing conflicts between religion and science. This issue will be addressed from the perspective of the philosophy and science of Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), whose unconventional belief in design lived in harmony with his revolutionary physical astronomy.

  20. Kepler Field of View

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kepler-10b orbits one of the 150,000 stars that the spacecraft is monitoring between the constellations of Cygnus and Lyra. We aim our mosaic of 42 detectors there, under the swan’s wing, just ab...

  1. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  2. VIEW OF ROOM 34B, LOOKING TOWARDS SIDE 2 OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOM 34B, LOOKING TOWARDS SIDE 2 OF THE MLP - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. Animation: Kepler-11 and Six Orbiting Planets

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler space telescope watches a star, Kepler-11. The star appears to blink in a pattern. It dims like clockwork as six "hands" of differing size orbit around it at different rates. Kepler-1...

  4. MicroRNA-34b promoter hypermethylation induces CREB overexpression and contributes to myeloid transformation

    PubMed Central

    Pigazzi, Martina; Manara, Elena; Bresolin, Silvia; Tregnago, Claudia; Beghin, Alessandra; Baron, Emma; Giarin, Emanuela; Cho, Er-Chieh; Masetti, Riccardo; Rao, Dinesh S.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Basso, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA-34b down-regulation in acute myeloid leukemia was previously shown to induce CREB overexpression, thereby causing leukemia proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The role of microRNA-34b and CREB in patients with myeloid malignancies has never been evaluated. We examined microRNA-34b expression and the methylation status of its promoter in cells from patients diagnosed with myeloid malignancies. We used gene expression profiling to identify signatures of myeloid transformation. We established that microRNA-34b has suppressor ability and that CREB has oncogenic potential in primary bone marrow cell cultures and in vivo. MicroRNA-34b was found to be up-regulated in pediatric patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (n=17) and myelodysplastic syndromes (n=28), but was down-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis (n=112). Our results showed that hypermethylation of the microRNA-34b promoter occurred in 66% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia explaining the low microRNA-34b levels and CREB overexpression, whereas preleukemic myelodysplastic syndromes and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were not associated with hypermethylation or CREB overexpression. In paired samples taken from the same patients when they had myelodysplastic syndrome and again during the subsequent acute myeloid leukemia, we confirmed microRNA-34b promoter hypermethylation at leukemia onset, with 103 CREB target genes differentially expressed between the two disease stages. This subset of CREB targets was confirmed to associate with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes in a separate cohort of patients (n=20). Seventy-eight of these 103 CREB targets were also differentially expressed between healthy samples (n=11) and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (n=72). Further, low microRNA-34b and high CREB expression levels induced aberrant myelopoiesis through CREB-dependent pathways in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we suggest that microRNA-34b controls CREB expression and

  5. Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Among the 1800 Kepler targets that have candidate planets, 20% have two or more candidate planets. While most of these objects have not yet been confirmed as true planets, several considerations strongly suggest that the vast majority of these multi-candidate systems are true planetary systems. Virtually all candidate systems are stable, as tested by numerical integrations (assuming a nominal mass-radius relationship). Statistical studies performed on these candidates reveal a great deal about the architecture of planetary systems, including the typical spacing of orbits and flatness of planetary systems. The distribution of observed period ratios shows that the vast majority of candidate pairs are neither in nor near low-order mean motion resonances. Nonetheless, there are small but statistically significant excesses of candidate pairs both in resonance and spaced slightly too far apart to be in resonance, particularly near the 2:1 resonance. The characteristics of the confirmed Kepler multi-planet systems will also be discussed.

  6. Kepler + MeDICi

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Jared M.; Gorton, Ian; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Almquist, Justin P.; Wynne, Adam S.; Chin, George; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-07-10

    applications are often structured as workflows that execute a series of interdependent, distributed software modules to analyze large data sets. Passing very large data sets between workflow steps can incur unacceptable overheads with workflow engines that are not designed to efficiently handle large data transfers. In this paper, we describe how we have enhanced a Kepler workflow application with the MeDICi Integration Framework, which has been specifically designed to support the execution of data intensive workflows. The MeDICi technology provides a scalable, component-based architecture that efficiently handles integration with heterogeneous, distributed software systems. This paper describes the MeDICi Integration Framework and the mechanisms we used to integrate MeDICi components with Kepler workflow actors. We illustrate this solution with a workflow application for an atmospheric sciences application, which demonstrates the advantages of this approach.

  7. Kepler Mission: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, D. G.; Lissauer, J. J.; Bryson, S.; Natalie, B.; Caldwell, D. A.; DeVore, E.; Jenkins, J. M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cochran, W. D.; Dunham, E. W.; Gautier, T. N.; Geary, J. C.; Latham, D. W.; Sasselov, D.; Gilliland, R. L.; Gould, A.; Howell, S. B.; Monet, D. G.

    2007-12-01

    Kepler is a Discovery-class mission designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone of solar-like stars. The instrument consists of a high precision photometer with Schmidt-type optics and a focal plane containing 95 million pixels to monitor over 100,000 stars to search for patterns of transits generated by planets as small as Mars. The recent reduction in the mission duration is discussed with regard to the impact on the expected science product and null statistics. Both terrestrial and giant planets discoveries will be followed up with ground-based Doppler-velocity observations to determine mass and density. The first meeting of Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium was held in Paris to organize an international team to analyze the Kepler data to determine the characteristics of the brighter target stars including their size and age. Stellar size determinations accurate to a few percent are expected. These will allow very accurate planet sizes to be determined from the depth of the transit signals. NASA HQ received thirty six proposals for the Participating Scientist Program and chose several new members to join the Science Team. Both the 0.95 m Schmidt corrector and 1.4 m aperture primary mirror have been completed and delivered for integration into the photometer. The focal plane with forty-two science CCD detectors and their processing electronics has been assembled and tested. The spacecraft assembly has begun with the mounting of the reaction control system, reaction wheels, attitude determination & control system, and power systems. Both the photometer and spacecraft are nearing final assembly with all subsystems having passed their environmental and performance testing. The photometer to spacecraft integration will begin this spring. The Mission is on schedule for a launch in February 2009. The Kepler Mission is funded by the NASA Astrophysics Division, Science Mission Directorate.

  8. The Kepler Input Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Brown, T. M.; Monet, D. G.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Hergenrother, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Kepler mission will monitor 170,000 planet-search targets during the first year, and 100,000 after that. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) will be used to select optimum targets for the search for habitable earth-like transiting planets. The KIC will include all known catalogued stars in an area of about 177 square degrees centered at RA 19:22:40 and Dec +44:30 (l=76.3 and b=+13.5). 2MASS photometry will be supplemented with new ground-based photometry obtained in the SDSS g, r, i, and z bands plus a custom filter centered on the Mg b lines, using KeplerCam on the 48-inch telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The photometry will be used to estimate stellar characteristics for all stars brighter than K 14.5 mag. The KIC will include effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, reddening, distance, and radius estimates for these stars. The CCD images are pipeline processed to produce instrumental magnitudes at PSI. The photometry is then archived and transformed to the SDSS system at HAO, where the astrophysical analysis of the stellar characteristics is carried out. The results are then merged with catalogued data at the USNOFS to produce the KIC. High dispersion spectroscopy with Hectochelle on the MMT will be used to supplement the information for many of the most interesting targets. The KIC will be released before launch for use by the astronomical community and will be available for queries over the internet. Support from the Kepler mission is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Homotopy Solutions of Kepler's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz-Coy, Norman; Jang, Jiann-Woei

    1996-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved using an integrative algorithm developed using homotropy theory. The solution approach is applicable to both elliptic and hyperbolic forms of Kepler's Equation. The results from the proposed algorithm compare quite favorably with those from existing iterative schemes.

  10. Kepler Science Operations Center Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middour, Christopher; Klaus, Todd; Jenkins, Jon; Pletcher, David; Cote, Miles; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Wohler, Bill; Girouard, Forrest; Gunter, Jay P.; Uddin, Kamal; Allen, Christopher; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Clarke, Bruce; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean; Quintana, Elisa; Sommers, Jeneen; Stroozas, Brett; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph; Wu, Hayley; Caldwell, Doug; Bryson, Stephen; Bhavsar,Paresh

    2010-01-01

    We give an overview of the operational concepts and architecture of the Kepler Science Data Pipeline. Designed, developed, operated, and maintained by the Science Operations Center (SOC) at NASA Ames Research Center, the Kepler Science Data Pipeline is central element of the Kepler Ground Data System. The SOC charter is to analyze stellar photometric data from the Kepler spacecraft and report results to the Kepler Science Office for further analysis. We describe how this is accomplished via the Kepler Science Data Pipeline, including the hardware infrastructure, scientific algorithms, and operational procedures. The SOC consists of an office at Ames Research Center, software development and operations departments, and a data center that hosts the computers required to perform data analysis. We discuss the high-performance, parallel computing software modules of the Kepler Science Data Pipeline that perform transit photometry, pixel-level calibration, systematic error-correction, attitude determination, stellar target management, and instrument characterization. We explain how data processing environments are divided to support operational processing and test needs. We explain the operational timelines for data processing and the data constructs that flow into the Kepler Science Data Pipeline.

  11. Kepler Equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1995-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved over the entire range of elliptic motion by a fifth-order refinement of the solution of a cubic equation. This method is not iterative, and requires only four transcendental function evaluations: a square root, a cube root, and two trigonometric functions. The maximum relative error of the algorithm is less than one part in 10(exp 18), exceeding the capability of double-precision computer arithmetic. Roundoff errors in double-precision implementation of the algorithm are addressed, and procedures to avoid them are developed.

  12. Deregulation of MiR-34b/Sox2 Predicts Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Maria Veronica; Gazzano, Giacomo; Giangiobbe, Sara; Montanari, Emanuele; Del Nero, Alberto; Rocco, Bernardo; Albo, Giancarlo; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will have an indolent and curable disease, whereas approximately 15% of these patients will rapidly progress to a castrate-resistant and metastatic stage with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the identification of molecular signature(s) that detect men at risk of progressing disease remains a pressing and still unmet need for these patients. Here, we used an integrated discovery platform combining prostate cancer cell lines, a Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model and clinically-annotated human tissue samples to identify loss of expression of microRNA-34b as consistently associated with prostate cancer relapse. Mechanistically, this was associated with epigenetics silencing of the MIR34B/C locus and increased DNA copy number loss, selectively in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. In turn, loss of miR-34b resulted in downstream deregulation and overexpression of the “stemness” marker, Sox2. These findings identify loss of miR-34b as a robust biomarker for prostate cancer progression in androgen-sensitive tumors, and anticipate a potential role of progenitor/stem cell signaling in this stage of disease. PMID:26107383

  13. 17 CFR 270.34b-1 - Sales literature deemed to be misleading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales literature deemed to be... (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.34b-1 Sales literature deemed to be misleading. Any advertisement, pamphlet, circular, form letter, or other sales literature addressed to...

  14. THE KEPLER PIXEL RESPONSE FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Klaus, Todd; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler requires detailed knowledge of how the Kepler pixels respond to starlight during a nominal observation. This information is provided by the Kepler pixel response function (PRF), defined as the composite of Kepler's optical point-spread function, integrated spacecraft pointing jitter during a nominal cadence and other systematic effects. To provide sub-pixel resolution, the PRF is represented as a piecewise-continuous polynomial on a sub-pixel mesh. This continuous representation allows the prediction of a star's flux value on any pixel given the star's pixel position. The advantages and difficulties of this polynomial representation are discussed, including characterization of spatial variation in the PRF and the smoothing of discontinuities between sub-pixel polynomial patches. On-orbit super-resolution measurements of the PRF across the Kepler field of view are described. Two uses of the PRF are presented: the selection of pixels for each star that maximizes the photometric signal-to-noise ratio for that star, and PRF-fitted centroids which provide robust and accurate stellar positions on the CCD, primarily used for attitude and plate scale tracking. Good knowledge of the PRF has been a critical component for the successful collection of high-precision photometry by Kepler.

  15. The Kepler intubation system.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Wehbe, Mohamad; Zaouter, Cedrick; Taddei, Riccardo; Morse, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop a robotic intubation system and to conduct a feasibility pilot study on the use of a robotic intubation system for endotracheal intubations. The Kepler Intubation System was developed, consisting of a remote control center (joystick and intubation cockpit) linked to a standard videolaryngoscope via a robotic arm. Ninety intubations were performed by the Kepler Intubation System on an airway trainer mannequin by a single operator. The first group of 30 intubations was performed with the operator in direct view of the mannequin (direct view group). The second group of 30 intubations was performed with the operator unable to see the mannequin (indirect view group). Thirty semiautomated intubations were also performed during which the robotic system replayed a trace of a previously recorded intubation maneuver (semiautomated group). First-attempt success rates and intubation times for each trial were recorded. Trends were analyzed using linear regression. Data are presented as mean (SD). All intubations were successful at first attempt. The mean intubation times were 46 (18) seconds, 51 (19) seconds, and 41 (1) seconds for the direct view, indirect view, and semiautomated group, respectively. Both the direct and indirect view groups had a negative slope, denoting that each successive trial required less time. The semiautomated group had a slope of 0 and a low SD of 1 second, illustrating the high reproducibility of automated intubations. We concluded that a robotic intubation system has been developed that can allow remote intubations within 40 to 60 seconds.

  16. Role for WNT16B in human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Teh, Muy-Teck; Blaydon, Diana; Ghali, Lucy R; Briggs, Victoria; Edmunds, Scott; Pantazi, Eleni; Barnes, Michael R; Leigh, Irene M; Kelsell, David P; Philpott, Michael P

    2007-01-15

    WNT signalling regulates a variety of cell functions including cell fate, polarity, and differentiation via the canonical or beta-catenin stabilisation pathway and/or the planar cell polarity or non-canonical pathway. We have previously demonstrated that two isoforms (A and B) from the WNT16 locus have differential expression in various adult human tissues. In this study we show that WNT16B but not WNT16A isoform was upregulated in basal cell carcinomas compared with normal skin. We further investigated the cellular and molecular functions of WNT16B in primary human epidermal keratinocytes and a keratinocyte cell line. Cellular expression of WNT16B neither stabilised beta-catenin nor activated the lymphoid enhancer factor or T-cell factor transcriptional reporter in primary keratinocytes. WNT16B activated the Jun-N-terminal kinase cascade suggesting the activation of a non-canonical WNT signalling pathway. Constitutive expression of WNT16B significantly enhanced the rate of cell proliferation and prolonged clonogenicity in primary keratinocytes. Silencing WNT16B by RNA interference reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Furthermore, overexpression of WNT16B induced a hyperproliferation phenotype in an organotypical culture system. This work presents the first evidence that WNT16B activates human keratinocyte proliferation possibly via a beta-catenin-independent non-canonical WNT transduction pathway.

  17. Kepler Data Release 4 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  18. Kepler's Planetary Systems in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows an overhead view of the orbital position of the planets in systems with multiple transiting planets discovered by NASA's Kepler mission as of Jan. 2012. All the colored planets ...

  19. The Fruits of Kepler's Struggle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belonuchkin, B. E.

    1992-01-01

    Presents six learning activities dealing with planetary motion, the launching of satellites, and Halley's comet, all of which utilize the three laws of Johannes Kepler. These three laws are discussed in detail, and answers to the activities are provided. (KR)

  20. Simulation of Kepler Supernova Explosion

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a simulation of the Kepler supernova as it interacts with material expelled by the giant star companion to the white dwarf before the latter exploded. It was assumed that the bulk ...

  1. A note on "Kepler's equation".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, J.

    1997-07-01

    This note briefly points out the formal similarity between Kepler's equation and equations developed in Hindu and Islamic astronomy for describing the lunar parallax. Specifically, an iterative method for calculating the lunar parallax has been developed by the astronomer Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (about 850 A.D., Turkestan), which is surprisingly similar to the iterative method for solving Kepler's equation invented by Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783).

  2. Kepler Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Mayer, David; Voss, Janice; Basri, Gibor; Gould, Alan; Brown, Timothy; Cockran, William; Caldwell, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is in the development phase with launch planned for 2007. The mission goal first off is to reliably detect a significant number of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. The mission design allows for exploring the diversity of planetary sizes, orbital periods, stellar spectral types, etc. In this paper we describe the technical approach taken for the mission design; describing the flight and ground system, the detection methodology, the photometer design and capabilities, and the way the data are taken and processed. (For Stellar Classification program. Finally the detection capability in terms of planet size and orbit are presented as a function of mission duration and stellar type.

  3. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  4. ADAM17 cleaves CD16b (FcγRIIIb) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Jianming; Newton, Robert; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Long, Chunmei; Walcheck, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    CD16b (FcγRIIIb) is exclusively expressed by human neutrophils and binds IgG in immune complexes. Cell surface CD16b undergoes efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Indeed, soluble CD16b is present at high levels in the plasma of healthy individuals, which appears to be maintained by the daily turnover of apoptotic neutrophils. At this time, the principal protease responsible for CD16b shedding is not known. We show that CD16b plasma levels were significantly decreased in patients administered a selective inhibitor targeting the metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17. Additional analysis with inhibitors selective for ADAM10 or ADAM17 revealed that only inhibition of ADAM17 significantly blocked the cleavage of CD16b following neutrophil activation and apoptosis. CD16b shedding by ADAM17 was further demonstrated using a unique ADAM17 function-blocking mAb and a cell-based ADAM17 reconstitution assay. Unlike human CD16, however, mouse CD16 did not undergo efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil stimulation or apoptosis, indicating that this mechanism cannot be modeled in normal mice. Taken together, our findings are the first to directly demonstrate that ADAM17 cleaves CD16 in human leukocytes. PMID:23228566

  5. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-12-12

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd(2+) uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  6. NASA's Kepler Mission Announces Latest Discoveries

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists from NASA's Kepler mission have been busy recently. The team has announced the discovery of Kepler-22b, its first confirmed planet in the habitable zone of its solar system, 600 light ye...

  7. Kepler Discovers Its First Rocky Planet

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission confirmed the discovery of its first rocky planet, named Kepler-10b. Measuring 1.4 times the size of Earth, it is the smallest planet ever discovered outside our solar system....

  8. VIEW OF ROOM 16B, LOOKING TOWARDS SIDE 3 OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOM 16B, LOOKING TOWARDS SIDE 3 OF THE MLP - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. Kepler-Daten von BR Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    In the Kepler field is the eclipsing binary BR Cyg. He is a BAV program star. In the KIC (Kepler Input Catalogue) he is associated with the identifier kplr009899416 [1]. There have been determined 1084 minima and as many secondary minima. Acknowledgement: This paper makes use of data from the Kepler exoplanetarchive.

  10. Accretion Timescales from Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    We constrain AGN accretion disk variability mechanisms using the optical light curves of AGN observed by Kepler. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on timescales of hours, days, months and years. The excellent sampling properties of the original Kepler mission - high S/N ratio (105), short sampling interval (30 minutes), and long sampling duration (~ 3.5 years) - allow for a detailed examination of the differences between the variability processes present in various sub-types of AGN such as Type I and II Seyferts, QSOs, and Blazars. We model the flux data using the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) representation from the field of time series analysis. We use the Kalman filter to determine optimal mode parameters and use the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to select the optimal model. We find that optical light curves from Kepler AGN cannot be fit by low order statistical models such as the popular AR(1) process or damped random walk. Kepler light curves exhibit complicated power spectra and are better modeled by higher order ARMA processes. We find that Kepler AGN typically exhibit power spectra that change from a bending power law (PSD ~ 1/fa) to a flat power spectrum on timescales in the range of ~ 5 - 100 days consistent with the orbital and thermal timescales of a typical 107 solar mass black hole.

  11. Modeling Starspots on Kepler-78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Andrew; Vanderburg, Andrew; Dumusque, Xavier; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Kepler-78 is a late G-type star which hosts Kepler-78b, an Earth-sized planet in an 8.5 hour orbit. The mass of Kepler-78b has been measured using the radial velocity technique, but this measurement is complicated by significant stellar activity, especially starspots. We present a new method for modeling starspots by applying a Markov Chain Monte Carlo process to the SOAP 2.0 starspot model. We apply this method to all available data simultaneously, including measurements of radial velocity, bisector span, and full width at half maximum. We recover the mass of Kepler-78b with excellent agreement to previous mass estimates. We also characterize the starspots of Kepler-78, constraining the latitude, longitude, size, and temperature of each spot group, and finding evidence of starspot evolution. Importantly, using both radial velocity measurements and line shape diagnostics seems to break the degeneracy between spot size and spot temperature. If this is correct, we also find that the starspots are warmer than one would expect of a G-type star. Our method of modeling starspots will allow us to better understand the surface phenomena of stars, as well as the properties of their planetary systems.

  12. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  13. Kepler Data Release 3 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    This describes the collection of data and the processing done on it so when researchers around the world get the Kepler data sets (which are a set of pixels from the telescope of a particular target (star, galaxy or whatever) over a 3 month period) they can adjust their algorithms fro things that were done (like subtracting all of one particular wavelength for example). This is used to calibrate their own algorithms so that they know what it is they are starting with. It is posted so that whoever is accessing the publicly available data (not all of it is made public) can understand it .. (most of the Kepler data is under restriction for 1 - 4 years and is not available, but the handbook is for everyone (public and restricted) The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFls and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 3 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http:// archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html .Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  14. Enabling the Kepler Exoplanet Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler mission, with its unrivaled photometric precision and nearly continuous monitoring, provides an unprecedented opportunity for an exoplanet census. However, while it has identified thousands of transiting planet candidates, only relatively few have yet been dynamically confirmed as bona fide planets, with only a handful more even conceivably amenable to future dynamical confirmation. As a result, the ability to draw detailed conclusions about the diversity of exoplanet systems from Kepler detections relies critically on assigning false positive probabilities to thousands of unconfirmed candidates. I have developed a procedure to calculate these probabilities using only the Kepler photometry, optionally including available follow-up observations. Using this, I can often statistically validate a candidate signal using two single-epoch observations: a stellar spectrum and a high-resolution image. Accordingly, I have applied this procedure to the publicly released Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) using results from several large follow-up campaigns: spectroscopic surveys of >100 KOIs with TripleSpec at the Palomar 200-in and >700 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, and imaging surveys of >60 KOIs with Keck/NIRC2 and nearly 1000 KOIs with the Palomar Robo-AO system. This has enabled me to identify hundreds of Kepler candidates as newly secure planets, identify some as likely false positives, and prescribe the most useful follow-up observations for the rest of the KOIs. These results will enable Kepler to fulfill its promise as a mission to study the statistics of exoplanet systems. In addition, this new approach to transit survey follow-up---detailed probabilistic assessment of large numbers of candidates in order to inform the application of relatively scarce follow-up resources---will remain fruitful as transit surveys continue to produce many more candidates than can be followed up with traditional strategies.

  15. Selecting Pixels for Kepler Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Haas, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission monitors > 100,000 stellar targets using 42 2200 1024 pixel CCDs. Bandwidth constraints prevent the downlink of all 96 million pixels per 30-minute cadence, so the Kepler spacecraft downlinks a specified collection of pixels for each target. These pixels are selected by considering the object brightness, background and the signal-to-noise of each pixel, and are optimized to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the target. This paper describes pixel selection, creation of spacecraft apertures that efficiently capture selected pixels, and aperture assignment to a target. Diagnostic apertures, short-cadence targets and custom specified shapes are discussed.

  16. Permeation Mechanisms in the TMEM16B Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B encode for Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCC) and are expressed in many cell types and play a relevant role in many physiological processes. Here, I performed a site-directed mutagenesis study to understand the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation of TMEM16B. I mutated two positive charged residues R573 and K540, respectively located at the entrance and inside the putative channel pore and I measured the properties of wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK-293 cells using whole-cell and excised inside-out patch clamp experiments. I found evidence that R573 and K540 control the ion permeability of TMEM16B depending both on which side of the membrane the ion substitution occurs and on the level of channel activation. Moreover, these residues contribute to control blockage or activation by permeant anions. Finally, R573 mutation abolishes the anomalous mole fraction effect observed in the presence of a permeable anion and it alters the apparent Ca2+-sensitivity of the channel. These findings indicate that residues facing the putative channel pore are responsible both for controlling the ion selectivity and the gating of the channel, providing an initial understanding of molecular mechanism of ion permeation in TMEM16B. PMID:28046119

  17. Calmodulin regulation of TMEM16A and 16B Ca2+-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-activated chloride channels encoded by TMEM16A and 16B are important for regulating epithelial mucus secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, olfactory transduction, and cell proliferation. Whether and how the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of TMEM16A and 16B channels has been controversial and the subject of an ongoing debate. Recently, using a bioengineering approach termed ChIMP (Channel Inactivation induced by Membrane-tethering of an associated Protein) we argued that Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM) is pre-associated with functioning TMEM16A and 16B channel complexes in live cells. Further, the pre-associated apoCaM mediates Ca2+-dependent sensitization of activation (CDSA) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of some TMEM16A splice variants. In this review, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent results relating to Ca2+-dependent regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels and the putative role of CaM. We further discuss potential future directions for these nascent ideas on apoCaM regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels, noting that such future efforts will benefit greatly from the pioneering work of Dr. David T. Yue and colleagues on CaM regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. PMID:26083059

  18. Permeation Mechanisms in the TMEM16B Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Simone

    2017-01-01

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B encode for Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCC) and are expressed in many cell types and play a relevant role in many physiological processes. Here, I performed a site-directed mutagenesis study to understand the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation of TMEM16B. I mutated two positive charged residues R573 and K540, respectively located at the entrance and inside the putative channel pore and I measured the properties of wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK-293 cells using whole-cell and excised inside-out patch clamp experiments. I found evidence that R573 and K540 control the ion permeability of TMEM16B depending both on which side of the membrane the ion substitution occurs and on the level of channel activation. Moreover, these residues contribute to control blockage or activation by permeant anions. Finally, R573 mutation abolishes the anomalous mole fraction effect observed in the presence of a permeable anion and it alters the apparent Ca2+-sensitivity of the channel. These findings indicate that residues facing the putative channel pore are responsible both for controlling the ion selectivity and the gating of the channel, providing an initial understanding of molecular mechanism of ion permeation in TMEM16B.

  19. The electron and energy transfer between oligothiophenes and thieno[3,4-b]thiophene units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarko, Jodi; Guo, Jianchang; Liang, Yongye; Rolczynski, Brian; Yu, Luping; Chen, Lin X.

    2008-08-01

    In a recent study, it has been shown that organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells consisting of polymers with certain stoichiometric ratios of alkyl thiophene:thieno[3,4-b]thiophene monomeric units in random sequences, when combined with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), may have potentials for creating more efficient devices. Such a potential enhancement is mainly due to the light harvesting in most of the visible and near infrared region by these low band-gap polymers. However, very little is known about the photoinduced energy/electron transfer and transport within these copolymers. It is important to understand both the ultrafast interactions between these two monomeric units when they are linked in the copolymers and their interactions with the electron acceptor PCBM in order to determine the transport mechanisms in these systems, and then to create the architectures that optimize electronic transport properties. Therefore, three oligomer molecules have been synthesized to model the local interactions in the copolymers, each of which consists of a thieno[3,4-b] thiophene derivative at its center linked with two alkyl oligothiophene side units. The alkyl oligothiophene units for the three molecules are 2, 4, or 8 units in length. By performing transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion measurements, the nature of the early exciton diffusion and energy transfer between these different units is elucidated.

  20. Kepler View of the Galaxy

    NASA Video Gallery

    Our Sun is just one out of over 200 billion stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way. The Sun is located in the Orion arm of our galaxy about 75,000 light years from the center of the Galaxy. Kepler will...

  1. Canonical Transformations of Kepler Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, canonical transformations generated by constants of motion in the case of the Kepler problem are discussed. It is shown that canonical transformations generated by angular momentum are rotations of the trajectory. Particular attention is paid to canonical transformations generated by the Runge-Lenz vector. It is shown that these…

  2. The Kepler Full Frame Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's exoplanet discovery mission Kepler provides uninterrupted 1-min and 30-min optical photometry of a 100 square degree field over a 3.5 yr nominal mission. Downlink bandwidth is filled at these short cadences by selecting only detector pixels specific to 105 preselected stellar targets. The majority of the Kepler field, comprising 4 x 10(exp 6) m_v < 20 sources, is sampled at much lower 1-month cadence in the form of a full-frame image. The Full Frame Images (FFIs) are calibrated by the Science Operations Center at NASA Ames Research Center. The Kepler Team employ these images for astrometric and photometric reference but make the images available to the astrophysics community through the Multimission Archive at STScI (MAST). The full-frame images provide a resource for potential Kepler Guest Observers to select targets and plan observing proposals, while also providing a freely-available long-cadence legacy of photometric variation across a swathe of the Galactic disk.

  3. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  4. [A novel pyridazino-fused ring system: synthesis of pyridazino[3,4-b]diazepam].

    PubMed

    Károlyházy, L; Horváth, G; Mátyus, P

    2001-08-01

    As an analogue of pyridazino-fused ring systems with pharmacological activities, the novel pyridazinol[3,4-b][1,5]diazepine ring system was prepared. The synthetic pathway includes three steps from 4 5-(N-benzyl-N-3-hydroxypropyl)amino derivative which is easily available through nucleophilic substitution reaction of the known 4,5-dichloro-2-methyl-6-nitro-3(2H)-pyridazinone (2) with N-benzyl-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)amine. In the first step, compound 4 was treated with thionyl chloride to give the chloropropyl derivative 5. In the second step, a Bechamp reduction was carried out with Fe in acetic acid to obtain the amino compound 6, and finally the ring closure reaction of 6 was performed in N,N-dimethylformamide in the presence of potassium carbonate at 110 degrees C for 40 hours. In this way the bicyclic compound 7 could be isolated in 48% yield.

  5. Kepler 453 b - The 10th Kepler Transiting Circumbinary Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Short, Donald R.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Brugamyer, Erik; Haghighipour, Nader; Buchhave, Lars A.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius; Kane, Stephen R.; Kostov, Veselin; Mazeh, Tsevi; Mills, Sean M.; Müller, Tobias W. A.; Quarles, Billy; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H.; Tal-Or, Lev; Torres, Guillermo; Windmiller, Gur; Borucki, William J.

    2015-08-01

    We present the discovery of Kepler-453 b, a 6.2 {R}\\oplus planet in a low-eccentricity, 240.5 day orbit about an eclipsing binary. The binary itself consists of a 0.94 and 0.195 {M}⊙ pair of stars with an orbital period of 27.32 days. The plane of the planet's orbit is rapidly precessing, and its inclination only becomes sufficiently aligned with the primary star in the latter portion of the Kepler data. Thus three transits are present in the second half of the light curve, but none of the three conjunctions that occurred during the first half of the light curve produced observable transits. The precession period is ˜103 years, and during that cycle, transits are visible only ˜8.9% of the time. This has the important implication that for every system like Kepler-453 that we detect, there are ˜11.5 circumbinary systems that exist but are not currently exhibiting transits. The planet's mass is too small to noticeably perturb the binary, and consequently its mass is not measurable with these data; however, our photodynamical model places a 1σ upper limit of 16 {M}\\oplus . With a period 8.8 times that of the binary, the planet is well outside the dynamical instability zone. It does, however, lie within the habitable zone of the binary, making it the third of 10 Kepler circumbinary planets to do so. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  6. Rediscovering Kepler's Third Law using NASA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Jason; Springsteen, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Kepler's three laws of planetary motion were discovered around four hundred years ago using data that was meticulously gathered by Tycho Brahe through naked eye observations. Here we will show that the same Kepler's result illustrated in his third planetary law still holds today, by using modern data from NASA. In addition, we discuss how all three of Kepler's laws of planetary motion can be derived directly from Newton's Gravitational law.

  7. Advances in exoplanet science from Kepler.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Jack J; Dawson, Rebekah I; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-09-18

    Numerous telescopes and techniques have been used to find and study extrasolar planets, but none has been more successful than NASA's Kepler space telescope. Kepler has discovered most of the known exoplanets, the smallest planets to orbit normal stars and the planets most likely to be similar to Earth. Most importantly, Kepler has provided us with our first look at the typical characteristics of planets and planetary systems for planets with sizes as small as, and orbits as large as, those of Earth.

  8. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA`s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  9. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.; Duren, R.; Frerking, M.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the Sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  10. KELT-16b: A Highly Irradiated, Ultra-short Period Hot Jupiter Nearing Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Thomas E.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Colón, Knicole D.; Angerhausen, Daniel; Bieryla, Allyson; Ngo, Henry; Stevens, Daniel J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Penev, Kaloyan; Mawet, Dimitri; Latham, David W.; Heintz, Tyler M.; Osei, Baffour W.; Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Visgaitis, Tiffany; Reed, Phillip A.; Escamilla, Alejandra; Yazdi, Sormeh; McLeod, Kim K.; Lunsford, Leanne T.; Spencer, Michelle; Joner, Michael D.; Gregorio, Joao; Gaillard, Clement; Matt, Kyle; Dumont, Mary Thea; Stephens, Denise C.; Cohen, David H.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Bozza, Valerio; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Siverd, Robert J.; Lund, Michael B.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Eastman, Jason D.; Penny, Matthew T.; Manner, Mark; Zambelli, Roberto; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Stockdale, Christopher; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Pogge, Richard W.; Gould, Andrew; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2017-03-01

    We announce the discovery of KELT-16b, a highly irradiated, ultra-short period hot Jupiter transiting the relatively bright (V = 11.7) star TYC 2688-1839-1/KELT-16. A global analysis of the system shows KELT-16 to be an F7V star with {T}{eff}=6236+/- 54 K, {log}{g}\\star ={4.253}-0.036+0.031, [{Fe}/{{H}}]=-{0.002}-0.085+0.086, {M}\\star ={1.211}-0.046+0.043 {M}ȯ , and {R}\\star ={1.360}-0.053+0.064{R}ȯ . The planet is a relatively high-mass inflated gas giant with {M}{{P}}={2.75}-0.15+0.16{M}{{J}}, {R}{{P}}={1.415}-0.067+0.084{R}{{J}}, density {ρ }{{P}}=1.20+/- 0.18 g cm‑3, surface gravity {log} {g}{{P}}={3.530}-0.049+0.042, and {T}{eq}={2453}-47+55 K. The best-fitting linear ephemeris is {T}{{C}}=2457247.24791+/- 0.00019 {{BJD}}{TDB} and P=0.9689951+/- 0.0000024 day. KELT-16b joins WASP-18b, ‑19b, ‑43b, ‑103b, and HATS-18b as the only giant transiting planets with P < 1 day. Its ultra-short period and high irradiation make it a benchmark target for atmospheric studies by the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer, and eventually the James Webb Space Telescope. For example, as a hotter, higher-mass analog of WASP-43b, KELT-16b may feature an atmospheric temperature–pressure inversion and day-to-night temperature swing extreme enough for TiO to rain out at the terminator. KELT-16b could also join WASP-43b in extending tests of the observed mass–metallicity relation of the solar system gas giants to higher masses. KELT-16b currently orbits at a mere ∼1.7 Roche radii from its host star, and could be tidally disrupted in as little as a few ×105 years (for a stellar tidal quality factor of {Q}* \\prime ={10}5). Finally, the likely existence of a widely separated bound stellar companion in the KELT-16 system makes it possible that Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations played a role in driving KELT-16b inward to its current precarious orbit.

  11. Downregulation of microRNA-34b is responsible for the elevation of blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Li, Haiyu; Du, Youyou; Shi, Qiangwei; Zhao, Luosha

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the microRNA (miRNA) responsible for the development of primary hypertension, and examine the downstream signaling pathway, which mediates the effect of the miRNA. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to identify which miRNA may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In silico analysis and a luciferase assay were used to validate the target of the selected miRNA, and miRNA mimics and small interfering (si)RNA of the target were transfected into smooth muscle cells to examine its effect on the biological activity of the cells. miR-34b was found to be upregulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), compared with Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Therefore, the present study used online miRNA target prediction tools to predict the candidate target genes of miR-34b in the database, and consequently identified cyclin G1 (CCNG1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) as its possible target genes. CDK6 subsequently identified to be the direct target gene of miR-34b using a luciferase reporter assay in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The present study also established the possible negative regulatory association between miR-34b and CDK6 via investigating the mRNA and protein expression levels of CDK6 and CCNG1 in VSMCs collected from the SHRs and WKY rats, respectively. To investigate the signaling pathways between miR-34b and CDK6, the mRNA and protein expression levels of CDK6, and the proliferation rates were compared in VSMCs transfected with CDK6 siRNA or miR-34b mimics, the results of which indicated that the miR-34b mimics exerted the same effects on the expression of CDK6 and cell proliferation as CDK6 siRNA. The negative regulatory association between miR-34b and its target, CDK6, was confirmed, which may offer potential as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:28098882

  12. Kepler Observations of Transiting Hot Compact Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    stars. The dark blue points show the first five Kepler extrasolar planets (Borucki et al. 2010a). The red diamonds indicate the Earth, Uranus , Neptune...masses and radii are shown in green. Kepler transiting planets are shown in blue. The positions of the Earth, Uranus , Neptune, Saturn, Jupiter, and the

  13. Intramolecular cycloaddition reactions of furo[3,4-b]indoles for alkaloid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Padwa, Albert; Zou, Yan; Cheng, Bo; Li, Hao; Downer-Riley, Nadale; Straub, Christopher S

    2014-04-04

    Model studies dealing with the Cu(II)- or Rh(II)-catalyzed carbenoid cyclization/cycloaddition cascade of several α-diazo indolo amido esters have been carried out as an approach to the alkaloid scandine. The Cu(II)-catalyzed reaction of an α-diazo indolo diester that contains a tethered oxa-pentenyl side chain was found to give rise to a reactive benzo[c]furan which undergoes a subsequent [4 + 2]-cycloaddition across the tethered π-bond. The reaction proceeds by the initial generation of a copper carbenoid intermediate which cyclizes onto the adjacent carbonyl group to give a reactive benzo[c]furan which in certain cases can be isolated. Disappointingly, the analogous reaction with the related amido indolo ester failed to take place, even when the tethered π-bond contained an electron-withdrawing carbomethoxy group. It would seem that the geometric requirements for the intramolecular cycloaddition of the furo[3,4-b]indole system with the tethered π-bond imposes distinct restrictions upon the bond angles of the reacting centers to prevent the cycloaddition reaction from occurring. However, the incorporation of another carbonyl group on the nitrogen atom of the tethered alkenyl diazo amido indolo ester seemingly provides better orbital overlap between the reacting π-systems and allows the desired cycloaddition reaction to occur.

  14. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonomo, A. S.; Almenara, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    As CoRoT, the Kepler space mission found a large amount of planetary transit candidates for which radial velocity follow-up is necessary in order to establish the planetary nature and then, to characterize the mass of the transiting companion. We are following up some interesting Kepler candidates with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted at the 1.93-m telescope in Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). More than one year after the first Kepler release, we will present the strategy used to select the most promising Kepler candidates, within reach of a detection with SOPHIE, using the experience of more than 4 years of CoRoT, SWASP and HAT radial velocity follow-up. We will also highlight the results of the first year of observations that led to the discovery of several new transiting exoplanets and help the understanding of the false positive rate of the Kepler mission.

  15. Planet Detection: The Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2012-03-01

    The search for exoplanets is one of the hottest topics in astronomy and astrophysics in the twenty-first century, capturing the public's attention as well as that of the astronomical community. This nascent field was conceived in 1989 with the discovery of a candidate planetary companion to HD114762 [35] and was born in 1995 with the discovery of the first extrasolar planet 51 Peg-b [37] orbiting a main sequence star. As of March, 2011, over 500 exoplanets have been discovered* and 106 are known to transit or cross their host star, as viewed from Earth. Of these transiting planets, 15 have been announced by the Kepler Mission, which was launched into an Earth-trailing, heliocentric orbit in March, 2009 [1,4,6,15,18,20,22,31,32,34,36,43]. In addition, over 1200 candidate transiting planets have already been detected by Kepler [5], and vigorous follow-up observations are being conducted to vet these candidates. As the false-positive rate for Kepler is expected to be quite low [39], Kepler has effectively tripled the number of known exoplanets. Moreover, Kepler will provide an unprecedented data set in terms of photometric precision, duration, contiguity, and number of stars. Kepler's primary science objective is to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets transiting their Sun-like host stars in the habitable zone, that range of orbital distances for which liquid water would pool on the surface of a terrestrial planet such as Earth, Mars, or Venus. This daunting task demands an instrument capable of measuring the light output from each of over 100,000 stars simultaneously with an unprecedented photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) at 6.5-h intervals. The large number of stars is required because the probability of the geometrical alignment of planetary orbits that permit observation of transits is the ratio of the size of the star to the size of the planetary orbit. For Earth-like planets in 1-astronomical unit (AU) orbits† about sun-like stars

  16. The host stars of Kepler's habitable exoplanets: superflares, rotation and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pugh, C. E.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Brown, D. J. A.; Lund, M. N.; Osborn, H. P.; Pollacco, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a detailed study of the light curves of Kepler's most Earth-like exoplanet host stars using the full length of Kepler data. We derive rotation periods, photometric activity indices, flaring energies, mass-loss rates, gyrochronological ages, X-ray luminosities and consider implications for the planetary magnetospheres and habitability. Furthermore, we present the detection of superflares in the light curve of Kepler-438, the exoplanet with the highest Earth Similarity Index to date. Kepler-438b orbits at a distance of 0.166 au to its host star, and hence may be susceptible to atmospheric stripping. Our sample is taken from the Habitable Exoplanet Catalogue, and consists of the stars Kepler-22, Kepler-61, Kepler-62, Kepler-174, Kepler-186, Kepler-283, Kepler-296, Kepler-298, Kepler-438, Kepler-440, Kepler-442, Kepler-443 and KOI-4427, between them hosting 15 of the most habitable transiting planets known to date from Kepler.

  17. KEPLER Mission: development and overview.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J

    2016-03-01

    The Kepler Mission is a space observatory launched in 2009 by NASA to monitor 170,000 stars over a period of four years to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, the size and orbital distributions of these planets, and the types of stars they orbit. Kepler is the tenth in the series of NASA Discovery Program missions that are competitively-selected, PI-directed, medium-cost missions. The Mission concept and various instrument prototypes were developed at the Ames Research Center over a period of 18 years starting in 1983. The development of techniques to do the 10 ppm photometry required for Mission success took years of experimentation, several workshops, and the exploration of many 'blind alleys' before the construction of the flight instrument. Beginning in 1992 at the start of the NASA Discovery Program, the Kepler Mission concept was proposed five times before its acceptance for mission development in 2001. During that period, the concept evolved from a photometer in an L2 orbit that monitored 6000 stars in a 50 sq deg field-of-view (FOV) to one that was in a heliocentric orbit that simultaneously monitored 170,000 stars with a 105 sq deg FOV. Analysis of the data to date has detected over 4600 planetary candidates which include several hundred Earth-size planetary candidates, over a thousand confirmed planets, and Earth-size planets in the habitable zone (HZ). These discoveries provide the information required for estimates of the frequency of planets in our galaxy. The Mission results show that most stars have planets, many of these planets are similar in size to the Earth, and that systems with several planets are common. Although planets in the HZ are common, many are substantially larger than Earth.

  18. Thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-Based Novel Small-Molecule Optoelectronic Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Xiaozhang

    2017-04-04

    Because of the tailorable photoelectric properties derived from judicious molecular design and large-area and low-temperature processability especially on flexible substrates, design and synthesis of new organic π-functional materials is always a central topic in the field of organic optoelectronics, which siginificantly contributed to the development of high-performance optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Compared with polymers, small molecules with well-defined molecular structures benefit the establishment of structure-property relationships, which may provide valuable guidelines for the design of new optoelectronic materials to further promote the device performance. New building blocks are essential for the construction of optoelectronic materials. As is well recognized, thiophene-based functional materials have played an indispensable role in the development of organic optoelectronics. Compared with six-membered benzene, five-membered thiophene shows weaker aromaticity and lower steric hindrance and may provide extra sulfur-sulfur interactions in solid state. Among various thiophene building blocks, thieno[3,4-b]thiophene (TbT) is an asymmetric fused bithiophene containing four functionalization positions, in which the proaromatic thiophene can effectively stabilize the quinoidal resonance of the aromatic thiophene. Thus, TbT exhibits a unique characteristic of quinoid-resonance effect that is powerful to modulate electronic structures. Although the application of TbT in polymer donor materials represented by PTB-7 has achieved a great success, its application in small-molecule optoelectronic materials is almost an untouched field. In this Account, we summerize the rational design of a series of TbT-based small-molecule optoelectronic materials designed and optimized by quinoid-resonance effect, regiochemistry, and side-chain engineering and demonstrate the crucial effect of TbT building blocks on the electronic structures, photophysical and charge transport properties, and photovoltaic performance. With well-defined regioregular oligothieno[3,4-b]thiopenes, we revealed the quinoid-resonance effect of the TbT moiety and its geometric origin. TbT-based small molecules exhibit full-color tunable emissions in the visible to near-infrared regions and excellent performance in OFETs and OPVs. For instance, TbT-based quinoidal molecules with near-infrared fluorescence quantum yields up to 53.1% and TbT-based aromatic molecules with full-color-tunable emissions and high fluorescence quantum yields approaching 100% in polar solvent were designed and synthesized. Solution-processable ambient-stable n-channel organic thin-film transistors based on two-dimensional π-expanded quinoidal terthiophenes with distal or proximal sulfur orientations (2DQTTs) realized a record electron mobility of 5.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Furthermore, TbT-based electron donor and electron acceptor materials were successfully designed for OPV applications delivering high power conversion efficiencies up to 9.26% and 10.07%, respectively. We believe that new TbT-based small-molecule materials designed by a synergy of molecular engineering strategy may not only further promote OFET and OPV performance but also realize more unique applications.

  19. From Kepler problem to skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Ghizdovăt, Vlad

    2016-05-01

    The classical treatment of the Kepler problem leaves room for the description of the space region of the central body by a hyperbolic geometry. If the correspondence between the empty space and the space filled with matter is taken to be a harmonic mapping, then the region of atomic nucleus, like the one of the Sun for the planetary system proper, is described by hyperbolic skyrmions. This fact makes possible the description of the nuclear matter within framework of general relativity. The classical “hedgehog” solution for skyrmions can then be classically interpreted in terms of the characterizations of intra-nuclear forces.

  20. Kepler as a Binary Star Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Rosanne

    2010-12-01

    The Kepler observatory was designed to discover transits by Earth-like planets orbiting Sun-like stars. Its first major discoveries, however, are hot objects in close orbits around main-sequence stars. These are likely to be white-dwarf remnants of stars that have transferred mass to the present-day main sequence stars. These particular main-sequence stars are among the Kepler targets because they are bright. The question is: how many of the other Kepler target stars are also orbited by white dwarfs? We have shown that several hundred white dwarfs are likely to transit the Kepler target stars during the mission. In some cases, the signature will be dominated by gravitational lensing, producing distinctive ``antitransits''. Neutron stars and black holes may also be discovered this way. The lensing signature provides a measurement of the gravitational mass of the compact object. Through the discovery of both transits and antitransits caused by white dwarfs, Kepler will discover and study binaries that have already experienced a phase of mass transfer or a common envelope phase. Thus, Kepler will become a premier tool for the study of interacting binaries. During the next phase of interaction, some of the Kepler binaries may become nuclear-burning white dwarfs, and may be candidates for Type Ia supernovae or accretion-induced collapse.

  1. We Do Not Forget Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wszołek, B.

    2009-12-01

    Year 2009 was announced as the International Year of Astronomy. This was to mark 400th anniversary of the first astronomical observation through a telescope by Galileo. From the other hand, this year marks 400th anniversary of Astronomia Nova, the famous work of Kepler published in Prague in 1609. Two laws of planetary motions opened human efforts to understand gravitational force; so the overall cosmic space conquest, with its great importance not only for astronomy, was developed thankful to Kepler's work. This contribution is thought to show the most inspiring ideas of Johannes Kepler, published in Astronomia Nova and in other his books.

  2. Kepler Stars with Multiple Transiting Planet Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Kepler spacecraft was launched into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit in March of 2009. Kepler is designed to conduct a statistical census of planetary system properties using transit photometry. Among the most exciting early results from Kepler are target stars found to have photometric signatures that suggest the presence of more than one transiting planet. Individual transiting planets provide information on the size and orbital period distributions of exoplanets. Multiple transiting planets provide additional information on the spacing and flatness distributions of planetary systems. Results to d ate and plans for future analysis will be presented.

  3. MiR-34b-3 and miR-449a inhibit malignant progression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by targeting lactate dehydrogenase A

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiling; Li, Xiaoling; Ge, Xiaolu; Jia, Liqing; Zhang, Zhezhe; Fang, Renpeng; Yang, Jing; Liu, Jianpin; Peng, Shuping; Zhou, Ming; Xiang, Juanjuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Wen; Xiong, Wei; Xiao, Gaoming; Fang, Li; Li, Gui-yuan; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA expression profiling assays have shown that miR-34b/c and miR-449a are down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC); however, the targets and functions of miR-34b/c and miR-449a in the pathologenesis of NPC remain elusive. In this study, we verified miR-34b/c and miR-449a were significantly reduced with the advance of NPC. Overexpression of miR-34b-3 and miR-449a suppressed the growth of NPC cells in culture and mouse tumor xenografts. Using tandem mass tags for quantitative labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to investigate protein changes after restoring expression of miR-34b-3, 251 proteins were found to be down-regulated after miR-34b-3 transfection. Through 3 replicate experiments, we found that miR-34b-3 regulated the expression of 15 potential targeted genes mainly clustered in the key enzymes of glycolysis metabolism, including lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA). Further investigation revealed that miR-34b-3 and miR-449a negatively regulated LDHA by binding to the 3′ untranslated regions of LDHA. Furthermore, LDHA overexpression rescued the miR-34b-3 and miR-449a induced tumor inhibition effect in CNE2 cells. In addition, miR-34b-3 and miR-449a suppressed LDH activity and reduced LD content, which were directly induced by downregulation of the LDHA. Our findings suggest that miR-34b-3 and miR-449a suppress the development of NPC through regulation of glycolysis via targeting LDHA and may be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of NPC. PMID:27458165

  4. Kepler's winding Path to true Heliocentrism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Volker

    The paper concerns the evolution of concepts by Johannes Kepler from Aristotelian conception of the Universe to Heliocentrism. Already as young Magister in Tubingen Kepler has taken an active part in Physical disputations of the candidates and has defended the doctrines of Copernik (1). In the Mysterium Cosmographicum he refers the planetary distances no longer to the center of the earth's orbit, but to the center of the true sun. But just by working out his Astronomia Nova Kepler succeeds in creating a strictly heliocentric astronomy as his handwriting Manuscripts give detailed information (2). Notes: 1) fragmentum orations de motu terrae. In Keppler Gesammelte werke Vol. 20.1, Munich 1988, p. 147-149 2) Commentaria in Theoriam Martis. Edition in: Kepler Gessamelete Werke Vol. 20.2 (in preparation)

  5. Kepler Discovers Earth-size Planet Candidates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Five of th...

  6. Comparison of the Kepler and Eddington Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Kepler and Eddington missions are spaceborne photometric missions with similar apertures. Both are capable of finding Earth-size extrasolar planets and both can detect p-mode oscillations in stars. The Kepler mission is optimized to find Earth-size planets in the habitability zone of Solar-like stars and does astroseismology only as incidental science. The Eddington mission appears to be optimized for astroseismology. The Kepler design provides a very large field of view, a low measurement cadence, a heliocentric orbit, and a long mission duration. The demand for a large field-of-view results in a Schmidt design with a massive corrector. However, the use of the corrector allows a 105 square degree FOV and thereby provides 15 times the number of stars at a given magnitude than does the optical design used in Eddington. Because Kepler stares at a single FOV throughout the mission, it does much less astroseismology than Eddington. Other comparisons are also discussed.

  7. Kepler Systems That Show Multiple Transiting Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Exoplanetary systems that have multiple transiting planets provide unique and important insight into the formation, evolution, and dynamics of exoplanetary systems. Kepler has announced the discovery of a confirmed planetary system with multiple transiting planets (Kepler 9, Holman et al. 2010) as well as several candidate planetary systems that show multiple transiting objects (Steffen et al. 2010). Kepler 9 shows deviations from a constant period due to the ongoing dynamical interactions between the confirmed planets. From these transit timing variations (TTV) one can measure the planetary masses from the photometric data alone. The presence of several systems with multiple transiting candidates from the first quarter of data indicate that Kepler should continue to find systems with multiple transiting planets. Such systems will provide important, general information about the histories of planetary systems.

  8. Kepler's Cosmos And The Lathe Of Heaven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Johannes Kepler's Mysterium Cosmographicum, published in 1596, presented his vision of the geometrical structure of the solar system. Kepler sought to account for the number of planets, thought to be six, as well as their orbital radii. He assigned orbits to the planets in three-dimensional space. Kepler proposed that the planets move on six spheres inscribed within and circumscribed around the five platonic solids. How did he arrive at his model? By his own account reported in the book, the central idea occurred to him while giving a lecture about planetary conjunctions. But was this revelation the origin of the model? In this presentation, we discuss the artistic, scientific and mathematical environment in which Kepler was immersed in late 16th century Europe. Examples will be shown of some of the readily available inscribed polyhedra that he may have seen - printed in widely circulated books, included in well-known paintings and engravings, and displayed as three dimensional ornamentally turned sculptures. It is highly likely that he saw such physical models five years later while in the employ of Rudolf II who was an avid ornamental turner. Layered polyhedral ivory turnings were made by the nobility with what were then fairly common lathes. Kepler himself wanted to have his own celestial model made into a punch bowl! Therefore, it seems plausible that Kepler had seen models of inscribed platonic solids well before 1596. Later in life Kepler reprinted the Mysterium Cosmographicum with very little fundamental change in its outlook, even after having found what we now call Kepler's three laws of planetary motion. His interest in nested polyhedra may well have preceded any astronomical evidence or geometrical reasoning, arising from artistic and aesthetic encounters that occurred early in his life. Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  9. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James; Frerking, Margaret; Duren, Riley

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA s first mission capable of detecting Earthsize planets orbiting in Habitable Zone of Sun-like stars. Objective is to measure how frequently planets of various sizes and orbits form around stars in the Milky Way. Kepler detects planets by measuring drop in brightness of star due to "transit" of a planet Earth-size planet transiting Sunlike star causes drop in brightness of only 84 parts per million

  10. Kepler Reliability and Occurrence Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler mission has produced tables of exoplanet candidates (``KOI table''), as well as tables of transit detections (``TCE table''), hosted at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu). Transit detections in the TCE table that are plausibly due to a transiting object are selected for inclusion in the KOI table. KOI table entries that have not been identified as false positives (FPs) or false alarms (FAs) are classified as planet candidates (PCs, Mullally et al. 2015). A subset of PCs have been confirmed as planetary transits with greater than 99% probability, but most PCs have <99% probability of being true planets. The fraction of PCs that are true transiting planets is the PC reliability rate. The overall PC population is believed to have a reliability rate >90% (Morton & Johnson 2011).

  11. Analyzing Kepler lightcurves of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulz, Shannon Diane; Reed, Mike

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler space telescope successfully found thousands of exoplanets. The next step is characterizing what those planets are like. Additional processing of the light curves and meticulous removal of spacecraft artifacts from the data such as pointing adjustments, safing events and thermal variations, may yield more information on the features of exoplanet systems. Bond albedo can be measured from the exoplanet's day-side flux contribution prior to secondary eclipse and asymmetries in the day-side contribution may indicate thermal asymmetries driven by motion in the planet's atmosphere. Transit timing variations indicate non-circular or precessing orbits, potentially due to a non-transiting third body, which influence the planetary environment and atmosphere. We investigated transit timing variations and day-side flux contributions of an exoplanet.

  12. The Kepler Project: Mission Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Kepler is a Discovery-class mission designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone of solar-like stars. The instrument consists of a 0.95 m aperture photometer designed to obtain high precision photometric measurement of > 100,000 stars to search for patterns of transits. The focal plane of the Schmidt-telescope contains 42 CCDs with at total of 95 mega pixels that cover 116 square degrees of sky. The photometer was launched into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit on March 6, 2009, finished its commissioning on May 12, and is now in the science operations mode. During the commissioning of the Kepler photometer, data were obtained at a 30 minute cadence for 53,000 stars for 9.7 days. Although the data have not yet been corrected for the presence of systematic errors and artifacts, the data show the presence of hundreds of eclipsing binary stars and variable stars of amazing variety. To provide some estimate of the capability of the photometer, a quick analysis of the photometric precision was made. Analysis of the commissioning data also show transits, occultations and light emitted from the known exoplanet HAT-P7b. The data show a smooth rise and fall of light: from the planet as it orbits its star, punctuated by a drop of 130 +/- 11 ppm in flux when the planet passes behind its star. We interpret this as the phase variation of the dayside thermal emission plus reflected light from the planet as it orbits its star and is occulted. The depth of the occultation is similar in amplitude to that expected from a transiting Earth-size planet and demonstrates that the Mission has the precision necessary to detect such planets.

  13. Discourse following award of Kepler Gold Medal. [Kepler Laws, planetary astronomy and physics, and Jupiter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Kuiper briefly reviews Kepler's contributions to the field of planetary astronomy and physics, along with references to his own background in the study of stars, planets, and the solar system. He mentions his participation in NASA programs related to planetary astronomy. He concludes his remarks with thanks for being honored by the award of the Kepler Gold Medal.

  14. Kepler, Galilei, the telescope and the consequences. (German Title: Kepler, Galilei, das Fernrohr und die Folgen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Karsten; Hamel, Jürgen

    The papers of this volume are dedicated to Johannes Kepler, the astronomy of his time, and the consequences of his researches. They deal with the reception on the Copernican system of the world at the court of landgrave William IV in Kassel and the use of astronomy at a princely court in the 16th century, exemplified by the Kassel residence. Two contributions discuss a text fragment in Kepler's Astronomia Nova and the dimensions of the geo- and heliocentric systems of the world in Kepler's Mysterium Cosmographicum. Other contributions deal with mathematical aspects un Kepler's exchange of letters, the biography of Kepler's discussion partner Ph. Feselius, as well as the early reception of the Tabulae Rudolphinae in the calendar literature, telescopes in Kepler's time, Chr. Scheiner's optical theory of the eye, and finally in the continuation of the heliocentric world system by Otto von Guericke's natural philosophy and science. In conclusion, the documents of the planned call of Kepler to Rostock university, as well as the first publication of a recently found, hitherto unknown letter by Kepler.

  15. COSPAR-16-B0.1/ICEUM12A: Lunar Exploration and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    Lunar science and exploration are having a renaissance with as many as twelve missions (and 18 vehicles) sent to Moon during the last "International Lunar decade". This session is aimed at discussing new progress in lunar science from recent missions, latest science results, newer insight into our understanding of Moon, modelling and synthesis of different scientific data, future missions, and science questions. It will include invited, contributed, and poster papers. Papers on new lunar mission concepts, instrumentation for the future missions, the upcoming lunar decade of landers and lunar robotic village, and preparations for human lunar exploration towards a "Moon Village" are also welcome in this session. COSPAR-16-B0.1 will also be ICEUM12A, part of the 12th International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon from the ILEWG ICEUM series started in 1994.

  16. The VPS33B-binding protein VPS16B is required in megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Denisa; Li, Ling; Christensen, Hilary; Pluthero, Fred G.; Chen, Shao Zun; Puhacz, Michael; Garg, Parvesh M.; Lanka, Kiran K.; Cummings, James J.; Kramer, Helmut; Wasmuth, James D.; Parkinson, John

    2012-01-01

    Patients with platelet α or dense δ-granule defects have bleeding problems. Although several proteins are known to be required for δ-granule development, less is known about α-granule biogenesis. Our previous work showed that the BEACH protein NBEAL2 and the Sec1/Munc18 protein VPS33B are required for α-granule biogenesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, and bioinformatics studies, we identified VPS16B as a VPS33B-binding protein. Immunoblotting confirmed VPS16B expression in various human tissues and cells including megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in megakaryocytic Dami cells. Characterization of platelets from a patient with arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome containing mutations in C14orf133 encoding VPS16B revealed pale-appearing platelets in blood films and electron microscopy revealed a complete absence of α-granules, whereas δ-granules were observed. Soluble and membrane-bound α-granule proteins were reduced or undetectable, suggesting that both releasable and membrane-bound α-granule constituents were absent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Dami cells stably expressing GFP-VPS16B revealed that similar to VPS33B, GFP-VPS16B colocalized with markers of the trans-Golgi network, late endosomes and α-granules. We conclude that VPS16B, similar to its binding partner VPS33B, is essential for megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis. PMID:23002115

  17. A Possible 5th Planet in the Kepler-89 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Andrew; Deck, Katherine; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Christiansen, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    Kepler-89 is a system with four known, transiting planets. We investigate a large discrepancy in the mass of the Jupiter-sized Kepler-89d between previous radial velocity (RV) and transit timing variation (TTV) measurements. We model the TTV data for the system and find evidence of a fifth planet, which we call Kepler-89f, inducing high amplitude TTVs on the outer transiting planet, Kepler-89e. We model the characteristics of this hypothetical planet and investigate how its presence may affect other system parameters, including the mass of Kepler-89d. We also analyze whether future transit observations of Kepler-89e could improve the characterization of Kepler-89f. Lastly, we explore how model results differ between fitting against TTV data versus fitting against raw transit times, and whether this could also be a contributing factor to the discrepancy between RV and TTV measurements of Kepler-89d.

  18. First Multi-Planet System Discovered by Kepler

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler Mission has discovered the first confirmed planetary system with more than one planet transiting the same star. The announcement of the discovery of the two planets, Kepler 9b and 9c,...

  19. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    NASA's Kepler mission is the source of more exoplanets than any other instrument, but the discovery depends on complex statistical analysis procedures embedded in the Kepler pipeline. A particular challenge is mitigating irregular stellar variability without loss of sensitivity to faint periodic planetary transits. This proposal presents a two-stage alternative analysis procedure. First, parametric autoregressive ARFIMA models, commonly used in econometrics, remove most of the stellar variations. Second, a novel matched filter is used to create a periodogram from which transit-like periodicities are identified. This analysis procedure, the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS), is confirming most of the Kepler Objects of Interest and is expected to identify additional planetary candidates. The proposed research will complete application of the KARPS methodology to the prime Kepler mission light curves of 200,000: stars, and compare the results with Kepler Objects of Interest obtained with the Kepler pipeline. We will then conduct a variety of astronomical studies based on the KARPS results. Important subsamples will be extracted including Habitable Zone planets, hot super-Earths, grazing-transit hot Jupiters, and multi-planet systems. Groundbased spectroscopy of poorly studied candidates will be performed to better characterize the host stars. Studies of stellar variability will then be pursued based on KARPS analysis. The autocorrelation function and nonstationarity measures will be used to identify spotted stars at different stages of autoregressive modeling. Periodic variables with folded light curves inconsistent with planetary transits will be identified; they may be eclipsing or mutually-illuminating binary star systems. Classification of stellar variables with KARPS-derived statistical properties will be attempted. KARPS procedures will then be applied to archived K2 data to identify planetary transits and characterize stellar variability.

  20. Teaching Kepler's Laws as More than Empirical Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Ellis D.

    2002-01-01

    At the pre-college and first-year college level of physics instruction, Kepler's laws are generally taught as empirical laws of nature. Introductory physics textbooks only derive Kepler's Second law of areas. It is possible to derive all of Kepler's laws mathematically from the conservation laws, employing only high-school algebra and geometry.…

  1. Irregular Variability In Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecker, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The transit method is the most successful tool for exoplanet discovery to date. With more than half of all known exoplanets discovered by Kepler using this method, the mission also revealed a number of objects with dimming events that defy the common explanations, the most prominent being KIC 8462852 aka ``Tabby's star''. I embarked on a search for objects with such irregular transit signatures in the data of K2, the two-wheeled successor mission of Kepler. My method is a combination of automated pre-selection of targets showing downward flux excursions and visual light curve inspection of the selected subset comprising about SI{1.5}% of the initial sample. In addition, I developed a tool to constrain the effective temperature of a planet-hosting star from photometry alone. This software finds broad application in any science case where a photometric spectral type estimate is necessary. I used existing transit models and Bayesian inference to perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of a planetary candidate I discovered. This putative gas giant is in a SI{1.32}day circular orbit with an exceptionally tight orbital radius of a ≈ 0.012 AU. My analysis revealed a scaled planetary radius of R_{p}/R_star = 0.0927±0.0026 and an edge-on orientation with an inclination i=89.8+3.0-3.4. EPIC 217393088.01 is one of the closest-orbiting exoplanets ever detected and the first giant planet with such a small orbital radius. An additional major finding of my search is EPIC 220262993, which exhibits aperiodic, asymmetric dips in flux with rapid dimming rates and up to SI{˜25}% depth, lasting for SIrange{2}{4} day. In previous works based on optical and mid-infrared photometry, this object was inconsistently classified as a possible quasar or a white dwarf. We conducted follow-up observations both photometrically with GROND on the MPI/ESO SI{2.2} meter telescope in La Silla (Chile) and spectroscopically with FIRE on the Magellan/Baade SI{6.5} meter telescope. With

  2. HATS-15b and HATS-16b: Two Massive Planets Transiting Old G Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Bakos, G.; Penev, K.; Brahm, R.; Zhou, G.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Suc, V.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Tan, T. G.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved (∼10 Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9 V star (V=14.8 mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of 2.17\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.105\\quad +/- \\quad 0.040 {R}{{J}}, and it completes its orbit in about 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of 3.27\\quad +/- \\quad 0.19 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.30\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {R}{{J}}; it orbits around its G3 V parent star (V=13.8 mag) in ∼2.7 days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days, which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations performed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile, with the Coralie and FEROS spectrographs mounted on the Euler-Swiss and MPG 2.2 m telescopes, respectively. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Keck Telescope. Observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope are used in this paper.

  3. Pri-Mir-34b/C and Tp-53 Polymorphisms are Associated With The Susceptibility of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Sun, Ruifen; Pu, Yan; Bai, Peng; Yuan, Fang; Liang, Yundan; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Yanyun; Sun, Yinghe; Zhu, Jingqiang; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Linbo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumor suppressor p53 directly regulated the abundance of the miR-34b/c. The interaction might contribute to certain cancer. We hypothesized that rs4938723 in the promoter region of pri-miR-34b/c and TP-53 Arg72Pro may be related to the risk of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 784 patients with PTC and 1006 healthy controls were recruited to participate in this study. The variants were discriminated using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). Additionally, the relative expression levels of miR-34b/c and TP-53 in 44 paired samples were revealed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). A significantly increased risk of PTC was observed in the miR-34b/c rs4938723 CT, CC, and CT/CC genotypes compared with the TT genotype (CT vs TT: adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.51, 95%confidence interval [CI] = 1.23–1.85; CC vs TT: adjusted OR = 1.89, 95%CI = 1.39–2.63; CT/CC vs TT: adjusted OR = 1.59, 95%CI = 1.30–1.92, respectively). Significantly increased PTC susceptibility was also associated with the TP-53 Arg72Pro CC and CG/CC genotypes compared with the GG genotype (CC vs GG: adjusted OR = 2.04, 95%CI = 1.54–2.70; CG/CC vs GG: adjusted OR = 1.35, 95%CI = 1.11–1.67, respectively). Stratification analysis revealed that patients carrying the TP-53 Arg72Pro C allele and CC genotype had a significantly increased risk for developing N1 (C vs. G: OR = 1.27, 95%CI = 1.03–1.56; CC vs. GG: OR = 1.62, 95%CI = 1.07–2.46, respectively). Combined analysis showed that the genotypes of rs4938723 CT/CC + TP-53CG/CC increased the risk of PTC compared with rs4938723TT + TP-53GG (OR = 2.25, 95%CI = 1.67–3.03). Additionally, level of miR-34b was significantly upregulated in PTC patients. These findings indicate that the miR-34b/c rs4938723 and TP-53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms may contribute to the

  4. Johannes Kepler and the Supernova of 1604

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boner, P. J.

    2006-08-01

    The brilliant luminary that first appeared in October 1604 was considered by many contemporaries to be a new star of unrivalled magnitude. Shining forth near the historic conjunction of Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, the new star held important implications for several areas of interest, notably astrology, astronomy, chronology and theology. Addressing all of these areas in his comprehensive book, De stella nova (1606), Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) studied the new star extensively under the aegis of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II (1552-1612) in Prague. The focus of the following presentation is Kepler's theory of the new star's origins in the celestial ether. Describing the heavens poetically as a fertile expanse of "liquid fields", Kepler suggested that the new star sprung from the celestial ether much like the numerous living beings in the sublunary realm which were spontaneously generated from the Earth. As evidence for his claim, Kepler pointed to the conspicuous mathematical patterns similarly observed in earthly and celestial entities. Kepler's efficient cause for this explanation, known as the animate faculty, accounted for both the generation and form of new phenomena in the celestial and terrestrial realms. The new star of 1604 proved to be no exception.

  5. DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, T. F.; Howell, S. B.; Petit, V.; Lépine, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present 16 new, and confirm 7 previously identified, DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field through ground-based spectroscopy with the Hale 200″, Kitt Peak 4-m, and Bok 2.3-m telescopes. Using atmospheric models, we determine their effective temperatures and surface gravities to constrain their position with respect to the ZZ Ceti (DA pulsator) instability strip, and look for the presence or absence of pulsation with Kepler's unprecedented photometry. Our results are as follows. (i) From our measurements of temperature and surface gravity, 12 of the 23 DA white dwarfs from this work fall well outside of the instability strip. The Kepler photometry available for 11 of these WDs allows us to confirm that none are pulsating. One of these 11 happens to be a presumed binary, KIC 11604781, with a period of ˜5 d. (ii) The remaining 11 DA white dwarfs are instability strip candidates, potentially falling within the current, empirical instability strip, after accounting for uncertainties. These WDs will help constrain the strip's location further, as eight are near the blue edge and three are near the red edge of the instability strip. Four of these WDs do not have Kepler photometry, so ground-based photometry is needed to determine the pulsation nature of these white dwarfs. The remaining seven have Kepler photometry available, but do not show any periodicity on typical WD pulsation time-scales.

  6. KEPLER MISSION STELLAR AND INSTRUMENT NOISE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Miglio, Andrea; Dunham, Edward W.; Argabright, Vic S.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Buzasi, Derek L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F.

    2011-11-01

    Kepler mission results are rapidly contributing to fundamentally new discoveries in both the exoplanet and asteroseismology fields. The data returned from Kepler are unique in terms of the number of stars observed, precision of photometry for time series observations, and the temporal extent of high duty cycle observations. As the first mission to provide extensive time series measurements on thousands of stars over months to years at a level hitherto possible only for the Sun, the results from Kepler will vastly increase our knowledge of stellar variability for quiet solar-type stars. Here, we report on the stellar noise inferred on the timescale of a few hours of most interest for detection of exoplanets via transits. By design the data from moderately bright Kepler stars are expected to have roughly comparable levels of noise intrinsic to the stars and arising from a combination of fundamental limitations such as Poisson statistics and any instrument noise. The noise levels attained by Kepler on-orbit exceed by some 50% the target levels for solar-type, quiet stars. We provide a decomposition of observed noise for an ensemble of 12th magnitude stars arising from fundamental terms (Poisson and readout noise), added noise due to the instrument and that intrinsic to the stars. The largest factor in the modestly higher than anticipated noise follows from intrinsic stellar noise. We show that using stellar parameters from galactic stellar synthesis models, and projections to stellar rotation, activity, and hence noise levels reproduce the primary intrinsic stellar noise features.

  7. Finding Optimal Apertures in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Robert L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Girouard, Forrest R.

    2016-12-01

    With the loss of two spacecraft reaction wheels precluding further data collection for the Kepler primary mission, even greater pressure is placed on the processing pipeline to eke out every last transit signal in the data. To that end, we have developed a new method to optimize the Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry (SAP) photometric apertures for both planet detection and minimization of systematic effects. The approach uses a per cadence modeling of the raw pixel data and then performs an aperture optimization based on signal-to-noise ratio and the Kepler Combined Differential Photometric Precision (CDPP), which is a measure of the noise over the duration of a reference transit signal. We have found the new apertures to be superior to the previous Kepler apertures. We can now also find a per cadence flux fraction in aperture and crowding metric. The new approach has also been proven to be robust at finding apertures in K2 data that help mitigate the larger motion-induced systematics in the photometry. The method further allows us to identify errors in the Kepler and K2 input catalogs.

  8. Observations of Kepler Habitable Zone Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W. F.; Orosz, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Kepler has recently revealed nine transiting circumbinary planets (CBPs) and a few more candidates are currently being worked on. While few in number, the sample exhibits some interesting trends: i) The Kepler CBPs are not seen in the shortest-period binary systems. ii) The CBPs tend to orbit very close to their host stars. If the planets were much closer, they would experience instabilities due to dynamical interactions with the binary. Excluding the outer planets of the three-planet Kepler-47 system, 9 of 12 systems have semi-major axes within a factor of two of the critical minimum orbit for stability. This tendency to reside near the instability limit is an unsolved problem. iii) As a consequence of their close-in orbits and the spectral types of their host stars, a surprisingly large fraction, roughly ~25%, of the Kepler CBPs lie within the habitable zone. In my talk I will review the observations of Kepler CBPs and will share the latest candidate planet discoveries. I will discuss the highly variable insolation the planets receive due to the binary nature of their host stars, with emphasis on their locations within the habitable zone.

  9. Climate and Habitability of Kepler 452b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongyun; Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Kepler 452b marks a milestone of searching for habitable exoplanets. While simple estimation indicates that Kepler 452b is located in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star, the climate state and habitability of Kepler 452b require detailed studies. Using a three-dimensional fully coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model and assuming an aqua-planet, we perform simulations to demonstrate climate states of Kepler 452b for different greenhouse effects and ice-albedo feedbacks. Our simulations show that sea ice can only invade from poles to about 45 degree in latitude for extremely low levels of CO2 (5 ppmv), and that surface temperature near the equator remains as high as 300 K. For high level of CO2 (0.2 bars), the exoplanet becomes ice free, and tropical surface temperature reaches about 335 K. The results suggest that Kepler 452b is very close to the inner edge of the habitable zone, and that its climate state can readily reach the runaway greenhouse limit as greenhouse concentration is higher.

  10. Image Artifact Flagging in the Kepler Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Bruce; Caldwell, Douglas; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2015-08-01

    Systematic instrument noise in the raw Kepler pixel data includes time-varying crosstalk from the fine guidance sensor (FGS) clock signals, manifestations of drifting moiré pattern as locally correlated nonstationary noise and rolling band artifacts (RBA). The Kepler pipeline module Dynablack produces best fit black level estimates per pixel per cadence by modeling a combination of collateral, FFI, reverse clocked and ARP target data. A search for transit features in the fit residuals identifies spatial regions and time intervals of strong time-varying black level which we identify as RBA. Dynablack produces flags marking these these RBA regions on a per row per cadence basis for several different transit time scales. The Photometric Analysis module (PA) generates per target per cadence data quality flags based on the Dynablack RBA flags which are in turn used by the Data Validation pipeline module (DV) in producing a contamination report associated with each target processed. The Dynablack (per row) RBA flags as well as a proxy for the per target flags produced in PA will be included in the final Kepler data release scheduled to arrive at the MAST in 2016.We detail how the RBA flags are produced in Dynablack, how these are then used to produce the per target quality flags used in DV and discuss why they should be considered when searching for transit signatures in the archived Kepler light curves. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA) human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only inhibited by chlorogenic

  12. Synthesis and characterization of thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine-based terthienyls: tunable precursors for low band gap conjugated materials.

    PubMed

    Schwiderski, Ryan L; Rasmussen, Seth C

    2013-06-07

    Synthetic methods have been developed for the preparation of new 2,3-dihalo- and 2,3-ditriflato-5,7-bis(2-thienyl)thieno[3,4-b]pyrazines. From these reactive intermediates, a variety of new 2,3-difunctionalized 5,7-bis(2-thienyl)thieno[3,4-b]pyrazines have been produced as precursors to conjugated materials. Structural, electronic, and optical characterization of these new analogues illustrate the extent to which the electronic nature of the functional groups can be used to tune the electronic properties of these thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine-based terthienyl units.

  13. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  14. Kepler Mission: A Technical Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer Schmidt-type telescope with an array of 42 CCDs. It has a 0.95 m aperture and 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 2 parts in 10(exp 5) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6 hr transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main-sequence stars from 9th to 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4/hour. An additional 250 stars can be monitored at a cadence of l/minute to do astro-seismology of stars brighter than 11.5 mv. The photometer is scheduled to be launched into heliocentric orbit in 2007. A ground-based program to classify all 225,000 stars in the FOV and to do a detailed examination of a subset of the stars that show planetary companions is also planned.

  15. Variations on the Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    The elliptical orbits resulting from Newtonian gravitation are generated with a multifaceted symmetry, mainly resulting from their conservation of both angular momentum and a vector fixing their orientation in space--the Laplace or Runge-Lenz vector. From the ancient formalisms of celestial mechanics, The author shows a rather counterintuitive behavior of the classical hydrogen atom, whose orbits respond in a direction perpendicular to a weak externally-applied electric field. He then shows how the same results can be obtained more easily and directly from the intrinsic symmetry of the Kepler problem. If the atom is subjected to an oscillating electric field, it enjoys symmetry in the time domain as well, which is manifest by quasi-energy states defined only modulo h{omega}. Using the Runge-Lenz vector in place of the radius vector leads to an exactly-solvable model Hamiltonian for an atom is an oscillating electric field--embodying one of the few meaningful exact solutions in quantum mechanics, and a member of an even more exclusive set of exact solutions having a time-dependent Hamiltonian. He further shows that, as long as the atom suffers no change in principal quantum number, incident radiation will produce harmonic radiation with polarization perpendicular to the incident radiation. This unusual polarization results from the perpendicular response of the wavefunction, and is distinguished from most usual harmonic radiation resulting from a scalar nonlinear susceptibility. Finally, he speculates on how this radiation might be observed.

  16. HABITABILITY OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS AND MOONS IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, B.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M. E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that habitable Earth-mass planets and moons can exist in the Kepler-16 system, known to host a Saturn-mass planet around a stellar binary, by investigating their orbital stability in the standard and extended habitable zone (HZ). We find that Earth-mass planets in satellite-like (S-type) orbits are possible within the standard HZ in direct vicinity of Kepler-16b, thus constituting habitable exomoons. However, Earth-mass planets cannot exist in planetary-like (P-type) orbits around the two stellar components within the standard HZ. Yet, P-type Earth-mass planets can exist superior to the Saturnian planet in the extended HZ pertaining to considerably enhanced back-warming in the planetary atmosphere if facilitated. We briefly discuss the potential detectability of such habitable Earth-mass moons and planets positioned in satellite and planetary orbits, respectively. The range of inferior and superior P-type orbits in the HZ is between 0.657-0.71 AU and 0.95-1.02 AU, respectively.

  17. Endopeptidase 24.16B. A new variant of endopeptidase 24.16.

    PubMed

    Rodd, D; Hersh, L B

    1995-04-28

    A peptidase, isolated from rat testes, is inhibited by 1 mM o-phenanthroline, 1 microM N-(1-(R,S)-carboxyl-3-phenylpropyl)-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-aminobenzoate, and 6 mM Pro-Ile, properties similar to those ascribed to endopeptidase 24.16. The enzyme hydrolyzes dynorphin A-8, neurotensin 1-13, angiotensin I, and substance P. Kinetic analysis of a series of angiotensin I analogs showed that substitutions at P-1, P-1', or P-2' had little effect on Km or Kcat. Variation of peptide size with a series of dynorphin A peptides showed chain length to be significant. The peptidase cleaved dynorphin A-8 at both Leu5-Arg6 and Arg6-Arg7, and neurotensin 1-13 at Pro10-Tyr11 and Arg8-Arg9. In contrast, rat endopeptidase 24.16 cleaves dynorphin A-8 at Gly4-Leu5 and Leu5-Arg6, and neurotensin 1-13 only at Pro10-Tyr11. These findings, as well as the observation that endopeptidase 24.16 exhibits a considerably higher affinity for Pro-Ile, Ki = 90 microM, indicates the peptidase isolated in this study is related to, but distinct from, rat endopeptidase 24.16. We propose that this new endopeptidase be referred to as endopeptidase 24.16B, while the originally described enzyme be referred to as endopeptidase 24.16A.

  18. WASP-16b: A NEW JUPITER-LIKE PLANET TRANSITING A SOUTHERN SOLAR ANALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Smalley, B. S.; Wilson, D. M.; Bentley, S. J.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Gillon, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Mayor, M.; Hebb, L.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, R.; Horne, K.; West, R. G.; Christian, D. J.; Joshi, Y. C.; Haswell, C. A.; Irwin, J.; Kane, S. R.

    2009-09-20

    We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R{sub p} = 1.008 +- 0.071 R{sub Jup} and M{sub p} = 0.855 +- 0.059 M{sub Jup}, orbiting a host star with R {sub *} = 0.946 +- 0.054 R{sub sun} and M{sub *} = 1.022 +- 0.101 M{sub sun}. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 +- 0.10) solar analog (T{sub eff} = 5700 +- 150 K and log g = 4.5 +- 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3{sup +5.8}{sub -2.2} Gyr).

  19. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95 cm Schmidt telescope to survey >100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, are also expected. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%. In addition, follow-up observations will, where possible, measure the mass of confirmed planets and look for any non-transiting giant planets. The Kepler Project is Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a Discovery Mission.

  20. Eclipsing Binary Star Detection Using Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vydra, Ekaterina; Buzasi, Derek L.

    2017-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries (EBs) are laboratories for precision astrophysics, because use of the orbital information of the system allows the determination of the physical parameters of the stars to a much higher degree of precision than is possible for single stars. The Kepler Space Telescope, while designed to hunt for planets, has also been a valuable tool in detecting and characterizing EBs and has already observed over 2200 specimens. Kepler suffered a failure in 2013 that affected its pointing ability, but some ingenious engineering adjustments have allowed it to continue collecting photometric data from new fields of view. Our goals were to develop an algorithm for EB detection using Kepler data, and then with the help of FGCU's K2 Aperture Photometry Pipeline to extend that algorithm to discover new EBs in the K2 fields. Here we report on our progess to date as well as future plans.

  1. Optical Phase Curves of Kepler Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R sstarf < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 ± 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 ± 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  2. Excluding False Positive Detections in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, John J.; Ouvarova, T.; Borucki, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    The NASA Kepler Mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, will search for Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in or near habitable zones. A high precision photometer will search for planetary transits of parent stars. For a system similar to the Earth-Sun, the decrease in light during a central transit will be one part in 10,000 of the total stellar brightness out of transit. This poster discusses the effort to address a significant concern: the possibility of false positive detections of extra-solar Earth analogs. The concern arises because about 50 per cent of star systems are double or multiple. Further, because the photometer design is constrained by the requirement for high sensitivity to changes of low light levels, the optical resolution is not high compared to other space or terrestrial telescopes. If a relatively nearby Kepler target star happens to contain, within the Kepler PSF, an eclipsing binary system that is reduced in brightness by a factor of 10,000, say because it is 100 times farther away, the photometric profile of an eclipse could mimic a planetary transit. We have therefore developed a program to use archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope to quantify the number density of faint stars in the Kepler field that are in the brightness range that could cause confusion. Since the beginning of the project, the location of the Kepler field itself has been changed to optimize observing efficiency. The work originally included HST/WFPC2 data, and has now been expanded to ACS data as well. We present here a summary of completed and continuing work on faint background systems in the new Kepler field.

  3. Kepler-80 and the Frequency of STIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; MacDonald, Mariah; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    At ESS-II, Kepler and detailed radial velocity surveys had confirmed that systems of multiple, small, close-in planets were relatively common, but there was a order of magnitude difference between the estimated frequency of STIPs from Kepler (~5%, Lissauer, Ragozzine et al. 2011) and the frequency from RV surveys (~50%, Mayor et al. 2011). Continued Kepler observations are providing insight into the properties of this new population, now called STIPs (Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets), both through individually interesting systems and through a large ~homogeneous population. Kepler-80 (KOI-500) is an important system due to its still-unique extreme three-body resonance configuration and its relatively compact configuration. I will present a full dynamical TTV analysis of this system including densities for the four outer planets. We will also discuss the statistical evidence for whether Kepler-80 and similar extremely-tightly-packed systems could be considered a separate population from the STIPs. Radial Velocity surveys have not detected any of these extremely-tightly-packed systems (~4 planets with periods within a factor of ~3), so with the masses from our TTV analysis, we investigate the ability of radial velocity surveys to detect such systems. We find that it is extremely difficult in practice to correctly disentangle the signals for all five planets of Kepler-80 due to the low-SNR amplitudes and similar frequencies involved (even for circular orbits with no resonance effects). STIPs will, to some degree, inherit this propensity for RV measurements to miss planets with similar periods; this has potentially important effects on the completeness estimates for RV surveys of STIPs. We address current results and present a roadmap for investigating the frequency of such systems in more detail using the Planetary System Simulator (SysSim), an extension of the population analysis of Lissauer, Ragozzine, et al. 2011.

  4. OPTICAL PHASE CURVES OF KEPLER EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-07-20

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R{sub *} < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 {+-} 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  5. Multiple effects of anthracene-9-carboxylic acid on the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Cherian, O Lijo; Menini, Anna; Boccaccio, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (CaCCs) play important roles in many physiological processes. Recent studies have shown that TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 constitute CaCCs in several cell types. Here we have investigated for the first time the extracellular effects of the Cl(-) channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A9C) and of its non-charged analogue anthracene-9-methanol (A9M) on TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. A9C caused a voltage-dependent block of outward currents and inhibited a larger fraction of the current as depolarization increased, whereas the non-charged A9M produced a small, not voltage dependent block of outward currents. A similar voltage-dependent block by A9C was measured both when TMEM16B was activated by 1.5 and 13μM Ca(2+). However, in the presence of 1.5μM Ca(2+) (but not in 13μM Ca(2+)), A9C also induced a strong potentiation of tail currents measured at -100mV after depolarizing voltages, as well as a prolongation of the deactivation kinetics. On the contrary, A9M did not produce potentiation of tail currents, showing that the negative charge is required for potentiation. Our results provide the first evidence that A9C has multiple effects on TMEM16B and that the negative charge of A9C is necessary both for voltage-dependent block and for potentiation. Future studies are required to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these complex effects of A9C on TMEM16B. Understanding these mechanisms will contribute to the elucidation of the structure and functional properties of TMEM16B channels.

  6. Development of 1H-Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines as Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Positive Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Hill, Matthew D; Fang, Haiquan; Brown, Jeffrey M; Molski, Thaddeus; Easton, Amy; Han, Xiaojun; Miller, Regina; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Matchett, Michele; Gulianello, Michael; Balakrishnan, Anand; Bertekap, Robert L; Santone, Kenneth S; Whiterock, Valerie J; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E; Degnan, Andrew P

    2016-12-08

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is an attractive target for the treatment of schizophrenia due to its role in regulating glutamatergic signaling in association with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). We describe the synthesis of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines and their utility as mGluR5 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) without inherent agonist activity. A facile and convergent synthetic route provided access to a structurally diverse set of analogues that contain neither the aryl-acetylene-aryl nor aryl-methyleneoxy-aryl elements, the predominant structural motifs described in the literature. Binding studies suggest that members of our new chemotype do not engage the receptor at the MPEP and CPPHA mGluR5 allosteric sites. SAR studies culminated in the first non-MPEP site PAM, 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine 31 (BMT-145027), to improve cognition in a preclinical rodent model of learning and memory.

  7. Synthesis and optical and electrochemical properties of julolidine-structured pyrido[3,4-b]indole dye.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Keishi; Ohshita, Joji; Ooyama, Yousuke

    2017-02-01

    The julolidine-structured pyrido[3,4-b]indole dye ET-1 has been newly designed and developed as a small D-A fluorescent dye. ET-1 showed bathochromic shifts of the fluorescence band upon changing from aprotic solvents to protic solvents, as well as positive fluorescence solvatochromism. Moreover, it was found that ET-1 can form a 1 : 1 Py(N)-B complex with boron trifluoride and a hydrogen-bonded proton transfer (Py(N)-H) complex with trifluoroacetic acid, which exhibit photoabsorption and fluorescence bands at a longer wavelength region than the pristine ET-1. Based on optical (photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy) and electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) measurements, Lippert-Mataga plots, (1)H NMR spectral measurement and density functional theory (DFT) calculation, this work indicated that the Py(N)-B complex or the Py(N)-H complex is effectively formed and stable in solution. This is due to the strong Py(N)-B interaction or Py(N)-hydrogen-bond, which can be attributed to the enhanced basicity or the accumulated electron density on the nitrogen atom of the pyridine ring caused by the introduction of a julolidine (quinolizidine) moiety as a strong electron-donating group. We propose that the D-A-type dye ET-1 based on the julolidine-structured pyrido[3,4-b]indole possesses the ability to act as a calorimetric and fluorescent sensor for Brønsted and Lewis acids.

  8. The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Dunham, E. W.; Gilliland, R.; Jenkins, J.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Cochran, W. D.; Howell, S.; Koch, D.; Latham, D.; Marcy, G.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission to find Earth-size exoplanets was launched on March 6, 2009, began science observations on May 11, 2009 and is now in full operation. Many planet candidates have been identified and ground based follow-up observations are weeding out false positive planet detections and beginning to confirm true planets. False positive identification techniques planned during the pre-flight phase of Kepler are proving to work well. The fraction of false positive planet detections due to binary stars sent for ground based follow-up appears small.

  9. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95-cm Schmidt telescope to survey 100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to ˜ 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1,000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, will also be found. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%.

  10. X-ray spectrum of Kepler's SNR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; White, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations made with the solid state spectrometer aboard the Einstein Observatory confirm Kepler's SNR as an X-ray source with an intensity between 1-3 KeV of 7.2 x 10 to the-11th power ergs/sq cm-s. The X-ray spectrum is similar to those of Cas A and Tycho, with strong line emission from the helium-like species of Si, S, and Ar. Direct comparisons to Tycho's SNR suggest a distance of Kepler's SNR of greater than or equal to 5 kpc.

  11. Supervised ensemble classification of Kepler variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G.; Borne, K.

    2016-07-01

    Variable star analysis and classification is an important task in the understanding of stellar features and processes. While historically classifications have been done manually by highly skilled experts, the recent and rapid expansion in the quantity and quality of data has demanded new techniques, most notably automatic classification through supervised machine learning. We present an expansion of existing work on the field by analysing variable stars in the Kepler field using an ensemble approach, combining multiple characterization and classification techniques to produce improved classification rates. Classifications for each of the roughly 150 000 stars observed by Kepler are produced separating the stars into one of 14 variable star classes.

  12. The regulation and function of miR-21-FOXO3a-miR-34b/c signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyan; Feng, Jie; Tang, Lili; Liao, Liqiu; Xu, Qing; Zhu, Shaihong

    2015-01-30

    Upregulation of miR-21 (microRNA-21) and downregulation of miR-34b/c have been found in breast cancer (BC). However, their regulation mechanism and function roles in BC have not been fully addressed. Here, we report that miR-21 levels were inversely correlated with miR-34b/c levels in BC. MiR-21 upregulation contributes to PTEN downregulation, which is beneficial for the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling. The activation of AKT phosphorylates FOXO3a, triggering relocalization of FOXO3a proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. FOXO3a is a newly identified transcription factor responsible for miR-34b/c expression. Downregulation of nuclear FOXO3a decreased the expression levels of miR-34b and miR-34c in breast cancer cells, in which p53 was mutated. We also found upregulation of circulating miR-21 and downregulation of circulating miR-34b/c in BC patients' serum. More importantly, we showed that systemic delivery of miR-34b/c or with anti-miR-21 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo. These results suggest that high circulating levels of miR-21 and low levels of miR-34b/c may provide potential biomarkers for BC diagnosis, and systemic delivery of miR-34b/c has potential as a therapeutic option for BC treatment.

  13. Planet Hunters: Kepler by Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C.; Fischer, D.; Smith, A. M.; Boyajian, T. S.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Schmitt, J.; Simpson, R.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the pubic Kepler light curves. Planet Hunters utilizes human pattern recognition to identify planet transits that may be missed by automated detection algorithms looking for periodic events. Referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’ or ‘citizen science’, the combined assessment of many non-expert human classifiers with minimal training can often equal or best that of a trained expert and in many cases outperform the best machine-learning algorithm. Visitors to the Planet Hunters' website are presented with a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler’s ~160,000 target stars and are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits in the web interface. 5-10 classifiers review each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 260,000 volunteers world wide have participated, contributing over 20 million classifications. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project’s more than 20 planet candidates, the discovery of PH1b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a quadruple star system, and the discovery of PH2-b, a confirmed Jupiter-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. I will provide an overview of Planet Hunters, highlighting several of project's most recent exoplanet and astrophysical discoveries. Acknowledgements: MES was supported in part by a NSF AAPF under award AST-1003258 and a American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant. We acknowledge support from NASA ADAP12-0172 grant to PI Fischer.

  14. Kepler-1647b: The Largest and Longest-period Kepler Transiting Circumbinary Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin B.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Quarles, Billy; Short, Donald R.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Gregorio, Joao; Hinse, Tobias C.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Kane, Stephen; Kull, Ilya; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Müller, Tobias W. A.; Pepper, Joshua; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Windmiller, Gur; Borucki, William J.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of known short-period planets orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet revolving around the eclipsing binary system Kepler-1647 has a very long orbital period (˜1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission lifetime. Due to the singular configuration of the system, Kepler-1647b is not only the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing, but also one of the longest-period transiting planets. With a radius of 1.06 ± 0.01 R Jup, it is also the largest CBP to date. The planet produced three transits in the light curve of Kepler-1647 (one of them during an eclipse, creating a syzygy) and measurably perturbed the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to measure its mass, 1.52 ± 0.65 M Jup. The planet revolves around an 11-day period eclipsing binary consisting of two solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined, mildly eccentric (e bin = 0.16), spin-synchronized orbit. Despite having an orbital period three times longer than Earth’s, Kepler-1647b is in the conservative habitable zone of the binary star throughout its orbit.

  15. Glycoengineered CD20 antibody obinutuzumab activates neutrophils and mediates phagocytosis through CD16B more efficiently than rituximab.

    PubMed

    Golay, Josée; Da Roit, Fabio; Bologna, Luca; Ferrara, Claudia; Leusen, Jeanette H; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino

    2013-11-14

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered type 2 CD20 antibody with enhanced CD16A-binding and natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity. CD16B is highly homologous to CD16A and a major FcγR on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We show here that glycoengineered obinutuzumab or rituximab bound CD16B with approximately sevenfold higher affinity, compared with nonglycoengineered wild-type parental antibodies. Furthermore, glycoengineered obinutuzumab activated PMNs, either purified or in chronic lymphoblastic leukemia whole blood, more efficiently than wild-type rituximab. Activation resulted in a 50% increase in CD11b expression and 70% down-modulation of CD62L on neutrophils and in release of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Activation was not accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity, but led to up to 47% phagocytosis of glycoengineered anti-CD20 opsonized chronic lymphoblastic leukemia targets by purified PMNs. Significant phagocytosis was observed in whole blood, but only in the presence of glycoengineered antibodies, and was followed by up to 50% PMN death. Finally we show, using anti-CD16B and anti-CD32A Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, that both of these receptors are involved in PMN activation, phagocytosis, and cell death induced by glycoengineered antibodies. We conclude that phagocytosis by PMNs is an additional mechanism of action of obinutuzumab mediated through its higher binding affinity for CD16B.

  16. INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE IN KEPLER's FIRST MONTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Gazis, Paul R.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Li Jie; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Argabright, Vic S.; Bachtell, Eric E.; Dunham, Edward W.; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.; Koch, David G.

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission relies on precise differential photometry to detect the 80 parts per million (ppm) signal from an Earth-Sun equivalent transit. Such precision requires superb instrument stability on timescales up to {approx}2 days and systematic error removal to better than 20 ppm. To this end, the spacecraft and photometer underwent 67 days of commissioning, which included several data sets taken to characterize the photometer performance. Because Kepler has no shutter, we took a series of dark images prior to the dust cover ejection, from which we measured the bias levels, dark current, and read noise. These basic detector properties are essentially unchanged from ground-based tests, indicating that the photometer is working as expected. Several image artifacts have proven more complex than when observed during ground testing, as a result of their interactions with starlight and the greater thermal stability in flight, which causes the temperature-dependent artifact variations to be on the timescales of transits. Because of Kepler's unprecedented sensitivity and stability, we have also seen several unexpected systematics that affect photometric precision. We are using the first 43 days of science data to characterize these effects and to develop detection and mitigation methods that will be implemented in the calibration pipeline. Based on early testing, we expect to attain Kepler's planned photometric precision over 80%-90% of the field of view.

  17. Kepler Confirmation of Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    2011-10-01

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft has detected 170 candidate multi-planet systems in the first two quarters of data released in February 2011 by Borucki et al. (2011). These systems comprise 115 double candidate systems, 45 triple candidate sys- tems, and 10 systems with 4 or more candidate planets. The architecture and dynamics of these systems were discussed by Lissauer et al. (2011), and a comparison of candidates in single- and multi-planet systems was presented by Latham et al. (2011). Proceeding from "planetary candidate" systems to confirmed and validated multi-planet systems is a difficult process, as most of these systems orbit stars too faint to obtain extremely precise (1ms-1) radial velocity confimation. Here, we discuss in detail the use of transit timing vari- ations (cf. e.g. Holman et al., 2010) to confirm planets near a mean motion resonance. We also discuss extensions to the BLENDER validation (Torres et al., 2004, 2011; Fressin et al., 2011) to validate planets in multi-planet systems. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for the Kepler Mis- sion is provided by NASA's Science Mission Direc- torate. We are deeply grateful for the very hard work of the entire Kepler team.

  18. Kepler as astronomical observer in Prague

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Volker

    Official histories of science have consistently perpetuated the rumour that Kepler's poor eyesight prevented him from undertaking astronomical observations. However the condition of his eyesight could not have been so serious for in 1582, when his father made it possible for him to see a lunar eclipse, Kepler saw the moon emerge clearly. We find quite a lot of his astronomical observations especially of the years in Prague, mostly left in his manuscripts and unpublished until now. They will be edited in Vol. XXI.1 of the Kepler-Edition in the next future. Kepler's astronomical observations in Prague were mostly initiated by spectacular phenomena in the sky. He was self-critical enough to know, that his observations could not compete with those of the best observers of his time. It was not necessary for him to come up to highest standard of accuracy, and it was not possible to do so because he did not possess proper astronomical instruments. But nevertheless it was important for him as a theorist of astronomy and as a philosopher of nature to take a view of the phenomena which he wished to study carefully.

  19. From Lightcurve to Planet: Vetting Kepler Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, William D.; Kepler Science Team

    2010-10-01

    After a possible transit-like signal is detected in a Kepler lightcurve, a large number of checks are made in order to determine whether the signal is due to a true planet or is a false-positive signal. The first steps include detailed inspection of the lightcurve itself and a search for correlation of astrometric residuals with the photometric transit signal. Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that are passed on to the Follow-up Observing Program then receive reconnaissance spectroscopy and high spatial resolution imaging. KOIs that survive these tests may then be subjected to high-precision radial velocity measurements to measure the stellar reflex orbit and thus fully confirm the existence of a planet. This last step of precise radial velocity measurement can not be used on all Kepler planets because: 1) telescope resources are limited, and 2) state-of-the-art velocity precision is insufficient to measure the stellar reflex orbit of an Earth-mass planet in a 1AU orbit around the faint Kepler targets. Examples of these verification steps will be presented.

  20. Kepler's Laws: Demonstration and Derivation Without Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Seville

    1969-01-01

    Presents a demonstration apparatus for Kepler's three laws of planetary motion consisting of an air-supported "satellite whose orbit on a level table surface is determined by an inverse square force generated by a Peaucellier linkage and long spring. The device can also be used to illustrate centrifugal force, statics, friction, momentum and…

  1. Constraining the oblateness of Kepler planets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Huang, Chelsea X.; Zhou, George; Lin, D. N. C.

    2014-11-20

    We use Kepler short-cadence light curves to constrain the oblateness of planet candidates in the Kepler sample. The transits of rapidly rotating planets that are deformed in shape will lead to distortions in the ingress and egress of their light curves. We report the first tentative detection of an oblate planet outside the solar system, measuring an oblateness of 0.22{sub −0.11}{sup +0.11} for the 18 M{sub J} mass brown dwarf Kepler 39b (KOI 423.01). We also provide constraints on the oblateness of the planets (candidates) HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01 to be <0.067, <0.251, and <0.186, respectively. Using the Q' values from Jupiter and Saturn, we expect tidal synchronization for the spins of HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01, and for their rotational oblateness signatures to be undetectable in the current data. The potentially large oblateness of KOI 423.01 (Kepler 39b) suggests that the Q' value of the brown dwarf needs to be two orders of magnitude larger than that of the solar system gas giants to avoid being tidally spun down.

  2. Kepler-79's low density planets

    SciTech Connect

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-04-10

    Kepler-79 (KOI-152) has four planetary candidates ranging in size from 3.5 to 7 times the size of the Earth, in a compact configuration with orbital periods near a 1:2:4:6 chain of commensurability, from 13.5 to 81.1 days. All four planets exhibit transit timing variations with periods that are consistent with the distance of each planet to resonance with its neighbors. We perform a dynamical analysis of the system based on transit timing measurements over 1282 days of Kepler photometry. Stellar parameters are obtained using a combination of spectral classification and the stellar density constraints provided by light curve analysis and orbital eccentricity solutions from our dynamical study. Our models provide tight bounds on the masses of all four transiting bodies, demonstrating that they are planets and that they orbit the same star. All four of Kepler-79's transiting planets have low densities given their sizes, which is consistent with other studies of compact multiplanet transiting systems. The largest of the four, Kepler-79 d (KOI-152.01), has the lowest bulk density yet determined among sub-Saturn mass planets.

  3. Spectral Mapping of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Blair, William; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox; Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian

    2008-03-01

    We propose to leverage our extensive previous multi-wavelength investigations of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) by obtaining IRS spectral maps of this premier example of a 'massive Type Ia' remnant. Of particular interest is the dense circumstellar medium (CSM) evidently surrounding Kepler. This material is best investigated in infrared, where shock-heated dust reveals the thermal-gas density and possible composition clues such as the 10-micron silicate feature. Full LL coverage (14-38 um) will permit detailed mapping of continuum shape changes with spatial position that are only hinted at from our previous MIPS 24 and 70 um imaging. SL mapping of selected regions will permit detailed studies of changes in the silicate feature with position, suggested by two slit positions in earlier observations. Combined with our deep Chandra observation (750 ks), these data will permit a detailed study of dust destruction in fast shocks. Kepler also shows regions near the remnant edge dominated by synchrotron X-ray emission, indicating electron acceleration to energies of order 100 TeV. However, the dominance of synchrotron continuum means that properties of the thermal medium, important for understanding shock-acceleration physics, cannot be diagnosed with X-rays. Our IRS spectra should allow such diagnosis. Kepler's unique position among Type Ia supernova remnants makes it a critical target for the understanding of the Type Ia phenomenon.

  4. Transit Timing Study of Kepler Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei

    2015-08-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. In this talk, I will talk about two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties.

  5. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel Antonio; Feigelson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; AR-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. The analysis procedures of the project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal of these periodic spikes. When a periodic transit is found, the model is displayed on a standard period-folded averaged light curve. Our findings to date on real

  6. Interactions between permeation and gating in the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Betto, Giulia; Cherian, O Lijo; Pifferi, Simone; Cenedese, Valentina; Boccaccio, Anna; Menini, Anna

    2014-06-01

    At least two members of the TMEM16/anoctamin family, TMEM16A (also known as anoctamin1) and TMEM16B (also known as anoctamin2), encode Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs), which are found in various cell types and mediate numerous physiological functions. Here, we used whole-cell and excised inside-out patch-clamp to investigate the relationship between anion permeation and gating, two processes typically viewed as independent, in TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells. The permeability ratio sequence determined by substituting Cl(-) with other anions (PX/PCl) was SCN(-) > I(-) > NO3 (-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > F(-) > gluconate. When external Cl(-) was substituted with other anions, TMEM16B activation and deactivation kinetics at 0.5 µM Ca(2+) were modified according to the sequence of permeability ratios, with anions more permeant than Cl(-) slowing both activation and deactivation and anions less permeant than Cl(-) accelerating them. Moreover, replacement of external Cl(-) with gluconate, or sucrose, shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation (G-V relation) to more positive potentials, whereas substitution of extracellular or intracellular Cl(-) with SCN(-) shifted G-V to more negative potentials. Dose-response relationships for Ca(2+) in the presence of different extracellular anions indicated that the apparent affinity for Ca(2+) at +100 mV increased with increasing permeability ratio. The apparent affinity for Ca(2+) in the presence of intracellular SCN(-) also increased compared with that in Cl(-). Our results provide the first evidence that TMEM16B gating is modulated by permeant anions and provide the basis for future studies aimed at identifying the molecular determinants of TMEM16B ion selectivity and gating.

  7. Interactions between permeation and gating in the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Betto, Giulia; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone; Cenedese, Valentina; Menini, Anna

    2014-01-01

    At least two members of the TMEM16/anoctamin family, TMEM16A (also known as anoctamin1) and TMEM16B (also known as anoctamin2), encode Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs), which are found in various cell types and mediate numerous physiological functions. Here, we used whole-cell and excised inside-out patch-clamp to investigate the relationship between anion permeation and gating, two processes typically viewed as independent, in TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells. The permeability ratio sequence determined by substituting Cl− with other anions (PX/PCl) was SCN− > I− > NO3− > Br− > Cl− > F− > gluconate. When external Cl− was substituted with other anions, TMEM16B activation and deactivation kinetics at 0.5 µM Ca2+ were modified according to the sequence of permeability ratios, with anions more permeant than Cl− slowing both activation and deactivation and anions less permeant than Cl− accelerating them. Moreover, replacement of external Cl− with gluconate, or sucrose, shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation (G-V relation) to more positive potentials, whereas substitution of extracellular or intracellular Cl− with SCN− shifted G-V to more negative potentials. Dose–response relationships for Ca2+ in the presence of different extracellular anions indicated that the apparent affinity for Ca2+ at +100 mV increased with increasing permeability ratio. The apparent affinity for Ca2+ in the presence of intracellular SCN− also increased compared with that in Cl−. Our results provide the first evidence that TMEM16B gating is modulated by permeant anions and provide the basis for future studies aimed at identifying the molecular determinants of TMEM16B ion selectivity and gating. PMID:24863931

  8. ALMOST ALL OF KEPLER'S MULTIPLE-PLANET CANDIDATES ARE PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Adams, Elisabeth; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; and others

    2012-05-10

    We present a statistical analysis that demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) indeed represent true, physically associated transiting planets. Binary stars provide the primary source of false positives among Kepler planet candidates, implying that false positives should be nearly randomly distributed among Kepler targets. In contrast, true transiting planets would appear clustered around a smaller number of Kepler targets if detectable planets tend to come in systems and/or if the orbital planes of planets encircling the same star are correlated. There are more than one hundred times as many Kepler planet candidates in multi-candidate systems as would be predicted from a random distribution of candidates, implying that the vast majority are true planets. Most of these multis are multiple-planet systems orbiting the Kepler target star, but there are likely cases where (1) the planetary system orbits a fainter star, and the planets are thus significantly larger than has been estimated, or (2) the planets orbit different stars within a binary/multiple star system. We use the low overall false-positive rate among Kepler multis, together with analysis of Kepler spacecraft and ground-based data, to validate the closely packed Kepler-33 planetary system, which orbits a star that has evolved somewhat off of the main sequence. Kepler-33 hosts five transiting planets, with periods ranging from 5.67 to 41 days.

  9. Spectroscopy of Kepler Candidate Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Currently the NASA Kepler Mission has identified 3449 exoplanet candidates, one third with estimated radii R_p<2.5R_oplus and orbiting faint (m_Kep>14.5) host stars. The NASA sponsored Kepler Follow-up Program is focusing on small exoplanet candidates (R_p<2.5R_oplus) and those in habitable zone orbits. Planet radii estimates depend on estimates of host star radii. Based on spectra previously obtained at the KPNO Mayall 4-m for 220 stars with candidate exoplanets, Everett et al. (2013) have shown that many host stars are larger than originally assumed (up to factor of 2). Therefore, the exoplanet candidates they host must be larger than originally assumed, which conversely reduces the number of known Earth- sized exoplanet candidates. Determination of the frequency of such Earth-sized planets is a cornerstone Kepler mission objective and of keen general interest. These Mayall spectra were also used to confirm the Buchhave et al. (2012) result that exoplanet candidates larger than 4R_oplus in short-period orbits are preferentially associated with host stars with solar or higher metallicity, using a fainter and larger sample of stars than Buchhave et al. In short, followup Mayall optical spectroscopy is critical to confirming the detection of Earth-sized exoplanets, a Kepler cornerstone goal, as well as characterizing the relationship between host star properties and planetary system properties. Here, we propose to continue our reconnaissance survey with a focus on the smallest (most rare) exoplanet candidates orbiting the faintest Kepler host stars.

  10. The Origin of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Badenes, Carles; Park, Sangwook; Laming, J. Martin

    2012-09-01

    It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR) is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 yr and an angular diameter of ~4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia SNRs such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M ⊙ (subenergetic) or 1.0 M ⊙ (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of <6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M ⊙ of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of >7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was an SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure r -2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind-shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.

  11. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  12. Celebrating 400 Years of Astronomia Nova: Johannes Kepler, the Kepler Mission, and the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, E. K.; Koch, D.; Gould, A.; Harman, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 is an occasion to celebrate astronomy around the world. In addition to honoring Galileo and the invention of the astronomical telescope, 2009 is the 400th anniversary year of Kepler's publication of the Astronomia Nova containing his first two laws of planetary motion. In recognition of Kepler's accomplishment, the first NASA mission capable of detecting Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of stars has been named after Johannes Kepler. The Kepler Mission launches in the spring of 2009 and will search for evidence of extrasolar planets as they transit--pass in front of--their parent stars. Using Kepler's Laws, scientists will interpret the Mission data to characterize the planets that are discovered. The Kepler Mission is conducting several Educational and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities leading up to and during IYA. Among these are the Name In Space project which offers participants the opportunity to send their name into space along with a statement about the importance of searching for extrasolar Earths. The Kepler Star Wheel (planisphere) shows both the Kepler field of view and naked eye stars with known planetary systems. A series of StarDate programs will be broadcast in English and Spanish. Inquiry-based classroom lessons suitable for middle and high school science classes are available for download at the website, and on the Kepler Mission poster. The Kepler Mission poster will be distributed to middle and high school science teachers through the National Science Teacher's Association and other science teacher organizations. Copies will be available at AGU. The Kepler EPO team is presenting pre-launch teacher workshops at several locations around the US. Details about the workshop, and event timeline will be presented. For further information on the Kepler Mission, its E/PO program, and online resources, please visit: http://Kepler.NASA.gov.

  13. Celebrating 400 Years of Astronomia Nova: Johannes Kepler, the Kepler Mission, and the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Edna; Koch, D.; Gould, A.; Harman, P.

    2009-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 is an occasion to celebrate astronomy around the world. In addition to honoring Galileo and the invention of the astronomical telescope, 2009 is the 400th anniversary year of Kepler's publication of the Astronomia Nova containing his first two laws of planetary motion. In recognition of Kepler's accomplishment, the first NASA mission capable of detecting Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of stars has been named after Johannes Kepler. The Kepler Mission launches in the spring of 2009 and will search for evidence of extrasolar planets as they transit--pass in front of--their parent stars. Using Kepler's Laws, scientists will interpret the Mission data to characterize the planets that are discovered. The Kepler Mission is conducting several Educational and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities leading up to and during IYA. Among these are the "Name In Space” project which offers participants the opportunity to send their name into space along with a statement about the importance of searching for extrasolar Earths. The "Kepler Star Wheel” (planisphere) shows both the Kepler field of view and naked eye stars with known planetary systems. A series of StarDate programs will be broadcast in English and Spanish. Inquiry-based classroom lessons suitable for middle and high school science classes are available for download at the website, and on the Kepler Mission poster. The Kepler Mission poster will be distributed to middle and high school science teachers through the National Science Teacher's Association and other science teacher organizations. Copies will be available at AAS. The Kepler EPO team is presenting pre-launch teacher workshops at several locations around the US. Details about the workshop, and event timeline will be presented. For further information on the Kepler Mission, its E/PO program, and online resources, please visit: http://kepler.nasa.gov. Funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Kepler-454b: Rocky or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Small exoplanets tend to fall into two categories: the smallest ones are predominantly rocky, like Earth, and the larger ones have a lower-density, more gaseous composition, similar to Neptune. The planet Kepler-454b was initially estimated to fall between these two groups in radius. So what is its composition?Small-Planet DichotomyThough Kepler has detected thousands of planet candidates with radii between 1 and 2.7 Earth radii, we have only obtained precise mass measurements for 12 of these planets.Mass-radius diagram (click for a closer look!) for planets with radius 2.7 Earth radii and well-measured masses. The six smallest planets (and Venus and Earth) fall along a single mass-radius curve of Earth-like composition. The six larger planets (including Kepler-454b) have lower-density compositions. [Gettel et al. 2016]These measurements, however, show an interesting dichotomy: planets with radii less than 1.6 Earth radii have rocky, Earth-like compositions, following a single relation between their mass and radius. Planets between 2 and 2.7 Earth radii, however, have lower densities and dont follow a single mass-radius relation. Their low densities suggest they contain a significant fraction of volatiles, likely in the form of a thick gas envelope of water, hydrogen, and/or helium.The planet Kepler-454b, discovered transiting a Sun-like star, was initially estimated to have a radius of 1.86 Earth radii placing it in between these two categories. A team of astronomers led by Sara Gettel (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have since followed up on the initial Kepler detection, hoping to determine the planets composition.Low-Density OutcomeGettel and collaborators obtained 63 observations of the host stars radial velocity with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, and another 36 observations with the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory. These observations allowed them to do several things:Obtain a more accurate radius estimate

  15. What's the Kepler Spacecraft Been Up To?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Remember back in May 2013 when the second of Keplers reaction wheels failed, rendering it unable to control its precision pointing? As a result of a clever backup plan by intrepid scientists, Kepler is still going strong! This January, a paper was published describing some of the results from the first year of the extended Kepler mission, known as K2.K2: A Second ChanceHistograms of the K2 planet candidate sample (solid yellow) compared with planet candidates from the first four months of Kepler observations (blue diagonal lines). The histograms compare planet radius, orbital period, and brightness. [Vanderburg et al. 2016]After an incredibly successful five years discovering transiting exoplanets, the failure of two of Keplers reaction wheels (which allow it to maintain its orientation) looked like it would shut down the mission. Luckily, the scientific community came up with the ingenious plan of stabilizing the telescope using the radiation pressure exerted by the Sun. Though this solution limits Kepler to observing within the ecliptic plane, it has provided a new life lease for the project.Despite the significantly worsened pointing precision in the K2 mission, new analysis techniques have been developed that decouple the motion of the spacecraft from its observations, resulting in an observational precision for K2 thats within 35% of the original precision achieved by Kepler.Using these techniques, a team of scientists led by Andrew Vanderburg (HarvardSmithsonian Center for Astrophysics) analyzed the publicly released data from the first year of the K2 mission. In a new study, they describe the results from the 59,174 targets that Kepler has observed in that time.Planetary CandidatesVanderburg and collaborators report that K2 has detected 234 planetary candidates around 208 stars in its first year. These candidates span a range of sizes from gas-giant to smaller than the Earth, and have orbital periods that range from hours to more than a month. The list

  16. Probing Agn Accretion Physics With Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael

    We propose to use Kepler observations of a sample of ~100 supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies (Active Galactic Nuclei; AGN) to test models for accretion physics, to study the relationship between variability and other AGN properties, and to guide methods for detecting and classifying AGN in future time-domain surveys. AGN exhibit optical brightness fluctuations on timescales from below an hour up to many years. These fluctuations are determined by the physics of accretion of matter onto black holes from their galactic environment. By observing variability on timescales down to below an hour, Kepler probes the accretion region on length scales that are too small to be directly imaged using conventional telescopes. Data from this unique time- domain telescope now allow us to test competing models for accretion physics that make different predictions for the statistics of variability. Preliminary work provides strong evidence that models of AGN variability that work on long timescale data are not adequate to describe the full range of fluctuation timescales probed by Kepler. We will analyze the light curves of Kepler AGN that span a large range of luminosity and AGN type, thus allowing study of the relationship between variability and other physical properties. Using methods developed and tested by the Kepler team, we will perform custom post-processing of these light curves to remove known systematics. Statistical analyses of the AGN light curves will include estimation of the Structure Function, which quantifies the correlations of brightness fluctuations, and maximum likelihood light curve reconstruction. Competing models for the stochastic behavior of AGN will be tested to evaluate which models best describe variability of AGN over the full range of timescales probed by Kepler. Correlations between the stochastic model parameters and physical parameters will provide new methods for classification of AGN from their variability and aid in

  17. THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE HOT-JUPITERS KEPLER-5b AND KEPLER-6b OBSERVED DURING OCCULTATIONS WITH WARM-SPITZER AND KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Knutson, Heather A.; Deming, Drake; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Seager, Sara

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the detection and the measurements of occultations of the two transiting hot giant exoplanets Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b by their parent stars. The observations are obtained in the near-infrared with Warm-Spitzer Space Telescope and at optical wavelengths by combining more than a year of Kepler photometry. The investigation consists of constraining the eccentricities of these systems and of obtaining broadband emergent photometric data for individual planets. For both targets, the occultations are detected at the 3{sigma} level at each wavelength with mid-occultation times consistent with circular orbits. The brightness temperatures of these planets are deduced from the infrared observations and reach T{sub Spitzer} = 1930 {+-} 100 K and T{sub Spitzer} = 1660 {+-} 120 K for Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b, respectively. We measure optical geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass and find A{sub g} = 0.12 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-5b and A{sub g} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-6b, leading to upper an limit for the Bond albedo of A{sub B} {<=} 0.17 in both cases. The observations for both planets are best described by models for which most of the incident energy is redistributed on the dayside, with only less than 10% of the absorbed stellar flux redistributed to the nightside of these planets.

  18. Precise Radial Velocity Measurements for Kepler Giants Hosting Planetary Candidates: Kepler-91 and KOI-1894

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hirano, Teruyuki; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Ryo; Takarada, Takuya; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Masuda, Kento

    2015-03-01

    We present results of radial-velocity follow-up observations for the two Kepler evolved stars Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) and KOI-1894, which had been announced as candidates to host transiting giant planets, with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope and the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS). By global modeling of the high-precision radial-velocity data taken with Subaru/HDS and photometric data taken by the Kepler mission accounting for orbital brightness modulations (ellipsoidal variations, reflected/emitted light, etc.) of the host stars, we independently confirmed that Kepler-91 hosts a transiting planet with a mass of 0.66 {{M}Jup}(Kepler-91b), and newly detected an offset of ˜20 m s-1 between the radial velocities taken at ˜1 yr interval, suggesting the existence of an additional companion in the system. As for KOI-1894, we detected possible phased variations in the radial velocities and light curves with 2-3σ confidence level, which could be explained as a reflex motion and ellipsoidal variation of the star caused by a transiting sub-Saturn-mass (˜0.18 {{M}Jup}) planet.

  19. Photometer Performance Assessment in Kepler Science Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Gunter, Jay P.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wohler, Bill; Wu, Hayley

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the Photometer Performance Assessment (PPA) software component in the science data processing pipeline of the Kepler mission. The PPA performs two tasks: One is to analyze the health and performance of the Kepler photometer based on the long cadence science data down-linked via Ka band approximately every 30 days. The second is to determine the attitude of the Kepler spacecraft with high precision at each long cadence. The PPA component is demonstrated to work effectively with the Kepler flight data.

  20. Preliminary Planet Population Statistics With Kepler Q1-Q16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Mullally, Fergal; Christiansen, Jessie; Huber, Daniel; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Thompson, Susan E.; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Batalha, Natalie M.

    2014-06-01

    We present preliminary extrasolar planet population statistics from analysis of the Kepler Q1-Q16 planet candidate sample. The analysis takes advantage of the recent work on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet candidate sample, extensive Monte-Carlo transit signal injection and recovery tests of the Kepler Pipeline, and updates to the stellar parameters provided by the Kepler Stellar Working Group. We also explore the sensitivity of the results to alternative inputs by considering a machine learning generated planet sample, systematics in the stellar sample properties, orbital eccentricity, and false positive rates.

  1. Revised Emergency Cooling System LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents) limits for PKL-reactor Mark 16B-31 charges

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J.P.; Steimke, J.L.

    1986-10-02

    Recent experiments have shown that the assembly damage models used to compute generic Emergency Cooling System (ECS) limits for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) in Mark 16B-31 charges may be nonconservative. The bases of these damage models were experiments that underestimated the heat input into a heated flow channel. This document provides interim ECS limits for Mark 16, Mark 31A, and Mark 31B assemblies. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Identifying non-resonant Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-02-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered a plethora of multiple transiting planet candidate exosystems, many of which feature putative pairs of planets near mean motion resonance commensurabilities. Identifying potentially resonant systems could help guide future observations and enhance our understanding of planetary formation scenarios. We develop and apply an algebraic method to determine which Kepler two-planet systems cannot be in a first-fourth order resonance, given the current, publicly available data. This method identifies when any potentially resonant angle of a system must circulate. We identify and list 70 near-resonant systems which cannot actually reside in resonance, assuming a widely used formulation for deriving planetary masses from their observed radii and that these systems do not contain unseen bodies that affect the interactions of the observed planets. This work strengthens the argument that a high fraction of exoplanetary systems may be near resonance but not actually in resonance.

  3. Transiting Planet Search in the Kepler Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; McCauliff, Sean D.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Tenebaum, Peter; Li, Jie; Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Mile T.; Middour, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission simultaneously measures the brightness of more than 160,000 stars every 29.4 minutes over a 3.5-year mission to search for transiting planets. Detecting transits is a signal-detection problem where the signal of interest is a periodic pulse train and the predominant noise source is non-white, non-stationary (1/f) type process of stellar variability. Many stars also exhibit coherent or quasi-coherent oscillations. The detection algorithm first identifies and removes strong oscillations followed by an adaptive, wavelet-based matched filter. We discuss how we obtain super-resolution detection statistics and the effectiveness of the algorithm for Kepler flight data.

  4. Dynamical Origins of the Kepler Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2016-10-01

    An overabundance of single-transiting planetary systems relative to those with multiple transits within the Kepler dataset, has been interpreted as evidence for mutual inclinations between planetary orbits. The physical origins of this so-called "Kepler Dichotomy," however, remain elusive. Here we show that the observed prevalence of single-planet systems is a direct consequence of the secular evolution of initially co-planar multi-planet systems that orbit stars whose spin-axes are inclined with respect to the protoplanetary disks they host. Such primordial misalignments arise naturally within the disk-hosting stage by way of gravitational torques from stellar companions, and have been previously invoked as explanations for the commonness of spin-orbit misalignments in hot Jupiter systems. Accordingly, our model places the early dynamical evolution of hot super-Earths and hot Jupiters into a unified theoretical framework.

  5. Kepler-47: a transiting circumbinary multiplanet system.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Jerome A; Welsh, William F; Carter, Joshua A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B; Haghighipour, Nader; MacQueen, Phillip J; Mazeh, Tsevi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Short, Donald R; Torres, Guillermo; Agol, Eric; Buchhave, Lars A; Doyle, Laurance R; Isaacson, Howard; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Shporer, Avi; Windmiller, Gur; Barclay, Thomas; Boss, Alan P; Clarke, Bruce D; Fortney, Jonathan; Geary, John C; Holman, Matthew J; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kruse, Ethan; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal; Winn, Joshua N; Koch, David G; Borucki, William J

    2012-09-21

    We report the detection of Kepler-47, a system consisting of two planets orbiting around an eclipsing pair of stars. The inner and outer planets have radii 3.0 and 4.6 times that of Earth, respectively. The binary star consists of a Sun-like star and a companion roughly one-third its size, orbiting each other every 7.45 days. With an orbital period of 49.5 days, 18 transits of the inner planet have been observed, allowing a detailed characterization of its orbit and those of the stars. The outer planet's orbital period is 303.2 days, and although the planet is not Earth-like, it resides within the classical "habitable zone," where liquid water could exist on an Earth-like planet. With its two known planets, Kepler-47 establishes that close binary stars can host complete planetary systems.

  6. Variable Stars with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Szabó, R.; Plachy, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets and stars and is continuing to do so in the K2 mission. The exquisite photometric precision, together with the long, uninterrupted observations opened up a new way to investigate the structure and evolution of stars. Asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, allowed us to investigate solar-like stars, and to peer into the insides of red giants and massive stars. But many discoveries have been made about classical variable stars, too, ranging from pulsators like Cepheids and RR Lyraes to eclipsing binary stars and cataclysmic variables, and even supernovae. In this review, which is far from an exhaustive summary of all results obtained with Kepler, we collected some of the most interesting discoveries, and ponder on the role for amateur observers in this golden era of stellar astrophysics.

  7. The astronomical revolution. Copernicus - Kepler - Borelli.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyré, A.

    The work was originally published in 1961 under the title "La révolution astronomique" as part of the series, Histoire de la pensée. This book is an unabridged and unaltered republication of the English translation, by R. E. W. Maddison, originally published in 1973 (see 10.003.074). The author elucidates, precisely and in stages, the revolutionary ideas of Nicolaus Copernicus as well as the work of two other thinkers who made major contributions to the astronomical revolution: Johannes Kepler and Giovanni Borelli. He illuminates the exact contribution of each man, placing his work in its historical context and dispelling a host of misconceptions about it. In order to effectively recapture the ferment and flavor of the times, the author, whenever possible, has allowed Copernicus, Kepler and Borelli to speak for themselves by quoting key passages from their writings. Many of these passages were here translated for the first time.

  8. Advances in the Kepler Transit Search Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2016-10-01

    Twenty years ago, no planets were known outside our own solar system. Since then, the discoveries of ~1500 exoplanets have radically altered our views of planets and planetary systems. This revolution is due in no small part to the Kepler Mission, which has discovered >1000 of these planets and >4000 planet candidates. While Kepler has shown that small rocky planets and planetary systems are quite common, the quest to find Earth's closest cousins and characterize their atmospheres presses forward with missions such as NASA Explorer Program's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) slated for launch in 2017 and ESA's PLATO mission scheduled for launch in 2024. These future missions pose daunting data processing challenges in terms of the number of stars, the amount of data, and the difficulties in detecting weak signatures of transiting small planets against a roaring background. These complications include instrument noise and systematic effects as well as the intrinsic stellar variability of the subjects under scrutiny. In this paper we review recent developments in the Kepler transit search pipeline improving both the yield and reliability of detected transit signatures. Many of the phenomena in light curves that represent noise can also trigger transit detection algorithms. The Kepler Mission has expended great effort in suppressing false positives from its planetary candidate catalogs. Over 18,000 transit-like signatures can be identified for a search across 4 years of data. Most of these signatures are artifacts, not planets. Vetting all such signatures historically takes several months' effort by many individuals. We describe the application of machine learning approaches for the automated vetting and production of planet candidate catalogs. These algorithms can improve the efficiency of the human vetting effort as well as quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is truly a planet. This information is crucial for obtaining valid planet occurrence

  9. Architecture of Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack

    We propose to determine the typical characteristics of planetary systems within 1 AU of stars. We will address basic questions including: How many planets are typical? What are their orbital spacings? How do these relate to planet sizes, relative inclinations, and stellar type? These questions probe the signatures of planet formation that are recorded in the catalogs of Kepler planet candidates. We propose to update the findings Lissauer et al. (2011, ApJS 197, 8), which used the first four months of Kepler observations, and Fabrycky et al. (2014, ApJ 790, 146) to encompass the additional planet candidates that have and will be cataloged by the Kepler project. The current catalog (Coughlin et al. (2015, arXiv 1512.06149) includes four times as many planet candidates as were known in 2011, almost twice as many as the catalog used by Fabrycky et al., as well as vastly improved measures of planetary radii and stellar properties. The improved catalogs will allow us to minimize detection biases andperform independent analyses of subsets of the data to compare distributions of planet periodratios, transit durations and planet radii to determine how these vary with orbital distance orincident fluxes. Analyses of the early Kepler data also identified an excess of planets just wide of resonance and a deficit just narrow of resonance. We propose to discriminate between tidal and dynamical models for this phenomenon with improved distributions of period ratios, sorted by planet size and orbit period, since tidal effects decline rapidly with distance from the star.

  10. Kepler Mission: A Search for Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was selected by NASA as one of the next two Discovery Missions. The mission design is based on the search for Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars, but does not preclude the discovery of larger or smaller planets in other orbits of non-solar-like stars. An overview of the mission, the scientific goals and the anticipated results will be presented.

  11. Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, Todd C.; McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission is designed to continuously monitor up to 170,000 stars at a 30 minute cadence for 3.5 years searching for Earth-size planets. The data are processed at the Science Operations Center (SOC) at NASA Ames Research Center. Because of the large volume of data and the memory and CPU-intensive nature of the analysis, significant computing hardware is required. We have developed generic pipeline framework software that is used to distribute and synchronize the processing across a cluster of CPUs and to manage the resulting products. The framework is written in Java and is therefore platform-independent, and scales from a single, standalone workstation (for development and research on small data sets) to a full cluster of homogeneous or heterogeneous hardware with minimal configuration changes. A plug-in architecture provides customized control of the unit of work without the need to modify the framework itself. Distributed transaction services provide for atomic storage of pipeline products for a unit of work across a relational database and the custom Kepler DB. Generic parameter management and data accountability services are provided to record the parameter values, software versions, and other meta-data used for each pipeline execution. A graphical console allows for the configuration, execution, and monitoring of pipelines. An alert and metrics subsystem is used to monitor the health and performance of the pipeline. The framework was developed for the Kepler project based on Kepler requirements, but the framework itself is generic and could be used for a variety of applications where these features are needed.

  12. Upcoming Kepler monitoring of OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson, Rick; McHardy, Ian; Jorstad, Svetlana; Marscher, Alan; Hovatta, Talvikki; Vaughan, Simon

    2015-02-01

    We wish to alert the community that Kepler will monitor the archetypal low-frequency peak BL Lac object OJ 287 (RA=08 54 48.9, Dec=+20 06 31, z=0.306, V=14-16) with 1 min sampling at > 90% duty cycle and high S/N in K2 Campaign 5, scheduled to run 2015 Apr 27 - Jul 13.

  13. Predicting the Potential Planet Yield from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Douglas A.; Dunham, E. W.; Argabright, V. S.; Borucki, W. J.; Burke, C. J.; Christiansen, J. L.; Gilliland, R. L.; Jenkins, J. M.; Rowe, J. F.; Seader, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Van Cleve, J.

    2012-05-01

    The pre-eminent scientific goal of the Kepler Mission is to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in or near the habitable zone of their stars. Two related key requirements needed to support this fundamental goal are the combined photometric precision for target stars and the mission lifetime. Kepler was designed to achieve a combined photometric precision -including intrinsic stellar variability- of 20 parts per million in 6.5 hours for 12th magnitude stars and to have a mission lifetime of 3.5 years. Based on the first 2 ½ years of data collection, we find that Kepler's precision for these stars is nearer to 30 ppm. We used the measured precision for each target to predict the detectability of habitable zone terrestrial planets based on the pipeline detection threshold of 7.1σ, the mission duration, and the measured data completeness. Combining this with the transit alignment probability and summing over all targets gives the potential planet yield for such planets. We find that the absolute value of the planet yield depends strongly on how biases in the Kepler Input Catalog values of surface gravity and effective temperature are handled, but that the relative improvement in planet yield is a factor of 2.5 to 3 in going from a 3.5 to a 7.5 year mission, largely independent of the KIC biases. Increasing the mission duration to 7.5 years makes up for the factor of 1.5 increase in noise, restoring Kepler’s ability to meet its primary mission goal.

  14. The Kepler End-to-End Model: Creating High-Fidelity Simulations to Test Kepler Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Peters, Dan J.; Tenenbaum, Peter P.; Klaus, Todd C.; Gunter, Jay P.; Cote, Miles T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission is designed to detect the transit of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars by observing 100,000 stellar targets. Developing and testing the Kepler ground-segment processing system, in particular the data analysis pipeline, requires high-fidelity simulated data. This simulated data is provided by the Kepler End-to-End Model (ETEM). ETEM simulates the astrophysics of planetary transits and other phenomena, properties of the Kepler spacecraft and the format of the downlinked data. Major challenges addressed by ETEM include the rapid production of large amounts of simulated data, extensibility and maintainability.

  15. Fossil Cores In The Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian

    Most gas giant exoplanets with orbital periods < few days are unstable against tidal decay and may be tidally disrupted before their host stars leave the main sequence. These gas giants probably contain rocky/icy cores, and so their cores will be stranded near their progenitor's Roche limit (few hours orbital period). These fossil cores will evade the Kepler mission's transit search because it is focused on periods > 0.5 days, but finding these fossil cores would provide unprecedented insights into planetary interiors and formation ? e.g., they would be a smoking gun favoring formation of gas giants via core accretion. We propose to search for and characterize fossil cores in the Kepler dataset. We will vet candidates using the Kepler photometry and auxiliary data, collect ground-based spectra of the host stars and radial-velocity (RV) and adaptive optics (AO) data to corroborate candidates. We will also constrain stellar tidal dissipation efficiencies (parameterized by Q) by determining our survey's completeness, elucidating dynamical origins and evolution of exoplanets even if we find no fossil cores. Our preliminary search has already found several dozen candidates, so the proposed survey has a high likelihood of success.

  16. Detectability of Oort Cloud Objects Using Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Nakar, Ehud

    2010-03-01

    The size distribution and total mass of objects in the Oort Cloud have important implications to the theory of planet formation, including the properties of, and the processes taking place in the early solar system. We discuss the potential of space missions, such as Kepler and CoRoT, designed to discover transiting exoplanets, to detect Oort Cloud, Kuiper Belt, and main belt objects by occultations of background stars. Relying on published dynamical estimates of the content of the Oort Cloud, we find that Kepler's main program is expected to detect between 0 and ~100 occultation events by deca-kilometer-sized Oort Cloud objects. The occultation rate depends on the mass of the Oort Cloud, the distance to its "inner edge," and the size distribution of its objects. In contrast, Kepler is unlikely to find occultations by Kuiper Belt or main belt asteroids, mainly due to the fact that it is observing a high ecliptic latitude field. Occultations by solar system objects will appear as a photometric deviation in a single measurement, implying that the information regarding the timescale and light-curve shape of each event is lost. We present statistical methods that have the potential to verify the authenticity of occultation events by solar system objects, to estimate the distance to the occulting population, and to constrain their size distribution. Our results are useful for planning of future space-based exoplanet searches in a way that will maximize the probability of detecting solar system objects, without hampering the main science goals.

  17. ON THE METALLICITIES OF KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Subo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Zhaohuan; De Cat, P.; Fu, J. N.; Yang, X. H.; Zhang, Haotong; Jin, Ge; Zhang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    We use 12,000 stars from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic survey data to show that the metallicities of Kepler field stars as given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) systematically underestimate both the true metallicity and the dynamic range of the Kepler sample. Specifically, to the first order approximation, we find [Fe/H]{sub KIC} = –0.20 + 0.43[Fe/H]{sub LAMOST}, with a scatter of ∼0.25 dex, due almost entirely to errors in KIC. This relation is most secure for –0.3 < [Fe/H]{sub LAMOST} < +0.4 where we have >200 comparison stars per 0.1 dex bin and good consistency is shown between metallicities determined by LAMOST and high-resolution spectra. It remains approximately valid in a slightly broader range. When the relation is inverted, the error in true metallicity as derived from KIC is (0.25 dex)/0.43-0.6 dex. We thereby quantitatively confirm the cautionary note by Brown et al. that KIC estimates of [Fe/H] should not be used by {sup a}nyone with a particular interest in stellar metallicities{sup .} Fortunately, many more LAMOST spectroscopic metallicities will be available in the near future.

  18. Johannes Kepler - And the New Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, James R.

    1999-11-01

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) is remembered as one of the greatest medieval astronomers in the tradition of Copernicus and Galileo, a man who made major contributions to physics, astronomy, and mathematics. Born in Germany and trained as a theologian, Kepler did not hesitate to challenge church doctrine by supporting the iconoclastic theory of a Sun-centered solar system. As Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor, he conducted careful observations of the night sky, which led to his discovery of the three Laws of Planetary Motion and the orbit of Mars. He also devised the Rudolphine Tables on planetary movements, and made key improvements to the telescope. Voelkel vividly describes the scientific achievements, providing enough background in physics and trigonometry so even beginners can enjoy this book. The author also gives us a captivating account of Kepler's tumultuous life, plagued by misery, disease, and fervent religious prosecution by the Catholic Church.Oxford Portraits in Science is an ongoing series of scientific biographies for young adults. Written by top scholars and writers, each biography examines the personality of its subject as well as the thought process leading to his or her discoveries. These illustrated biographies combine accessible technical information with compelling personal stories to portray the scientists whose work has shaped our understanding of the natural world.

  19. Characterization of Kepler Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, M.; Ciardi, D. R.; Silva, D.; Szkody, P.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 220 Exoplanet host stars in the Kepler field for which spectroscopic properties have been determined, we examine their spatial, physical, and time variable properties. Covering effective temperatures from 4670K to 6400K (K4 to F4) and masses from 0.7 to 1.4 M-sun, this sample represents host stars covering the entire Kepler field of view. The majority of the host stars contain one or more Earth-sized exoplanet and range in log g from 4.0 to 4.7 and [Fe/H] from -02.4 to +0.3. Using Yale-Yonsei isochrone fits and photometric information form the Howell-Everett UBV survey of the Kepler field, we examine a complete set of parameters for these stars including their likely residence in the thin or thick disk of the Galaxy. the variability of this sample, in terms of time sale and amplitude, is examined as well.

  20. [Johannes Kepler's contributions to ophthalmologic optics].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, W

    1986-02-01

    Until the beginning of the 17th century it was held that an image is formed in the eye on the anterior surface of the crystalline lens. Ophthalmological optics as a scientific discipline only began with a discovery made by Johannes Kepler. Without performing new experiments, and solely by application of the laws of light refraction, he analyzed the path of light through the eye and demonstrated that an image is formed on the retina and that it is inverted. Acceptance of this discovery was impeded by contemporary prejudices which could imagine nothing but an upright image in the eye, even though this attitude could not explain certain phenomena. Kepler's discovery of the path of light in the eye made it possible to explain the following physical phenomena: central visual acuity, visual field, dark adaptation, and errors of refraction. Physiological diplopia and the mechanism of accommodation were discovered later. The law stating that the intensity of light decreases with the square of distance was also formulated by Johannes Kepler; this law, too, could only be demonstrated after the path of light through the eye had been discovered. In recent years the Keplerian telescope has assumed a practical significance in ophthalmological optics. As a reading aid for individuals with impaired vision it offers a significantly higher magnification than any other optical visual aid.

  1. BIRTH LOCATIONS OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Silsbee, Kedron; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2015-07-20

    The Kepler mission has discovered about a dozen circumbinary planetary systems, all containing planets on ∼1 AU orbits. We place bounds on the locations in the circumbinary protoplanetary disk, where these planets could have formed through collisional agglomeration starting from small (kilometer-sized or less) planetesimals. We first present a model of secular planetesimal dynamics that accounts for the (1) perturbation due to the eccentric precessing binary, as well as the (2) gravity and (3) gas drag from a precessing eccentric disk. Their simultaneous action leads to rich dynamics, with (multiple) secular resonances emerging in the disk. We derive analytic results for size-dependent planetesimal eccentricity and demonstrate the key role of the disk gravity for circumbinary dynamics. We then combine these results with a simple model for collisional outcomes and find that in systems like Kepler-16, planetesimal growth starting with 10–100 m planetesimals is possible outside a few AU. The exact location exterior to which this happens is sensitive to disk eccentricity, density, and precession rate, as well as to the size of the first generation of planetesimals. Strong perturbations from the binary in the inner part of the disk, combined with a secular resonance at a few AU, inhibit the growth of kilometer-sized planetesimals within 2–4 AU of the binary. In situ planetesimal growth in the Kepler circumbinary systems is possible only starting from large initial planetesimals (few-kilometer-sized even assuming favorable disk properties, i.e., low surface density)

  2. Planet Hunters in the Kepler Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C. J.; Fischer, D.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.; Smith, A. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Carter, J. A.; Howard, A.; Torres, G.; Crepp, J. R.; Keel, W. C.; Welsh, W. F.; Kaib, N. A.; Terrell, D.; Gagliano, R.; Jek, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the Kepler light curves. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits, with multiple independent classifiers reviewing a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's ~160,000 target stars. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 13 million classifications. With the start of the Kepler extended mission, Planet Hunters has entered a new phase. We will detail the upgrades and new features added to the project, highlighting in particular our search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting both stars in binary) in the the extended mission Quarterly data releases. We will also report on our latest planet candidates, including the characterization of our first confirmed planet candidate, a circumbinary planet in a four star system. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a National Science Foundation Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258 and in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

  3. Quick Look Software for the Kepler Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topka, Kenneth; Jenkins, J.; Caldwell, D.; Borucki, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    Kepler is NASA’s first mission capable of finding extra-solar terrestrial planets that are Earth-size and smaller. The instrument includes a high gain antenna that is bolted in a fixed position on the satellite. Thus, the satellite will be rotated in order to point the antenna at Earth for transmission, an operation that will occur approximately once a month. In between Earth pointing communication with Kepler is also possible using a low gain antenna via X-band, normally used for up-link of commands and down-link of engineering data. Some of this band pass is reserved for pixel data as well, making limited amount of science data available for quick look analysis about twice a week. Quick look software analyzes instrument health and performance as soon as possible after the data are obtained using the pixel data from X-band. The performance assessments are based on examination of time series data generated by the software, and include stellar brightness, centroid locations, plate scale, encircled energy, background flux values, CCD black, smear, and dark current levels, CCD dynamic range, and attitude solution. A more detailed analysis will be performed after the monthly down-link of all science data. New time series analyzed then include cosmic ray hit rate, CCD hot pixel formation rate, and combined differential photometric precision. All the metrics calculated for quick look will be reanalyzed at higher precision and higher time resolution. The Kepler mission is funded by NASA’s Discovery Program

  4. Rapid, Microwave Accelerated Synthesis of [1,2,4]Triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles from 4-Acylamino-1,2,4-Triazoles.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Stesphanie L; Olson, Margaret E; Harki, Daniel A

    2016-09-07

    1,2,4-Triazoles and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles are prevalent moieties in pharmaceutical agents, yet fused [1,2,4]-triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles are surprisingly under-represented for both synthesis and biological application. We report a rapid, two-step synthesis of [1,2,4]-triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles from commercial 4-amino-1,2,4-triazoles that is highlighted by a microwave accelerated intramolecular cyclization to generate the fused ring system. Our efforts to optimize reaction conditions and elucidate reaction mechanism are also described.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 3,6-diamino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives as protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chioua, Mourad; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Soriano, Elena; Lozach, Olivier; Meijer, Laurent; Marco-Contelles, José

    2009-08-15

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a number of differently substituted 3,6-diamino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives are reported. From the inhibition results on a selection of disease-relevant protein kinases [IC(50) (microM) DYRK1A=11; CDK5=0.41; GSK-3=1.5] we have observed that 3,6-diamino-4-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-5-carbonitrile (4) constitutes a potential new and simple lead compound in the search of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Harmonical cosmology: Johannes Kepler and Athanasius Kircher. (German Title: Harmonikale Kosmologie: Johannes Kepler und Athanasius Kircher)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebohm, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The connection between musical theory and astronomy is an aspect of Pythagorean cosmology, which still played a role in the 17th century, and was advanced at that time in very different ways: while Johannes Kepler conceives a proper geometrical system of harmonics and tries to connect it with accurate astronomical data, Athanasius Kircher, harshly criticising Kepler's ideas, sets a qualitative system against it, which is based on analogies. The reason for this discrepancy is not only found in the basically different systems of harmonics of both researchers, but also in the different positions that were taken by both within the controversy about the heliocentric system of the world.

  7. Borehole completion data package for SWL facility wells 699-22-35 and 699-23-34B

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, F.N.

    1997-09-01

    Two groundwater monitoring wells were drilled at the Hanford Solid Waste Landfill in 1993 and 1994 in support of the WAC 173-304 groundwater monitoring program at that size. The wells, 699-22-35 and 699-23-34B, were constructed in accordance with the requirements of WAC 173-160. However, a waver was received from the Washington State Department of Ecology to complete the wells with 10.7-m (35-ft) screens to allow for the expected drop in the water table in the vicinity of the landfill. The wells, drilled with an ODEX air rotary drilling rig, were completed at depths of 54.8 m (180 ft) and 49.8 m (163.5 ft), respectively, and were completed with 4-in. stainless steel casing and continuous-wrap wire screen with a sand pack of 20-40 mesh silica sand. The wells were developed and equipped with Hydrostar sampling pumps. Sampling with the SEAMIST membrane system during drilling indicated significant quantities of carbon tetrachloride vapor to depths of at least 35.6 m (120 ft) within the vadose zone.

  8. CAN PLANETARY INSTABILITY EXPLAIN THE KEPLER DICHOTOMY?

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.; Holmelin, Viktor

    2012-10-10

    The planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission provide a rich sample to constrain the architectures and relative inclinations of planetary systems within approximately 0.5 AU of their host stars. We use the triple-transit systems from the Kepler 16 months data as templates for physical triple-planet systems and perform synthetic transit observations, varying the internal inclination variation of the orbits. We find that all the Kepler triple-transit and double-transit systems can be produced from the triple-planet templates, given a low mutual inclination of around 5 Degree-Sign . Our analysis shows that the Kepler data contain a population of planets larger than four Earth radii in single-transit systems that cannot arise from the triple-planet templates. We explore the hypothesis that high-mass counterparts of the triple-transit systems underwent dynamical instability to produce a population of massive double-planet systems of moderately high mutual inclination. We perform N-body simulations of mass-boosted triple-planet systems and observe how the systems heat up and lose planets by planet-planet collisions, and less frequently by ejections or collisions with the star, yielding transits in agreement with the large planets in the Kepler single-transit systems. The resulting population of massive double-planet systems nevertheless cannot explain the additional excess of low-mass planets among the observed single-transit systems and the lack of gas-giant planets in double-transit and triple-transit systems. Planetary instability of systems of triple gas-giant planets can be behind part of the dichotomy between systems hosting one or more small planets and those hosting a single giant planet. The main part of the dichotomy, however, is more likely to have arisen already during planet formation when the formation, migration, or scattering of a massive planet, triggered above a threshold metallicity, suppressed the formation of other planets in sub-AU orbits.

  9. Kepler and the Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Rahlf

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a famous astronomer. But like other astronomers he had a problem to find work that would guarantee a regular income. So he was lucky to get work as "Styrian landscape mathematician" in Graz. One of his tasks was to write an annual calendar of weather forecasts and policital developments on the basis of astrological facts. He correctly predicted a conflict with the Osmanic Empire, although it is not clear whether the stars or the newspapers were the cause for that. Both his horoscope for Wallenstein and his book "Warnung an die Gegner der Astrologie" are well known. Kepler believed in some aspects of astrology, the influence of the planets for example. He deduced this front his ideas about physics. He neglected other aspects of astrology. e.g. the significance of the zodiac. In 1604 Kepler observed a new star and believed in a connection to a special and very rare planetary conjunction. After a Jupiter-Saturn-conjunction Jupiter met Mars. Kepler speculated that the star of Bethlehem might be a new star which was generated after a similar conjunction and recalculated it for 6/7 BC. Nowadays examples of both astronomical (and astrological) interpretations of the star of Bethlehem exist. The best known is the three time conjunction of 6/7 BC. But the interpretation of Martin (1980) for 213 BC seems equally excellent. Vardaman (1989) takes the Halley comet of 12 BC to be the star of Bethlehem. Other speculations arise from two Novae in the years 5 and 4 BC, tabulated in sources from the Far East. But historians tell us that there is no need fo a real star. The text in Matthew, book 2 is a legend. What is important in regard to the understanding of the star of Bethlehem is the "sidus Julium" the comet which could be seen in the sky during Caesar's funeral and the match of the King of Armenia Tiridates to Nero in Rome during. There was no real star over Bethlehem. All we have are interesting speculations, like those by Kepler.

  10. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R{sub ⊕}. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M

  11. 17 CFR 239.16b - Form S-8, for registration under the Securities Act of 1933 of securities to be offered to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form S-8, for registration under the Securities Act of 1933 of securities to be offered to employees pursuant to employee benefit plans. 239.16b Section 239.16b Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  12. 17 CFR 239.16b - Form S-8, for registration under the Securities Act of 1933 of securities to be offered to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form S-8, for registration under the Securities Act of 1933 of securities to be offered to employees pursuant to employee benefit plans. 239.16b Section 239.16b Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  13. Demystifying Kepler Data: A Primer for Systematic Artifact Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Barclay, T.; Fanelli, M.; Pepper, J.; Still, M.; Howell, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has collected data of high photometric precision and cadence almost continuously since operations began on 2009 May 2. Primarily designed to detect planetary transits and asteroseismological signals from solar-like stars, Kepler has provided high quality data for many areas of investigation. Unconditioned simple aperture time-series photometry are however affected by systematic structure. Examples of these systematics are differential velocity aberration, thermal gradients across the spacecraft, and pointing variations. While exhibiting some impact on Kepler's primary science, these systematics can critically handicap potentially ground-breaking scientific gains in other astrophysical areas, especially over long timescales greater than 10 days. As the data archive grows to provide light curves for 10(exp 5) stars of many years in length, Kepler will only fulfill its broad potential for stellar astrophysics if these systematics are understood and mitigated. Post-launch developments in the Kepler archive, data reduction pipeline and open source data analysis software have occurred to remove or reduce systematic artifacts. This paper provides a conceptual primer for users of the Kepler data archive to understand and recognize systematic artifacts within light curves and some methods for their removal. Specific examples of artifact mitigation are provided using data available within the archive. Through the methods defined here, the Kepler community will find a road map to maximizing the quality and employment of the Kepler legacy archive.

  14. The discovery and structure-activity relationships of pyrano[3,4-b]indole based inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase.

    PubMed

    LaPorte, Matthew G; Draper, Tandy L; Miller, Lori E; Blackledge, Charles W; Leister, Lara K; Amparo, Eugene; Hussey, Alison R; Young, Dorothy C; Chunduru, Srinivas K; Benetatos, Christopher A; Rhodes, Gerry; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Herbertz, Torsten; Burns, Christopher J; Condon, Stephen M

    2010-05-01

    We describe the structure-activity relationship of the C1-group of pyrano[3,4-b]indole based inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase. Further exploration of the allosteric binding site led to the discovery of the significantly more potent compound 12.

  15. Kepler planet-detection mission: introduction and first results.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Caldwell, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W; Dupree, Andrea K; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Kondo, Yoji; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Meibom, Søren; Kjeldsen, Hans; Lissauer, Jack J; Monet, David G; Morrison, David; Sasselov, Dimitar; Tarter, Jill; Boss, Alan; Brownlee, Don; Owen, Toby; Buzasi, Derek; Charbonneau, David; Doyle, Laurance; Fortney, Jonathan; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Rowe, Jason; Anderson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars; Ciardi, David; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Isaacson, Howard; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra; Torres, Guillermo; Johnson, John Asher; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Bryson, Stephen T; Dotson, Jessie; Haas, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D; Quintana, Elisa V; Clarke, Bruce D; Allen, Christopher; Li, Jie; Wu, Haley; Tenenbaum, Peter; Verner, Ekaterina; Bruhweiler, Frederick; Barnes, Jason; Prsa, Andrej

    2010-02-19

    The Kepler mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet's surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars, and five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 and 1.6 Jupiter radii and orbital periods from 3.2 to 4.9 days were discovered. The density of the Neptune-sized Kepler-4b is similar to that of Neptune and GJ 436b, even though the irradiation level is 800,000 times higher. Kepler-7b is one of the lowest-density planets (approximately 0.17 gram per cubic centimeter) yet detected. Kepler-5b, -6b, and -8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.

  16. Phase curves of the Kepler-11 multi-planet system

    SciTech Connect

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-06-01

    The Kepler mission has allowed the detection of numerous multi-planet exosystems where the planetary orbits are relatively compact. The first such system detected was Kepler-11 which has six known planets at the present time. These kinds of systems offer unique opportunities to study constraints on planetary albedos by taking advantage of both the precision timing and photometry provided by Kepler data to monitor possible phase variations. Here we present a case study of the Kepler-11 system in which we investigate the phase modulation of the system as the planets orbit the host star. We provide predictions of maximum phase modulation where the planets are simultaneously close to superior conjunction. We use corrected Kepler data for Q1-Q17 to determine the significance of these phase peaks. We find that data quarters where maximum phase peaks occur are better fit by a phase model than a 'null hypothesis' model.

  17. Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Caldwell, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Cochran, William D.; DeVore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W.; /Lowell Observ. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet's surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars, and five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 and 1.6 Jupiter radii and orbital periods from 3.2 to 4.9 days were discovered. The density of the Neptune-sized Kepler-4b is similar to that of Neptune and GJ 436b, even though the irradiation level is 800,000 times higher. Kepler-7b is one of the lowest-density planets ({approx}0.17 gram per cubic centimeter) yet detected. Kepler-5b, -6b, and -8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.

  18. Kepler's Theory of Highly Symmetric Plane Figures and Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsch, Gerhard

    The main idea of Kepler's Mysterium Cosmographicum of 1596 involves the five regular "Platonic" polyhedra. Hence it seems appropriate to discuss Kepler's considerations on, or his "theory" of regular plane figures and solids. This is a key aspect of his "geometrical cosmology". In modern mathematics the regularity of figures and solids is normally expressed in terms of symmetries and symmetry groups. Although Kepler himself does not speak of symmetries, the author is applying at some points the modern, admittedly anachronistic terminology. This seems to be justified, because here is presented a mathematician's view rather than a historical discourse. The tradition of plane regular figures and regular solids, from antiquity to Kepler's time, and the sourses of Kepler's mathematics have been thoroughly investigated by Hofmann and Fields.

  19. Sirolimus induces apoptosis and reverses multidrug resistance in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro via increasing microRNA-34b expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Rui-hua; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; Li, Kun-peng; Lu, Zhi-gang; Liu, Yuan; Han, Kun; Gan, Zhi-hua; Lin, Shu-chen; Hu, Hai-yan; Min, Da-liu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Multi-drug resistance poses a critical bottleneck in chemotherapy. Given the up-regulation of mTOR pathway in many chemoresistant cancers, we examined whether sirolimus (rapamycin), a first generation mTOR inhibitor, might induce human osteosarcoma (OS) cell apoptosis and increase the sensitivity of OS cells to anticancer drugs in vitro. Methods: Human OS cell line MG63/ADM was treated with sirolimus alone or in combination with doxorubicin (ADM), gemcitabine (GEM) or methotrexate (MTX). Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. MiRNAs in the cells were analyzed with miRNA microarray. The targets of miR-34b were determined based on TargetScan analysis and luciferase reporter assays. The expression of relevant mRNA and proteins was measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MiR-34, PAK1 and ABCB1 levels in 40 tissue samples of OS patients were analyzed using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays. Results: Sirolimus (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the cell proliferation (IC50=23.97 nmol/L) and induced apoptosis. Sirolimus (10 nmol/L) significantly sensitized the cells to anticancer drugs, leading to decreased IC50 values of ADM, GEM and MTX (from 25.48, 621.41 and 21.72 μmol/L to 4.93, 73.92 and 6.77 μmol/L, respectively). Treatment of with sirolimus increased miR-34b levels by a factor of 7.5 in the cells. Upregulation of miR-34b also induced apoptosis and increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs, whereas transfection with miR-34b-AMO, an inhibitor of miR-34b, reversed the anti-proliferation effect of sirolimus. Two key regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and multiple drug resistance, PAK1 and ABCB1, were demonstrated to be the direct targets of miR-34b. In 40 tissue samples of OS patients, significantly higher miR-34 ISH score and lower PAK5 and ABCB1 scores were detected in the chemo-sensitive group. Conclusion: Sirolimus increases the sensitivity of human OS

  20. HAT-P-16b: A 4 M J Planet Transiting a Bright Star on an Eccentric Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, L. A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Andersen, J.; Fűrész, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Béky, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-16b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 10.8 mag F8 dwarf GSC 2792-01700, with a period P = 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455027.59293 ± 0.00031 (BJD10), and transit duration 0.1276 ± 0.0013 days. The host star has a mass of 1.22 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 1.24 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 6158 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.17 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.193 ± 0.094 M J and radius of 1.289 ± 0.066 R J, yielding a mean density of 2.42 ± 0.35 g cm-3. Comparing these observed characteristics with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-16b is consistent with a 1 Gyr H/He-dominated gas giant planet. HAT-P-16b resides in a sparsely populated region of the mass-radius diagram and has a non-zero eccentricity of e = 0.036 with a significance of 10σ. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NASA (N018Hr).

  1. Biodegradation of Selected Nigerian Fruit Peels by the use of a Non-pathogenic Rhizobium species CWP G34B.

    PubMed

    Esther Boboye, Bolatito; Ajayi, George Olarewaju

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the ability of Rhizobium species CWP G34B to degrade the peels of selected Nigerian fruits. The potential of the bacterium to digest some carbon sources (lactose, maltose, sucrose and mannitol) and peels of some Nigerian fruits (pineapple, orange, plantain, banana, pawpaw and mango fruits) was investigated by growing the organism on the substances separately after which DNSA reagent method was used to quantify glucose released into the medium. The results showed that the bacterium was able to degrade all the carbohydrates with the highest and the lowest glucose concentrations of 5.52 mg/ml for lactose and 0.50 mg/ml for mannitol. The carbohydrate-catabolic-enzyme (CCE) activity ranged from 0.169 mg/ml to 1.346 mg/ml glucose per mg/ml protein. Mannitol exhibited the highest CCE activity while the lowest activity was observed in the presence of sucrose. The amount of extracellular protein synthesized was highest (9.803 mg/ml) in the presence of maltose and lowest (0.925 mg/ml) in mannitol. The mean polygalacturonase activity was 0.54 unit/ml when the bacterium was grown in pectin in contrast to 0.28 unit/ml when it was grown in mannitol. The bacterium showed ability to breakdown the peels of the Nigerian fruits with the highest capability in banana and pineapple (0.42 and 0.41 mg/ml glucose per mg/ml protein respectively). The fruit-peel-degrading enzyme activity was lowest in orange peel (0.75 unit/ml).

  2. DETECTABILITY OF OORT CLOUD OBJECTS USING KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Nakar, Ehud

    2010-03-01

    The size distribution and total mass of objects in the Oort Cloud have important implications to the theory of planet formation, including the properties of, and the processes taking place in the early solar system. We discuss the potential of space missions, such as Kepler and CoRoT, designed to discover transiting exoplanets, to detect Oort Cloud, Kuiper Belt, and main belt objects by occultations of background stars. Relying on published dynamical estimates of the content of the Oort Cloud, we find that Kepler's main program is expected to detect between 0 and {approx}100 occultation events by deca-kilometer-sized Oort Cloud objects. The occultation rate depends on the mass of the Oort Cloud, the distance to its 'inner edge', and the size distribution of its objects. In contrast, Kepler is unlikely to find occultations by Kuiper Belt or main belt asteroids, mainly due to the fact that it is observing a high ecliptic latitude field. Occultations by solar system objects will appear as a photometric deviation in a single measurement, implying that the information regarding the timescale and light-curve shape of each event is lost. We present statistical methods that have the potential to verify the authenticity of occultation events by solar system objects, to estimate the distance to the occulting population, and to constrain their size distribution. Our results are useful for planning of future space-based exoplanet searches in a way that will maximize the probability of detecting solar system objects, without hampering the main science goals.

  3. Activity and Rotation of Kepler-17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valio, Adriana; Estrela, Raissa; Netto, Yuri; Bravo, J. P.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic activity on stars manifests itself in the form of dark spots on the stellar surface, which cause modulations of a few percent in the light curve of the star as it rotates. When a planet eclipses its host star, it might cross in front of one of these spots, creating a “bump” in the transit light curve. By modeling these spot signatures, it is possible to determine the physical properties of the spots such as size, temperature, and location. In turn, monitoring of the spots’ longitude provides estimates of the stellar rotation and differential rotation. This technique was applied to the star Kepler-17, a solar–type star orbited by a hot Jupiter. The model yields the following spot characteristics: average radius of 49 ± 10 Mm, temperatures of 5100 ± 300 K, and surface area coverage of 6 ± 4%. The rotation period at the transit latitude, -5^\\circ , occulted by the planet was found to be 11.92 ± 0.05 day, slightly smaller than the out-of-transit average period of 12.4 ± 0.1 day. Adopting a solar-like differential rotation, we estimated the differential rotation of Kepler-17 to be {{Δ }}{{Ω }}=0.041+/- 0.005 rd day‑1, which is close to the solar value of 0.050 rd day‑1, and a relative differential rotation of {{Δ }}{{Ω }}/{{Ω }}=8.0+/- 0.9 % . Because Kepler-17 is much more active than our Sun, it appears that, for this star, larger rotation rate is more effective in the generation of magnetic fields than shear.

  4. Chandra And Kepler Monitoring Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Rishi R.; Gizis, John E.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of Chandra observation of L1 dwarf WISEP J190648.47+401106.8 (W1906+40 hereafter) and Kepler monitoring of L8 dwarf WISEP J060738.65+242953.4 (W0607+24 hereafter). W1906+40 was observed by Chandra for 49 ks on August 14, 2015. The net count of X-ray photons from this L dwarf is estimated to be ≍2 with the lower and upper limits equal to 0.44 and 6.07 respectively at 90 % confidence level. The time averaged X-ray luminosity over the duration of observation is found to be 1.87 × 10^25 erg s^-1 with the lower and upper limits equal to 4.03 × 10^24 erg s^-1 and 5.19× 10^25 erg s^-1 respectively at 90 % confidence level. The corresponding X-ray activity level is log L_X ≍ -4.64. This dwarf does not follow the rotation ac- tivity relation as seen in earlier-type stars despite being a rapid rotator with period of 8.9 hours. In addition, total time averaged energy (UBVRI ) of white light flares observed in the same dwarf is calculated to be 5.25 × 10^25 which is 30% of the total time averaged flare energy (XUBVRI). W0607+24 was monitored by Kepler for 36 days during K2 Campaign 0. Kepler photometry rules out any possibility of stable periodic signals in the optical with amplitudes greater than 1.5% and periods between 1.5 hours and 2 days. The results are consistent with those obtained by Spitzer observations which show no variabiltiy at the 0.2% level over 10 hours each in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands.

  5. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  6. Kepler & K2: One spacecraft, Two Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    This year, we mark twenty years of exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems orbiting main sequence stars. Exoplanet discoveries spill into the thousands, and the sensitivity boundaries continue to expand. NASA's Kepler Mission unveiled a galaxy replete with small planets and revealed populations that don't exist in our own solar system. The mission has yielded a sample sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a function of size, orbital period, and host star properties. We've learned that every late-type star has at least one planet on average, that terrestrial-sized planets are more common than larger planets within 1 AU, and that the nearest, potentially habitable earth-sized planet is likely within 5pc. After four years of continuous observations, the Kepler prime mission ended in May 2013 with the loss of a second reaction wheel. Thanks to innovative engineering, the spacecraft gained a second lease on life and emerged as the ecliptic surveyor, K2. In many regards, K2 is a distinctly new mission, not only by pointing at new areas of the sky but also by focusing on community-driven goals that diversify the science yield. For exoplanets, this means targeting bright and low mass stars -- the populations harboring planets amenable to dynamical and atmospheric characterization. To date, the mission has executed 7 observing campaigns lasting ~80 days each and has achieved a 6-hour photometric precision of 30 ppm. A couple dozen planets have been confirmed, including two nearby (< 50 pc) systems on the watch-list for future JWST campaigns. While Kepler prime is setting the stage for the direct imaging missions of the future, K2 is easing us into an era of atmospheric characterization -- one spacecraft, two missions, and a bright future for exoplanet science.

  7. Photometric analysis of the system Kepler-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Ji, Y.; Erdem, A.; Banks, T.

    2016-10-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis program WinFitter to an intensive study of Kepler-1 (= TrES-2) using all the available photometry (14 quarters; 1570640 measures) from the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu. The mean individual data-point error of the normalized flux values is 0.00026, leading to the model's specification for the mean reference flux of the system to an accuracy of {˜} 0.5 ppm. Completion of the analysis requires a number of prior quantities, relating mainly to the host star, that are adopted from relevant literature.

  8. ID16B: a hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline at the ESRF for nano-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Criado, Gema; Villanova, Julie; Tucoulou, Rémi; Salomon, Damien; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Labouré, Sylvain; Guilloud, Cyril; Valls, Valentin; Barrett, Raymond; Gagliardini, Eric; Dabin, Yves; Baker, Robert; Bohic, Sylvain; Cohen, Cédric; Morse, John

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the ESRF Phase I Upgrade Programme, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron beamline ID16B has been recently developed for hard X-ray nano-analysis. The construction of ID16B was driven by research areas with major scientific and societal impact such as nanotechnology, earth and environmental sciences, and bio-medical research. Based on a canted undulator source, this long beamline provides hard X-ray nanobeams optimized mainly for spectroscopic applications, including the combination of X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 2D/3D X-ray imaging techniques. Its end-station re-uses part of the apparatus of the earlier ID22 beamline, while improving and enlarging the spectroscopic capabilities: for example, the experimental arrangement offers improved lateral spatial resolution (∼50 nm), a larger and more flexible capability for in situ experiments, and monochromatic nanobeams tunable over a wider energy range which now includes the hard X-ray regime (5-70 keV). This paper describes the characteristics of this new facility, short-term technical developments and the first scientific results.

  9. ID16B: a hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline at the ESRF for nano-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Criado, Gema; Villanova, Julie; Tucoulou, Rémi; Salomon, Damien; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Labouré, Sylvain; Guilloud, Cyril; Valls, Valentin; Barrett, Raymond; Gagliardini, Eric; Dabin, Yves; Baker, Robert; Bohic, Sylvain; Cohen, Cédric; Morse, John

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the ESRF Phase I Upgrade Programme, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron beamline ID16B has been recently developed for hard X-ray nano-analysis. The construction of ID16B was driven by research areas with major scientific and societal impact such as nanotechnology, earth and environmental sciences, and bio-medical research. Based on a canted undulator source, this long beamline provides hard X-ray nanobeams optimized mainly for spectroscopic applications, including the combination of X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 2D/3D X-ray imaging techniques. Its end-station re-uses part of the apparatus of the earlier ID22 beamline, while improving and enlarging the spectroscopic capabilities: for example, the experimental arrangement offers improved lateral spatial resolution (∼50 nm), a larger and more flexible capability for in situ experiments, and monochromatic nanobeams tunable over a wider energy range which now includes the hard X-ray regime (5–70 keV). This paper describes the characteristics of this new facility, short-term technical developments and the first scientific results. PMID:26698084

  10. Kepler Mission to Detect Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    Kepler Mission to detect Earth-like planets in our Milky Way galaxy was approved by NASA in December 2001 for a 4-5 year mission. The launch is planned in about 5 years. The Kepler observatory will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit. The unique feature of the Kepler Mission is its ability to detect Earth-like planets orbiting around solar-type stars at a distance similar to that of Earth (from our Sun); such an orbit could provide an environment suitable for supporting life as we know it. The Kepler observatory accomplishes this feat by looking for the transits of planetary object in front of their suns; Kepler has a photometric precision of 10E-5 (0.00001) to achieve such detections. Other ongoing planetary detection programs (based mostly on a technique that looks for the shifting of spectral lines of the primary star due to its planetary companions' motions around it) have detected massive planets (with masses in the range of Jupiter); such massive planets are not considered suitable for supporting life. If our current theories for the formation of planetary systems are valid, we expect to detect about 50 Earth-like planets during Kepler's 4-year mission (assuming a random distribution of the planetary orbital inclinations with respect to the line of sight from Kepler). The number of detection will increase about 640 planets if the planets to be detected are Jupiter-sized.

  11. Kepler Mission to Detect Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    2003-01-01

    Kepler Mission to detect Earth-like planets in our Milky Way galaxy was approved by NASA in December 2001 for a 4-5 year mission. The launch is planned in about 5 years. The Kepler observatory will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit. The unique feature of the Kepler Mission is its ability to detect Earth-like planets orbiting around solar-type stars at a distance similar to that of Earth (from our Sun); such an orbit could provide an environment suitable for supporting life as we know it. The Kepler observatory accomplishes this feat by looking for the transits of planetary object in front of their suns; Kepler has a photometric precision of 10E-5 (0.00001) to achieve such detections. Other ongoing planetary detection programs (based mostly on a technique that looks for the shifting of spectral lines of the primary star due to its planetary companions' motions around it) have detected massive planets (with masses in the range of Jupiter); such massive planets are not considered suitable for supporting life. If our current theories for the formation of planetary systems are valid, we expect to detect about 50 Earth-like planets during Kepler's 4-year mission (assuming a random distribution of the planetary orbital inclinations with respect to the line of sight from Kepler). The number of detection will increase about 640 planets if the planets to be detected are Jupiter-sized.

  12. Spitzer Observations Suggest a Low Kepler False Postive Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Ballard, S.; Kepler Team

    2011-09-01

    I present the results from a large project that uses 800 hours of the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Object of Interest (KOI). The project's main purposes are to validate the planetary status of the Kepler candidates and to estimate observationally the Kepler false positive rate. A small amount of this telescope time is also dedicated to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets. I revue the project and introduce our target sample which is composed of 34 candidates selected amongst the first 400 KOIs. This list contains mainly sub-Neptune sizes candidates orbiting a wide range of spectral type stars. I present the analysis of the complete sample. By comparing the transit light curves of candidates observed with Kepler and Spitzer, we can exclude significant sources of astrophysical false positives resulting from blends (eclipsing binaries, hierarchical triples, etc...) that can mimic an exoplanetary signature in the Kepler bandpass. I show that our measured Spitzer transit depths are almost entirely in agreement with the Kepler depths. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate is extremely low.

  13. A Planet Hunters Search of the Kepler TCE Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Meg; Lintott, Chris; Fischer, Debra; Smith, Arfon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Brewer, John; Giguere, Matt; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Rob; Wang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    NASA's Kepler spacecraft has spent the past 4 years monitoring ~160,000 stars for the signatures of transiting exoplanets. Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of citizen science projects, uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project's discoveries including PH1 b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a four star system., and over 20 previously unknown planet candidates. The Kepler team has released the list of 18,406 potential transit signals or threshold-crossing events (TCEs) identified in Quarters 1-12 (~1000 days) by their automated Transit Planet Search (TPS) algorithm. The majority of these detections found by TPS are triggered by transient events and are not valid planet candidates. To identify planetary candidates from the detected TCEs, a human review of the validation reports, generated by the Kepler pipeline for each TCE, is performed by several Kepler team members. We have undertaken an independent crowd-sourced effort to perform a systematic search of the Kepler Q1-12 TCE list. With the Internet we can obtain multiple assessments of each TCE's data validation report. Planet Hunters volunteers evaluate whether a transit is visible in the Kepler light curve folded on the expected period identified by TPS. We present the first results of this analysis.

  14. Kepler Transit Depths Contaminated By a Phantom Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Croll, Bryce; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.

    2017-02-01

    We present ground-based observations from the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) of three transits of Kepler-445c—a supposed super-Earth exoplanet with properties resembling GJ 1214b—and demonstrate that the transit depth is ∼50% shallower than the depth previously inferred from Kepler spacecraft data. The resulting decrease in planetary radius significantly alters the interpretation of the exoplanet’s bulk composition. Despite the faintness of the M4 dwarf host star, our ground-based photometry clearly recovers each transit and achieves repeatable 1σ precision of ∼0.2% (2 millimags). The transit parameters estimated from the DCT data are discrepant with those inferred from the Kepler data to at least 17σ confidence. This inconsistency is due to a subtle miscalculation of the stellar crowding metric during the Kepler pre-search data conditioning (PDC). The crowding metric, or CROWDSAP, is contaminated by a non-existent phantom star originating in the USNO-B1 catalog and inherited by the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Phantom stars in the KIC are likely rare, but they have the potential to affect statistical studies of Kepler targets that use the PDC transit depths for a large number of exoplanets where an individual follow-up observation of each is not possible. The miscalculation of Kepler-445c’s transit depth emphasizes the importance of stellar crowding in the Kepler data, and provides a cautionary tale for the analysis of data from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which will have even larger pixels than Kepler.

  15. Exploring exoplanet populations with NASA's Kepler Mission.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Natalie M

    2014-09-02

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a function of size, orbital period, star type, and insolation flux. The mission has made significant progress toward achieving that goal. Over 3,500 transiting exoplanets have been identified from the analysis of the first 3 y of data, 100 planets of which are in the habitable zone. The catalog has a high reliability rate (85-90% averaged over the period/radius plane), which is improving as follow-up observations continue. Dynamical (e.g., velocimetry and transit timing) and statistical methods have confirmed and characterized hundreds of planets over a large range of sizes and compositions for both single- and multiple-star systems. Population studies suggest that planets abound in our galaxy and that small planets are particularly frequent. Here, I report on the progress Kepler has made measuring the prevalence of exoplanets orbiting within one astronomical unit of their host stars in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's long-term goal of finding habitable environments beyond the solar system.

  16. Credentialing Kepler: Transits in the Seventeenth Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, O.

    2005-08-01

    Kepler's successful prediction of the 1631 transit of Mercury spurred an interest in his decidedly user-unfriendly Rudolfine Tables. Because his Ephemerides went only to 1636, he did not draw attention to the 1639 transit of Venus, although the tables actually predicted the phenomenon, and the observation by Horrocks again proved the superiority of Kepler's work. By mid-century alternative user-friendly versions of the Rudolfine Tables were published by V. Renieri in Italy, J.B. Morin in France, Maria Cunitia in Germany, and (in a more modified form) by J. Shakerley in England. Transits of Mercury were observed in 1651 (by Shakerley in Surat, India), 1661, 1667, 1690, and 1697, giving astronomers opportunities to compare the predictions from these tables as well as those of Lansbergen (which were a variant of the Copernican Prutenic Tables). Because of the subsequent interest in transits for determining the length of the astronomical unit, the 18th-century French astronomer J-N. Delisle compiled for these early transits extensive systematic records, which are now preserved at the Paris Observatory. By his day, however, the as-yet-unpublished tables of Edmond Halley gave the most successful predictions, and Delisle showed little interest in further credentialing the Rudolfine Tables, a process that had already taken place in the previous century.

  17. INITIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF KEPLER SHORT CADENCE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Hall, Jennifer; Klaus, Todd; McCauliff, Sean

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission offers two options for observations-either long cadence (LC) used for the bulk of core mission science, or short cadence (SC) which is used for applications such as asteroseismology of solar-like stars and transit timing measurements of exoplanets where the 1 minute sampling is critical. We discuss the characteristics of SC data obtained in the 33.5 day long Quarter 1 observations with Kepler which completed on 2009 June 15. The truly excellent time series precisions are nearly Poisson limited at 11th magnitude providing per-point measurement errors of 200 parts-per-million per minute. For extremely saturated stars near seventh magnitude precisions of 40 ppm are reached, while for background limited measurements at 17th magnitude precisions of 7 mmag are maintained. We note the presence of two additive artifacts, one that generates regularly spaced peaks in frequency, and one that involves additive offsets in the time domain inversely proportional to stellar brightness. The difference between LC and SC sampling is illustrated for transit observations of TrES-2.

  18. FIRST KEPLER RESULTS ON RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kolenberg, K.; Guggenberger, E.; Szabo, R.; Benko, J. M.; Derekas, A.; Kollath, Z.; Nuspl, J.; Kurtz, D. W.; Gilliland, R. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Brown, T. M.; Chadid, M.; Criscienzo, M. Di; Kinemuchi, K.; Kunder, A.; Kopacki, G.; Moskalik, P.; Nemec, J. M.; Silvotti, R.

    2010-04-20

    We present the first results of our analyses of selected RR Lyrae stars for which data have been obtained by the Kepler Mission. As expected, we find a significant fraction of the RRab stars to show the Blazhko effect, a still unexplained phenomenon that manifests itself as periodic amplitude and phase modulations of the light curve, on timescales of typically tens to hundreds of days. The long time span of the Kepler Mission of 3.5 yr and the unprecedentedly high precision of its data provide a unique opportunity for the study of RR Lyrae stars. Using data of a modulated star observed in the first roll as a showcase, we discuss the data, our analyses, findings, and their implications for our understanding of RR Lyrae stars and the Blazhko effect. With at least 40% of the RR Lyrae stars in our sample showing modulation, we confirm the high incidence rate that was only found in recent high-precision studies. Moreover, we report the occurrence of additional frequencies, beyond the main pulsation mode and its modulation components. Their half-integer ratio to the main frequency is reminiscent of a period doubling effect caused by resonances, observed for the first time in RR Lyrae stars.

  19. Scientific Issues Addressed by the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourcki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Lissauer, J. J.; Jenkins, J. M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Kepler Mission uses a wide field-of-view telescope to photometrically monitor 100,000 main-sequence stars for evidence of planetary transits. Because of the large number of stars monitored and because the mission is designed with a precision (0.002%) sufficient to readily recognize Earth-size planets transiting solar-like stars, several hundred Earth-size planets should be found. Based on the the Dopper velocity observations that find 2% of the main-sequence stars have Jupiter-size planets in short-period orbits, the Kepler mission is also expected to detect about 2000 giant planets. Several questions about the association of planet types and stellar characteristics can be investigated. For example; Are small planets found when Jupiter-mass planets are also present in inner orbits? What is the frequency of small planets compared to Jupiter-mass planets? What is the frequency and distribution of planets intermediate in size and mass to that of Earth and Jupiter? What correlations exist between planet size, distribution, and frequency with the characteristics of the stars they orbit? A comparison between model predictions and observation should be a useful step in evolving better models of planetary system formation and help put the formation of our Solar System in perspective.

  20. Kepler Instrument Performance: the 1 Year Checkup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Jenkins, J. M.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Argabright, V. S.; Batalha, N. M.; Bryson, S. T.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Christiansen, J. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Geary, J. C.; Li, J.; Machalek, P.; Tenenbaum, P.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wu, H.; Koch, D. G.; Borucki, W. J.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to detect the 80 parts per million (ppm) signal from an Earth-Sun equivalent transit. Such precision requires superb instrument stability on time scales up to 2 days and systematic error removal to better than 20 ppm. The sole scientific instrument is the photometer, a 0.95 m aperture Schmidt telescope that feeds the 94.6 million pixel CCD detector array, which contains both Science and Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) CCDs. We find that the in-flight detector properties of the focal plane, including bias levels, read noise, gain, linearity, saturation, FGS to Science crosstalk, and video crosstalk between Science CCDs, are essentially unchanged from their pre-launch values. Now that Kepler has been collecting science data for more than a year, we are able to track stars through a complete orbit of the spacecraft around the Sun and its associated roll orientations. Using these data, we can begin to disentangle the instrument related signals from those intrinsic to the sky background and stars, measure both short- and long-term effects from cosmic rays, see interactions of previously known image artifacts with starlight, and uncover several unexpected systematics that affect photometric precision, including unexplained diffuse illumination events that occur at significant levels 10 times per month. Funding for this Discovery Mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  1. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  2. A SEARCH FOR EXOZODIACAL CLOUDS WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Jackson, Brian K.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Johnson, Marshall; Caldwell, Caroline; Agol, Eric; Ford, Eric B.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.

    2013-02-20

    Planets embedded within dust disks may drive the formation of large scale clumpy dust structures by trapping dust into resonant orbits. Detection and subsequent modeling of the dust structures would help constrain the mass and orbit of the planet and the disk architecture, give clues to the history of the planetary system, and provide a statistical estimate of disk asymmetry for future exoEarth-imaging missions. Here, we present the first search for these resonant structures in the inner regions of planetary systems by analyzing the light curves of hot Jupiter planetary candidates identified by the Kepler mission. We detect only one candidate disk structure associated with KOI 838.01 at the 3{sigma} confidence level, but subsequent radial velocity measurements reveal that KOI 838.01 is a grazing eclipsing binary and the candidate disk structure is a false positive. Using our null result, we place an upper limit on the frequency of dense exozodi structures created by hot Jupiters. We find that at the 90% confidence level, less than 21% of Kepler hot Jupiters create resonant dust clumps that lead and trail the planet by {approx}90 Degree-Sign with optical depths {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, which corresponds to the resonant structure expected for a lone hot Jupiter perturbing a dynamically cold dust disk 50 times as dense as the zodiacal cloud.

  3. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  4. New Constraints on the Kepler Exomoon Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teachey, Alexander; Kipping, David M.; Schmitt, Allan; Bakos, Gaspar; Buchhave, Lars A.; Torres, Guillermo; Nesvorny, David; Hartman, Joel; Huang, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    The search for exomoons represents an exciting new avenue in exoplanetary science. The discovery of these worlds is expected to reveal much about the formation and evolution of planets and moons beyond our Solar System, just as the first exoplanet discoveries broadened our understanding two decades ago. For the past several years the Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK) project has been searching for evidence of exomoons, and in previously published work we employed computationally expensive photodynamical methods to survey 60 planets for the presence of moons. We present here new results using an alternative phase-folding approach to compliment this search. While less sensitive on a case-by-case basis, the method is sufficiently quick and easy to implement that hundreds of Kepler planets can be studied en masse, leading to new tighter constraints on the ensemble. As a by-product of this work we present transit timing variation posterior distributions for hundreds of planets which will be available online to the community. Finally, we discuss the exomoon population statistics implied by our analysis.

  5. Generalized Kepler problems. I. Without magnetic charges

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guowu

    2013-01-15

    For each simple euclidean Jordan algebra V of rank {rho} and degree {delta}, we introduce a family of classical dynamic problems. These dynamical problems all share the characteristic features of the Kepler problem for planetary motions, such as the existence of Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector and hidden symmetry. After suitable quantizations, a family of quantum dynamic problems, parametrized by the nontrivial Wallach parameter {nu}, is obtained. Here, {nu} Element-Of W(V):={l_brace}k({delta}/2) Double-Vertical-Line k=1,...,({rho}-1){r_brace} Union (({rho}-1)({delta}/2),{infinity}) and was introduced by N. Wallach to parametrize the set of nontrivial scalar-type unitary lowest weight representations of the conformal group of V. For the quantum dynamic problem labelled by {nu}, the bound state spectra is -(1/2/(I+{nu}({rho}/2)){sup 2}), I= 0, 1, Horizontal-Ellipsis and its Hilbert space of bound states gives a new realization for the afore-mentioned representation labelled by {nu}. A few results in the literature about these representations become more explicit and more refined. The Lagrangian for a classical Kepler-type dynamic problem introduced here is still of the simple form: (1/2) parallel x parallel {sup 2}+(1/r). Here, x is the velocity of a unit-mass particle moving on the space consisting of V's semi-positive elements of a fixed rank, and r is the inner product of x with the identity element of V.

  6. Kepler and the long-period variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hartig, Erich; Lebzelter, Thomas; Cash, Jennifer; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Walter, Donald K. E-mail: thomas.lebzelter@univie.ac.at E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu E-mail: dkw@physics.scsu.edu

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Kepler photometry is used to explore the details of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) light curves. Since AGB variability has a typical timescale on the order of a year, we discuss at length the removal of long-term trends and quarterly changes in Kepler data. Photometry for a small sample of nine semi-regular (SR) AGB stars is examined using a 30 minute cadence over a period of 45 months. While undergoing long-period variations of many magnitudes, the light curves are shown to be smooth at the millimagnitude level over much shorter time intervals. No flares or other rapid events were detected on a sub-day timescale. The shortest AGB period detected is on the order of 100 days. All the SR variables in our sample are shown to have multiple modes. This is always the first overtone, typically combined with the fundamental. A second common characteristic of SR variables is shown to be the simultaneous excitation of multiple closely separated periods for the same overtone mode. Approximately half the sample had a much longer variation in the light curve, likely a long secondary period (LSP). The light curves were all well represented by a combination of sinusoids. However, the properties of the sinusoids are time variable, with irregular variations present at low levels. No non-radial pulsations were detected. It is argued that the LSP variation seen in many SR variables is intrinsic to the star and linked to multiple mode pulsation.

  7. Latest Results from the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Kepler Mission Team

    2012-10-01

    As the Kepler Mission completes the end of its third year of science observations, calibrated time series data of increasing length are becoming available that make possible the detection of planetary candidates smaller than Earth and candidates with orbital periods nearing one year. Further, the greater capability and sophistication of the pipeline analyses improve the completeness of the results and provide better estimates of the parameter distributions. The most recent data release on 28 July 2012 (Quarters 6 through 9) adds an additional ¾ year of observations so that most planetary candidates with orbital periods as long as 273 days now show at least 3 transits. Data for an additional year (i.e., Quarters 10 through 13) are scheduled to be released on 28 October 2012. A first look at the size, period, and semi-major axis distributions of these data will be presented. Summaries of the planets confirmed, candidates that are being actively analyzed, and the methods being used to verify and confirm planets will be discussed. The Extended Kepler Mission operations begin on 1 October 2012 and many changes in mission focus and operations, data release, and science community participation are being implemented and will be outlined. Funding for this Discovery mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. ASTEROSEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF KNOWN PLANET HOSTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Brown, T. M.; Gilliland, R. L.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.

    2010-04-20

    In addition to its great potential for characterizing extra-solar planetary systems, the Kepler Mission is providing unique data on stellar oscillations. A key aspect of Kepler asteroseismology is the application to solar-like oscillations of main-sequence stars. As an example, we here consider an initial analysis of data for three stars in the Kepler field for which planetary transits were known from ground-based observations. For one of these, HAT-P-7, we obtain a detailed frequency spectrum and hence strong constraints on the stellar properties. The remaining two stars show definite evidence for solar-like oscillations, yielding a preliminary estimate of their mean densities.

  9. Marking the 400th Anniversary of Kepler's Astronomia nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, T. J.

    2010-11-01

    Special Session 9 of the XXVII General Assembly (11-14 August 2009, Rio de Janeiro) was devoted to the topic “Marking the 400th Anniversary of Kepler's Astronomia nova”. During the two-and-a-half day meeting (spread over four days), there were nine invited and three contributed talks, a round-table discussion on the future of Kepler studies and an open session to propose the setting up of a Johannes Kepler Working Group under the aegis of the IAU.

  10. Using Kepler Light Curves for Astronomy Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Jennifer; Rivers, S.; Eleby, J.; Gould, A.; Komatsu, T.

    2014-01-01

    We will present our efforts related to Education and Public Outreach activities using Kepler Light Curves. We are currently developing interactive web based activities to introduce the public to the general topic of Stellar Variability and Intrinsic Variable Stars in particular using the high quality light curves of over a dozen Kepler targets. Along with the public website, we are exploring areas to develop teacher guides to use Kepler Light Curves in the middle and high school classrooms. These efforts are supported through a NASA EPSCoR grant "South Carolina Joint Venture Program" via a subaward to SC State University.

  11. Chemical Abundances of M-dwarfs from the APOGEE Survey. I. The Exoplanet Hosting Stars Kepler-138 and Kepler-186

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, D.; Cunha, K.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, O.; Allende Prieto, C.; Smith, V. V.; Mahadevan, S.; Blake, C.; Johnson, J. A.; Jönsson, H.; Pinsonneault, M.; Holtzman, J.; Majewski, S. R.; Shetrone, M.; Teske, J.; Nidever, D.; Schiavon, R.; Sobeck, J.; García Pérez, A. E.; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Stassun, K.

    2017-02-01

    We report the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the exoplanet-hosting M-dwarf stars Kepler-138 and Kepler-186 from the analysis of high-resolution (R ∼ 22,500) H-band spectra from the SDSS-IV–APOGEE survey. Chemical abundances of 13 elements—C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe—are extracted from the APOGEE spectra of these early M-dwarfs via spectrum syntheses computed with an improved line list that takes into account H2O and FeH lines. This paper demonstrates that APOGEE spectra can be analyzed to determine detailed chemical compositions of M-dwarfs. Both exoplanet-hosting M-dwarfs display modest sub-solar metallicities: [Fe/H]Kepler-138 = ‑0.09 ± 0.09 dex and [Fe/H]Kepler-186 = ‑0.08 ± 0.10 dex. The measured metallicities resulting from this high-resolution analysis are found to be higher by ∼0.1–0.2 dex than previous estimates from lower-resolution spectra. The C/O ratios obtained for the two planet-hosting stars are near-solar, with values of 0.55 ± 0.10 for Kepler-138 and 0.52 ± 0.12 for Kepler-186. Kepler-186 exhibits a marginally enhanced [Si/Fe] ratio.

  12. Two miRNA clusters, miR-34b/c and miR-449, are essential for normal brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingwen; Bao, Jianqiang; Kim, Minkyung; Yuan, Shuiqiao; Tang, Chong; Zheng, Huili; Mastick, Grant S.; Xu, Chen; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Ablation of a single miRNA gene rarely leads to a discernable developmental phenotype in mice, in some cases because of compensatory effects by other functionally related miRNAs. Here, we report that simultaneous inactivation of two functionally related miRNA clusters (miR-34b/c and miR-449) encoding five miRNAs (miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-449b, and miR-449c) led to sexually dimorphic, partial perinatal lethality, growth retardation, and infertility. These developmental defects correlated with the dysregulation of ∼240 target genes, which are mainly involved in three major cellular functions, including cell-fate control, brain development and microtubule dynamics. Our data demonstrate an essential role of a miRNA family in brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis. PMID:24982181

  13. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kovacs, G.; Shporer, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; and others

    2012-07-15

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  14. Stellar Rotation in Kepler: Forward Modeling of the Kepler Period Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; García, Rafael A.; Ceillier, Tugdual

    2015-09-01

    The Kepler mission has made it possible to detect the signatures of surface rotation in tens of thousands of stars across many different spectral types, ages, and evolutionary states. While it is tempting to use these rotation rates as a means to determine the ages of field stars in Kepler via the gyrochronology relationships, we show that 1) only a fraction of these stars should be viable targets for the existing period-age relationships due to "contamination" from hot stars and subgiants, and 2) that apparent age trends in the rotation distributions can be explained with an activity-based detection bias. We have performed a forward modeling exercise in an effort to reproduce the observed distribution of rotation periods.

  15. WNT16B is a new marker of cellular senescence that regulates p53 activity and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Binet, Romuald; Ythier, Damien; Robles, Ana I; Collado, Manuel; Larrieu, Delphine; Fonti, Claire; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Serrano, Manuel; Harris, Curtis C; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-12-15

    Senescence is a tumor suppression mechanism that is induced by several stimuli, including oncogenic signaling and telomere shortening, and controlled by the p53/p21(WAF1) signaling pathway. Recently, a critical role for secreted factors has emerged, suggesting that extracellular signals are necessary for the onset and maintenance of senescence. Conversely, factors secreted by senescent cells may promote tumor growth. By using expression profiling techniques, we searched for secreted factors that were overexpressed in fibroblasts undergoing replicative senescence. We identified WNT16B, a member of the WNT family of secreted proteins. We found that WNT16B is overexpressed in cells undergoing stress-induced premature senescence and oncogene-induced senescence in both MRC5 cell line and the in vivo murine model of K-Ras(V12)-induced senescence. By small interfering RNA experiments, we observed that both p53 and WNT16B are necessary for the onset of replicative senescence. WNT16B expression is required for the full transcriptional activation of p21(WAF1). Moreover, WNT16B regulates activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Overall, we identified WNT16B as a new marker of senescence that regulates p53 activity and the PI3K/AKT pathway and is necessary for the onset of replicative senescence.

  16. pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a case-control study in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jia; Ma, Xue-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Shen, Shi-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. miR-34 induces changes of its downstream genes, and plays a key role in altering the apoptotic cycle and pathways of downstream cells, and finally influences the development of cancer. We assessed the relationship of the pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism with hepatocellular carcinoma risk in a Chinese population. During the period of January 2014 and December 2015, a total of 164 HCC patients and 305 healthy controls were recruited from the Inner Mongolia People’s Hospital. Genotyping of the pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Using χ2 test, we observed that HCC patients were likely to have a habit of alcohol consumption (χ2 = 10.24, P = 0.001) and infect with HBV or HCV (χ2 = 128.17, P < 0.001). In co-dominant model, the CC genotype of pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 had a significant higher risk of HCC as compared with the TT genotype, and the corresponding adjusted OR (95% CI) was 4.14 (1.91-9.75). In dominant model, we observed that the TC+CC genotype were associated with an increased risk of HCC in comparison to the TT genotype (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.17-2.55). In recessive model, the CC genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of HCC when compared with the TT+TC genotype (OR = 3.46, 95% CI = 1.62-8.54). The pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism was associated with a higher risk of HCC in the Chinese population examined. Further large-scale and multi-center studies are required to confirm these results. PMID:28337312

  17. Single-layer electroluminescent devices based on fluorene-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoxaline co-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokladko-Kowar, Monika; Danel, Andrzej; Chacaga, Łukasz

    2013-11-01

    A fluorene based copolymer was synthesized for electroluminescent application. To the main chain of polymer the nitrogen heterocyclic, 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoxaline, unit was introduced. The incorporation of this derivative tuned the emission from the blue to yellow-green one. A simple, single layered device was fabricated with the configuration ITO/PEDOT/co-poly-FLU-PQX/Ca/Mg.

  18. Photophysical properties of 6-N,N-dimethylpyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline substituted with pyridyl in the 3-position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabka, Danuta; Danel, Andrzej; Kolbus, Anna; Szary, Karol

    2017-04-01

    The new electron donor-acceptor dye, 6-N,N-dimethyl-3-pyridyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline (DMA-3PPhPQ) was synthesized. Spectral properties of DMA-3PPhPQ were investigated in a great number of organic solvents with different polarity. The red shifts in absorption and fluorescence maxima with increasing polarity of the solvents was observed for various functions of polarity of the solvents. This compound exhibit a CT fluorescence.

  19. Transit Timing Variation analysis with Kepler light curves of KOI 227 and Kepler 93b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulz, Shannon; Reed, Mike

    2017-01-01

    By searching for transit signals in approximately 150,000 stars, NASA’s Kepler Space telescope found thousands of exoplanets over its primary mission from 2009 to 2013 (Tenenbaum et al. 2014, ApJS, 211, 6). Yet, a detailed follow-up examination of Kepler light curves may contribute more evidence on system dynamics and planetary atmospheres of these objects. Kepler’s continuous observing of these systems over the mission duration produced light curves of sufficient duration to allow for the search for transit timing variations. Transit timing variations over the course of many orbits may indicate a precessing orbit or the existence of a non-transiting third body such as another exoplanet. Flux contributions of the planet just prior to secondary eclipse may provide a measurement of bond albedo from the day-side of the transiting planet. Any asymmetries of the transit shape may indicate thermal asymmetries which can measure upper atmosphere motion of the planet. These two factors can constrain atmospheric models of close orbiting exoplanets. We first establish our procedure with the well-documented TTV system, KOI 227 (Nesvorny et al. 2014, ApJ, 790, 31). Using the test case of KOI 227, we analyze Kepler-93b for TTVs and day-side flux contributions. Kepler-93b is likely a rocky planet with R = 1.50 ± 0.03 Earth Radii and M = 2.59 ± 2.0 Earth Masses (Marcy et al. 2014, ApJS, 210, 20). This research is funded by a NASA EPSCoR grant.

  20. ASTEROSEISMIC DETERMINATION OF OBLIQUITIES OF THE EXOPLANET SYSTEMS KEPLER-50 AND KEPLER-65

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Winn, J. N.; Handberg, R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Stello, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Basu, S.; Fischer, D. A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Buchhave, L. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Gilliland, R. L.; Huber, D.; Isaacson, H.; and others

    2013-04-01

    Results on the obliquity of exoplanet host stars-the angle between the stellar spin axis and the planetary orbital axis-provide important diagnostic information for theories describing planetary formation. Here we present the first application of asteroseismology to the problem of stellar obliquity determination in systems with transiting planets and Sun-like host stars. We consider two systems observed by the NASA Kepler mission which have multiple transiting small (super-Earth sized) planets: the previously reported Kepler-50 and a new system, Kepler-65, whose planets we validate in this paper. Both stars show rich spectra of solar-like oscillations. From the asteroseismic analysis we find that each host has its rotation axis nearly perpendicular to the line of sight with the sines of the angles constrained at the 1{sigma} level to lie above 0.97 and 0.91, respectively. We use statistical arguments to show that coplanar orbits are favored in both systems, and that the orientations of the planetary orbits and the stellar rotation axis are correlated.

  1. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, Gal; Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu

    2012-05-15

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  2. Kepler: The Search for Earth-Size Planets Begins

    NASA Video Gallery

    Since its launch in March, 2009, the Kepler Mission has announced the discovery of 9 confirmed exoplanets (or planets outside our solar system). This video explores how the team works to combine ph...

  3. NASA's Kepler Discovers Its Smallest 'Habitable Zone' Planets to Date

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary systems that include three super-Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone," the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature o...

  4. NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Multiple Planets Orbiting Twin Suns

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered the first transiting circumbinary system -- multiple planets orbiting two suns -- 4,900 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Cygnus, proving that more t...

  5. The Conservation Principles and Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motz, Lloyd

    1975-01-01

    Derives Kepler's three laws of planetary motion algebraically from conservation principles without introducing Newton's law of force explicitly. This procedure can be presented to students who have had no more than high school algebra. (Author)

  6. The Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Bryson, Stephen T.; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) is responsible for several aspects of the Kepler Mission, including managing targets, generating on-board data compression tables, monitoring photometer health and status, processing the science data, and exporting the pipeline products to the mission archive. We describe how the generic pipeline framework software developed for Kepler is extended to achieve these goals, including pipeline configurations for processing science data and other support roles, and custom unit of work generators that control how the Kepler data are partitioned and distributed across the computing cluster. We describe the interface between the Java software that manages the retrieval and storage of the data for a given unit of work and the MATLAB algorithms that process these data. The data for each unit of work are packaged into a single file that contains everything needed by the science algorithms, allowing these files to be used to debug and evolve the algorithms offline.

  7. Introducing Triquetrum, A Possible Future for Kepler and Ptolemy II

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Christopher; Billings, Jay Jay

    2016-01-01

    Triquetrum is an open platform for managing and executing scientific workflows that is under development as an Eclipse project. Both Triquetrum and Kepler use Ptolemy II as their execution engine. Triquetrum presents opportunities and risks for the Kepler community. The opportunities include a possibly larger community for interaction and a path for Kepler to move from Kepler's one-off ant-based build environment towards a more common OSGi-based environment and a way to maintain a stable Ptolemy II core. The risks include the fact that Triquetrum is a fork of Ptolemy II that would result in package name changes and other possible changes. In addition, Triquetrum is licensed under the Eclipse Public License v1.0, which includes a patent clause that could conflict with the University of California patent clause. This paper describes these opportunities and risks.

  8. Photometric analysis of the exoplanet containing system Kepler-491

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püsküllü, ćaǧlar; Soydugan, Faruk

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present solutions of the transit light curves of the recently discovered planet Kepler-491b observed by Kepler space-telescope within a span of four years. In order to obtain stellar, planetary and orbital properties, WINFITTER code was applied to light curve data available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA). We also searched for significant signals at the transit timing variation (TTV).

  9. INITIAL DATA RELEASE OF THE KEPLER-INT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Martin, E. L.; Groot, P. J.; Verbeek, K.; Jonker, P. G.; Scaringi, S.; Greimel, R.; Knigge, C.; Ostensen, R. H.; Drew, J. E.; Farnhill, H.; Drake, J.; Wright, N. J.; Ripepi, V.; Southworth, J.; Still, M. [NASA Ames Research Center, M and others

    2012-07-15

    This paper describes the first data release of the Kepler-INT Survey (KIS) that covers a 116 deg{sup 2} region of the Cygnus and Lyra constellations. The Kepler field is the target of the most intensive search for transiting planets to date. Despite the fact that the Kepler mission provides superior time-series photometry, with an enormous impact on all areas of stellar variability, its field lacks optical photometry complete to the confusion limit of the Kepler instrument necessary for selecting various classes of targets. For this reason, we follow the observing strategy and data reduction method used in the IPHAS and UVEX galactic plane surveys in order to produce a deep optical survey of the Kepler field. This initial release concerns data taken between 2011 May and August, using the Isaac Newton Telescope on the island of La Palma. Four broadband filters were used, U, g, r, i, as well as one narrowband one, H{alpha}, reaching down to a 10{sigma} limit of {approx}20th mag in the Vega system. Observations covering {approx}50 deg{sup 2}, thus about half of the field, passed our quality control thresholds and constitute this first data release. We derive a global photometric calibration by placing the KIS magnitudes as close as possible to the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) photometry. The initial data release catalog containing around 6 million sources from all the good photometric fields is available for download from the KIS Web site (www.astro.warwick.ac.uk/research/kis/) as well as via MAST (KIS magnitudes can be retrieved using the MAST enhanced target search page http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/kepler{sub f}ov/search.php and also via Casjobs at MAST Web site http://mastweb.stsci.edu/kplrcasjobs/).

  10. Johannes Kepler in Prague - and a new museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim, R.

    2010-06-01

    Four centuries ago in 1610, the Kepler family were living in their last place of residence in Prague, in a house in a courtyard off Karlova Street (Karlova ulice), very close to the east end of Charles Bridge (Karluv most). The house is No.188, U Francouzske koruny (French Crown House), and has a passage through to Anenska Street. Kepler spent 12 years in the city, publishing his most important works including Astronomia Nova.

  11. Statistical eclipses of close-in Kepler sub-Saturns

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, Holly A.; Deming, Drake

    2014-10-20

    We present a method to detect small atmospheric signals in Kepler's planet candidate light curves by averaging light curves for multiple candidates with similar orbital and physical characteristics. Our statistical method allows us to measure unbiased physical properties of Kepler's planet candidates, even for candidates whose individual signal-to-noise precludes the detection of their secondary eclipse. We detect a secondary eclipse depth of 3.83{sub −1.11}{sup +1.10} ppm for a group of 31 sub-Saturn (R < 6 R {sub ⊕}) planet candidates with the greatest potential for a reflected light signature ((R{sub p} /a){sup 2} > 10 ppm). Including Kepler-10b in this group increases the depth to 5.08{sub −0.72}{sup +0.71} ppm. For a control group with (R{sub p} /a){sup 2} < 1 ppm, we find a depth of 0.36 ± 0.37 ppm, consistent with no detection. We also analyze the light curve of Kepler-10b and find an eclipse depth of 7.08 ± 1.06 ppm. If the eclipses are due solely to reflected light, this corresponds to a geometric albedo of 0.22 ± 0.06 for our group of close-in sub-Saturns, 0.37 ± 0.05 if including Kepler-10b in the group, and 0.60 ± 0.09 for Kepler-10b alone. Including a thermal emission model does not change the geometric albedo appreciably, assuming A{sub B} = (3/2)*A{sub g} . Our result for Kepler-10b is consistent with previous works. Our result for close-in sub-Saturns shows that Kepler-10b is unusually reflective, but our analysis is consistent with the results of Demory for super-Earths. Our results also indicate that hot Neptunes are typically more reflective than hot Jupiters.

  12. Kepler-7b: A Transiting Planet With Unusually Low Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    the velocity variations are due to a planetary companion. The orbital parameters are listed in Table 2. Allowing the eccentricity to be a free...the determination of the stellar and planetary parameters for Kepler-7 followed exactly the procedures reported in Koch et al. (2010) and Borucki et al...near the end of its life on the main sequence. Key words: planetary systems – stars: individual (Kepler-7, KIC 5780885, 2MASS 19141956+4105233

  13. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The statistical analysis procedures of the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve, but visual inspection of the residual series shows that significant deviations from Gaussianity remain for many of them. Although the reduction in stellar signal is encouraging, it is important to note that the transit signal is also altered in the resulting residual time series. The periodogram derived from our Transit Comb Filter (TCF) is most effective for shorter period planets with quick ingress/egress times (relative to Kepler's 29-minute sample rate). We do not expect high sensitivity to periods of hundreds of days. Our findings to date on real-data tests of the KARPS methodology will be discussed including confirmation of some Kepler Team `candidate' planets, no confirmation of some `candidate' and `false positive' sytems, and suggestions of mischosen harmonics in the Kepler Team periodograms. We also present cases of new possible planetary signals.

  14. Increased MicroRNA-34b and -34c Predominantly Expressed in Stromal Tissues Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okayama, Hirokazu; Inamura, Kentaro; Anami, Katsuhiro; Nguyen, Giang H.; Horikawa, Izumi; Hawkes, Jason E.; Bowman, Elise D.; Leung, Suet Yi; Harris, Curtis C.

    2015-01-01

    The microRNA-34 family (miR-34a, -34b and -34c) have been reported to be tumor suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs) that are regulated by the TP53 and DNA hypermethylation. However, the expression, regulation, and prognostic value of the miR-34 family have not been systematically studied in colon cancer. To elucidate the roles of miR-34 family in colon carcinogenesis, miR-34a/b/c were measured in tumors and adjacent noncancerous tissues from 159 American and 113 Chinese colon cancer patients using quantitative RT-PCR, and we examined associations between miR-34a/b/c expression with TNM staging, cancer-specific mortality, TP53 mutation status and Affymetrix microarray data. All miR-34 family members were significantly increased in colon tumors, counter to the proposed tumor suppressor role for these miRNAs. Increased miR-34b/c were observed in more advanced tumors in two independent cohorts and increased expression of miR-34b/c was associated with poor cancer-specific mortality. While the expression of miR-34 family was not associated with TP53 mutation status, TP53 transcriptional activity was associated with miR-34a/b/c expression that is consistent with the proposed regulation of miR-34a/b/c by TP53. To examine where the miR-34 family is expressed, the expression of miR-34 family was compared between epitheliums and stromal tissues using laser microdissection technique. The expression of miR-34b/c was increased significantly in stromal tissues, especially in cancer stroma, compared with epithelial tissue. In conclusion, increased miR-34b/c predominantly expressed in stromal tissues is associated with poor prognosis in colon cancer. MiR-34 may contribute to cancer-stromal interaction associated with colon cancer progression. PMID:25894979

  15. Masses of Kepler-46b, c from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad-Olivera, Ximena; Nesvorný, David; Kipping, David M.; Roig, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    We use 16 quarters of the Kepler mission data to analyze the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the extrasolar planet Kepler-46b (KOI-872). Our dynamical fits confirm that the TTVs of this planet (period P={33.648}-0.005+0.004 days) are produced by a non-transiting planet Kepler-46c (P={57.325}-0.098+0.116 days). The Bayesian inference tool MultiNest is used to infer the dynamical parameters of Kepler-46b and Kepler-46c. We find that the two planets have nearly coplanar and circular orbits, with eccentricities ≃ 0.03 somewhat higher than previously estimated. The masses of the two planets are found to be {M}b={0.885}-0.343+0.374 and {M}c={0.362}-0.016+0.016 Jupiter masses, with M b being determined here from TTVs for the first time. Due to the precession of its orbital plane, Kepler-46c should start transiting its host star a few decades from now.

  16. Kepler Mission Website: Portal to the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; DeVore, E.; Gould, A.; Koch, D.

    2008-05-01

    The 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope is an opportunity to turn the public's eyes skyward and to the universe beyond the solar system. The Kepler Mission, launching in 2009, the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) will is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to detect and characterize hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone, using the transit method of detection. The habitable zone encompasses the distances from a star where liquid water can exist on a planet's surface. Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Program Mission. The Kepler Mission website http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/ offers classroom activity lesson plans Detecting Planet Transits, The Human Orrery, and Morning Star and Evening Star. The activities are suitable for the informal science education realm. The spacecraft paper model and LEGO model orrerey can be used in the classroom by teachers or at home by families. The mission simulation and animation, as well as lessons and models highlight the science concepts critical to employing the transit method of detection, Kepler's Laws. The Send Your Name to Space on Kepler Spacecraft provides a certificate of participation for all individuals that submit there name to be listed on a DVD placed on the spacecraft. This poster will provide details on each of the items described.

  17. Catching Shadows: Kepler's Year-Two Transit Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie

    2011-04-01

    Launched in March, 2009, NASA's Kepler Mission is poised to determine the abundance of earth-size planets in the Galaxy. The project has hosted two major data releases, providing the astronomical community with four months of nearly continuous, high-precision photometry of all stars targeted as part of the Kepler planet search. A catalog of nearly 1,000 stars with transiting planet candidates, more than 70% of which are smaller than Neptune, accompanied the data release (Borucki et al. 2011). Ground-based follow-up observations, transit timing observations, and blend analyses have all played a major role in validating the planet interpretation, leading to major mission milestones such as the discovery of Kepler's first rocky planet, Kepler-10b, and the discovery of six transiting planets orbiting the same star, Kepler-11. Multiple transiting planet candidate systems are abundant in the released data. Dynamical studies suggest that the false-positive rate for these systems will likely be less than 10%, and the potential for determining planet masses via transit timing variations hold much promise for confirming the smallest planet candidates. I will present an overview of Kepler's recent discoveries and our progress towards the ultimate objective which is to determine the frequency of habitable, earth-size planets.

  18. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSITING HOT COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Howell, Steve B.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoff; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; Jenkins, Jon; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Monet, David G.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler photometry has revealed two unusual transiting companions: one orbiting an early A-star and the other orbiting a late B-star. In both cases, the occultation of the companion is deeper than the transit. The occultation and transit with follow-up optical spectroscopy reveal a 9400 K early A-star, KOI-74 (KIC 6889235), with a companion in a 5.2 day orbit with a radius of 0.08 R {sub sun} and a 10,000 K late B-star KOI-81 (KIC 8823868) that has a companion in a 24 day orbit with a radius of 0.2 R {sub sun}. We infer a temperature of 12,250 K for KOI-74b and 13,500 K for KOI-81b. We present 43 days of high duty cycle, 30 minute cadence photometry, with models demonstrating the intriguing properties of these objects, and speculate on their nature.

  19. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  20. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARIES WITH STELLAR COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D. R.; Matson, R. A.; Guo, Z.; Lester, K. V.; Orosz, J. A.; Peters, G. J. E-mail: rmatson@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: lester@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: gjpeters@mucen.usc.edu

    2015-12-15

    Many short-period binary stars have distant orbiting companions that have played a role in driving the binary components into close separation. Indirect detection of a tertiary star is possible by measuring apparent changes in eclipse times of eclipsing binaries as the binary orbits the common center of mass. Here we present an analysis of the eclipse timings of 41 eclipsing binaries observed throughout the NASA Kepler mission of long duration and precise photometry. This subset of binaries is characterized by relatively deep and frequent eclipses of both stellar components. We present preliminary orbital elements for seven probable triple stars among this sample, and we discuss apparent period changes in seven additional eclipsing binaries that may be related to motion about a tertiary in a long period orbit. The results will be used in ongoing investigations of the spectra and light curves of these binaries for further evidence of the presence of third stars.

  1. Exoplanet Population Estimate from Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2015-11-01

    The intrinsic population of exoplanets around Kepler target stars is estimated by comparing the observed numbers of planets at each radius and period against a simulation that accounts for the probability of transit and the estimated instrument sensitivity. By assuming that the population can be modeled as a function of period times a function of radius, and further assuming that these functions are broken power laws, sufficient leverage is gained such that the well-measured short-period planet distribution can effectively be used as a template for the less-well sampled long-period terrestrial planets. The resulting population distribution provides a challenge to models of the origin and evolution of planetary systems.

  2. Autonomous orbital navigation using Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method of determining the six elements of elliptic satellite orbits has been developed for use aboard manned and unmanned spacecraft orbiting the earth, moon, or any planet. The system requires the use of a horizon sensor or other device for determining the local vertical, a precision clock or timing device, and Apollo-type navigation equipment including an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a digital computer, and a coupling data unit. The three elements defining the in-plane motion are obtained from simultaneous measurements of central angle traversed around the planet and elapsed flight time using a linearization of Kepler's equation about a reference orbit. It is shown how Kalman filter theory may also be used to determine the in-plane orbital elements. The three elements defining the orbit orientation are obtained from position angles in celestial coordinates derived from the IMU with the spacecraft vertically oriented after alignment of the IMU to a known inertial coordinate frame.

  3. Extremes of Population Estimated from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2015-12-01

    The extremes of exoplanet population (0.5 to 16 Earth radii, 0.5 to 512 days period) are estimated from Kepler observations by comparing the observed numbers of planets at each radius and period against a simulation that accounts for the probability of transit and the estimated instrument sensitivity. By assuming that the population can be modeled as a function of period times a function of radius, and further assuming that these functions are broken power laws, sufficient leverage is gained such that the well-measured short-period extreme of the planet distribution can effectively be used as a template for the less-well sampled long-period extreme. The resulting population distribution over this full range of radius and period provides a challenge to models of the origin and evolution of planetary systems.

  4. Efficient inverse solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1986-01-01

    A bicubic polynomial approximation to Kepler's equation for elliptic orbits is shown to provide accurate starting values for efficient numerical solution of this equation for eccentric anomaly. In the approximate equation, a cubic in mean anomaly is set equal to a cubic in eccentric anomaly. The coefficients in the two cubics are obtained as functions of eccentricity by specifying values of function and slope at the midpoint and the endpoint of the complete interval (0 to pi). The initial estimate of eccentric anomaly to use in an iteration formula is obtained by evaluating the cubic in mean anomaly and finding the single real root of the cubic in eccentric anomaly. Numerical results are presented which indicate that the estimate accuracy of this method is roughly an order of magnitude better than that of other recently-reported formulas.

  5. Kepler-16: a transiting circumbinary planet.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Laurance R; Carter, Joshua A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Slawson, Robert W; Howell, Steve B; Winn, Joshua N; Orosz, Jerome A; Prša, Andrej; Welsh, William F; Quinn, Samuel N; Latham, David; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fortney, Jonathan J; Shporer, Avi; Ford, Eric B; Lissauer, Jack J; Ragozzine, Darin; Rucker, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Jenkins, Jon M; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Middour, Christopher K; Hall, Jennifer R; McCauliff, Sean; Fanelli, Michael N; Quintana, Elisa V; Holman, Matthew J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Still, Martin; Stefanik, Robert P; Brown, Warren R; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Tang, Sumin; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Short, Donald R; Steffen, Jason H; Sasselov, Dimitar; Dunham, Edward W; Cochran, William D; Boss, Alan; Haas, Michael R; Buzasi, Derek; Fischer, Debra

    2011-09-16

    We report the detection of a planet whose orbit surrounds a pair of low-mass stars. Data from the Kepler spacecraft reveal transits of the planet across both stars, in addition to the mutual eclipses of the stars, giving precise constraints on the absolute dimensions of all three bodies. The planet is comparable to Saturn in mass and size and is on a nearly circular 229-day orbit around its two parent stars. The eclipsing stars are 20 and 69% as massive as the Sun and have an eccentric 41-day orbit. The motions of all three bodies are confined to within 0.5° of a single plane, suggesting that the planet formed within a circumbinary disk.

  6. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2∶1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history. PMID:22566651

  7. Approximate solutions of the hyperbolic Kepler equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano, Martín; Martín-Molina, Verónica; Ortigas-Galindo, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    We provide an approximate zero widetilde{S}(g,L) for the hyperbolic Kepler's equation S-g {{arcsinh}}(S)-L=0 for gin (0,1) and Lin [0,∞ ). We prove, by using Smale's α -theory, that Newton's method starting at our approximate zero produces a sequence that converges to the actual solution S( g, L) at quadratic speed, i.e. if S_n is the value obtained after n iterations, then |S_n-S|≤ 0.5^{2^n-1}|widetilde{S}-S|. The approximate zero widetilde{S}(g,L) is a piecewise-defined function involving several linear expressions and one with cubic and square roots. In bounded regions of (0,1) × [0,∞ ) that exclude a small neighborhood of g=1, L=0, we also provide a method to construct simpler starters involving only constants.

  8. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  9. The Kepler Mission and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Jenkins, Jon; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D.; Devore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Gould, Alan; Jenkins, Jon; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey; Monet, David; Sasselov, Dimitar; Boss, Alan; Caldwell, John; Dupree, Andrea K.; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Meibom, Søren; Morrison, David; Tarter, Jill; Bryson, Stephen T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason F.; van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Buzasi, Derek; Charbonneau, David; Doyle, Lau-Rance; Ford, Eric; Fortney, Jonathan; Holman, Matthew; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason; Welsh, William

    Kepler is a Discovery-class mission designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone of solar-like stars. The instrument consists of a 0.95 m aperture photometer designed to obtain high-precision photometric measurement for more than 3.5 years of more than 100,000 stars to search for patterns of transits of exoplanets. The focal plane of the Schmidt telescope contains 42 CCDs with a total of 95 megapixels that cover 115 square degrees of sky. The single star field will be viewed for the entire duration of the mission. The photometer was launched into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit on March 6, 2009, finished its commissioning on May 12, and is now in the science operations mode. The bases for a number of the design choices are described. Although the data have not yet been fully corrected for the presence of systematic errors and artifacts, the data show the presence of thousands of eclipsing binaries and variable stars of amazing variety. The character of stellar variability allows us to distinguish dwarf stars from giants. Astrometric stability at the sub-millipixel level of the photocenters of stars allows us in many cases to distinguish transit candidates from background eclipsing binaries. Analysis of the early data shows transits, occultations and even visible light emission from the hot exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The latest results on exoplanet detections from Kepler will be presented. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. 146 Kepler-Lamost targets fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yaqian

    2015-08-01

    Accurate stellar fundamental parameters with high precision are important for distinguishing stellar populationand star study.Turn-off stars are in the relatively vital stellar evolution state. Studying turn-off stars can help us to have a more comprehensive understand of the stellar physics.With the help of observation provided by Lamost project, we obtain atmospheric parameters of 146 turn-off stars from LSP3 pipeline. Combined with stellar pulsation data from Kepler, we can get asteroseismic characteristic of stars,such as Δν and νmax.In this paper,we constructed a grid of evolutionary models, with the mass range from 0.8 to 2.5 M⊙ and metallicities Zini = 0.0085, 0.0105, 0.0130, 0.0165, 0.0200, 0.0250, 0.0300, 0.0400 (i.e.[Fe/H] from -0.3 to 0.4dex).All evolutionary tracks were started in the pre-main sequence birth line and ended at the base of Red Giant Branch.Based on the stellar model grid we constructed,as well as Kepler-Lamost observations, we obtained fundamental parameters of 146 around turn-off stars, and found that 112 targets lied in turn-off state or in the Main Sequence,15 targets are subgiant stars and 7 targets have evolved to the red giants stage.Then we use pulsation code(JIG) of Guenther to extract theorical individual frequencies and calculate theorical Δν.Meanwhile we obtained more precise fundamental parameters of these stars.

  11. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  12. The Kepler Dichotomy in Planetary Disks: Linking Kepler Observables to Simulations of Late-stage Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John; Ballard, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    NASA’s Kepler Mission uncovered a wealth of planetary systems, many with planets on short-period orbits. These short-period systems reside around 50% of Sun-like stars and are similarly prevalent around M dwarfs. Their formation and subsequent evolution is the subject of active debate. In this paper, we simulate late-stage, in situ planet formation across a grid of planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles and total mass. We compare simulation results with observable characteristics of the Kepler sample. We identify mixture models with different primordial planetesimal disk properties that self-consistently recover the multiplicity, radius, period and period ratio, and duration ratio distributions of the Kepler planets. We draw three main conclusions. (1) We favor a “frozen-in” narrative for systems of short-period planets, in which they are stable over long timescales, as opposed to metastable. (2) The “Kepler dichotomy,” an observed phenomenon of the Kepler sample wherein the architectures of planetary systems appear to either vary significantly or have multiple modes, can naturally be explained by formation within planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles. Finally, (3) we quantify the nature of the “Kepler dichotomy” for both GK stars and M dwarfs, and find that it varies with stellar type. While the mode of planet formation that accounts for high multiplicity systems occurs in 24% ± 7% of planetary systems orbiting GK stars, it occurs in 63% ± 16% of planetary systems orbiting M dwarfs.

  13. The Kepler DB, a Database Management System for Arrays, Sparse Arrays and Binary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Middour, Christopher; Klaus, Todd C.; Wohler, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Science Operations Center stores pixel values on approximately six million pixels collected every 30-minutes, as well as data products that are generated as a result of running the Kepler science processing pipeline. The Kepler Database (Kepler DB) management system was created to act as the repository of this information. After one year of ight usage, Kepler DB is managing 3 TiB of data and is expected to grow to over 10 TiB over the course of the mission. Kepler DB is a non-relational, transactional database where data are represented as one dimensional arrays, sparse arrays or binary large objects. We will discuss Kepler DB's APIs, implementation, usage and deployment at the Kepler Science Operations Center.

  14. A Bayesian Atmospheric Retrieval Performed on HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Kathleen J.; Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan C.; Hardin, Matthew Ryan; Bowman, Oliver Oliver; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lenius, Maria; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Ariston Hardy, Ryan; Cameron, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b is a cooler (1020 ± 17 K), 0.487 ± 0.018 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting a K3 star every 3.7224747 ± 0.0000065 days (Bakos et al. 2009, co-discovered by West et al. 2008). We observed secondary eclipses of both planets using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the two planets. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  15. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-ones as a New Class of Topoisomerase II Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Prencipe, Filippo; Preti, Delia; Saponaro, Giulia; Romagnoli, Romeo; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Borea, Pier Andrea; Maia, Rodolfo Couto; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2015-01-01

    A series of 1,3,6-triphenylpyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-one derivatives was designed, synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic activity in A375 human melanoma and human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. The new pyrazolopyridones displayed comparable activities to the antitumor compound etoposide. The inhibitory effect of compounds 17, 18, 27 and 32 against topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage activities was measured finding good correlation with the results obtained from MTS assay. Docking studies into bacterial topoisomerase II (DNA Gyrase), topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ binding sites in the DNA binding interface were performed.

  16. Combined analysis of pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 and TP53 Arg72Pro with cervical cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Sun, Ruifen; Chen, Peng; Liang, Yundan; Ni, Shanshan; Quan, Yi; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Linbo

    2016-05-01

    miR-34 family members can form a p53-miR-34 positive feedback loop and induce apoptosis, DNA repair, angiogenesis, and cell cycle arrest. We conducted a case-control study to examine whether two polymorphisms (i.e., rs4938723 in the promoter of pri-miR-34b/c and TP53 Arg72Pro) were linked to the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer among Chinese Han women. Genotypes of the two polymorphisms in 328 cervical cancer patients and 568 control subjects were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. We found a significantly increased cervical cancer risk in the pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 under dominant and overdominant model (CT/CC vs. TT: adjusted OR = 1.34, 95 % CI = 1.01-1.77; CT vs. TT/CC: adjusted OR = 1.37, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.80, respectively). Increased cervical cancer risks were also found in the TP53 Arg72Pro under a heterozygous comparison and overdominant model (CG vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.44, 95 % CI = 1.06-1.95; CG vs. GG/CC: adjusted OR = 1.47, 95 % CI = 1.12-1.94, respectively). Stratification analysis showed that patients carrying the pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 CT genotype had a significantly increased risk for developing poorly differential status and clinical stage I. Moreover, increased cancer risks were observed for the TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism in patients with poorly differential status, clinical stage II, and without lymph node metastasis. Combined analysis revealed that the genotypes of rs4938723 CT/CC and TP53 Arg72Pro CG/CC had an increased cervical cancer risk (OR = 2.21, 95 % CI = 1.38-3.53). These findings suggest that the pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 and TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms may contribute to the genesis of cervical cancer.

  17. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  18. Take off with NASA's Kepler Mission!: The Search for Other "Earths"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David; DeVore, Edna K.; Gould, Alan; Harman, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Humans have long wondered about life in the universe. Are we alone? Is Earth unique? What is it that makes our planet a habitable one, and are there others like Earth? NASA's Kepler Mission seeks the answers to these questions. Kepler is a space-based, specially designed 0.95 m aperture telescope. Launching in 2009, Kepler is NASA's first mission…

  19. DENSITY AND ECCENTRICITY OF KEPLER PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2013-07-20

    We analyze the transit timing variations (TTV) obtained by the Kepler mission for 22 sub-Jovian planet pairs (19 published, 3 new) that lie close to mean motion resonances. We find that the TTV phases for most of these pairs lie close to zero, consistent with an eccentricity distribution that has a very low root-mean-squared value of e {approx} 0.01; but about a quarter of the pairs possess much higher eccentricities, up to e {approx} 0.1-0.4. For the low-eccentricity pairs, we are able to statistically remove the effect of eccentricity to obtain planet masses from TTV data. These masses, together with those measured by radial velocity, yield a best-fit mass-radius relation M {approx} 3 M{sub Circled-Plus }(R/R{sub Circled-Plus }). This corresponds to a constant surface escape velocity of {approx}20 km s{sup -1}. We separate the planets into two distinct groups: ''mid-sized'' (those greater than 3 R{sub Circled-Plus }) and 'compact' (those smaller). All mid-sized planets are found to be less dense than water and therefore must contain extensive H/He envelopes that are comparable in mass to that of their cores. We argue that these planets have been significantly sculpted by photoevaporation. Surprisingly, mid-sized planets, a minority among Kepler candidates, are discovered exclusively around stars more massive than 0.8 M{sub Sun }. The compact planets, on the other hand, are often denser than water. Combining our density measurements with those from radial velocity studies, we find that hotter compact planets tend to be denser, with the hottest ones reaching rock density. Moreover, hotter planets tend to be smaller in size. These results can be explained if the compact planets are made of rocky cores overlaid with a small amount of hydrogen, {<=}1% in mass, with water contributing little to their masses or sizes. Photoevaporation has exposed bare rocky cores in cases of the hottest planets. Our conclusion that these planets are likely not water worlds contrasts

  20. FORMING CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF KEPLER-34

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Paardekooper, S.; Baruteau, C.; Thebault, P.

    2014-02-10

    Observations of circumbinary planets orbiting very close to the central stars have shown that planet formation may occur in a very hostile environment, where the gravitational pull from the binary should be very strong on the primordial protoplanetary disk. Elevated impact velocities and orbit crossings from eccentricity oscillations are the primary contributors to high energy, potentially destructive collisions that inhibit the growth of aspiring planets. In this work, we conduct high-resolution, inter-particle gravity enabled N-body simulations to investigate the feasibility of planetesimal growth in the Kepler-34 system. We improve upon previous work by including planetesimal disk self-gravity and an extensive collision model to accurately handle inter-planetesimal interactions. We find that super-catastrophic erosion events are the dominant mechanism up to and including the orbital radius of Kepler-34(AB)b, making in situ growth unlikely. It is more plausible that Kepler-34(AB)b migrated from a region beyond 1.5 AU. Based on the conclusions that we have made for Kepler-34, it seems likely that all of the currently known circumbinary planets have also migrated significantly from their formation location with the possible exception of Kepler-47(AB)c.

  1. Adaptive optics images. III. 87 Kepler objects of interest

    SciTech Connect

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don

    2014-11-01

    The Kepler mission has revolutionized our understanding of exoplanets, but some of the planet candidates identified by Kepler may actually be astrophysical false positives or planets whose transit depths are diluted by the presence of another star. Adaptive optics images made with ARIES at the MMT of 87 Kepler Objects of Interest place limits on the presence of fainter stars in or near the Kepler aperture. We detected visual companions within 1'' for 5 stars, between 1'' and 2'' for 7 stars, and between 2'' and 4'' for 15 stars. For those systems, we estimate the brightness of companion stars in the Kepler bandpass and provide approximate corrections to the radii of associated planet candidates due to the extra light in the aperture. For all stars observed, we report detection limits on the presence of nearby stars. ARIES is typically sensitive to stars approximately 5.3 Ks magnitudes fainter than the target star within 1'' and approximately 5.7 Ks magnitudes fainter within 2'', but can detect stars as faint as ΔKs = 7.5 under ideal conditions.

  2. ON THE LOW FALSE POSITIVE PROBABILITIES OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R{sub +} < R{sub p} < 20 R{sub +}. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal-deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  3. The Kepler map in the three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2011-02-01

    The Kepler map was derived by Petrosky (1986) and Chirikov and Vecheslavov (1986) as a tool for description of the long-term chaotic orbital behaviour of the comets in nearly parabolic motion. It is a two-dimensional area-preserving map, describing the motion of a comet in terms of energy and time. Its second equation is based on Kepler's third law, hence the title of the map. Since 1980s the Kepler map has become paradigmatic in a number of applications in celestial mechanics and atomic physics. It represents an important kind of general separatrix maps. Petrosky and Broucke (1988) used refined methods of mathematical physics to derive analytical expressions for its single parameter. These methods became available only in the second half of the 20th century, and it may seem that the map is inherently a very modern mathematical tool. With the help of the Jacobi integral I show that the Kepler map, including analytical formulae for its parameter, can be derived by quite elementary methods. The prehistory and applications of the Kepler map are considered and discussed.

  4. DEBRIS sightings in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Borucki, William; Argabright, Vic; Hascall, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    A small fraction of Kepler telescope exposures are rejected because of transient, excess background in the field. The patterns of illumination vary from broad streaks to diffuse patches, sometimes filling the focal plane. Examination of such images and their temporal variation shows that they can be attributed to nearby particles crossing the field-of-view of the telescope. Most of the particles appear to be receding. The visual appearance and frequency are consistent with the "debris storms" reported by STEREO SECCHI observers and which they found to be coincident with meteoroid impacts. In addition, a few events, lasting several hours each, appear to be caused by more distant extended sources, possibly the remains of comet dust trails. The tracking cameras, located at the opposite end from the telescope's entrance, and pointed at roughly right angles to its line-of-sight, also detected moving light sources. Their behavior was consistent with the main telescope sightings. Future missions requiring precise, uninterrupted photometry and pointing may benefit from understanding this phenomenon and mitigating it by design and data analysis.

  5. Eclipsing Binaries from the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Cochran, William; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Nick

    2005-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a photometric space mission that will continuously observe a single 100 sq deg field of view (FOV) of greater than 100,000 stars in the Cygnus-Lyra region for 4 or more years with a precision of 14 ppm (R=12). The primary goal of the mission is to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. In the process, many eclipsing binaries (EB) will also be detected. Prior to launch, the stellar characteristics will have been detennined for all the stars in the FOV with R<16. As part of the verification process, stars with transits <5% will need to have follow-up radial velocity observations performed to determine the component masses and thereby separate transits caused by stellar companions from those caused by planets. The result will be a rich database on EBs. The community will have access to the archive for uses such as for EB modeling of the high-precision light curves. A guest observer program is also planned for objects not already on the target list.

  6. The Kepler Mission and Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Cochran, William; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a photometric mission with a precision of 14 ppm (at R=12) that is designed to continuously observe a single field of view (FOV) of greater 100 sq deg in the Cygnus-Lyra region for four or more years. The primary goal of the mission is to monitor greater than 100,000 stars for transits of Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. In the process, many eclipsing binaries (EB) will also be detected and light curves produced. To enhance and optimize the mission results, the stellar characteristics for all the stars in the FOV with R less than 16 will have been determined prior to launch. As part of the verification process, stars with transit candidates will have radial velocity follow-up observations performed to determine the component masses and thereby separate eclipses caused by stellar companions from transits caused by planets. The result will be a rich database on EBs. The community will have access to the archive for further analysis, such as, for EB modeling of the high-precision light curves. A guest observer program is also planned to allow for photometric observations of objects not on the target list but within the FOV, since only the pixels of interest from those stars monitored will be transmitted to the ground.

  7. OVERVIEW OF THE KEPLER SCIENCE PROCESSING PIPELINE

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission Science Operations Center (SOC) performs several critical functions including managing the {approx}156,000 target stars, associated target tables, science data compression tables and parameters, as well as processing the raw photometric data downlinked from the spacecraft each month. The raw data are first calibrated at the pixel level to correct for bias, smear induced by a shutterless readout, and other detector and electronic effects. A background sky flux is estimated from {approx}4500 pixels on each of the 84 CCD readout channels, and simple aperture photometry is performed on an optimal aperture for each star. Ancillary engineering data and diagnostic information extracted from the science data are used to remove systematic errors in the flux time series that are correlated with these data prior to searching for signatures of transiting planets with a wavelet-based, adaptive matched filter. Stars with signatures exceeding 7.1{sigma} are subjected to a suite of statistical tests including an examination of each star's centroid motion to reject false positives caused by background eclipsing binaries. Physical parameters for each planetary candidate are fitted to the transit signature, and signatures of additional transiting planets are sought in the residual light curve. The pipeline is operational, finding planetary signatures and providing robust eliminations of false positives.

  8. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: Four Transiting Planets More Massive than Jupiter Orbiting Moderately Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenár, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; Penev, K.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M J and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M J), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 ± 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 ± 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A289Hr) and NASA (N167Hr and N029Hr). Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  9. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VII. The Catalog of Eclipsing Binaries Found in the Entire Kepler Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Brian; Conroy, Kyle; Prša, Andrej; Abdul-Masih, Michael; Kochoska, Angela; Matijevič, Gal; Hambleton, Kelly; Barclay, Thomas; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fulton, B. J.; Hoekstra, Abe Johannes; Jek, Kian; Kane, Stephen R.; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David; Mazeh, Tsevi; Orosz, Jerome A.; Pepper, Joshua; Quarles, Billy; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John; Stassun, Keivan; Thompson, Susan E.; Welsh, William F.; Agol, Eric; Derekas, Aliz; Devor, Jonathan; Fischer, Debra; Green, Gregory; Gropp, Jeff; Jacobs, Tom; Johnston, Cole; LaCourse, Daryll Matthew; Saetre, Kristian; Schwengeler, Hans; Toczyski, Jacek; Werner, Griffin; Garrett, Matthew; Gore, Joanna; Martinez, Arturo O.; Spitzer, Isaac; Stevick, Justin; Thomadis, Pantelis C.; Vrijmoet, Eliot Halley; Yenawine, Mitchell; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William

    2016-03-01

    The primary Kepler Mission provided nearly continuous monitoring of ∼200,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. We present the final catalog of eclipsing binary systems within the 105 deg2 Kepler field of view. This release incorporates the full extent of the data from the primary mission (Q0-Q17 Data Release). As a result, new systems have been added, additional false positives have been removed, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed, classifications have been revised to rely on analytical models, and eclipse timing variations have been computed for each system. We identify several classes of systems including those that exhibit tertiary eclipse events, systems that show clear evidence of additional bodies, heartbeat systems, systems with changing eclipse depths, and systems exhibiting only one eclipse event over the duration of the mission. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams and included a catalog completeness evaluation. The total number of identified eclipsing and ellipsoidal binary systems in the Kepler field of view has increased to 2878, 1.3% of all observed Kepler targets. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  10. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 Kepler planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as ∼0.″15, and magnitude differences Δm ≤slant 6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not been previously imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 12.6 % +/- 0.9 % at separations between 0.″15 and 4.″0. Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 26 stars with detected companions that host rocky, habitable zone candidates and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems and stellar binarity, using the combined data set of Baranec et al. and this paper. Our previous 2σ result of a low detected nearby star fraction of KOIs hosting close-in giant planets is less apparent in this larger data set. We also find a significant correlation between detected nearby star fraction and KOI number, suggesting possible variation between early and late Kepler data releases.

  11. Kepler Circumbinary Planets: The Best of Both Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W.

    2015-07-01

    While long anticipated in both in science and science fiction, the existence of a planet orbiting a pair of normal stars was not firmly established until the discovery of Kepler-16. With that single discovery, many questions soon arose about the nature of circumbinary planets: What kinds of orbits, masses, and radii could they have? What kinds of binary stars can host planets? How common are they? Since 2011, nine more transiting Kepler circumbinary planets have been discovered, and several more candidate systems are under investigation. While still few in number, the sample is becoming large enough that some intriguing patterns are starting to emerge, regarding the planets' radii, orbits, host star binary periods, and their proximity to the habitable zone. In this talk I will discuss the discovery and characterization of the Kepler circumbinary planets, the emerging trends, and present the latest discoveries and candidate systems.

  12. DISCOVERY OF A ZZ CETI IN THE KEPLER MISSION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Mullally, Fergal; Howell, Steve B.; Oestensen, R. H.; Bloemen, S.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Telting, John; Southworth, John; Everett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of the first identified pulsating DA white dwarf, WD J1916+3938 (Kepler ID 4552982), in the field of the Kepler mission. This ZZ Ceti star was first identified through ground-based, time-series photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy confirms that it is a hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf with T {sub eff} = 11,129 {+-} 115 K and log g = 8.34 {+-} 0.06, placing it within the empirical ZZ Ceti instability strip. The object shows up to 0.5% amplitude variability at several periods between 800 and 1450 s. Extended Kepler observations of WD J1916+3938 could yield the best light curve, to date, of any pulsating white dwarf, allowing us to directly study the interior of an evolved object representative of the fate of the majority of stars in our Galaxy.

  13. Studying RR Lyrae Stars with Kepler/K2 (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, C.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) While RR Lyrae stars have long been studied from the ground, the high photometric precision, high cadence, and long observing times offered by the Kepler Space Telescope have yielded exciting discoveries that are revolutionizing our understanding of these stars. In its new K2 mission, Kepler is observing an even larger sample of RR Lyrae stars, promising to provide new insights into them and our Milky Way. In this talk I will present some of the most exciting new discoveries about RR Lyrae stars from the K2 mission with a special focus on what we are learning about the RR Lyrae in the globular cluster M4, our first chance to observe a single population of RR Lyrae with Kepler.

  14. Photometric analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) Science Processing Pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (~thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (~one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  15. Kepler's Use of Archetypes in his defence against Aristotelian Scepticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Rhonda M.

    In 1621, looking back over an impresive career, Johannes Kepler commented that "almost every book on astronomy which I have published since that time could be referred to one or another of the important chapters set out in this little book (the Mysterium Cosmographicum) and would contain either an illustration or a completion of it". Kepler viewed the Mysterium, his first book, as the genesis of hist later works; Here the author is focusing on the conceptual foundations it provided for his approach to physical astronomy and the Aristotelian dominant during his time. It turns out that despite Kepler's arowedly Platonic and Pythagorean sympathies, his physical astronomy comports with Aristotle's directives in the Posterior Analytics. Perhaps paradoxically, his arhetypal cosmology as expressed in the Mysterium enabled the merging Platonic and Aristotelian intuitions in his construction of the new astronomy.

  16. Kepler in Curricula of the Agrarian Engineering School of Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillet, Jaume Fabregat

    In the Agrarian Engineering school of Barcelona, within the subject of Mathematics some references to history are included, particularly about several great scientists, like Kepler who is famous for his astronomical laws, but he was occupied by other subjects for example he wrote about wine barrels. It is interesting to introduce students to dynamic aspects of science and not only to program an ordered mathematical knowledge of physical systems or, worse, only to offer a collection of numerical recipes or only presenting the foundation of theory; it is important to promote relationships between technical topics and other lateral matters. To instigate an integral education, students did a brief study entitled "Kepler, mathematics and agriculture"; students were guided to link Kepler with agriculture through astronomy.

  17. Eccentricities & Resonances among Planetary Systems Identified by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    NASA's Kepler mission has identified over 1200 transiting planet candidates, including 170 sets of transiting planet candidates with a common host stars. First, we compare the distribution of transit durations for single and multiple planet candidate systems to investigate the potential differences in the eccentricity distributions between these populations. Second, we compare the frequency of pairs of planets (or planet candidates in the case of Kepler) in or near mean-motion resonances based on Kepler and Doppler planet searches. This comparison helps to address a long-standing question regarding the frequency of small planets in mean-motion resonances that are difficult to identify from Doppler data alone. Finally, we compare the frequency of pairs of planet candidates in or near mean-motion resonances with the frequency of transit timing variations in systems with a single or widely separated planet candidates.

  18. Asteroseismology Of The Kepler DBV - It's a Hot One!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Agnes; Ostensen, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present an asteroseismic analysis of the DBV recently found in the field of view of the Kepler satellite. We analyze the 5-mode pulsation spectrum that was produced based on one month of high cadence Kepler data. The pulsational characteristics of the star and the asteroseismic analysis strongly suggest that the star is hotter (29200 K) than the 24900 K suggested by model fits to the low S/N survey spectrum of the object. This result has profound and exciting implications for tests of the Standard Model of particle physics. Hot DBVs are expected to lose over half of their energy through the emission of plasmon neutrinos. Continuous monitoring of the star with the Kepler satellite over the course of 3 to 5 years is not only very likely to yield more modes to help constrain the asteroseismic fits, but also allow us to obtain a rate of change of any stable mode and therefore measure the emission of plasmon neutrinos.

  19. Kepler Ground-Based Photometry Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, D.; Howell, S.; Everett, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our efforts to evaluate the feasibility of using the 4-Shooter CCD camera on the 48-inch reflector at the Whipple Observatory to carry out a multi-band photometric survey of the Kepler target region. We also include recommendations for future work. We were assigned 36 nights with the &hooter during 2003 for this feasibility study. Most of the time during the first two dozen nights was dedicated to the development of procedures, test exposures, and a reconnaissance across the Kepler field. The final 12 nights in September and October 2003 were used for "production" observing in the middle of the Kepler field using the full complement of seven filters (SDSS u, g, r, i, z, plus our special Gred and D51 intermediate-band filters). Nine of these 12 nights were clear and photometric, and production observations were obtained at 109 pointings, corresponding to 14.6 square degrees.

  20. An Introduction to Exoplanets and the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    A quarter century ago, the only planets known to humanity were the familiar objects that orbit our Sun. But improved observational techniques allowed astronomers to begin detecting planets around other stars in the 1990s. The first extrasolar planets (often referred to as exoplanets) to be discovered were quite exotic and unfamiliar objects. Most were giant objects that are hundreds of times as massive as the Earth and orbit so close to their star that they are hotter than pizza ovens. But as observational capabilities improved, smaller and cooler planets were found. The most capable planet-hunting tool developed to date is NASA's Kepler telescope, which was launched in 2009. Kepler has found that planets similar in size to our Earth are quite abundant within our galaxy. Results of Kepler's research will be summarized and placed into context within the new and growing discipline of exoplanet studies.

  1. THE KEPLER CLUSTER STUDY: STELLAR ROTATION IN NGC 6811

    SciTech Connect

    Meibom, Soeren; Latham, David W.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Furesz, Gabor; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew H.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Barnes, Sydney A.; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Haas, Michael R.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Basri, Gibor; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Janes, Kenneth A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2011-05-20

    We present rotation periods for 71 single dwarf members of the open cluster NGC 6811 determined using photometry from NASA's Kepler mission. The results are the first from The Kepler Cluster Study, which combines Kepler's photometry with ground-based spectroscopy for cluster membership and binarity. The rotation periods delineate a tight sequence in the NGC 6811 color-period diagram from {approx}1 day at mid-F to {approx}11 days at early-K spectral type. This result extends to 1 Gyr similar prior results in the {approx}600 Myr Hyades and Praesepe clusters, suggesting that rotation periods for cool dwarf stars delineate a well-defined surface in the three-dimensional space of color (mass), rotation, and age. It implies that reliable ages can be derived for field dwarf stars with measured colors and rotation periods, and it promises to enable further understanding of various aspects of stellar rotation and activity for cool stars.

  2. Management and Systems Engineering of the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James; Livesay, Leslie; Frerking, Margaret; Cooke, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Kepler is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zones around stars other than the sun. Selected for implementation in 2001 and launched in 2009, Kepler seeks to determine whether Earth-like planets are common or rare in the galaxy. The investigation requires a large, space-based photometer capable of simultaneously measuring the brightnesses of 100,000 stars at part-per-million level of precision. This paper traces the development of the mission from the perspective of project management and systems engineering and describes various methodologies and tools that were found to be effective. The experience of the Kepler development is used to illuminate lessons that can be applied to future missions.

  3. Using Kepler for Tool Integration in Microarray Analysis Workflows.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhuohui; Stowe, Jennifer C; Altintas, Ilkay; McCulloch, Andrew D; Zambon, Alexander C

    Increasing numbers of genomic technologies are leading to massive amounts of genomic data, all of which requires complex analysis. More and more bioinformatics analysis tools are being developed by scientist to simplify these analyses. However, different pipelines have been developed using different software environments. This makes integrations of these diverse bioinformatics tools difficult. Kepler provides an open source environment to integrate these disparate packages. Using Kepler, we integrated several external tools including Bioconductor packages, AltAnalyze, a python-based open source tool, and R-based comparison tool to build an automated workflow to meta-analyze both online and local microarray data. The automated workflow connects the integrated tools seamlessly, delivers data flow between the tools smoothly, and hence improves efficiency and accuracy of complex data analyses. Our workflow exemplifies the usage of Kepler as a scientific workflow platform for bioinformatics pipelines.

  4. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  5. Period Analysis of Three SRS: Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Red, Wesley; Jones, Gabrielle; Cash, Jennifer; Walter, Donald K.

    2017-01-01

    As a portion of a larger project to observe SemiRegular Variable Stars in the original Kepler field, our research group is analyzing the light curve of three objects currently classified as SRS: stars in the GCVS, meaning that they possible members of the newer classification of Semi Regular variables of Short periods. We will present our analysis of the Kepler data to date. In particular these targets presented some interesting challenges to the standard analysis pipeline and we will present the steps taken to work around these challenges.This work was support by the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium. This work was also supported in part by NSF PAARE award AST-1358913 to SCSU and Kepler GO award NNX13AC24G to SCSU.

  6. A Measure of Stellar Binarity Among Kepler Target Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofi, Larissa; Baranec, Christoph; Howard, Andrew; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ziegler, Carl

    2015-12-01

    The dynamical interactions between stars in binary systems create a complex environment for planet formation and evolution. The Kepler mission offers an opportunity to compare binary stars with, and without, detections of inner transiting exoplanets. Kepler stars with no planet detections can act as a control sample in an effort to discover if inner planet formation in binary systems is a rare occurrence. We build a control sample of ~700 serendipitously observed targets from Robo-AO images of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), while also targeting a specific control dataset with parameters matched to an initial dataset of ~300 KOIs. We find that the binary fraction of KOIs, and the control sample with no detected planets, match to within 1-σ. Our findings do not suggest that inner transiting exoplanets are rare in binary systems for this sample.

  7. A Configuration Counterpart of the Kepler Problem Hodograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivarelli, Maria Dina

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents two peculiar geometrical structures in the configuration space of the classical Kepler problem: the circularU-graph and the circularS-graph. TheS-graph shows up a configuration space counterpart of the well-known velocity space hodograph. Several interesting results are brought out, such as a peculiar description of the mechanical energy. An extension to the three-dimensional space, through theU-sphere and theS-sphere, characterizes the regular Kepler orbits by means of the north pole of the associatedS-sphere. The Minkowskian parameterization introduced in [1] is easily recovered and is shown to fit naturally in theS-sphere description of the Kepler problem.

  8. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing the occurrence rates of planets within 1AU. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. In the last year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has more than doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta-Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  9. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Team

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a funtion size, orbital period, star-type, and insolation flux. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. This year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has nearly doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta-Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  10. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing the occurrence rates of planets within 1AU. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. In the last year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has nearly doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta- Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  11. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN THE KEPLER SEARCH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Marshall C.; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.

    2015-07-10

    The properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding a planetary system can impact planetary climate through a number of mechanisms, including changing the size of the astrosphere (one of the major shields for cosmic rays) as well as direct deposition of material into planetary atmospheres. In order to constrain the ambient ISM conditions for exoplanetary systems, we present observations of interstellar Na i and K i absorption toward seventeen early type stars in the Kepler prime mission field of view (FOV). We identify 39 Na i and 8 K i velocity components, and attribute these to 11 ISM clouds. Six of these are detected toward more than one star, and for these clouds we put limits on the cloud properties, including distance and hydrogen number density. We identify one cloud with significant (≳1.5 cm{sup −3}) hydrogen number density located within the nominal ∼100 pc boundary of the Local Bubble. We identify systems with confirmed planets within the Kepler FOV that could lie within these ISM clouds, and estimate upper limits on the astrosphere sizes of these systems under the assumption that they do lie within these clouds. Under this condition, the Kepler-20, 42, and 445 multiplanet systems could have compressed astrospheres much smaller than the present-day heliosphere. Among the known habitable zone planet hosts, Kepler-186 could have an astrosphere somewhat smaller than the heliosphere, while Kepler-437 and KOI-4427 could have astrospheres much larger than the heliosphere. The thick disk star Kepler-444 may have an astrosphere just a few AU in radius.

  12. The Kepler Mission and the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; DeVore, E.; Gould, A.; Koch, D.

    2008-05-01

    Johannes Kepler was one of Galileo's contemporaries, publishing New Astronomy defining his first two laws, nearly 400 years ago, in 1609. It is a fitting tribute that the Kepler Mission launches in 2009. Kepler continued his studies of motion and made observations of satellites of Jupiter, and published his third law. We now recognize Kepler's laws as 1. Planets move in elliptical; 2. The planets move such that the line between the Sun and the Planet sweeps out equal areas in equal time no matter where in the orbit; and 3. The square of the period of the orbit of a planet is proportional to the mean distance from the Sun cubed. Kepler's laws were deduced empirically from the motions of the planet Mars in the early 17th century, before Newton deduced the law of gravity and his laws of motion. The Kepler Mission, a NASA Discovery mission, is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to detect and characterize hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone. The habitable zone encompasses the distances from a star where liquid water can exist on a planet's surface. Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. The Mission Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program has developed a Night Sky Network (NSN) outreach kit, Shadows and Silhouettes. This NSN kit is used by amateur astronomers at school and public observing events to illustrate a transit, and explain eclipses.

  13. Formation, tidal evolution, and habitability of the Kepler-186 system

    SciTech Connect

    Bolmont, Emeline; Raymond, Sean N.; Selsis, Franck; Hersant, Franck; Von Paris, Philip; Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-09-20

    The Kepler-186 system consists of five planets orbiting an early M dwarf. The planets have physical radii of 1.0-1.50 R {sub ⊕} and orbital periods of 4-130 days. The 1.1 R {sub ⊕} Kepler-186f with a period of 130 days is of particular interest. Its insolation of roughly 0.32 S {sub ⊕} places it within the surface liquid water habitable zone (HZ). We present a multifaceted study of the Kepler-186 system, using two sets of parameters which are consistent with the data and also self-consistent. First, we show that the distribution of planet masses can be roughly reproduced if the planets were accreted from a high surface density disk presumably sculpted by an earlier phase of migration. However, our simulations predict the existence of one to two undetected planets between planets e and f. Next, we present a dynamical analysis of the system including the effect of tides. The timescale for tidal evolution is short enough that the four inner planets must have small obliquities and near-synchronous rotation rates. The tidal evolution of Kepler-186f is slow enough that its current spin state depends on a combination of its initial spin state, its dissipation rate, and the stellar age. Finally, we study the habitability of Kepler-186f with a one-dimensional climate model. The planet's surface temperature can be raised above 273 K with 0.5-5 bars of CO{sub 2}, depending on the amount of N{sub 2} present. Kepler-186f represents a case study of an Earth-sized planet in the cooler regions of the HZ of a cool star.

  14. VALFAST: Secure Probabilistic Validation of Hundreds of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim; Petigura, E.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A.; Marcy, G. W.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Riddle, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Robo-AO Team

    2014-01-01

    The scope, scale, and tremendous success of the Kepler mission has necessitated the rapid development of probabilistic validation as a new conceptual framework for analyzing transiting planet candidate signals. While several planet validation methods have been independently developed and presented in the literature, none has yet come close to addressing the entire Kepler survey. I present the results of applying VALFAST---a planet validation code based on the methodology described in Morton (2012)---to every Kepler Object of Interest. VALFAST is unique in its combination of detail, completeness, and speed. Using the transit light curve shape, realistic population simulations, and (optionally) diverse follow-up observations, it calculates the probability that a transit candidate signal is the result of a true transiting planet or any of a number of astrophysical false positive scenarios, all in just a few minutes on a laptop computer. In addition to efficiently validating the planetary nature of hundreds of new KOIs, this broad application of VALFAST also demonstrates its ability to reliably identify likely false positives. This extensive validation effort is also the first to incorporate data from all of the largest Kepler follow-up observing efforts: the CKS survey of ~1000 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, the Robo-AO survey of >1700 KOIs, and high-resolution images obtained through the Kepler Follow-up Observing Program. In addition to enabling the core science that the Kepler mission was designed for, this methodology will be critical to obtain statistical results from future surveys such as TESS and PLATO.

  15. The Kepler problem from Newton to Johann Bernoulli.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, D.

    1996-08-01

    Newton solved what was called at the time "the direct Kepler problem": given a curve (e.g., an ellipse) and the center of attraction (e.g., the focus), what is the law of attraction, if Kepler's second law holds? The "inverse problem", the determination of all possible orbit solutions for a given central force field, was systematically treated later, first by Jacob Hermann, and then thoroughly and completely by Johann Bernoulli. This paper traces the history of work on the problem and of the accompanying scientific controversies until the time of Johann Bernoulli and his pupil Leonhard Euler.

  16. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  17. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) I: Survey Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, John J.; Howell, S.; Harding, P.; Mihos, C.; Rudick, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Knox, C.; Ciardi, D.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Burrell Optical Kepler Survey (BOKS) is a ground-based, high cadence, stellar variability survey over a portion of the planned science field for the Kepler mission. The survey was carried out at the 0.6m Burrell Schmidt telescope, with an observed field size of 1.36 square degrees. Over 60,000 stars were observed within the BOKS field in the SDSS r-band spanning a time period of 39 days, with a 4.5 minute cadence. We give a basic description of the survey, and calculate the observability function for stellar variablity of different types.

  18. Exoplanet Science from NASA’s Kepler Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason

    2012-09-12

    NASA's exoplanet mission is the world's premier instrument for the discovery and study of planets orbiting distant stars. As the nominal mission comes to a close, Kepler has discovered nearly 2500 planet candidates, confirmed dozens of multi-planet systems, provided important insights into the orbital architectures of planetary systems, identified specific systems that challenge theories of planet formation and dynamical evolution, has revolutionized our understanding of stellar interiors, and is gearing to measure the frequency of Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars in its extended mission phase. I present the most recent results from the Kepler mission.

  19. Asteroseismology of Kepler ZZ Ceti Stars with Fully Evolutionary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, A. D.; Córsico, A. H.; Castanheira, B. G.; De Gerónimo, F. C.; Kepler, S. O.; Althaus, L. G.; Koester, D.; Kawka, A.; Gianninas, A.; Bonato, C.

    2017-03-01

    Recently the Kepler spacecraft observed ZZ Ceti stars giving the opportunity to study their variability for long baselines. We present a study of pulsational properties of two ZZ Ceti stars observed with the Kepler spacecraft: GD 1212 and SDSS J113655.17+040952.6, based on a grid of full evolutionary models of DA white dwarf stars, characterized by detailed and consistent inner chemical profiles. For J113655.17+040952 we found values of gravity and effective temperature in good agreement with spectroscopy. For GD 1212 the asteroseismological fits show a stellar mass higher than the spectroscopic value, but in agreement with the determinations from photometry coupled with parallax.

  20. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.-Y.; Song, Y.-H.; Luo, A.-L.; Huang, L.-C.; Ip, W.-H.; Fu, J.-N.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Cao, Z.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectra of early-type M0–M3 dwarfs is compared with Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in {{{H}}}α have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index, and the equivalent widths of the {{{H}}}α emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster-rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods < 20 days).

  1. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  2. Kepler and the origins of pre-Newtonian mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    The technical concept of "mass" is traced from its medieval origins in theology up to, but not including, Newton's Principia. Building on the advances of the Middle Ages, Kepler conceived, albeit in rudimentary form, the fundamental physical ideas of mass, "inertia," and gravitational "mutual attraction." These splendid concepts were later developed and carried forward into Newton's era by several 17th-century natural philosophers. Unlike his three planetary laws, Kepler's physics has long gone unappreciated by the scientific community. Nonetheless, it formed the conceptual foundation for much of classical dynamics.

  3. Kepler Mission Discovers Trove of Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-02-01

    NASA's Kepler discovery mission is collecting more than just pennies from heaven. Results from the first 4 months of science operations of the Kepler space telescope, announced on 2 February, include the discovery of 1235 candidate planets orbiting 997 stars in a small portion of the Milky Way galaxy examined by the telescope. Follow-up observations likely could confirm about 80% of the candidates as actual planets rather than false positives, according to researchers. This new trove of possible exoplanets could greatly expand the number of known planets outside of our solar system.

  4. Orbits of the Kepler problem via polar reciprocals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Polar reciprocals of trajectories are an elegant alternative to hodographs for motion in a central force field. Their principal advantage is that the transformation from a trajectory to its polar reciprocal is its own inverse. The form of the polar reciprocals of Kepler orbits is established, and a geometrical construction is presented for the orbits of the Kepler problem starting from their polar reciprocals. No obscure knowledge of conics is required to demonstrate the validity of the method. Unlike a graphical procedure suggested by Feynman and extended by Derbes, the method based on polar reciprocals works without changes for elliptical, parabolic, and hyperbolic trajectories.

  5. EXPLORING THE HABITABLE ZONE FOR KEPLER PLANETARY CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D.

    2011-08-01

    This Letter outlines a simple approach to evaluate habitability of terrestrial planets by assuming different types of planetary atmospheres and using corresponding model calculations. Our approach can be applied for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches. The resulting uncertainties and changes in the number of planetary candidates in the HZ for the Kepler 2011 February data release are discussed. To first order, the HZ depends on the effective stellar flux distribution in wavelength and time, the planet albedo, and greenhouse gas effects. We provide a simple set of parameters which can be used for evaluating future planet candidates from transit searches.

  6. Transit Timing Study with Kepler and its synergy with LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST: http://www.lamost.org) provides mass and radius measurements of the stars thus helps with modeling transit timing. Here, we will show two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties by combining Kepler and LAMOST.

  7. The voltage dependence of the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel is modified by mutations in the first putative intracellular loop

    PubMed Central

    Cenedese, Valentina; Betto, Giulia; Celsi, Fulvio; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are involved in several physiological processes. Recently, TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 have been shown to function as CaCCs, but very little information is available on the structure–function relations of these channels. TMEM16B is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, in microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, and in the synaptic terminals of retinal photoreceptors. Here, we have performed the first site-directed mutagenesis study on TMEM16B to understand the molecular mechanisms of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. We have mutated amino acids in the first putative intracellular loop and measured the properties of the wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK 293T cells using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique in the presence of various intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We mutated E367 into glutamine or deleted the five consecutive glutamates 386EEEEE390 and 399EYE401. The EYE deletion did not significantly modify the apparent Ca2+ dependence nor the voltage dependence of channel activation. E367Q and deletion of the five glutamates did not greatly affect the apparent Ca2+ affinity but modified the voltage dependence, shifting the conductance–voltage relations toward more positive voltages. These findings indicate that glutamates E367 and 386EEEEE390 in the first intracellular putative loop play an important role in the voltage dependence of TMEM16B, thus providing an initial structure–function study for this channel. PMID:22412191

  8. WHERE TO FIND HABITABLE ''EARTHS'' IN CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Huigen; Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2013-04-20

    Six P-type planets have been found thus far around five binary systems, i.e., Kepler-16b, 34b, 35b, 38b, and 47b and c, which are all Neptune- or Jupiter-like planets. The stability of planets and the habitable zones are influenced by the gravitational and radiative perturbations of binary companions. In this Letter, we check the stability of an additional habitable Earth-mass planet in each system. Based on our simulations in 10 Myr, a habitable ''Earth'' is hardly stable in Kepler-16, while a stable ''Earth'' in Kepler-47 close to the boundaries of the habitable zone is possible. In contrast, Kepler-34, 35, and 38 seem to have high probabilities of being able to tolerante a stable ''Earth'' in their habitable zones. The affects of transit time variations are quite small due to the small mass of an undetected ''Earth,'' except that of Kepler-16b. With a time precision of 10{sup -3} day ({approx}88 s), an ''Earth'' in the corotational resonance with Kepler-16b can be detected in three years, while habitable ''Earths'' in the Kepler-34 and 38 systems can be detected in 10 yr. Habitable ''Earths'' in Kepler-35 and 47 are not likely to be detected in 10 yr under this precision.

  9. DEBRIS DISKS IN KEPLER EXOPLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2012-06-10

    The Kepler mission recently identified 997 systems hosting candidate extrasolar planets, many of which are super-Earths. Realizing these planetary systems are candidates to host extrasolar asteroid belts, we use mid-infrared data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to search for emission from dust in these systems. We find excesses around eight stars, indicating the presence of warm to hot dust ({approx}100-500 K), corresponding to orbital distances of 0.1-10 AU for these solar-type stars. The strongest detection, KOI 1099, demands {approx}500 K dust interior to the orbit of its exoplanet candidate. One star, KOI 904, may host very hot dust ({approx}1200 K, corresponding to 0.02 AU). Although the fraction of these exoplanet-bearing stars with detectable warm excesses ({approx}3%) is similar to that found by Spitzer surveys of solar-type field stars, the excesses detectable in the WISE data have much higher fractional luminosities (L{sub dust}/L{sub *}) than most known debris disks, implying that the fraction with debris disks of comparable luminosity may actually be significantly higher. It is difficult to explain the presence of dust so close to the host stars, generally corresponding to dust rings at radii <0.3 AU; both the collisional and Poynting-Robertson drag timescales to remove dust from the system are hundreds of years or less at these distances. Assuming a steady state for these systems implies large mass consumption rates with these short removal timescales, meaning that the dust production mechanism in these systems must almost certainly be episodic in nature.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Parallel Observations Supporting the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, J.; Borucki, W.

    1999-09-01

    Kepler will detect Earth-like planets by monitoring 100,000 stars over four years for planetary transits. The required photometric precision is one part in 100.000. It is expected that if such ``Earths" are common, about 200 will be detected. In order to achieve the necessary precision, Kepler will be intentionally unfocussed, spreading the light of a single star over an area of 25 pixels. This will minimize the effect of space-craft jitter on photon counting. However, it will also allow the possibility of confusion with background objects which may be in the line of sight to a Kepler target. The greatest concern is that there may be a distant eclipsing binary star which could introduce a photometric signature that is similar to a planetary transit. For the brightest stars in Kepler's intended magnitude range, which is 9 to 14 mv, this will not be serious, because the profiles are different: eclipses have a ``V" shape, transits are flat-bottomed, and Kepler will differentiate the two. However, in this magnitude range, the number of stars per magnitude doubles at each fainter magnitude. More than half of Kepler's discoveries will be in the magnitude which is the faintest in which the precision of the photometry will be able to reveal a transit. That is, most of the discoveries will be low signal to noise events, in which the reality of a small decrease in the light from the region of the target star is certain, but the details of the decrease are not. Hubble Space Telescope images indicate there will be, on average, 0.5 background objects in the magnitude range that could be a problem for Kepler in the 25 pixel blur region of Kepler's optics. Approximately half of the stars will be binaries. The probability that a binary will be eclipsing is the same as that a planetary orbit will be transitting. In order to reduce the chance of a misidentification, various strategies can be used. Rather than integrating the signal over the 25 pixels and returning only the sum, the

  11. Naphtho[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene-based bulk heterojunction solar cells: how molecular structure influences nanoscale morphology and photovoltaic properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Jin; Cheon, Ye Rim; Back, Jang Yeol; Kim, Yun-Hi; Chung, Dae Sung; Park, Chan Eon

    2014-11-10

    Organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices based on a series of three naphtho[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene (NDT) derivatives blended with phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester were studied. These three derivatives, which have NDT units with various thiophene-chain lengths, were employed as the donor polymers. The influence of their molecular structures on the correlation between their solar-cell performances and their degree of crystallization was assessed. The grazing-incidence angle X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy results showed that the three derivatives exhibit three distinct nanoscale morphologies. We correlated these morphologies with the device physics by determining the J-V characteristics and the hole and electron mobilities of the devices. On the basis of our results, we propose new rules for the design of future generations of NDT-based polymers for use in bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  12. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazol derivatives and their terbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu; Chai, Yuchao; Li, Kangyun; Chen, Yanwen; Yan, Dong; Guo, Dongcai

    2014-12-01

    Eight novel 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazol derivatives have been designed and synthesized, and their corresponding Tb(3+) complexes were also prepared successfully. The fluorescence properties and fluorescence quantum yields of the target complexes were investigated, the results showed that the ligands were an efficient sensitizer for Tb(3+) luminescence, and the target complexes exhibited characteristic fluorescence emissions of Tb(3+) ion. The fluorescence intensity of the complex substituted by chlorine was stronger than that of other complexes. The substituents' nature has a great effect upon the electrochemical properties of the target complexes. The results showed that the introduction of the electron-withdrawing groups tended to decrease the oxidation potential and highest occupied molecular orbital energy levels of the target Tb(3+) complexes; however, introduction of the electron-donating groups can increase the corresponding complexes' oxidation potential and highest occupied molecular orbital energy levels.

  13. PERIOD ERROR ESTIMATION FOR THE KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Plavchan, Peter

    2013-06-15

    The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (KEBC) describes 2165 eclipsing binaries identified in the 115 deg{sup 2} Kepler Field based on observations from Kepler quarters Q0, Q1, and Q2. The periods in the KEBC are given in units of days out to six decimal places but no period errors are provided. We present the PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm, which can be used to estimate the period errors of strictly periodic variables observed by the Kepler Mission. The PEC algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. The PEC algorithm can be efficiently programmed using just a few lines of C computer language code. The PEC algorithm was used to develop a simple model that provides period error estimates for eclipsing binaries in the KEBC with periods less than 62.5 days: log {sigma}{sub P} Almost-Equal-To - 5.8908 + 1.4425(1 + log P), where P is the period of an eclipsing binary in the KEBC in units of days. KEBC systems with periods {>=}62.5 days have KEBC period errors of {approx}0.0144 days. Periods and period errors of seven eclipsing binary systems in the KEBC were measured using the NASA Exoplanet Archive Periodogram Service and compared to period errors estimated using the PEC algorithm.

  14. The Measurements of the Solar Diameter at the Kepler's Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Fraschetti, Federico

    2002-12-01

    We examine five measurements of the solar disk diameter made with a pinhole instrument by Tycho in 1591 and Kepler in 1600-1602 [1]. Those are the first accurate measurements of the solar disk diameter available in literature, even if Ptolemy and Copernicus already did such measurements [2].

  15. KEPLER: General purpose 1D multizone hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, T. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    KEPLER is a general purpose stellar evolution/explosion code that incorporates implicit hydrodynamics and a detailed treatment of nuclear burning processes. It has been used to study the complete evolution of massive and supermassive stars, all major classes of supernovae, hydrostatic and explosive nucleosynthesis, and x- and gamma-ray bursts on neutron stars and white dwarfs.

  16. A POTENTIAL SUPER-VENUS IN THE KEPLER-69 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Barclay, Thomas

    2013-06-20

    Transiting planets have greatly expanded and diversified the exoplanet field. These planets provide greater access to characterization of exoplanet atmospheres and structure. The Kepler mission has been particularly successful in expanding the exoplanet inventory, even to planets smaller than the Earth. The orbital period sensitivity of the Kepler data is now extending into the habitable zones of their host stars, and several planets larger than the Earth have been found to lie therein. Here we examine one such proposed planet, Kepler-69c. We provide new orbital parameters for this planet and an in-depth analysis of the habitable zone. We find that, even under optimistic conditions, this 1.7 R{sub Circled-Plus} planet is unlikely to be within the habitable zone of Kepler-69. Furthermore, the planet receives an incident flux of 1.91 times the solar constant, which is similar to that received by Venus. We thus suggest that this planet is likely a super-Venus rather than a super-Earth in terms of atmospheric properties and habitability, and we propose follow-up observations to disentangle the ambiguity.

  17. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-11

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity [Formula: see text]) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination [Formula: see text]) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits ([Formula: see text]). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with [Formula: see text] 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular [Formula: see text] and coplanar [Formula: see text] degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [[Formula: see text](1-2)[Formula: see text

  18. Distribution of Planetary Inclinations as Inferred from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; Kepler Team

    2011-05-01

    The true mutual inclination between orbits in a planetary system is a key indicator of dominant planet formation mechanisms. It is, therefore, unfortunate that the vast majority of current exoplanet observations are only sensitive to line-of-sight inclinations, at best. Even in systems with multiple transiting planets, arguably the best observational case, the line-of-sight inclinations are a weak constraint on the mutual inclination between planetary orbits. However, the large and homogeneous observations from the Kepler Space Telescope provide a population that can be assessed statistically in order to estimate the typical mutual inclination of exoplanetary systems. Lissauer et al. 2011b use the Quarter 0-2 Kepler observations presented in Borucki et al. 2011 to show that there is a population of planetary systems with multiple, small (radii between 1.5 and 6 Earth radii), short-period planets and that the typical mutual inclination in these systems is only a few degrees. Based on these new Kepler results and other observations, I will present the current best understanding of the inclination distribution of planetary systems and prospects for future progress. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Student Ideas about Kepler's Laws and Planetary Orbital Motions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Ka Chun; Sahami, Kamran; Denn, Grant

    2010-01-01

    We present the analysis of oral interviews with 112 undergraduate nonmajor students during the first week of a General Education Introduction to Astronomy class before they had received any instruction. The students were asked questions relating to Kepler's three Laws of Motion, as well as their understanding of what keeps planets in orbit around…

  20. A regioselective Huisgen reaction inside a Keplerate polyoxomolybdate nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Besson, Claire; Schmitz, Sebastian; Capella, Kimberly M; Kopilevich, Sivil; Weinstock, Ira A; Kögerler, Paul

    2012-09-07

    A 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction taking place quantitatively between propiolic acid "guests" and azide functions previously attached to binding sites within the cavity of a {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate reproducibly gives a 2 : 1 ratio of 1,4- and 1,5-triazoles.

  1. PREDICTING PLANETS IN KEPLER MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-05-20

    We investigate whether any multi-planet systems among Kepler candidates (2011 February release) can harbor additional terrestrial-mass planets or smaller bodies. We apply the packed planetary systems hypothesis that suggests all planetary systems are filled to capacity, and use a Hill stability criterion to identify eight two-planet systems with significant gaps between the innermost and outermost planets. For each of these systems, we perform long-term numerical integrations of 10{sup 7} years to investigate the stability of 4000-8000 test particles injected into the gaps. We map out stability regions in orbital parameter space, and therefore quantify the ranges of semimajor axes and eccentricities of stable particles. Strong mean-motion resonances can add additional regions of stability in otherwise unstable parameter space. We derive simple expressions for the extent of the stability regions, which is related to quantities such as the dynamical spacing {Delta}, the separation between two planets in units of their mutual Hill radii. Our results suggest that planets with separation {Delta} < 10 are unlikely to host extensive stability regions, and that about 95 out of a total of 115 two-planet systems in the Kepler sample may have sizeable stability regions. We predict that Kepler candidate systems including KOI 433, KOI 72/Kepler-10, KOI 555, KOI 1596, KOI 904, KOI 223, KOI 1590, and KOI 139 can harbor additional planets or low-mass bodies between the inner and outer detected planets. These predicted planets may be detected by future observations.

  2. A Simple Derivation of Kepler's Laws without Solving Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provost, J.-P.; Bracco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Proceeding like Newton with a discrete time approach of motion and a geometrical representation of velocity and acceleration, we obtain Kepler's laws without solving differential equations. The difficult part of Newton's work, when it calls for non-trivial properties of ellipses, is avoided by the introduction of polar coordinates. Then a simple…

  3. Chandrasekhar's relation and stellar rotation in the Kepler field

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J. R. P.; Soares, B. B.; De Freitas, D. B. E-mail: brauliosoares@uern.br

    2014-11-20

    According to the statistical law of large numbers, the expected mean of identically distributed random variables of a sample tends toward the actual mean as the sample increases. Under this law, it is possible to test the Chandrasekhar's relation (CR), (V) = (π/4){sup –1}(Vsin i), using a large amount of Vsin i and V data from different samples of similar stars. In this context, we conducted a statistical test to check the consistency of the CR in the Kepler field. In order to achieve this, we use three large samples of V obtained from Kepler rotation periods and a homogeneous control sample of Vsin i to overcome the scarcity of Vsin i data for stars in the Kepler field. We used the bootstrap-resampling method to estimate the mean rotations ((V) and (Vsin i)) and their corresponding confidence intervals for the stars segregated by effective temperature. Then, we compared the estimated means to check the consistency of CR, and analyzed the influence of the uncertainties in radii measurements, and possible selection effects. We found that the CR with (sin i) = π/4 is consistent with the behavior of the (V) as a function of (Vsin i) for stars from the Kepler field as there is a very good agreement between such a relation and the data.

  4. THE ALBEDOS OF KEPLER'S CLOSE-IN SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Exoplanet research focusing on the characterization of super-Earths is currently limited to the handful of targets orbiting bright stars that are amenable to detailed study. This Letter proposes to look at alternative avenues to probe the surface and atmospheric properties of this category of planets, known to be ubiquitous in our galaxy. I conduct Markov Chain Monte Carlo light-curves analyses for 97 Kepler close-in R{sub P} ≲ 2.0 R {sub ⊕} super-Earth candidates with the aim of detecting their occultations at visible wavelengths. Brightness temperatures and geometric albedos in the Kepler bandpass are constrained for 27 super-Earth candidates. A hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach is then employed to characterize the population-level reflective properties of these close-in super-Earths. I find median geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass ranging between 0.16 and 0.30, once decontaminated from thermal emission. These super-Earth geometric albedos are statistically larger than for hot Jupiters, which have medians A{sub g} ranging between 0.06 and 0.11. A subset of objects, including Kepler-10b, exhibit significantly larger albedos (A{sub g} ≳ 0.4). I argue that a better understanding of the incidence of stellar irradation on planetary surface and atmospheric processes is key to explain the diversity in albedos observed for close-in super-Earths.

  5. Stability of the Kepler-11 system and its origin

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Nikhil; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    A significant fraction of Kepler systems are closely packed, largely coplanar, and circular. We study the stability of a six-planet system, Kepler-11, to gain insights on the dynamics and formation history of such systems. Using a technique called 'frequency maps' as fast indicators of long-term stability, we explore the stability of the Kepler-11 system by analyzing the neighborhood space around its orbital parameters. Frequency maps provide a visual representation of chaos and stability, and their dependence on orbital parameters. We find that the current system is stable, but lies within a few percent of several dynamically dangerous two-body mean-motion resonances. Planet eccentricities are restricted below a small value, ∼0.04, for long-term stability, but planet masses can be more than twice their reported values (thus allowing for the possibility of mass loss by past photoevaporation). Based on our frequency maps, we speculate on the origin of instability in closely packed systems. We then proceed to investigate how the system could have been assembled. The stability constraints on Kepler-11 (mainly eccentricity constraints) suggest that if the system were assembled in situ, a dissipation mechanism must have been at work to neutralize the eccentricity excitation. On the other hand, if migration was responsible for assembling the planets, there has to be little differential migration among the planets to avoid them either getting trapped into mean motion resonances, or crashing into each other.

  6. Eta-Sub-Earth Projection from Kepler Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2012-01-01

    Outline of talk: (1) The Kepler database (2) Biases (3) The radius distribution (4) The period distribution (5) Projecting from the sam ple to the population (6) Extrapolating the period distribution (7) The Habitable Zone (8) Calculating the number of terrestrial, HZ plan ets (10) Conclusions

  7. Fundamental Parameters of Kepler Eclipsing Binaries. I. KIC 5738698

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Rachel A.; Gies, Douglas R.; Guo, Zhao; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2016-06-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve as a valuable source of stellar masses and radii that inform stellar evolutionary models and provide insight into additional astrophysical processes. The exquisite light curves generated by space-based missions such as Kepler offer the most stringent tests to date. We use the Kepler light curve of the 4.8 day eclipsing binary KIC 5739896 with ground based optical spectra to derive fundamental parameters for the system. We reconstruct the component spectra to determine the individual atmospheric parameters, and model the Kepler photometry with the binary synthesis code Eclipsing Light Curve to obtain accurate masses and radii. The two components of KIC 5738698 are F-type stars with {M}1\\=\\1.39+/- 0.04 {M}⊙ , {M}2\\=\\1.34+/- 0.06 {M}⊙ , and {R}1\\=\\1.84+/- 0.03 {R}⊙ , {R}2\\=\\1.72+/- 0.03 {R}⊙ . We also report a small eccentricity (e≲ 0.0017) and unusual albedo values that are required to match the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve. Comparison with evolutionary models indicate an approximate age of 2.3 Gyr for the system.

  8. Humans Need Not Apply: Robotization of Kepler Planet Candidate Vetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the vast majority of Kepler planet candidate vetting has been performed by a dedicated team of humans. While human expertise has been invaluable in understanding the nuances of Kepler data, human vetting is very time-consuming and can be inconsistent. Over 20,000 threshold crossing events have been produced by the latest pipeline run on all 17 quarters of Kepler mission data, and many more artificial planet transits have been injected to estimate completeness. Given these large numbers, human vetting is no longer feasible on a reasonable time-scale, and would be difficult to characterize. We have created automated vetting programs known as "robovetters" that are specifically designed to mimic the decision-making process employed by the humans. They analyze both the light curve and pixel-level data in order to produce specific reasons for identifying false positives. We present benchmark tests on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet catalog, which was vetted by humans, and present preliminary robovetter results based on a recent transit-search of the newly reprocessed Q1-Q17 data set.

  9. A Measure of Stellar Binarity Among Kepler Target Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofi, Larissa; Baranec, Christoph; Howard, Andrew; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas Michael; Ziegler, Carl

    2015-08-01

    We are characterizing the potential bias in the Kepler population by comparing the stellar binary fraction of the ~190,000 Kepler Input Catalog targets (KICs) to the binary fraction of the ~4,000 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). While the Kepler mission has been essential to the search for, and characterization of, extrasolar planets, there are still limitations to our statistical understanding of exoplanets and their formation based on this sample. We still do not fully understand what observational biases may exist and how to adequately correct for them when applying this information to a large scale understanding of exoplanets. Comparing binarity fractions of the KOI sub-sample and KIC population can indicate biases in the KOI subset and may have implications for preferred planet formation environments. Using visible-light adaptive optics images from Robo-AO, we are comparing the binary fraction of the KOIs to the binary fraction of the larger KIC population. Existing KOI images are used to build a sample of serendipitous KIC observations, resulting in ~700 KICs. An additional ~300 KIC targets will be observed in June 2015 with Robo-AO, for a total of ~1,000 KICs. The latter targets are chosen with surface gravities, spectral types, effective temperatures, and galactic latitudes similar to those of the observed KOIs, in order to match the sample parameters.

  10. Stability of the Kepler-11 System and Its Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Nikhil; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    A significant fraction of Kepler systems are closely packed, largely coplanar, and circular. We study the stability of a six-planet system, Kepler-11, to gain insights on the dynamics and formation history of such systems. Using a technique called "frequency maps" as fast indicators of long-term stability, we explore the stability of the Kepler-11 system by analyzing the neighborhood space around its orbital parameters. Frequency maps provide a visual representation of chaos and stability, and their dependence on orbital parameters. We find that the current system is stable, but lies within a few percent of several dynamically dangerous two-body mean-motion resonances. Planet eccentricities are restricted below a small value, ~0.04, for long-term stability, but planet masses can be more than twice their reported values (thus allowing for the possibility of mass loss by past photoevaporation). Based on our frequency maps, we speculate on the origin of instability in closely packed systems. We then proceed to investigate how the system could have been assembled. The stability constraints on Kepler-11 (mainly eccentricity constraints) suggest that if the system were assembled in situ, a dissipation mechanism must have been at work to neutralize the eccentricity excitation. On the other hand, if migration was responsible for assembling the planets, there has to be little differential migration among the planets to avoid them either getting trapped into mean motion resonances, or crashing into each other.

  11. Searching Kepler Variable Stars with the Eclipsing Binary Factory Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvizi, Mahmoud; Paegert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Repositories of large survey data, such as the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, provide an ideally sized sample from which to identify astrophysically interesting eclipsing binary systems (EBs). However, constraints on the rate of human analysis in solving for the characteristic parameters make mining this data using classical techniques prohibitive. The Kepler data set provides both the high precision simple aperture photometry necessary to detect EBs and a corresponding Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog - V3 (KEBC3) of 2,406 EBs in the Kepler filed of view (FoV) as a benchmark. We developed a fully automated end-to-end computational pipeline known as the Eclipsing Binary Factory (EBF) that employs pre-classification data processing modules, a feed-forward single layer perception neural network classifier (NNC), and a subsequent neural network solution estimator (NNSE). This paper focuses on the EBF component modules to include NNC, but excludes the NNSE, as a precursor to a fully automated pipeline that uses solution estimates of characteristic parameters to identify astrophysically interesting EBs. The EBF was found to recover ~94% of KEBC3 EBs contained in the Kepler “Q3” data release where the period is less than thirty days.

  12. New Kepler Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, B.; Tseng, S.; Million, C.; Thompson, R.; Seibert, M.; Abney, F.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Fraquelli, D. A.; Handy, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Levay, K.; Matuskey, J.; McLean, B.; Quick, L.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has collected high-precision, time-series photometry of over 200,000 stars. The reduced lightcurves, target pixel files, and a variety of catalog metadata are already available at MAST. We present new data products and services at MAST that will further aid researchers as Kepler begins its transition to a legacy mission, particularly in the realm of stellar astrophysics. New photometric catalogs to accompany the Kepler targets have arrived at MAST within the past year, and several more will be coming in the relative future. These include the second half of the Kepler INT survey (U,g,r,i,H_alpha; available now), an improved GALEX source catalog (NUV and FUV; available now), PanSTARRS (g,r,i,z; available soon), and WISE (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns; planned). We expect searches for variability will become one of the most active areas of archive use, so MAST is including a wide range of variability statistics as part of the archive database. In addition to being searchable through database queries and web forms, each Preview page will now include a summary of these variability indices for each of the target's lightcurves within a Quarter. Along with updated NUV and FUV fluxes, a new tool at MAST called gPhoton will allow users to create time-series lightcurves, including animated movies and intensity images, from any set of GALEX photons with arbitrary aperture and bin sizes. We show some examples of the ways GALEX UV lightcurves generated with gPhoton can be used in conjunction with the Kepler data. Finally, MAST has released an initial version of its Data Discovery Portal. This one-stop, interactive web application gives users the ability to search and access data from any of MAST's missions (HST, GALEX, Kepler, FUSE, IUE, JWST, etc.), as well as any data available through the Virtual Observatory. It includes filtering options, access to interactive displays, an accompanying AstroViewer with data footprints on-sky, the ability to upload your own

  13. A dynamical analysis of the Kepler-11 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migaszewski, Cezary; Słonina, Mariusz; Goździewski, Krzysztof

    2012-11-01

    The Kepler-11 planetary system hosts at least six transiting super-Earth planets detected through the precise photometric observations of the Kepler mission (Lissauer et al.). In this paper, we re-analyse the available Kepler data, using the direct N-body approach rather than an indirect transit timing variation method as employed in the discovery paper. The orbital modelling in the realm of the direct approach relies on the whole data set, not only on the mid-transits times. Most of the results in the original paper are confirmed and extended. We constrained the mass of the outermost planet g to less than 30 M⊕. The mutual inclinations between orbits b and c as well as between orbits d and e are determined with a good precision, in the range of [1°, 5°]. Having several solutions to the four qualitative orbital models of the Kepler-11 system, we analyse its global dynamics with the help of dynamical maps. They reveal a sophisticated structure of the phase space, with narrow regions of regular motion. The dynamics are governed by a dense net of three- and four-body mean motion resonances, forming the Arnold web. Overlapping of these resonances is a main source of instability. We found that the Kepler-11 system may be long-term stable only in particular multiple resonant configurations with small relative inclinations. The mass-radius data derived for all companions reveal a clear anticorrelation between the mean density of the planets and their distance from the star. This may reflect the formation and early evolution history of the system.

  14. CANDIDATE PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONES OF KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric

    2013-06-20

    A key goal of the Kepler mission is the discovery of Earth-size transiting planets in ''habitable zones'' where stellar irradiance maintains a temperate climate on an Earth-like planet. Robust estimates of planet radius and irradiance require accurate stellar parameters, but most Kepler systems are faint, making spectroscopy difficult and prioritization of targets desirable. The parameters of 2035 host stars were estimated by Bayesian analysis and the probabilities p{sub HZ} that 2738 candidate or confirmed planets orbit in the habitable zone were calculated. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program models were compared to photometry from the Kepler Input Catalog, priors for stellar mass, age, metallicity and distance, and planet transit duration. The analysis yielded probability density functions for calculating confidence intervals of planet radius and stellar irradiance, as well as p{sub HZ}. Sixty-two planets have p{sub HZ} > 0.5 and a most probable stellar irradiance within habitable zone limits. Fourteen of these have radii less than twice the Earth; the objects most resembling Earth in terms of radius and irradiance are KOIs 2626.01 and 3010.01, which orbit late K/M-type dwarf stars. The fraction of Kepler dwarf stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable zone ({eta}{sub Circled-Plus }) is 0.46, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.31-0.64. Parallaxes from the Gaia mission will reduce uncertainties by more than a factor of five and permit definitive assignments of transiting planets to the habitable zones of Kepler stars.

  15. Hubble Observations of Kepler-Monitored Seyfert Is

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The bulk of AGN optical variability is generated by viscous processes in the accretion disk. The nature and amplitude of the variability is thought to be strongly connected to the black hole mass and Eddington ratio {McLeod et al 2010}. For the past 3 years we have obtained high-precision {milli-magnitude errors}, densely-sampled {every 30 min}, long-duration {years} optical light curves from Kepler of 28 AGN our team has discovered in the Kepler field. These data permit, for the first time, the precise measurement of the optical variability of a sample of AGN over a wide range of timescales {from hours to years}, BH masses and Eddington ratios, allowing a detailed characterization of the variability processes.To properly model the disk emission and probe the origin of the variability, it is necessary to measure and subtract off the substantial but uncertain contribution due to starlight in the underlying galaxy. Because of the poor angular resolution of Kepler and ground based data, only HST can obtain this data. Without this measurement it is impossible to determine the absolute variability amplitude of the AGN, an accurate black hole mass or AGN luminosity. We request 8 GO orbits for WFC3 imaging of 8 AGN selected to span a wide range of Eddington ratio and black hole mass. These 8 objects are representative of the full range of mass and Eddington ratio of the present Kepler monitored sample. HST observations are crucial to obtain the full value of the already-extraordinary Kepler AGN light curves. In addition the HST observations will determine the nature of the host galaxy, a key parameter in understanding the origin and evolution of AGN.

  16. THE HIGH ALBEDO OF THE HOT JUPITER KEPLER-7 b

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Gillon, Michael; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Welsh, William F.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig

    2011-07-01

    Hot Jupiters are expected to be dark from both observations (albedo upper limits) and theory (alkali metals and/or TiO and VO absorption). However, only a handful of hot Jupiters have been observed with high enough photometric precision at visible wavelengths to investigate these expectations. The NASA Kepler mission provides a means to widen the sample and to assess the extent to which hot Jupiter albedos are low. We present a global analysis of Kepler-7 b based on Q0-Q4 data, published radial velocities, and asteroseismology constraints. We measure an occultation depth in the Kepler bandpass of 44 {+-} 5 ppm. If directly related to the albedo, this translates to a Kepler geometric albedo of 0.32 {+-} 0.03, the most precise value measured so far for an exoplanet. We also characterize the planetary orbital phase light curve with an amplitude of 42 {+-} 4 ppm. Using atmospheric models, we find it unlikely that the high albedo is due to a dominant thermal component and propose two solutions to explain the observed planetary flux. First, we interpret the Kepler-7 b albedo as resulting from an excess reflection over what can be explained solely by Rayleigh scattering, along with a nominal thermal component. This excess reflection might indicate the presence of a cloud or haze layer in the atmosphere, motivating new modeling and observational efforts. Alternatively, the albedo can be explained by Rayleigh scattering alone if Na and K are depleted in the atmosphere by a factor of 10-100 below solar abundances.

  17. THE NEPTUNE-SIZED CIRCUMBINARY PLANET KEPLER-38b

    SciTech Connect

    Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Short, Donald R.; Windmiller, Gur; Carter, Joshua A.; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Brugamyer, Erik; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ford, Eric B.; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Haghighipour, Nader; and others

    2012-10-20

    We discuss the discovery and characterization of the circumbinary planet Kepler-38b. The stellar binary is single-lined, with a period of 18.8 days, and consists of a moderately evolved main-sequence star (M{sub A} = 0.949 {+-} 0.059 M {sub Sun} and R{sub A} = 1.757 {+-} 0.034 R {sub Sun }) paired with a low-mass star (M{sub B} = 0.249 {+-} 0.010 M {sub Sun} and R{sub B} = 0.2724 {+-} 0.0053 R {sub Sun }) in a mildly eccentric (e = 0.103) orbit. A total of eight transits due to a circumbinary planet crossing the primary star were identified in the Kepler light curve (using Kepler Quarters 1-11), from which a planetary period of 105.595 {+-} 0.053 days can be established. A photometric dynamical model fit to the radial velocity curve and Kepler light curve yields a planetary radius of 4.35 {+-} 0.11 R {sub Circled-Plus }, or equivalently 1.12 {+-} 0.03 R {sub Nep}. Since the planet is not sufficiently massive to observably alter the orbit of the binary from Keplerian motion, we can only place an upper limit on the mass of the planet of 122 M {sub Circled-Plus} (7.11 M {sub Nep} or equivalently 0.384 M {sub Jup}) at 95% confidence. This upper limit should decrease as more Kepler data become available.

  18. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  19. Calcium concentration jumps reveal dynamic ion selectivity of calcium-activated chloride currents in mouse olfactory sensory neurons and TMEM16b-transfected HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Dibattista, Michele; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels play relevant roles in several physiological processes, including olfactory transduction, but their molecular identity is still unclear. Recent evidence suggests that members of the transmembrane 16 (TMEM16, also named anoctamin) family form Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in several cell types. In vertebrate olfactory transduction, TMEM16b/anoctamin2 has been proposed as the major molecular component of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. However, a comparison of the functional properties in the whole-cell configuration between the native and the candidate channel has not yet been performed. In this study, we have used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to measure functional properties of the native channel in mouse isolated olfactory sensory neurons and compare them with those of mouse TMEM16b/anoctamin2 expressed in HEK 293T cells. We directly activated channels by rapid and reproducible intracellular Ca2+ concentration jumps obtained from photorelease of caged Ca2+ and determined extracellular blocking properties and anion selectivity of the channels. We found that the Cl− channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) and DIDS applied at the extracellular side of the membrane caused a similar inhibition of the two currents. Anion selectivity measured exchanging external ions and revealed that, in both types of currents, the reversal potential for some anions was time dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry that TMEM16b/anoctamin2 largely co-localized with adenylyl cyclase III at the surface of the olfactory epithelium. Therefore, we conclude that the measured electrophysiological properties in the whole-cell configuration are largely similar, and further indicate that TMEM16b/anoctamin2 is likely to be a major subunit of the native olfactory Ca2+-activated Cl− current. PMID:20837642

  20. Calcium concentration jumps reveal dynamic ion selectivity of calcium-activated chloride currents in mouse olfactory sensory neurons and TMEM16b-transfected HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Dibattista, Michele; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2010-11-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels play relevant roles in several physiological processes, including olfactory transduction, but their molecular identity is still unclear. Recent evidence suggests that members of the transmembrane 16 (TMEM16, also named anoctamin) family form Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels in several cell types. In vertebrate olfactory transduction, TMEM16b/anoctamin2 has been proposed as the major molecular component of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. However, a comparison of the functional properties in the whole-cell configuration between the native and the candidate channel has not yet been performed. In this study, we have used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to measure functional properties of the native channel in mouse isolated olfactory sensory neurons and compare them with those of mouse TMEM16b/anoctamin2 expressed in HEK 293T cells. We directly activated channels by rapid and reproducible intracellular Ca(2+) concentration jumps obtained from photorelease of caged Ca(2+) and determined extracellular blocking properties and anion selectivity of the channels. We found that the Cl(-) channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) and DIDS applied at the extracellular side of the membrane caused a similar inhibition of the two currents. Anion selectivity measured exchanging external ions and revealed that, in both types of currents, the reversal potential for some anions was time dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry that TMEM16b/anoctamin2 largely co-localized with adenylyl cyclase III at the surface of the olfactory epithelium. Therefore, we conclude that the measured electrophysiological properties in the whole-cell configuration are largely similar, and further indicate that TMEM16b/anoctamin2 is likely to be a major subunit of the native olfactory Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current.

  1. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    PubMed

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J H

    1983-11-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Cellex D, Sephadex G-150, and orange A dye-ligand affinity gels. Extracts prepared from cells cultured anaerobically with tetrathionate or aerobically with thiosulfate followed by oxygen deprivation showed an 11- to 30-fold increase in TTR activity, with no increase in TSO activity. The inducible TTR resided in both the ultracentrifuge pellet and supernatant fractions and was readily separated from constitutive TSO and TTR in the latter by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. Inducible TTR exhibited TSR activity, which was also located in both membrane and soluble extract fractions and which cochromatographed with inducible TTR. The results indicate that constitutive TSO and TTR in marine heterotroph 16B represent reverse activities of the same enzyme whose major physiological function is thiosulfate oxidation. Evidence is also presented which suggests a possible association of inducible TTR and TSR in strain 16B.

  2. Enzymatic liquefaction of agarose above the sol-gel transition temperature using a thermostable endo-type β-agarase, Aga16B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Seo, Nari; Yu, Sora; Kim, Dong Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mun; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-02-01

    The main carbohydrate of red macroalgae is agarose, a heterogeneous polysaccharide composed of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose. When saccharifying agarose by enzymes, the unique physical properties of agarose, namely the sol-gel transition and the near-insolubility of agarose in water, limit the accessibility of agarose to the enzymes. Due to the lower accessibility of agarose to enzymes in the gel state than to the sol state, it is important to prevent the sol-gel transition by performing the enzymatic liquefaction of agarose at a temperature higher than the sol-gel transition temperature of agarose. In this study, a thermostable endo-type β-agarase, Aga16B, originating from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40(T), was characterized and introduced in the liquefaction process. Aga16B was thermostable up to 50 °C and depolymerized agarose mainly into neoagarooligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization 4 and 6. Aga16B was applied to enzymatic liquefaction of agarose at 45 °C, which was above the sol-gel transition temperature of 1 % (w/v) agarose (∼35 °C) when cooling agarose. This is the first systematic demonstration of enzymatic liquefaction of agarose, enabled by determining the sol-gel temperature of agarose under specific conditions and by characterizing the thermostability of an endo-type β-agarase.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler Mission. VII. Eclipsing binaries in DR3 (Kirk+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, B.; Conroy, K.; Prsa, A.; Abdul-Masih, M.; Kochoska, A.; Matijevic, G.; Hambleton, K.; Barclay, T.; Bloemen, S.; Boyajian, T.; Doyle, L. R.; Fulton, B. J.; Hoekstra, A. J.; Jek, K.; Kane, S. R.; Kostov, V.; Latham, D.; Mazeh, T.; Orosz, J. A.; Pepper, J.; Quarles, B.; Ragozzine, D.; Shporer, A.; Southworth, J.; Stassun, K.; Thompson, S. E.; Welsh, W. F.; Agol, E.; Derekas, A.; Devor, J.; Fischer, D.; Green, G.; Gropp, J.; Jacobs, T.; Johnston, C.; Lacourse, D. M.; Saetre, K.; Schwengeler, H.; Toczyski, J.; Werner, G.; Garrett, M.; Gore, J.; Martinez, A. O.; Spitzer, I.; Stevick, J.; Thomadis, P. C.; Vrijmoet, E. H.; Yenawine, M.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W.

    2016-07-01

    The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog lists the stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) augmented by: primary and secondary eclipse depth, eclipse width, separation of eclipse, ephemeris, morphological classification parameter, and principal parameters determined by geometric analysis of the phased light curve. The previous release of the Catalog (Paper II; Slawson et al. 2011, cat. J/AJ/142/160) contained 2165 objects, through the second Kepler data release (Q0-Q2). In this release, 2878 objects are identified and analyzed from the entire data set of the primary Kepler mission (Q0-Q17). The online version of the Catalog is currently maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu/. A static version of the online Catalog associated with this paper is maintained at MAST https://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/eclipsing_binaries.html. (10 data files).

  4. The Detection of Hidden Worlds in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David

    The observed diversity of exoplanets is stunning. To explain it, we need to broaden the range of physical parameters used in our models of planetary formation and, most likely, include new physics. This proposal discusses analysis of the Transit Lightcurve Variations (TLVs) in Kepler data. Its main goal is to use this data to increase the wealth of well-characterized exoplanets. Specifically, we propose the following two themes: Theme 1: TLVs, and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) in particular, are being used by the exoplanet community to confirm and characterize planetary systems. In the past funding cycle of this project several methods have been developed to aid the TLV analysis. It is now proposed to put these tools on a common ground using an efficient and robust Bayesian inference tool. The method will be applied in a homogeneous survey of Kepler transits. It is expected that many new planetary systems will be detected, confirmed and characterized. The work proposed here will increase the scientific value of the Kepler mission. Theme 2: The moons of extrasolar planets, or exomoons, are expected to reveal deep insights into planet formation and evolution. They may provide frequent, temperate abodes for life and affect the habitability of the planet they orbit. Here we propose to survey Kepler planets and planetary candidates for evidence of exomoons. Our goal is to determine the occurrence rate of large exomoons, and potentially provide confirmed discoveries. This effort will help to determine one of the most important parameters in modern astronomy, the occurrence rate of Earth-like worlds, because the occurrence rate of Earth-like worlds is the sum of the prevalence of Earth-like exoplanets and Earth-like exomoons. Relevance Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) provides support for investigations whose focus is on the analysis of archival data from NASA space astrophysics missions. Here we propose the analysis of data from the NASA's Kepler telescope

  5. TransitSOM: Self-Organizing Map for Kepler and K2 transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.

    2017-03-01

    A self-organizing map (SOM) can be used to identify planetary candidates from Kepler and K2 datasets with accuracies near 90% in distinguishing known Kepler planets from false positives. TransitSOM classifies a Kepler or K2 lightcurve using a self-organizing map (SOM) created and pre-trained using PyMVPA (ascl:1703.009). It includes functions for users to create their own SOMs.

  6. PREDICTING THE DETECTABILITY OF OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Verner, G. A.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; Appourchaux, T.; Garcia, R. A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Thompson, M. J.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Bryson, S. T.; Brown, T. M.

    2011-05-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we outline how to make an estimate of the detectability of solar-like oscillations in any given Kepler target, using rough estimates of the temperature and radius, and the Kepler apparent magnitude.

  7. Preliminary evidence for association of genetic variants in pri-miR-34b/c and abnormal miR-34c expression with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martínez, I; Sánchez-Mora, C; Pagerols, M; Richarte, V; Corrales, M; Fadeuilhe, C; Cormand, B; Casas, M; Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Ribasés, M

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairment to sustain attention and inability to control impulses and activity level. The etiology of ADHD is complex, with an estimated heritability of 70–80%. Under the hypothesis that alterations in the processing or target binding of microRNAs (miRNAs) may result in functional alterations predisposing to ADHD, we explored whether common polymorphisms potentially affecting miRNA-mediated regulation are involved in this psychiatric disorder. We performed a comprehensive association study focused on 134 miRNAs in 754 ADHD subjects and 766 controls and found association between the miR-34b/c locus and ADHD. Subsequently, we provided preliminary evidence for overexpression of the miR-34c-3p mature form in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ADHD subjects. Next, we tested the effect on gene expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the ADHD-associated region and found that rs4938923 in the promoter of the pri-miR-34b/c tags cis expression quantitative trait loci for both miR-34b and miR-34c and has an impact on the expression levels of 681 transcripts in trans, including genes previously associated with ADHD. This gene set was enriched for miR-34b/c binding sites, functional categories related to the central nervous system, such as axon guidance or neuron differentiation, and serotonin biosynthesis and signaling canonical pathways. Our results provide preliminary evidence for the contribution to ADHD of a functional variant in the pri-miR-34b/c promoter, possibly through dysregulation of the expression of mature forms of miR-34b and miR-34c and some target genes. These data highlight the importance of abnormal miRNA function as a potential epigenetic mechanism contributing to ADHD. PMID:27576168

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planetary candidates. VII. 48-month (Coughlin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J. L.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E.; Rowe, J. F.; Burke, C. J.; Latham, D. W.; Batalha, N. M.; Ofir, A.; Quarles, B. L.; Henze, C. E.; Wolfgang, A.; Caldwell, D. A.; Bryson, S. T.; Shporer, A.; Catanzarite, J.; Akeson, R.; Barclay, T.; Borucki, W. J.; Boyajian, T. S.; Campbell, J. R.; Christiansen, J. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Haas, M. R.; Howell, S. B.; Huber, D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Li, J.; Patil-Sabale, A.; Quintana, E. V.; Ramirez, S.; Seader, S.; Smith, J. C.; Tenenbaum, P.; Twicken, J. D.; Zamudio, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This catalog is based on Kepler's 24th data release (DR24), which includes the processing of all data utilizing version 9.2 of the Kepler pipeline (Jenkins et al. 2010ApJ...724.1108J). This marks the first time that all of the Kepler mission data have been processed consistently with the same version of the Kepler pipeline. Over a period of 48 months (2009 May 13 to 2013 May 11), subdivided into 17 quarters (Q1-Q17), a total of 198646 targets were observed. (7 data files).

  9. The Third Transit of Snow-Line Exoplanet Kepler-421b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip Steven

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission has uncovered a handful of long-period transiting exoplanets that orbit from the cold outer reaches of their systems, despite their low transit probabilities. The atmospheres of these cold gas giant exoplanets are amenable to transit transmission spectroscopy enabling tests of planetary formation and evolution theories. Of particular scientific interest is Kepler-421b, a Neptune-sized exoplanet with a 704-day orbital period residing near the snow-line. Since the Kepler Spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b, the transit ephemeris is relatively uncertain. We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Barring significant TTVs, our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b. We find strong evidence in favor of transit models with no TTVs, suggesting that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the combined Kepler and DCT observations, we calculate the timing of future transits and discuss the unique opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of this cold, long-period exoplanet via transmission spectroscopy.

  10. Planet Population Statistics With Kepler Q1-Q16: Stellar Effective Temperature Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Mullally, Fergal; Christiansen, Jessie; Huber, Daniel; Seader, Shawn; Catanzarite, Joseph; Bryson, Steve; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason; Thompson, Susan E.; Clarke, Bruce; Tenenbaum, Peter; Batalha, Natalie M.; Haas, Michael R.; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Kepler Project

    2015-01-01

    We explore extrasolar planet population statistics and the dependence of planet occurrence rates on stellar effective temperature from analysis of the Kepler Q1-Q16 planet candidate sample. The analysis takes advantage of the recent work on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet candidate sample, extensive Monte-Carlo transit signal injection and recovery tests of the Kepler Pipeline, and updates to the stellar parameters provided by the Kepler Stellar Working Group. Results focus of intermediate orbital periods, 50< Porb<300 day, where astrophysical and instrumental contamination of the planet sample is low.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 4 Kepler systems transit timing observations (Steffen+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, J. H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Carter, J. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Fressin, F.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Moorhead, A. V.; Rowe, J. F.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bryson, S.; Caldwell, D. A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D. R.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Everett, M. E.; Gautier, T. N., III; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Jenkins, J. M.; Horch, E.; Howell, S. B.; Isaacson, H.; Klaus, T. C.; Koch, D. G.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lucas, P.; MacQueen, P. J.; Marcy, G. W.; McCauliff, S.; Middour, C. K.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F. R.; Quinn, S. N.; Quintana, E. V.; Shporer, A.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Cleve, J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate. (4 data files).

  12. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates XI. Kepler-412 system: probing the properties of a new inflated hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Santerne, A.; Barros, S. C. C.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Bruno, G.; Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Hot Jupiters are still a fascinating exoplanet population that presents a diversity we are still far from understanding. High-precision photometric observations combined with radial velocity measurements give us a unique opportunity to constrain their properties better, on both their internal structure and their atmospheric bulk properties. Aims: We initiated a follow-up program of Kepler-released planet candidates with the goal of confirming the planetary nature of a number of them through radial velocity measurements. For those that successfully passed the radial velocity screening, we furthermore performed a detailed exploration of their properties to characterize the systems. As a byproduct, these systematic observations allow us to consolidate the exoplanets' occurrence rate. Methods: We performed a complete analysis of the Kepler-412 system, listed as planet candidate KOI-202 in the Kepler catalog, by combining the Kepler observations from Q1 to Q15, to ground-based spectroscopic observations that allowed us to derive radial velocity measurements, together with the host-star parameters and properties. We also analyzed the light curve to derive the star's rotation period and the phase function of the planet, including the secondary eclipse. Results: We secured the planetary nature of Kepler-412b. We found the planet has a mass of 0.939 ± 0.085MJup and a radius of 1.325 ± 0.043RJup, which makes it a member of the bloated giant subgroup. It orbits its G3 V host star in 1.72 days. The system has an isochronal age of 5.1 Gyr, consistent with its moderate stellar activity as observed in the Kepler light curve and the rotation of the star of 17.2 ± 1.6 days. From the detected secondary we derived the day-side temperature as a function of the geometric albedo. We estimated that the geometrical albedo Ag should be between 0.094 ± 0.015 and 0.013+0.017-0.013 and the brightness of the day side 2380 ± 40 K. The measured night-side flux corresponds to a

  13. Synthesis and theoretical studies of non‒covalent interactions within a newly synthesized chiral 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunus, Uzma; Ahmed, Shahbaz; Chahkandi, Mohammad; Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2017-02-01

    In this work the synthesis of a new compound formulated as C12H12N4OS, ((S)-1-(6-Phenyl-7H-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazin-3-yl)ethanol) (5) reported and theoretical studies of the non‒covalent interactions constructed the related crystalline network described. It has been characterized by IR, Mass, and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X‒ray diffraction analysis. The binding energy of the non‒covalent interactions constructing the network of 5 have been calculated by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT‒D). The optimization of the formed network using H‒bonding and π‒stacking revealed that 1‒D coordination chain has been composed of neutral monomeric compound. For this purpose, the independent smallest fragment (monomer) and subsequently the related network, including seven monomers, having all non‒covalent interactions have been optimized. The results demonstrate that hydrogen bonds, especially Osbnd H⋯N, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N, and Csbnd H⋯S interactions, govern the network formation. The calculated results of electronic transition in agreement with the experiment ones show eleven major bands derived from σ → π, n → n/σ*/π* aromatic rings to hydroxyl, inter‒atomic of oxygen, and thiadiazine to phenyl ring charge transfer transitions.

  14. Density functional theory investigation of opto-electronic properties of thieno[3,4-b]thiophene and benzodithiophene polymer and derivatives and their applications in solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshkholgh, Mehri Javan; Marsusi, Farah; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza

    2015-02-01

    PTBs polymers with thieno[3,4-b]thiophene [TT] and benzodithiophene [BDT] units have particular properties, which demonstrate it as one of the best group of donor materials in organic solar cells. In the present work, density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the optimized structure, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), band gap and dihedral angle of PTB7 at B3LYP/6-31G(d). Two different approaches are applied to carry out these investigations: Oligomer extrapolation technique and periodic boundary condition (PBC) method. The results obtained from PBC-DFT method are in fair agreement with experiments. Based on these reliable outcomes; the investigations continued to perform some derivatives of PTB7. In this study, sulfur is substituted by nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, phosphor or selenium atoms in pristine PTB7. Due to the shift of HOMO and LUMO levels, smaller band gaps are predicted to appear in some derivatives in comparison with PTB7. Maximum theoretical efficiencies, η, of the mentioned derivatives as well as local difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states (Δμge) are computed. The results indicate that substitution of sulfur by nitrogen or oxygen in BDT unit, and silicon or phosphor in TT unit of pristine PTB7 leads to a higher η as well as Δμge.

  15. The crystal structure of 3-chloro-2-(4-methyl­phenyl)-2H-pyrazolo­[3,4-b]quinoline

    PubMed Central

    Sowmya, Haliwana B. V.; Suresha Kumara, Tholappanavara H.; Jasinski, Jerry P.; Millikan, Sean P.; Yathirajan, Hemmige S.; Glidewell, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of 3-chloro-2-(4-methyl­phen­yl)-2H-pyrazolo­[3,4-b]quinoline, C17H12ClN3, (I), the dihedral angle between the planes of the pyrazole ring and the methyl­ated phenyl ring is 54.25 (9)°. The bond distances in the fused tricyclic system provide evidence for 10-π delocalization in the pyrazolo­pyridine portion of the mol­ecule, with diene character in the fused carbocyclic ring. In the crystal, mol­ecules of (I) are linked by two independent C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming sheets containing centrosymmetric R 2 2(16) and R 6 4(28) rings, and these sheets are all linked together by π–π stacking inter­actions with a ring-centroid separation of 3.5891 (9) Å. PMID:25995882

  16. Synthesis and in vitro antiproliferative activity of novel 12(H)-quino[3,4-b][1,4]benzothiazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zięba, Andrzej; Latocha, Małgorzata; Sochanik, Aleksander

    2013-09-01

    Novel method of N-dealkylating quinobenzothiazinium salts 2, promoted by reaction with benzimidazole, led to a series of new azaphenothiazine derivatives having 12(H)-quino[3,4-b][1,4] benzothiazine 4 structure. Reaction of compounds 4 in an alkaline milieu with alkylating agents occur as N-alkylation of the thiazine nitrogen and yields quinobenzothiazine derivatives 7. In vitro antiproliferative activity of compounds 4 and 7 was tested using two cancer cell lines (SNB-19 and C-32) and cisplatin as a reference. Most of the studied azaphenothiazine derivatives showed activity against both cell lines investigated (5.6-12.4 μg/ml concentration range tested). Compounds 4(b-e) containing a halogen atom or methyl group at the 9-position of the quinobenzothiazine ring show activity in the tested concentration range only against C-32 cell line. Compound 4f with methyl group in 11-position of quinobenzothiazine ring lacked activity against either cell line. The presence of additional aminoalkyl substituents at the thiazine nitrogen atom in compounds 7 increases their activity against both examined cell lines, when compared to compounds 4.

  17. Photoluminescence of 1,3-Diphenyl-1 H-pyrazolo[3,4- b]quinoline and its derivatives: Experiment and quantum chemical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Całus, S.; Gondek, E.; Danel, A.; Jarosz, B.; Kityk, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    The optical absorption and photoluminescent spectra are studied in recently synthesized diphenyl pyrazoloquinolines (DPPQ): 1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b] quinoline and its 6-vinyl, 6-N,N-diphenyl, 6-methyl, 6-fluoro, 6-bromo and 6-chloro derivatives. The photoemission spectra are recorded in organic solvents of different polarity and found to be highly solvatochromic. The measured spectra are compared with the quantum chemical calculations performed by means of the semiempirical methods (AM1 or PM3) in combination with the equilibrium molecular conformation (EMC) in vacuo (T = 0 K, Γ = 0.12 eV) or MD simulations (T = 300 K). The broadening of absorption and emission bands and their red-shift with increasing of temperature may be well reproduced by MD simulations. The Stokes shift of the photoluminescent spectra is obtained by including vibrational modes into the emission equation. The quantum chemical method AM1 in combination with MD simulations gives in most cases the best agreement with the experimental data. By comparing the emission spectra of 6-N,N-diphenyl-DPPQ with other DPPQ-derivatives one concludes that the molecular fragment diphenyl-amin [(C6H5)2N-] is likely subjected to strong conformational changes in solvents. The large difference between the excited- and state-dipole moments indicates on a strong electron transfer effect being common for all DPPQ derivatives.

  18. Density functional theory investigation of opto-electronic properties of thieno[3,4-b]thiophene and benzodithiophene polymer and derivatives and their applications in solar cell.

    PubMed

    Khoshkholgh, Mehri Javan; Marsusi, Farah; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza

    2015-02-05

    PTBs polymers with thieno[3,4-b]thiophene [TT] and benzodithiophene [BDT] units have particular properties, which demonstrate it as one of the best group of donor materials in organic solar cells. In the present work, density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the optimized structure, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), band gap and dihedral angle of PTB7 at B3LYP/6-31G(d). Two different approaches are applied to carry out these investigations: Oligomer extrapolation technique and periodic boundary condition (PBC) method. The results obtained from PBC-DFT method are in fair agreement with experiments. Based on these reliable outcomes; the investigations continued to perform some derivatives of PTB7. In this study, sulfur is substituted by nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, phosphor or selenium atoms in pristine PTB7. Due to the shift of HOMO and LUMO levels, smaller band gaps are predicted to appear in some derivatives in comparison with PTB7. Maximum theoretical efficiencies, η, of the mentioned derivatives as well as local difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states (Δμge) are computed. The results indicate that substitution of sulfur by nitrogen or oxygen in BDT unit, and silicon or phosphor in TT unit of pristine PTB7 leads to a higher η as well as Δμge.

  19. Thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine as an Electron Deficient π-Bridge in D-A-π-A DSCs.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Nalaka P; Yella, Aswani; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad; Grätzel, Michael; Delcamp, Jared H

    2016-03-02

    Thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine (TPz) is examined as an electron deficient π-bridge enabling near-infrared (NIR) spectral access in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Seven dissymmetric dyes for DSCs were synthesized (NL2-NL8) with TPz as the π-bridge utilizing palladium catalyzed C-H activation methodology. C-H bond cross-coupling was uniquely effective among the cross-couplings and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions analyzed in monofunctionalizing the TPz building block. The TPz-based NL2-NL8 dyes examine the effects of various donors, π-spacers, and acceptors within the donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) dye design. Proaromatic TPz stabilizes the excited-state oxidation potential (E(s+/s*)) of the dyes by maintaining aromaticity upon excitation of the dye molecule. This leads to concise conjugated systems capable of accessing the NIR region. Through judicious structural modifications, dye band gaps were reduced to 1.48 eV, and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) reached 7.1% in this first generation TPz-dye series.

  20. "Cosmomorphistic geometry" in the unconscious geometry of Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Adolf

    Some mathematical aspects of the Music theory by Johannes Kepler are discussed, paying a special attention to the book "De harmonice mundi". Other scientists interested in Music theory are mentioned throughout the paper: The Pythagorean school, Klaudios Ptolemaios, Leonard Euler, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Christian von Goldbach, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholz, Karl Friedrich Gauss. The relation with the ancient chinese schools of cosmography has been discussed: From the the Pythagorean to the ancient Chinese schools of cosmography we find arithmo-geometrical applications of numbers which are emblematic, hold meaning or represent the essence of things, the author writes. It was Johannes Kepler who taught us this "transconstructive method" of forming classical and ancient begginings of structuralistic thinking into a system from which deductions can readily be made.

  1. Compositions of Hot Super-earth Atmospheres: Exploring Kepler Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.; Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines a simple approach to evaluate the atmospheric composition of hot rocky planets by assuming different types of planetary composition and using corresponding model calculations. To explore hot atmospheres above 1000 K, we model the vaporization of silicate magma and estimate the range of atmospheric compositions according to the planet's radius and semi-major axis for the Kepler 2011 February data release. Our results show five atmospheric types for hot, rocky super-Earth atmospheres, strongly dependent on the initial composition and the planet's distance to the star. We provide a simple set of parameters that can be used to evaluate atmospheric compositions for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches.

  2. Unraveling the Internal Chemical Composition of Kepler White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Charpinet, S.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of the asteroseismic analysis of a selected sample of white dwarf stars in the Kepler and Kepler-2 fields. Our seismic procedure using the forward method based on physically sound, static models, includes a new core parameterization leading us to reproduce the periods of these stars at the precision of the observations. These new fits outperform current state-of-the-art standards by orders of magnitude. We precisely establish the internal structures of these stars and unravel the inner C/O stratification of their core. By studying their internal chemical compositions, and more precisely the C/O profiles, this opens up interesting perspectives on better constraining key processes in stellar physics such as nuclear burning, convection, and mixing, that shape this stratification over time.

  3. COMPOSITIONS OF HOT SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES: EXPLORING KEPLER CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.; Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2011-12-15

    This paper outlines a simple approach to evaluate the atmospheric composition of hot rocky planets by assuming different types of planetary composition and using corresponding model calculations. To explore hot atmospheres above 1000 K, we model the vaporization of silicate magma and estimate the range of atmospheric compositions according to the planet's radius and semi-major axis for the Kepler 2011 February data release. Our results show five atmospheric types for hot, rocky super-Earth atmospheres, strongly dependent on the initial composition and the planet's distance to the star. We provide a simple set of parameters that can be used to evaluate atmospheric compositions for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches.

  4. Dynamics of the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2013-09-01

    The remnant of Kepler's Type Ia SN shows an interaction of SN ejecta with a highly asymmetric ambient circumstellar medium (CSM). This material was ejected by a single-degenerate progenitor prior to the explosion, and its complex spatial distribution contains invaluable information about the progenitor itself. We propose a third-epoch observation of Kepler's SNR that will provide us with much improved expansion rates, allowing for measurements of shock speeds along the whole periphery of the remnant. These measurements will be compared with 3-D hydrodynamic simulations, thus unraveling the true shape of the CSM in a Type Ia progenitor. They will also advance our knowledge of poorly-understood particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification processes in fast SNR shocks.

  5. Inverse solution of Kepler's equation for hyperbolic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1987-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for efficient inverse solution of Kepler's equation for hyperbolic orbits. It is shown that an expansion of Barker's equation into a bicubic polynomial provides a good approximation to obtain accurate starting values for rapid numerical solution of Kepler's equation. In the approximate equation a cubic in normalized elapsed flight time from pericenter is set equal to a cubic in a function S of eccentricity and true anomaly. The initial estimate of S to use in an iteration formula is obtained by evaluating the cubic in normalized flight time and finding in most cases the single real root of the other cubic. This initial estimate has an accuracy corresponding to values of true anomaly in error by less than 0.5 degrees generally.

  6. Trojan Asteroids in the Kepler Campaign 6 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Sharkey, Benjamin N. L.; Woodward, Charles E.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a Kepler spacecraft survey during the K2 mission to characterize the rotational properties of 56 Trojan asteroids in the L4 cloud. More than one rotational period was observed for 51 of these targets, allowing for well constrained lightcurve rotation periods and amplitudes, five of which are found to be in conflict with previously published values. We find ∼10% of objects have rotational periods longer than 100 hr, an excess of slow rotators 10 times larger than suggested from the literature. Investigation of the rotational frequencies of our Kepler sample when combined with high-quality lightcurves in the literature reveals the distribution of rotational frequencies is non-Maxwellian even when consideration is given to size-dependent variations in rotational rate. From investigation of lightcurve shapes and amplitudes, we estimate the binary fraction within the Trojan population to be ∼6%–36% depending on the methodology utilized to identify binary candidates.

  7. Kepler Scientific Workflow Design and Execution with Contexts

    SciTech Connect

    Ngu, Anne Hee Hiong; Jamnagarwala, Arwa; Chin, George; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-09-01

    A context-aware scientific workflow is a typical scientific workflow that is enhanced with context binding and awareness mechanisms. Context facilitates further configuration of the scientific workflow at runtime such that it is tuned to its environment during execution and responds intelligently based on such awareness without customized coding of the workflow. In this paper, we present a context annotation framework, which supports rapid development of context-aware scientific workflows. Context annotation enables a diverse type of actor in Kepler that may bind with different sensed environmental information as part of the actor’s regular data. Context-aware actors simplify the construction of scientific workflows that require intricate knowledge in initializing and configuring a large number of parameters to cover all different execution conditions. This paper presents the motivation, system design, implementation, and usage of context annotation in relation to the Kepler scientific workflow system.

  8. The Kepler Mission: A Photometric Search for Earthlike Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Borucki, William; Koch, David; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    If Earth lies in or near the orbital plane of an extrasolar planet, that planet passes in front of the disk of its star once each orbit as viewed from Earth. Precise photometry can reveal such transits, which can be distinguished from rotationally-modulated starspots and intrinsic stellar variability by their periodicity, square-well shapes and relative spectral neutrality. Transit observations would provide the size and orbital period of the detected planet. Although geometrical considerations limit the fraction of planets detectable by this technique, many stars can be surveyed within the field of view of one telescope, so transit photometry is quite efficient. Scintillation in and variability of Earth's atmosphere limit photometric precision to roughly one-thousandth of a magnitude, allowing detection of transits by Jupiter-sized planets but not by Earth-sized planets from the ground. The COROT spacecraft will be able to detect Uranus-sized planets orbiting near stars. The Kepler Mission, which is being proposed to NASA's Discovery Program this year, will have a photometer with a larger aperture (1 meter) than will COROT, so it will be able to detect transits by planets as small as Earth. Moreover, the Kepler mission will examine the same star field for four years, allowing confirmation of planets with orbital periods of a year. If the Sun's planetary system is typical for single stars, Kepler should detect approximately 480 terrestrial planets. Assuming the statistics from radial velocity surveys are typical, Kepler should also detect transits of 150 inner giant planets and reflected light variations of 1400 giant planets with orbital periods of less than one week.

  9. Visual Analysis and Comparison of Kepler Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Mackenzie; Ragozzine, Darin; Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi; Rowe, Jason

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope is designed to find extrasolar planets by watching a section of the sky and observing if an object transits in front its parent star. By noticing the dimming and brightening of the star as a prospective transit occurs, Kepler records the times when the planet moves in front of its star. If other planets are gravitationally influencing the transiting planet, the planet might transit late or early; these deviations from a perfectly periodic set of transits are called "transit timing variations (TTVs). Therefore, Kepler TTVs are useful in determining exoplanet masses which are hard to measure in other ways.We decided to visually analyze the TTV data of all ~6000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) to determine whether interesting TTV signals would be missed by purely statistical analyses. Using data from Rowe et al. 2014 and Holczer et al. 2015, submitted, we created combined TTV plots, periodigrams, and folded quadratic+sinusoid fits. The raw TTV data and ancillary plots were visually inspected for each of the ~6000 KOIs. To find the most likely KOIs containing visible TTVs and to organize the over 6000 KOIs analyzed, a rating system was developed based on numerous visual factors. These rating factors include the amount of outliers, if there is a clear sinusoidal period within the folded plots, and if there is a clear peak in the periodigram. By sorting KOIs as such, we were able to compare our findings of the strongest candidates with the same KOIs statistically analyzed by Holczer et al. 2015 (submitted, see also Mazeh et al. 2013).It was found that the majority of our findings matched those of Holczer et al. 2015, with only small discrepancies that were understandable based on our different methodologies. Our visual inspection of the full list of KOIs contributed multiple systems that were not included in the initial list of KOIs with significant TTVs identified statistically.

  10. Kepler: Analogies in the search for the law of refraction.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos Alberto

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the methodology used by Kepler to discover a quantitative law of refraction. The aim is to argue that this methodology follows a heuristic method based on the following two Pythagorean principles: (1) sameness is made known by sameness, and (2) harmony arises from establishing a limit to what is unlimited. We will analyse some of the author's proposed analogies to find the aforementioned law and argue that the investigation's heuristic pursues such principles.

  11. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST–Kepler analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity e¯≈0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination i¯≈3°) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits (e¯≈0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with e¯≈ 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular (e¯=0.04−0.04+0.03) and coplanar (i¯=1.4−1.1+0.8 degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [e¯≈(1–2)×i¯] between mean eccentricities and mutual inclinations. The prevalence of circular orbits and the common relation may imply that the solar system is not so atypical in the galaxy after all. PMID:27671635

  12. Classical and quantum magnetism in giant Keplerate magnetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Luban, M; Schröder, C; Modler, R; Kögerler, P; Axenovich, M; Schnack, J; Canfield, P; Bud'ko, S; Harrison, N

    2001-09-17

    Complementary theoretical modeling methods are presented for the classical and quantum Heisenberg model to explain the magnetic properties of nanometer-sized magnetic molecules. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between our experimental data down to 0.1 K and for fields up to 60 Tesla and our theoretical results for the giant Keplerate species {Mo72Fe30}, by far the largest paramagnetic molecule synthesized to date.

  13. Construction of fractal nanostructures based on Kepler-Shubnikov nets

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V. Talanov, V. M.

    2013-05-15

    A system of information codes for deterministic fractal lattices and sets of multifractal curves is proposed. An iterative modular design was used to obtain a series of deterministic fractal lattices with generators in the form of fragments of 2D structures and a series of multifractal curves (based on some Kepler-Shubnikov nets) having Cantor set properties. The main characteristics of fractal structures and their lacunar spectra are determined. A hierarchical principle is formulated for modules of regular fractal structures.

  14. Selection, Prioritization, and Characteristics of Kepler Target Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    cluster members, and high proper motion stars. Key words: planetary systems – stars: statistics 1. INTRODUCTION Kepler’s primary objective is to...stellar parameters (Section 2). Section 3 contains a description of the metrics computed for each star in order to quantify the detectability of planets...extinction of stars in the Kepler field from broad and intermediate band photometry . An estimate of the stellar radius and mass fol- lows via isochrone

  15. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity e¯≈0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination i¯≈3°) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits (e¯≈0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with e¯≈0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular (e¯=0.04-0.04+0.03) and coplanar (i¯=1.4-1.1+0.8 degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [×i¯] between mean eccentricities and mutual inclinations. The prevalence of circular orbits and the common relation may imply that the solar system is not so atypical in the galaxy after all.

  16. The Kepler Mission on Two Reaction Wheels is K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Barclay, T.; Batalha, N. M.; Bryson, S.; Caldwell, D. A.; Campbell, J.; Coughlin, J.; Howell, S. B.; Jenkins, J. M.; Klaus, T. C.; Mullally, F.; Sanderfer, D. T.; Sobeck, C. K.; Still, M. D.; Troeltzsch, J.; Twicken, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    Although data collection for the original Kepler mission is complete, a repurposed Kepler has the potential to discover many hundreds of new, small exoplanets around low-mass stars located in or near the ecliptic plane. This repurposing of the Kepler spacecraft, dubbed “K2,” seeks to maximize photometric performance using its two operational reaction wheels by observing in the ecliptic plane where solar torques can be carefully balanced to minimize boresight roll. The K2 mission shows great promise and, once approved, will observe many different fields during a sequence of two- to three-month campaigns over the next few years. Like the original Kepler mission, K2 has many challenges, but is anticipated to be well worth the climb scientifically. K2 can observe many thousands of new sources during each campaign and hundreds of thousands of new sources over its lifetime. In addition to its continued search for exoplanets, the K2 mission will provide access to a wide variety of scientifically interesting targets that include young and variable stars, open clusters of differing ages, star-forming regions, supernovae, white dwarfs, microlensing events, solar system objects, AGNs, normal galaxies, and the Galactic Center. Performance testing began in September, 2013, and has continued throughout the fall and early winter. The results of the first ecliptic-plane tests are described and used to predict photometric performance. A trade study reveals the likely number of targets, cadence durations, initial fields of view, and planned observing strategies. K2 is an exciting new mission that addresses a wide variety of scientific questions with expanded opportunities for community participation.

  17. Kepler, Horrocks and the Transit of Venus in 1639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas; Kerschbaum, Franz

    2004-08-01

    Kepler was the first astronomer to predict a transit of Venus in his 'Admonitio' from 1629. This prediction was based on his 'Rudolphine Tables', published three years before. Even though both works - making use of his ground-breaking new theory of the planetary motions - and the message of his 'Admonitio' are a great achievement, it turned out some years later that the latter contained some views that needed to be corrected. First of all, there was a small but -- for European observers -- fatal error concerning the exact time of the Venus transit of 1631, leading to its non-observation in Paris. Second, Kepler failed to predict the 1639 Venus transit. It was the English astronomer Horrocks who first recognized this and who did indeed observe the latter. Third, Kepler's ideas about the size of the solar system (and, hence, the apparent diameters of the planets) were substantially wrong. In our contribution, we analyze the historical background to these errors of a genius, based on his original texts, as well as Horrocks' and Hevelius' views and discoveries on the subject. It seems that Hevelius' annotated edition of Horrocks' account 'Venus in sole visa' has scarcely been studied in the way it would deserve -- which is maybe due to the fact that only a few libraries are still in possession of this book. There is little doubt that Kepler, had he lived until 1639, would have had to change his views on the proportions of our solar system dramatically. At the same time, it should be stressed that his predition and Horrocks' observations demonstrate that knowing the mechanism of the planetary motions is by far more important than knowing the actual size of the planetary orbits and planetary bodies.

  18. Current Results from Kepler & Follow-on Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, W.

    2014-04-01

    All 17 quarters of Kepler data have been now calibrated and deposited in archives. Uniform reprocessing of the entire data set with current software is expected to be completed this Fall. An important aspect of the Mission is the revision of the stellar properties of the target stars needed to get more accurate values of their planets. The Star Working Group has published its first catalog with revised values for R* and Teff for the 196,468 stars observed by Kepler [1]. Their results show that many stars which are unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) are actually giants, while many others stars (in particular M dwarfs) are smaller than that listed. A catalog has been published that contains the results from data acquired during quarters Q1-Q8 and lists a total of 2738 planetary candidates [3]. Revised values of exoplanet and stellar results include the effects of increases in stellar temperature as per the [4] study and stellar property adjustments for consistency with Yale-Yonsei stellar isochrones. Nearly 7300 KOI are currently listed in the NEXSci archive with approximately 3538 classified as planetary candidates or verified as planets. Based on the latest edition the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog [5] an additional 2611 KOI are considered to be eclipsing binaries while the rest are a combination of background eclipsing binaries and background transiting planets. A catalog covering Q1-Q12 data is being developed and is expected to be published this summer (Rowe et al. in progress). It will make substantial corrections to the values of exoplanet characteristics based on revised stellar properties from the Huber et al, 2014 catalog of stellar properties and will use the Dartmouth isochrones for cool stars instead of the Yonsei-Yale values. New discoveries and Mission developments will also be presented.

  19. Analysis of Kepler Observations of ASAS Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Jacklyn M.; Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study that compares the performance of period-finding algorithms when using data gathered by ground-based telescopes to their performance when using data gathered by space-based telescopes. In order to make this comparison, the periods reported by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) Catalog for Variable Stars in the Kepler Field of View, a study that identified targets for the Kepler Mission before its launch, were compared to periods determined by this study. Only targets that were identified in the ASAS Catalog and later observed by the Kepler Mission were selected for analysis, for a total of 599 targets. The observations gathered by the Kepler Mission were analyzed using three period-finding algorithms: the Lafler-Kinman algorithm, the Analysis of Variance algorithm, and the Conditional Entropy algorithm. These three algorithms analyzed the light curves of each target, and one of the periods produced was selected to be compared to the period found by the ASAS Catalog. The analysis of the two data sets highlights issues with the performance of period finding algorithms with ground-based data, leading to crude period estimates for all targets with periods longer than 10 days. Since the Large Synoptic Scanning Telescope (LSST), due for first light in 2020, will have a similar observation schedule to that of the ASAS survey, similar issues can be expected with the analysis of LSST data for some types of long period variables, like semiregulars), that have periods longer than 10 days. Pezzato was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  20. Validation and characterization of Kepler exoplanet candidates with Warm Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    I present the status and results from an ongoing project that uses 800 hours of the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of transiting extrasolar planet candidates detected by the Kepler Mission. The main purposes of this project is to validate planetary candidates, and to characterize confirmed planets. By comparing the light curves spanning times of primary transit for candidates observed with Kepler and Spitzer, we can exclude significant sources of astrophysical false positives resulting from blends (e.g. background eclipsing binaries) that mimic an exoplanetary signature in the Kepler bandpass. I show how our infrared observations can help to validate the planetary nature of several candidates with small radii, which could be rocky in composition. By combining occultation measurements of the reflected starlight in the optical with estimates of the thermal emission in the near-infrared, we are able to constrain the energy budget of a handful of hot-Jupiters and compare such constraints to those for other giant planets.

  1. High Resolution Imaging of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Adams, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Gautier, T. N., III; Howell, S.; Kulesa, C.; McCarthy, D.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    The spatial resolution of the Kepler telescope is designed to be 4 arcsec ( 1 pixel) which could allow background stars to contribute to the light of a Kepler target. Thus an observed transit might be a false positive due to a background eclipsing binary. In addition, dilution of the transit signal by a background star can severely compromise the parameters derived for a planet candidate. The Kepler Follow on Program (KFOP) includes high resolution images of the KOI targets, obtained principally at the following facilities: speckle imaging in V and R with the two-color speckle camera on the 3.5m WIYN telescope; Adaptive Optics imaging in J band and Ks with the PHARO near-infrared camera on the 200-in Hale Telescope; Adaptive Optics imaging in J and Ks band with the ARIES camera on the 6.5m MMT Telescope; AO imaging in J band and Ks with IRCAL on the 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory. Results from the follow up observations will be shown as well as the implications for the derivation of planetary characteristics. High spatial resolution images are a key part of the follow-up program for high-confidence level acceptance for Earth and super Earth-size planets.

  2. A Catalog of Kepler Habitable Zone Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hill, Michelle L.; Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Haghighipour, Nader; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Selsis, Franck; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Kepler mission ha s discovered thousands of new planetary candidates, many of which have been confirmed through follow-up observations. A primary goal of the mission is to determine the occurrence rate of terrestrial-size planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. Here we provide a list of HZ exoplanet candidates from the Kepler Q1-Q17 Data Release 24 data-vetting process. This work was undertaken as part of the Kepler HZ Working Group. We use a variety of criteria regarding HZ boundaries and planetary sizes to produce complete lists of HZ candidates, including a catalog of 104 candidates within the optimistic HZ and 20 candidates with radii less than two Earth radii within the conservative HZ. We cross-match our HZ candidates with the stellar properties and confirmed planet properties from Data Release 25 to provide robust stellar parameters and candidate dispositions. We also include false-positive probabilities recently calculated by Morton et al. for each of the candidates within our catalogs to aid in their validation. Finally, we performed dynamical analysis simulations for multi-planet systems that contain candidates with radii less than two Earth radii as a step toward validation of those systems.

  3. Asteroseismology of 1523 misclassified red giants using Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Murphy, Simon J.; Xiang, Maosheng; Bi, Shaolan; Li, Tanda

    2016-12-01

    We analysed solar-like oscillations in 1523 Kepler red giants which have previously been misclassified as subgiants, with predicted νmax values [based on the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC)] between 280 and 700 μHz. We report the discovery of 626 new oscillating red giants in our sample, in addition to 897 oscillators that were previously characterized by Hekker et al. from one quarter of Kepler data. Our sample increases the known number of oscillating low-luminosity red giants by 26 per cent (up to ˜1900 stars). About three quarters of our sample are classified as ascending red giant branch stars, while the remainder are red-clump stars. A novel scheme was applied to determine Δν for 108 stars with νmax close to the Nyquist frequency (387 μHz > νmax > 387 μHz). Additionally, we identified 47 stars oscillating in the super-Nyquist frequency regime, up to 387 μHz, using long-cadence light curves. We show that the misclassifications are most likely due to large uncertainties in KIC surface gravities, and do not result from the absence of broad-band colours or from different physical properties such as reddening, spatial distribution, mass or metallicity. The sample will be valuable to study oscillations in low-luminosity red giants and to characterize planet candidates around those stars.

  4. Using Transiting Exoplanets to Study Starspots with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hebb, Leslie; Hawley, Suzanne

    2015-08-01

    Starspots are a fundamental manifestation of stellar dynamos that constrain the surface magnetic field strength and topology. Kepler has already produced the first ensemble studies of starspots, discovering rotation periods and rough spot properties for thousands of stars across the main sequence. Here we study the G dwarf Kepler 17, which hosts a transiting 2.5 Jupiter mass exoplanet on a 1.5 day orbit. Starspots are frequently occulted during transit, allowing us to probe smaller-scale starspot regions on the stellar surface along the projected path of the planet. These planet-spot occultations reveal the presence of at least 7 unique starspot groups on the stellar surface at any time. The spot crossings also give an empirical estimate of the starspot temperature contrast, which we find are consistent with the Solar umbra. Using over 4 years of data for Kepler 17, we observe changes in the starspot positions and sizes indicative of differential rotation and active region diffusion. Using an MCMC-based light curve modeling code, we determine the positions and sizes of each spot group over time. Our approach is novel in modeling both the in- and out-of transit features in the light curve, allowing us to break fundamental degeneracies between spot size, latitude, and contrast. This technique constrains key properties for understanding stellar dynamos, including the stellar rotation period, differential rotation rate, and spot diffusion timescales.

  5. Kepler Mission: Detecting Earth-sized Planets in Habitable Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, which is presently in Phase A, is being proposed for launch in 5 years for a 4-year mission to determine the frequency of Earth-sized or larger planets in habitable zones in our galaxy. Kepler will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit to provide stable physical environments for the sensitive scientific instruments. The satellite is equipped with a photometric system with the precision of 10E-5, which should be sufficient for detecting the transits of Earth-sized or larger planets in front of dwarf stars similar to the Sun. Approximately 100,000 or more sun-like stars brighter than the 14th apparently magnitude will be monitored continuously for 4 years in a preselected region of the sky, which is about 100 square degrees in size. In addition, Kepler will have a participating scientist program that will enable research in intrinsic variable stars, interacting binaries including cataclysmic stars and X-ray binaries, and a large number of solar analogs in our galaxy. Several ten thousand additional stars may be investigated in the guest observer program open to the whole world.

  6. Kepler's theory of force and his medical sources.

    PubMed

    Regier, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) makes extensive use of souls and spiritus in his natural philosophy. Recent studies have highlighted their importance in his accounts of celestial generation and astrology. In this study, I would like to address two pressing issues. The first is Kepler's context. The biological side of his natural philosophy is not naively Aristotelian. Instead, he is up to date with contemporary discussions in medically flavored natural philosophy. I will examine his relationship to Melanchthon's anatomical-theological Liber de anima (1552) and to Jean Femel's very popular Physiologia (1567), two Galenic sources with a noticeable impact on how he understands the functions of life. The other issue that will direct my article is force at a distance. Medical ideas deeply inform Kepler's theories of light and solar force (virtus motrix). It will become clear that they are not a hindrance even to the hardcore of his celestial physics. Instead, he makes use of soul and spiritus in order to develop a fully mathematized dynamics.

  7. PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING ASTEROSEISMIC BINARIES IN KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Farmer, R.; Kolb, U.; Girardi, L.; Appourchaux, T.

    2014-03-20

    Asteroseismology may in principle be used to detect unresolved stellar binary systems comprised of solar-type stars and/or red giants. This novel method relies on the detection of the presence of two solar-like oscillation spectra in the frequency spectrum of a single light curve. Here, we make predictions of the numbers of systems that may be detectable in data already collected by the NASA Kepler Mission. Our predictions, which are based upon TRILEGAL and BiSEPS simulations of the Kepler field of view, indicate that as many as 200 or more ''asteroseismic binaries'' may be detectable in this manner. Most of these binaries should be comprised of two He-core-burning red giants. Owing largely to the limited numbers of targets with the requisite short-cadence Kepler data, we expect only a small number of detected binaries containing solar-type stars. The predicted yield of detections is sensitive to the assumed initial mass ratio distribution (IMRD) of the binary components and therefore represents a sensitive calibration of the much debated IMRD near mass ratio unity.

  8. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  9. Kepler + MeDICi - Service-Oriented Scientific Workflow Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Jared M.; Gorton, Ian; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Almquist, Justin P.; Wynne, Adam S.; Chin, George; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-07-30

    Scientific applications are often structured as workflows that execute a series of interdependent, distributed software modules to analyze large data sets. The order of execution of the tasks in a workflow is commonly controlled by complex scripts, which over time become difficult to maintain and evolve. In this paper, we describe how we have integrated the Kepler scientific workflow platform with the MeDICi Integration Framework, which has been specifically designed to provide a standards-based, lightweight and flexible integration platform. The MeDICi technology provides a scalable, component-based architecture that efficiently handles integration with heterogeneous, distributed software systems. This paper describes the MeDICi Integration Framework and the mechanisms we used to integrate MeDICi components with Kepler workflow actors. We illustrate this solution with a workflow application for an atmospheric sciences application. The resulting solution promotes a strong separation of concerns, simplifying the Kepler workflow description and promoting the creation of a reusable collection of components available for other workflow applications in this domain.

  10. Spacing of Kepler Planets: Sculpting by Dynamical Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Bonan; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-07-01

    We study the orbital architecture of multi-planet systems detected by the Kepler transit mission using N-body simulations, focusing on the orbital spacing between adjacent planets in systems showing four or more transiting planets. We find that the observed spacings are tightly clustered around 12 mutual Hill radii, when transit geometry and sensitivity limits are accounted for. In comparison, dynamical integrations reveal that the minimum spacing required for systems of similar masses to survive dynamical instability for as long as 1 billion yr is ∼10 if all orbits are circular and coplanar and ∼12 if planetary orbits have eccentricities of ∼0.02 (a value suggested by studies of planet transit-time variations). This apparent coincidence, between the observed spacing and the theoretical stability threshold, leads us to propose that typical planetary systems were formed with even tighter spacing, but most, except for the widest ones, have undergone dynamical instability, and are pared down to a more anemic version of their former selves, with fewer planets and larger spacings. So while the high-multiple systems (five or more transiting planets) are primordial systems that remain stable, the single or double planetary systems, abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission, may be the descendants of more closely packed high-multiple systems. If this hypothesis is correct, we infer that the formation environment of Kepler systems should be more dissipative than that of the terrestrial planets.

  11. Rotating Stars from Kepler Observed with Gaia DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Astrometric data from the recent Gaia Data Release 1 have been matched against the sample of stars from Kepler with known rotation periods. A total of 1299 bright rotating stars were recovered from the subset of Gaia sources with good astrometric solutions, most with temperatures above 5000 K. From these sources, 894 were selected as lying near the main sequence using their absolute G-band magnitudes. These main-sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered roughly around a 600 Myr rotation isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler, but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiants. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting that the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within ∼300 pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. This work emphasizes the unique power for understanding stellar populations that is created by combining temporal monitoring from Kepler with astrometric data from Gaia.

  12. Kepler-47: A Three-Planet Circumbinary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, William; Orosz, Jerome; Quarles, Billy; Haghighipour, Nader

    2015-12-01

    Kepler-47 is the most interesting of the known circumbinary planets. In the discovery paper by Orosz et al. (2012) two planets were detected, with periods of 49.5 and 303 days around the 7.5-day binary. In addition, a single "orphan" transit of a possible third planet was noticed. Since then, five additional transits by this planet candidate have been uncovered, leading to the unambiguous confirmation of a third transiting planet in the system. The planet has a period of 187 days, and orbits in between the previously detected planets. It lies on the inner edge of the optimistic habitable zone, while its outer sibling falls within the conservative habitable zone. The orbit of this new planet is precessing, causing its transits to become significantly deeper over the span of the Kepler observations. Although the planets are not massive enough to measurably perturb the binary, they are sufficiently massive to interact with each other and cause mild transit timing variations (TTVs). This enables our photodynamical model to estimate their masses. We find that all three planets have very low-density and are on remarkably co-planar orbits: all 4 orbits (the binary and three planets) are within ~2 degrees of one another. Thus the Kepler-47 system puts interesting constraints on circumbinary planet formation and migration scenarios.

  13. Data Processing and Archiving Software for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swam, M. S.; Swade, D.; Sontag, C.; Heller-Boyer, C.; Gaffney, N.; Kidwell, R.

    2007-10-01

    The Kepler Mission, a NASA Discovery mission scheduled for launch in 2008 November, will survey a 105 deg^2 field of view in the Cygnus-Lyra region of the Milky Way galaxy to detect and characterize hundreds of Earth-size planets in or near the habitable zone. The Kepler Data Management Center at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) will provide the data processing and archiving functions for the mission. Data processing consists of converting spacecraft telemetry into FITS data products, populating header keywords, and basic calibration of the data. The archive will save the original telemetry and science data products in several different forms to serve the principal investigator, guest observers, and the astronomical community at large. Extensive re-use of proven, multi-mission data processing and archive systems developed at STScI for the Hubble Space Telescope project will greatly reduce the development effort for the Kepler mission, and should result in fewer operational problems. This paper will discuss the software architecture and re-use plans for these systems.

  14. Data Validation in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hayley; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Allen, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Wohler, Bill; Girouard, Forrest; McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of the Data Validation (DV) software component and its context within the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline and overall Kepler Science mission. The SOC pipeline performs a transiting planet search on the corrected light curves for over 150,000 targets across the focal plane array. We discuss the DV strategy for automated validation of Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs) generated in the transiting planet search. For each TCE, a transiting planet model is fitted to the target light curve. A multiple planet search is conducted by repeating the transiting planet search on the residual light curve after the model flux has been removed; if an additional detection occurs, a planet model is fitted to the new TCE. A suite of automated tests are performed after all planet candidates have been identified. We describe a centroid motion test to determine the significance of the motion of the target photocenter during transit and to estimate the coordinates of the transit source within the photometric aperture; a series of eclipsing binary discrimination tests on the parameters of the planet model fits to all transits and the sequences of odd and even transits; and a statistical bootstrap to assess the likelihood that the TCE would have been generated purely by chance given the target light curve with all transits removed. Keywords: photometry, data validation, Kepler, Earth-size planets

  15. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR TROJAN PLANETS IN THE KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, Markus

    2013-09-10

    Trojans are circumstellar bodies that reside in characteristic 1:1 orbital resonances with planets. While all the trojans in our solar system are small ({approx}<100 km), stable planet-size trojans may exist in extrasolar planetary systems, and the Kepler telescope constitutes a formidable tool to search for them. Here we report on a systematic search for extrasolar trojan companions to 2244 known Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with epicyclic orbital characteristics similar to those of the Jovian trojan families. No convincing trojan candidates are found, despite a typical sensitivity down to Earth-size objects. This fact, however, cannot be used to stringently exclude the existence of trojans in this size range, since stable trojans need not necessarily share the same orbital plane as the planet, and thus may not transit. Following this reasoning, we note that if Earth-sized trojans exist at all, they are almost certainly both present and in principle detectable in the full set of Kepler data, although a very substantial computational effort would be required to detect them. Additionally, we also note that some of the existing KOIs could in principle be trojans themselves, with a primary planet orbiting outside of the transiting plane. A few examples are given for which this is a readily testable scenario.

  16. More Unusual Light Curves from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    Twenty-three new objects have been added to the growing collection of stars observed to have unusual dips in their light curves. A recent study examines these stars and the potential causes of their strange behavior.An Influx of DataThe primary Kepler mission provided light curves for over 100,000 stars, and its continuation K2 is observing another 20,000 stars every three months. As we enter an era where these enormous photometric data sets become commonplace Gaia will obtain photometry for millions of stars, and LSST billions its crucial that we understand the different categories of variability observed in these stars.The authors find three different types of light curves among their 23 unusual stars. Scallop-shell curves (top) show many undulations; persistent flux-dip class curves (middle) have discrete triangularly shaped flux dips; transient, narrow dip class curves (bottom) have only one dip that is variable in depth. The authors speculate a common cause for the scallop-shell and persistent flux-dip stars, and a different cause for the transient flux-dip stars. [Stauffer et al. 2017]After filtering out the stars with planets, those in binary systems, those with circumstellar disks, and those with starspots, a number of oddities remain: a menagerie of stars with periodic variability that cant be accounted for in these categories. Some of these stars are now famous (for instance, Boyajians star); some are lesser known. But by continuing to build up this sample of stars with unusual light curves, we have a better chance of understanding the sources of variability.Building the MenagerieTo this end, a team of scientists led by John Stauffer (Spitzer Science Center at Caltech) has recently hunted for more additions to this sample in the K2 data set. In particular, they searched through the light curves from stars in the Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region a data set that makes up the largest collection of high-quality light curves for low-mass, pre

  17. Passing NASA's Planet Quest Baton from Kepler to TESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J.

    Kepler vaulted into the heavens on March 7, 2009, initiating NASAs search for Earth- size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in the habitable zone, where liquid water could exist on a rocky planetary surface. In the 4 years since Kepler began science operations, a flood of photometric data on upwards of 190,000 stars of unprecedented precision and continuity has provoked a watershed of 134+ confirmed or validated planets, 3200+ planetary candidates (most sub-Neptune in size and many compara- ble to or smaller than Earth), and a resounding revolution in asteroseismology and astrophysics. The most recent discoveries include Kepler-62 with 5 planets total of which 2 are in the habitable zone with radii of 1.4 and 1.7 Re. The focus of the mission is shifting towards how to rapidly vet the 18,000+ threshold crossing events produced with each transiting planet search, and towards those studies that will allow us to understand what the data are saying about the prevalence of planets in the solar neighborhood and throughout the galaxy. This talk will provide an overview of the science results from the Kepler Mission and the work ahead to derive the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars from the treasure trove of Kepler data. NASAs quest for exoplanets continues with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satel- lite (TESS) mission, slated for launch in May 2017 by NASAs Explorer Program. TESS will conduct an all-sky transit survey to identify the 1000 best small exoplanets in the solar neighborhood for follow up observations and characterization. TESSs targets will include all F, G, K dwarfs from +4 to +12 magnitude and all M dwarfs known within ˜200 light-years. 500,000 target stars will be observed over two years with ˜500 square degrees observed continuously for a year in each hemisphere in the James Webb Space Telescopes continuously viewable zones. Since the typical TESS target star is 5 magnitudes brighter than Kepler’s and 10 times

  18. THE SDSS-HET SURVEY OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARIES: SPECTROSCOPIC DYNAMICAL MASSES OF THE KEPLER-16 CIRCUMBINARY PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Chad F.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Wright, Jason T.; Roy, Arpita; Terrien, Ryan C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Fleming, Scott W.

    2012-06-01

    We have used high-resolution spectroscopy to observe the Kepler-16 eclipsing binary as a double-lined system and measure precise radial velocities for both stellar components. These velocities yield a dynamical mass ratio of q = 0.2994 {+-} 0.0031. When combined with the inclination, i 90.{sup 0}3401{sup +0.0016}{sub -0.0019}, measured from the Kepler photometric data by Doyle et al. (D11), we derive dynamical masses for the Kepler-16 components of M{sub A} = 0.654 {+-} 0.017 M{sub Sun} and M{sub B} = 0.1959 {+-} 0.0031 M{sub Sun }, a precision of 2.5% and 1.5%, respectively. Our results confirm at the {approx}2% level the mass-ratio derived by D11 with their photometric-dynamical model (PDM), q = 0.2937 {+-} 0.0006. These are among the most precise spectroscopic dynamical masses ever measured for low-mass stars and provide an important direct test of the results from the PDM technique.

  19. Increased striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels is an early event in Parkinson's disease-related pathology and it is potentially regulated by miR-34b.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Porta, Sílvia; Buira, Sandra P; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Albasanz, José Luis; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity. In the brain, A2ARs are found highly enriched in striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons, related to the control of voluntary movement. Pharmacological modulation of A2ARs is particularly useful in Parkinson's disease (PD) due to their property of antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor activity. Increases in A2AR levels have been described in PD patients showing an important loss of dopaminergic denervation markers, but no data have been reported about A2AR levels in incidental PD brains. In the present report, we show that increased A2ARs protein levels were also detected in the putamen of incidental PD cases (Braak PD stages 1-2) with respect to age-matched controls. By contrast, A2ARs mRNA levels remained unchanged, suggesting that posttranslational mechanisms could be involved in the regulation of A2ARs. It has been described how miR-34b/c downregulation is an early event in PD cases. We found that miR-34b levels are also significantly reduced in the putamen of incidental PD cases and along disease progression. Given that 3'UTR of A2AR contains a predicted target site for miR-34b, the potential role of this miRNA in protein A2AR levels was assessed. In vitro studies revealed that endogenous A2AR protein levels increased when miR-34b function was blocked using a specific anti-miR-34b. Moreover, using a luciferase reporter assay with point mutations in a miR-34b predicted binding site within the 3'UTR region of A2AR mRNA abolished the effect of the miRNA using a miR-34b mimic. In addition, we showed a reduced percentage of DNA methylation in the 5'UTR region of ADORA2A in advanced PD cases. Overall, these findings reveal that increased A2AR protein levels occur in asymptomatic PD patients and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying A2AR expression levels along the progression of this neurodegenerative disease.

  20. The mass of the super-Earth orbiting the brightest Kepler planet hosting star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; HARPS-N Team

    2016-01-01

    HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 oscillating F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early analysis of the Q0 - Q5 Kepler light curves by Howell et al. (2012) revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of 1.6 R_Earth and an orbital period of 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2s upper limit of about 10 M_Earth. Here we present 82 new radial velocity observations of this system obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph. We detect the Doppler shift signal of Kepler-21b at the 3.6s level, and measure a planetary mass of 5.9 ± 1.6 M_Earth. We also update the radius of the planet to 1.65 ± 0.08 R_Earth, using the now available Kepler Q0 - Q17 photometry for this target. The mass of Kepler-21b appears to fall on the apparent dividing line between super-Earths that have lost all the material in their outer layers and those that have retained a significant amount of volatiles. Based on our results Kepler-21b belongs to the first group. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by funding from the NASA XRP Program and the John Templeton Foundation.

  1. Kepler-432 b: a massive planet in a highly eccentric orbit transiting a red giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Lillo-Box, J.; Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Barrado, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first disclosure of the planetary nature of Kepler-432 b (aka Kepler object of interest KOI-1299.01). We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By simultaneously fitting these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that Kepler-432 b is a dense transiting exoplanet with a mass of Mp = 4.87 ± 0.48MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 ± 0.036RJup. The planet revolves every 52.5 d around a K giant star that ascends the red giant branch, and it moves on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 ± 0.030. By analysing two near-IR high-resolution images, we found that a star is located at 1.1'' from Kepler-432, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, Kepler-432 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important for constraining the evolutionary processes of planetary systems. RV data (Table A.1) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/L5

  2. Had the Planet Mars Not Existed: Kepler's Equant Model and Its Physical Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracco, C.; Provost, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the equant model for the motion of planets, which was the starting point of Kepler's investigations before he modified it because of Mars observations. We show that, up to first order in eccentricity, this model implies for each orbit a velocity, which satisfies Kepler's second law and Hamilton's hodograph, and a centripetal…

  3. An Alternative Way to Achieve Kepler's Laws of Equal Areas and Ellipses for the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiang, W. Y.; Chang, H. C.; Yao, H.; Chen, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler's laws of planetary motion are acknowledged as highly significant to the construction of universal gravitation. This paper demonstrates different ways to derive the law of equal areas for the Earth by general geometrical and trigonometric methods, which are much simpler than the original derivation depicted by Kepler. The established law of…

  4. Tidal Dissipation in a Homogeneous Spherical Body. 2. Three Examples: Mercury, IO, and Kepler-10 b

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler -10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency...our calculation, Kepler -10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  5. Target Charaterization and Follow-Up Observations in Support of the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, David W.

    2004-01-01

    This report covers work carried out at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory during the period 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2004 to support efforts to prepare the Kepler Input Catalog. The Catalog will be used to select the targets observed for planetary transits by Kepler.

  6. Preliminary Results of Autotuning GEMM Kernels for the NVIDIA Kepler Architecture- GeForce GTX 680

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Luszczek, Pitor; Tomov, Stanimire; Dongarra, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Kepler is the newest GPU architecture from NVIDIA, and the GTX 680 is the first commercially available graphics card based on that architecture. Matrix multiplication is a canonical computational kernel, and often the main target of initial optimization efforts for a new chip. This article presents preliminary results of automatically tuning matrix multiplication kernels for the Kepler architecture using the GTX 680 card.

  7. geoKepler Workflow Module for Computationally Scalable and Reproducible Geoprocessing and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowart, C.; Block, J.; Crawl, D.; Graham, J.; Gupta, A.; Nguyen, M.; de Callafon, R.; Smarr, L.; Altintas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF-funded WIFIRE project has developed an open-source, online geospatial workflow platform for unifying geoprocessing tools and models for for fire and other geospatially dependent modeling applications. It is a product of WIFIRE's objective to build an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. geoKepler includes a set of reusable GIS components, or actors, for the Kepler Scientific Workflow System (https://kepler-project.org). Actors exist for reading and writing GIS data in formats such as Shapefile, GeoJSON, KML, and using OGC web services such as WFS. The actors also allow for calling geoprocessing tools in other packages such as GDAL and GRASS. Kepler integrates functions from multiple platforms and file formats into one framework, thus enabling optimal GIS interoperability, model coupling, and scalability. Products of the GIS actors can be fed directly to models such as FARSITE and WRF. Kepler's ability to schedule and scale processes using Hadoop and Spark also makes geoprocessing ultimately extensible and computationally scalable. The reusable workflows in geoKepler can be made to run automatically when alerted by real-time environmental conditions. Here, we show breakthroughs in the speed of creating complex data for hazard assessments with this platform. We also demonstrate geoKepler workflows that use Data Assimilation to ingest real-time weather data into wildfire simulations, and for data mining techniques to gain insight into environmental conditions affecting fire behavior. Existing machine learning tools and libraries such as R and MLlib are being leveraged for this purpose in Kepler, as well as Kepler's Distributed Data Parallel (DDP) capability to provide a framework for scalable processing. geoKepler workflows can be executed via an iPython notebook as a part of a Jupyter hub at UC San Diego for sharing and reporting of the scientific analysis and results from

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Properties of Kepler multi-planet candidate systems (Wang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, J.-W.; Barclay, T.; Fischer, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Our sample consists of bright host stars with multi-planet transiting systems from Kepler. Out of 5779 Kepler Objects of Interest (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/), we selected all the systems with a Kepler magnitude (KP) brighter than 13.5mag and with at least two planet candidates. The sample includes 343 planet candidates (see Table3) in 138 multi-planet candidate systems (see Table2) from the Kepler mission. For these systems, we used archival data from Kepler to characterize their stellar (see Table2) and orbital properties (see Table3). We used UKIRT images to calculate brightness contrast curves and to detect stellar companions around planet candidate host stars (see Table4). (3 data files).

  9. Photometry Using Kepler "Superstamps" of Open Clusters NGC 6791 & NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Drury, Jason A.; Bellamy, Beau R.; Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Reed, Mike; Quick, Breanna

    2015-09-01

    The Kepler space telescope has proven to be a gold mine for the study of variable stars. Usually, Kepler only reads out a handful of pixels around each pre-selected target star, omitting a large number of stars in the Kepler field. Fortunately, for the open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, Kepler also read out larger "superstamps" which contained complete images of the central region of each cluster. These cluster images can be used to study additional stars in the open clusters that were not originally on Kepler's target list. We discuss our work on using two photometric techniques to analyze these superstamps and present sample results from this project to demonstrate the value of this technique for a wide variety of variable stars.

  10. A Transit Timing Posterior Distribution Catalog for all Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin; Becker, Juliette; Johnson, John

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the unprecedented precision of Kepler, the first unambiguous observations of transit timing variations (TTVs) are now in hand. TTVs have afforded us the ability to precisely characterize both transiting and non-transiting exoplanets by observing dynamical interactions in multi-transiting systems. Catalogs attempting to publish transit times of large numbers of Kepler systems exist. However, these catalogs are incomplete: for each event only a point estimate and assumed Gaussian uncertainity of the transit time is included. Moreover, published catalogs only include long-cadence data, do not cover the full Kepler observing baseline, and assume the Kepler noise is perfectly uncorrelated. Here, we present a complete TTV catalog, in which we produce full posterior distributions on the time of each transit for every Kepler planet candidate without any assumptions of Gaussianity in the transit times.

  11. Changing Phases of Alien Worlds: Probing Atmospheres of Kepler Planets with High-precision Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2015-05-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of planetary phase variations, including possible planetary light offsets, using eighteen quarters of data from the Kepler space telescope. Our analysis found fourteen systems with significant detections in each of the phase curve components: planet’s phase function, secondary eclipse, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. We model the full phase curve simultaneously, including primary and secondary transits, and derive albedos, day- and night-side temperatures and planet masses. Most planets manifest low optical geometric albedos (< 0.25), with the exception of Kepler-10b, Kepler-91b, and KOI-13b. We find that KOI-13b, with a small eccentricity of 0.0006 ± 0.0001, is the only planet for which an eccentric orbit is favored. We detect a third harmonic for HAT-P-7b for the first time, and confirm the third harmonic for KOI-13b reported in Esteves et al.: both could be due to their spin-orbit misalignments. For six planets, we report a planetary brightness peak offset from the substellar point: of those, the hottest two (Kepler-76b and HAT-P-7b) exhibit pre-eclipse shifts or on the evening-side, while the cooler four (Kepler-7b, Kepler-8b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b) peak post-eclipse or on the morning-side. Our findings dramatically increase the number of Kepler planets with detected planetary light offsets, and provide the first evidence in the Kepler data for a correlation between the peak offset direction and the planet’s temperature. Such a correlation could arise if thermal emission dominates light from hotter planets that harbor hot spots shifted toward the evening-side, as theoretically predicted, while reflected light dominates cooler planets with clouds on the planet’s morning-side.

  12. CHANGING PHASES OF ALIEN WORLDS: PROBING ATMOSPHERES OF KEPLER PLANETS WITH HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; Mooij, Ernst J. W. De; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2015-05-10

    We present a comprehensive analysis of planetary phase variations, including possible planetary light offsets, using eighteen quarters of data from the Kepler space telescope. Our analysis found fourteen systems with significant detections in each of the phase curve components: planet’s phase function, secondary eclipse, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. We model the full phase curve simultaneously, including primary and secondary transits, and derive albedos, day- and night-side temperatures and planet masses. Most planets manifest low optical geometric albedos (< 0.25), with the exception of Kepler-10b, Kepler-91b, and KOI-13b. We find that KOI-13b, with a small eccentricity of 0.0006 ± 0.0001, is the only planet for which an eccentric orbit is favored. We detect a third harmonic for HAT-P-7b for the first time, and confirm the third harmonic for KOI-13b reported in Esteves et al.: both could be due to their spin–orbit misalignments. For six planets, we report a planetary brightness peak offset from the substellar point: of those, the hottest two (Kepler-76b and HAT-P-7b) exhibit pre-eclipse shifts or on the evening-side, while the cooler four (Kepler-7b, Kepler-8b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b) peak post-eclipse or on the morning-side. Our findings dramatically increase the number of Kepler planets with detected planetary light offsets, and provide the first evidence in the Kepler data for a correlation between the peak offset direction and the planet’s temperature. Such a correlation could arise if thermal emission dominates light from hotter planets that harbor hot spots shifted toward the evening-side, as theoretically predicted, while reflected light dominates cooler planets with clouds on the planet’s morning-side.

  13. BEER ANALYSIS OF KEPLER AND CoRoT LIGHT CURVES. I. DISCOVERY OF KEPLER-76b: A HOT JUPITER WITH EVIDENCE FOR SUPERROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first case in which the BEER algorithm identified a hot Jupiter in the Kepler light curve, and its reality was confirmed by orbital solutions based on follow-up spectroscopy. The companion Kepler-76b was identified by the BEER algorithm, which detected the BEaming (sometimes called Doppler boosting) effect together with the Ellipsoidal and Reflection/emission modulations (BEER), at an orbital period of 1.54 days, suggesting a planetary companion orbiting the 13.3 mag F star. Further investigation revealed that this star appeared in the Kepler eclipsing binary catalog with estimated primary and secondary eclipse depths of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. Spectroscopic radial velocity follow-up observations with Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph and SOPHIE confirmed Kepler-76b as a transiting 2.0 {+-} 0.26 M{sub Jup} hot Jupiter. The mass of a transiting planet can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude. The ellipsoidal-based mass estimate of Kepler-76b is consistent with the spectroscopically measured mass while the beaming-based estimate is significantly inflated. We explain this apparent discrepancy as evidence for the superrotation phenomenon, which involves eastward displacement of the hottest atmospheric spot of a tidally locked planet by an equatorial superrotating jet stream. This phenomenon was previously observed only for HD 189733b in the infrared. We show that a phase shift of 10. Degree-Sign 3 {+-} 2. Degree-Sign 0 of the planet reflection/emission modulation, due to superrotation, explains the apparently inflated beaming modulation, resolving the ellipsoidal/beaming amplitude discrepancy. Kepler-76b is one of very few confirmed planets in the Kepler light curves that show BEER modulations and the first to show superrotation evidence in the Kepler band. Its discovery illustrates for the first time the ability of the BEER algorithm to detect short

  14. BEER Analysis of Kepler and CoRoT Light Curves. I. Discovery of Kepler-76b: A Hot Jupiter with Evidence for Superrotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first case in which the BEER algorithm identified a hot Jupiter in the Kepler light curve, and its reality was confirmed by orbital solutions based on follow-up spectroscopy. The companion Kepler-76b was identified by the BEER algorithm, which detected the BEaming (sometimes called Doppler boosting) effect together with the Ellipsoidal and Reflection/emission modulations (BEER), at an orbital period of 1.54 days, suggesting a planetary companion orbiting the 13.3 mag F star. Further investigation revealed that this star appeared in the Kepler eclipsing binary catalog with estimated primary and secondary eclipse depths of 5 × 10-3 and 1 × 10-4, respectively. Spectroscopic radial velocity follow-up observations with Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph and SOPHIE confirmed Kepler-76b as a transiting 2.0 ± 0.26 M Jup hot Jupiter. The mass of a transiting planet can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude. The ellipsoidal-based mass estimate of Kepler-76b is consistent with the spectroscopically measured mass while the beaming-based estimate is significantly inflated. We explain this apparent discrepancy as evidence for the superrotation phenomenon, which involves eastward displacement of the hottest atmospheric spot of a tidally locked planet by an equatorial superrotating jet stream. This phenomenon was previously observed only for HD 189733b in the infrared. We show that a phase shift of 10.°3 ± 2.°0 of the planet reflection/emission modulation, due to superrotation, explains the apparently inflated beaming modulation, resolving the ellipsoidal/beaming amplitude discrepancy. Kepler-76b is one of very few confirmed planets in the Kepler light curves that show BEER modulations and the first to show superrotation evidence in the Kepler band. Its discovery illustrates for the first time the ability of the BEER algorithm to detect short-period planets and brown dwarfs.

  15. Conjugated polymers based on benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene with low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital energy levels for organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shengqiang; Stuart, Andrew C; Liu, Shubin; You, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Fusing bithiophene units with a benzo moiety, benzo[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene (BDT), was projected by theoretical calculations to lower the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of the resulting polymers compared with that of the bithiophene unit, which would enhance the open circuit voltage of bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells fabricated from BDT-based polymers blended with PCBM. The homopolymer of BDT (HMPBDT) and alternating copolymer of BDT with 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (PBDT-BT) were therefore synthesized and fully characterized. Both the homopolymer (HMPBDT) and the copolymer (PBDT-BT) were experimentally confirmed to have low HOMO energy levels (-5.70 eV for HMPBDT and -5.34 eV for PBDT-BT). Introducing the acceptor moiety (2,1,3-benzothiadiazole) successfully lowered the optical band gap of the copolymer from 2.31 eV (HMPBDT) to 1.78 eV (PBDT-BT). Bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices were fabricated from blends of these structurally related polymers with PBCM to investigate the photovoltaic performances. The optimized device of HMPBDT:PCBM (1:3, 180 nm) exhibited an improved open circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.76 V, a short circuit current (J(sc)) of 0.34 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.40, offering an overall efficiency of 0.10%. The observed large phase separation of the thin film by AFM and the large band gap were accountable for the small current. The optimized device of PBDT-BT:PCBM (1:3, 55 nm) demonstrated a better efficiency of 0.6%, with V(oc) = 0.72 V, J(sc) = 2.06 mA/cm(2), and FF = 0.42. The much improved current was attributed to the lower bandgap and better film morphology. However, the low hole mobility limited the thickness of the PBDT-BT:PCBM film, making inaccessible the thicker film which would utilize more light and enhance the current. Further improvements are expected if the mobility and film morphology can be improved by the new materials design, together with low band gap and low HOMO energy level.

  16. On the Origin of the Kepler-36 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimlinger, Thomas; Hamilton, Douglas; Richardson, Derek

    2015-11-01

    The Kepler-36 system comprises two exoplanets: an inner terrestrial super-Earth (4.5 ME) and an outer gaseous sub-Neptune (8.1 ME). Both planets are orbiting very close to their host star (0.12 and 0.13 AU away) and to each other. Their orbital periods are in nearly a 7:6 ratio, a mean-motion resonance that is not usually populated. Finally, the inner planet is much denser than Earth (7.5 g/cm3), while the outer planet is substantially less dense (0.89 g/cm3), a surprise given the close proximity of their orbits.We examine origin scenarios for Kepler-36 featuring planetary migration due to dissipative forces within the circumstellar gas disk. In our model, the planets did not form in situ but rather moved inwards through a region of smaller planetesimals and embryos. We assume that the outer body formed beyond the frost line with significant gas accretion to account for its low density. This sub-Neptune migrated inward and captured an embryo of negligible relative mass into a 2:1 orbital resonance. Collisions between this embryo and other bodies of similar mass broke the resonance and allowed the two planets to converge while the inner one grew in mass and density.Using HNDrag, an N-body code, we have found several scenarios that might explain the observations. Although our successful scenarios occur with low probability, this is actually a strength since few known systems share the peculiarities of Kepler-36. Our model explains the main observed features of this system in the context of standard planetary formation theory.

  17. χ2 Discriminators for Transiting Planet Detection in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seader, Shawn; Tenenbaum, P.; Jenkins, J.

    2012-10-01

    The Kepler Mission continuously observes a host of target stars in a 115 square-degree field of view to discover Earth-like planets transiting Sun-like stars through analysis of photometric data. The Kepler Science Operations Center at NASA Ames Research Center processes the data with the Science Processing Pipeline, which is composed of several modules including the Transiting Planet Search (TPS). To search for transit signatures, TPS employs a bank of wavelet-based matched filters that form a grid on a three dimensional parameter space of transit duration, period, and epoch. Owing to non-stationary and non-Gaussian noise, uncorrected systematics, and poorly mitigated noise events of either astrophysical or non-astrophysical nature, large spurious Threshold Crossing Events (TCE’s) can be produced by the matched filtering performed in TPS. These false alarms waste resources as they propagate through the remainder of the Pipeline, and so a method to discriminate against them is crucial in maintaining the desired sensitivity to true events. Here we describe four separate χ2 tests which represent a novel application of the formalism developed by Allen for false alarm mitigation in searches for gravitational waves. The basic idea behind these vetoes is to break up the matched filter output into several contributions and compare each contribution with what is expected under the assumption that a true signal is present in the data. Vetoes can then be constructed which, under certain assumptions, have been shown to be χ2 distributed with expectation values that are independent of whether or not a true signal is present, thereby making them useful discriminators. The four different ways of breaking up the output and forming χ2 vetoes illustrated here, allow discrimination against different classes of false alarms. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

  18. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  19. Efficient Solutions of Kepler's Equation via Hybrid and Digital Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltrogge, Daniel L.

    2015-12-01

    The solution of Kepler's equation is accomplished via families of hybrid and table lookup techniques. A new arithmetic operation timing approach with general application to scientific programming is used to accurately estimate performance of each Kepler's equation solution technique. The hybrid approaches couple a power series expansion starting approximation with nine different types of higher-order corrective step methods. The resulting computationally efficient non-iterative methods avoid "if" statements and directly yield in-plane Euler rotation angles necessary to map orbit elements to orbital position. The best-performing of the nine hybrid methods are up to two times faster than the original efficient Laguerre iterative method and achieve worst-case resultant true anomaly accuracies down to machine precision at 3 × 10-11° for eccentricities up to 0.999999. This matches or exceeds the performance of iterative methods and translates to less than three micro-meters at GEO altitude. Meanwhile, six digital approaches were explored, with the best table lookup approach boasting a ten-fold speed increase with a worst-case accuracy of 1 × 10-6° (154 mm) for an eccentricity of 0.999999. These combinations of accuracy and speed performance make both the hybrid and table lookup approaches well-suited for in-line incorporation into a wide range of low- to high-fidelity semi-analytic orbit propagators and multi-threaded or vector programming languages and computing hardware (GPUs, etc.). And finally, a new operator-based computational timing technique is designed and employed to estimate the performance of math-laden computer programs, with sample application to all of the aforementioned Kepler's equation solution techniques.

  20. PREDICTING A THIRD PLANET IN THE KEPLER-47 CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hinse, Tobias C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Kostov, Veselin B.; Goździewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-20

    We have studied the possibility that a third circumbinary planet in the Kepler-47 planetary system is the source of the single unexplained transiting event reported during the discovery of these planets. We applied the MEGNO technique to identify regions in the phase space where a third planet can maintain quasi-periodic orbits, and assessed the long-term stability of the three-planet system by integrating the entire five bodies (binary + planets) for 10 Myr. We identified several stable regions between the two known planets as well as a region beyond the orbit of Kepler-47c where the orbit of the third planet could be stable. To constrain the orbit of this planet, we used the measured duration of the unexplained transit event (∼4.15 hr) and compared that with the transit duration of the third planet in an ensemble of stable orbits. To remove the degeneracy among the orbits with similar transit durations, we considered the planet to be in a circular orbit and calculated its period analytically. The latter places an upper limit of 424 days on the orbital period of the third planet. Our analysis suggests that if the unexplained transit event detected during the discovery of the Kepler-47 circumbinary system is due to a planetary object, this planet will be in a low eccentricity orbit with a semi-major axis smaller than 1.24 AU. Further constraining of the mass and orbital elements of this planet requires a re-analysis of the entire currently available data, including those obtained post-announcement of the discovery of this system. We present details of our methodology and discuss the implication of the results.

  1. Atmospheric characterization of the hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Szabó, Gyula M.; Zhao, Ming; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2014-06-10

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 μm and 3.6 μm and a ground-based occultation observation in the K{sub s} band (2.1 μm). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2750 ± 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, A {sub g} = 0.33{sub −0.06}{sup +0.04}. While measured with a simplistic method, a high A {sub g} is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.''15 ± 0.''05 away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements, leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of M{sub p} = 4.94-8.09 M {sub J} and R{sub p} = 1.406 ± 0.038 R {sub J}. Finally, we measure a Kepler midoccultation time that is 34.0 ± 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the midtransit time and the delay due to light-travel time and discuss possible scenarios.

  2. Do the Kepler AGN light curves need reprocessing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Williams, Joshua; Carini, Michael T.

    2015-10-01

    We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST data base with a reprocessed light curve constructed from raw pixel data. We use the first-order structure function, SF(δt), to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD (power spectral density) of Kasliwal et al. On short time-scales, we find a steeper log PSD slope (γ = 2.90 to within 10 per cent) for the reprocessed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST (γ = 2.65 to within 10 per cent) - both inconsistent with a damped random walk (DRW) which requires γ = 2. The log PSD slope inferred for the reprocessed light curve is consistent with previous results that study the same reprocessed light curve. The turnover time-scale is almost identical for both light curves (27.1 and 27.5 d for the reprocessed and MAST data base light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Reprocessing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusions reached by Kasliwal et al. - not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.

  3. On the X-ray spectrum of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Blondin, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a method to do nonequilibrium ionization calculations on the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, based on the algorithm of Hughes & Helfand (1985). We have calculated the ionization structure and X-ray emission for a two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamical simulation for the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN); the hydrodynamical model was presented in a previous paper. In this model, the progenitor of Kepler's SN is assumed to have been a massive runaway star ejected from the Galactic plane. In its red supergiant stage, its dense stellar wind was distorted and compressed into a bow shock by the ram pressure of the tenuous interstellar medium. The subsequent interaction of the supernova ejecta with this asymmetric circumstellar matter produced a strongly asymmetric supernova remnant (SNR). In this paper, we present calculated X-ray spectra for this hydrodynamical model. A comparison with observations implies a moderate overabundance of Fe in Kepler's SNR (only 50% larger than its cosmic value), in contrast to a large (6 to 15) Fe overabundance derived previously. However, we confirm earlier conclusions that Si and S abundances are 2 to 3 times solar. These modest enhancements of Si, S, and Fe may be attributed either to heavy-element enriched SN ejecta or to the initial chemical abundances of the SN progenitor, which originated in the metal-rich inner Galaxy. The comparison of our models with the observed spectra confirm theoretical predictions that moderate electron heating occurs at strong collisionless shock fronts, with the implied electron/mean temperature ratio of approximately 0.5.

  4. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Motivation & Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) models, Generalized Auto-Regressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH), and related models are flexible, phenomenological methods used with great success to model stochastic temporal behaviors in many fields of study, particularly econometrics. Powerful statistical methods are implemented in the public statistical software environment R and its many packages. Modeling involves maximum likelihood fitting, model selection, and residual analysis. These techniques provide a useful framework to model stellar variability and are used in KARPS with the objective of reducing stellar noise to enhance opportunities to find as-yet-undiscovered planets. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; ARMA-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. We apply the procedures to simulated Kepler-like time series with known stellar and planetary signals to evaluate the effectiveness of the KARPS procedures. The ARMA-type modeling is effective at reducing stellar noise, but also reduces and transforms the transit signal into ingress/egress spikes. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal

  5. Architecture and Stability of Planetary Systems Based on Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.

    2014-04-01

    We used a sample of Kepler candidate planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii to determine the typical dynamical spacing of neighboring planets (Fang and Margot, ApJ 767, 2013). To derive the intrinsic (i.e., free of observational bias) dynamical spacing of neighboring planets, we generated populations of planetary systems following various dynamical spacing distributions, subjected them to synthetic observations by the Kepler spacecraft, and compared the properties of observed planets in our simulations with actual Kepler detections. We found that, on average, neighboring planets are spaced 21.7 mutual Hill radii apart with a standard deviation of 9.5. This dynamical spacing distribution is consistent with that of adjacent planets in the Solar System. To test the packed planetary systems (PPS) hypothesis, the idea that all planetary systems are filled to capacity, we determined the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed by performing long-term (10e8 years) numerical integrations. In each simulation, we integrated a system with planets spaced according to our best-fit dynamical spacing distribution but containing an additional planet on an intermediate orbit. We chose the least disruptive initial conditions for the additional planet, and chose its mass to be equal to that of the smallest planet in the system. The fraction of simulations exhibiting signs of instability (ejections or collisions) provides an approximate lower bound on the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed. We found that over 31%, 35%, and 45% of 2-planet, 3-planet, and 4-planet systems are dynamically packed, respectively. Such sizeable fractions suggest that many planetary systems are indeed filled to capacity. This feature of planetary systems is a fundamental constraint that formation and evolution models must satisfy.

  6. Atmospheric Characterization of the Hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Szabó, Gyula M.; Zhao, Ming; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2014-06-01

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 μm and 3.6 μm and a ground-based occultation observation in the Ks band (2.1 μm). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2750 ± 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, A g = 0.33^{+0.04}_{-0.06}. While measured with a simplistic method, a high A g is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.''15 ± 0.''05 away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements, leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of Mp = 4.94-8.09 M J and Rp = 1.406 ± 0.038 R J. Finally, we measure a Kepler midoccultation time that is 34.0 ± 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the midtransit time and the delay due to light-travel time and discuss possible scenarios.

  7. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P < 0.05), but the mRNA and protein expression of ALV-J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway. PMID:28194372

  8. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P < 0.05), but the mRNA and protein expression of ALV-J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway.

  9. Kepler Mission to Detect Earth-like Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    2005-01-01

    Kepler Mission has been approved and funded for launch into an Earth-trailing orbit in 2007. The satellite observatory is designed to detect Earth-like planets in the Cygnus region of the sky (one hundred square degrees). If all goes as planned, we expect to detect some 60 Earth-like planets, plus a greater number of larger planets. None of the planets that have been discovered so far are not Earth-like; they are mostly Jupiter-sized, large planets.

  10. Extension of Gauss' method for the solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Fill, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Gauss' method for solving Kepler's equation is extended to arbitrary epochs and orbital eccentricities. Although originally developed for near parabolic orbits in the vicinity of pericenter, a generalization of the method leads to a highly efficient algorithm which compares favorably to other methods in current use. A key virtue of the technique is that convergence is obtained by a method of successive substitutions with an initial approximation that is independent of the orbital parameters. The equations of the algorithm are universal, i.e., independent of the nature of the orbit whether elliptic, hyperbolic, parabolic or rectilinear.

  11. E -band excitations in the magnetic Keplerate molecule Fe30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, O.

    2007-01-01

    Low-temperature excitations in the magnetic Keplerate molecule Fe30 as calculated by linear spin-wave theory (SWT), modified linear SWT, and spin-level mean-field theory (SLMFT) are compared to recent inelastic neutron scattering results by Garlea [Phys. Rev. B 73, 024414 (2006)]. SLMFT reproduces a part of the experimental spectrum rather well, but not all of it. SWTs yield a small fraction of the E -band excitations and hence are not capable of a complete description of the excitation spectrum.

  12. KEPLER INPUT CATALOG: PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION AND STELLAR CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, Mark E. E-mail: latham@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: everett@noao.edu

    2011-10-15

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli and Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {l_brace}T{sub eff}, log (g), log (Z), E{sub B-V}{r_brace} using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about {+-}200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T{sub eff}. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T{sub eff} {<=} 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur

  13. Kepler Planet Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morrison, David; Rowe, Jason; Bryson, Stephen T.; Dotson, Jessie; Haas,Michael; Gautier, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size and rocky planets in and near the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars. The HZ is defined to be the region of space where a rocky planet could maintain liquid water on its surface. Kepler is the 10th competitively-selected Discovery Mission and was launched on March 6, 2009. Since completing its commissioning, Kepler has observed over 156,000 stars simultaneously and near continuously to search for planets that periodically pass in front of their host star (transit). The photometric precision is approximately 23 ppm for 50% of the 12th magnitude dwarf stars for an integration period of 6.5 hours. During the first 3 months of operation the photometer detected transit-like signatures from more than 200 stars. Careful examination shows that many of these events are false-positives such as small stars orbiting large stars or blends of target stars with eclipsing binary stars. Ground-based follow-up observations confirm the discovery of five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 andl.6 Jupiter radii (R(sub J)) and orbital periods ranging from 3.2 to 4.9 days. Ground-based observations with the Keck 1, Hobby-Ebberly, Hale, WIYN, MMT, Tillinghast, Shane, and Nordic Optical Telescopes are used to vet the planetary candidates and measure the masses of the putative planets. Observations of occultations and phase variations of hot, short-period planets such as HT-P-7b provide a probe of atmospheric properties. Asteroseismic analysis already shows the presence of p-mode oscillations in several stars. Such observations will be used to measure the mean stellar density and infer the stellar size and age. For stars too dim to permit asteroseismology, observations of the centroid motion of target stars will be used to measure the parallax and be combined with photometric measurements to estimate stellar sizes. Four open clusters are being observed to determine stellar rotation rates as a function of age and

  14. Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-19

    Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet?s surface. During the first 6... planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet’s surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars...inward migration of a giant planet is expected to remove inner, smaller planets by scattering them into the star or out of the planetary system, a second

  15. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Gandhi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over three quarters in 2010 - 2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with approx 30 min sampling, > 90% duty cycle and approx < 0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  16. Tangent bundle geometry from dynamics: Application to the Kepler problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, J. F.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Jover-Galtier, J. A.; Marmo, G.

    In this paper, we consider a manifold with a dynamical vector field and enquire about the possible tangent bundle structures which would turn the starting vector field into a second-order one. The analysis is restricted to manifolds which are diffeomorphic with affine spaces. In particular, we consider the problem in connection with conformal vector fields of second-order and apply the procedure to vector fields conformally related with the harmonic oscillator (f-oscillators). We select one which covers the vector field describing the Kepler problem.

  17. KIC11560447: An Active Eclipsing Binary From the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozavci, Ibrahim; Hussain, Gaitee; Yılmaz, Mesut; O'Neal, Douglas; osman Selam, Selim; Şenavcı, Hakan Volkan

    2016-07-01

    We performed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the detached eclipsing binary KIC11560447, in order to investigate the spot activity of the system. In this context, we reconstructed the surface maps with the help of the code DoTS, using time series spectra obtained at the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory. We also analysed high precision Kepler light curves of the system simultaneously with the code DoTS to reveal the spot migration and activity behaviour.

  18. Ensemble Supervised and Unsupervised Learning with Kepler Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Gideon; Kirk Borne

    2016-06-01

    Variable star analysis and classification is an important task in the understanding of stellar features and processes. While historically classifications have been done manually by highly skilled experts, the recent and rapid expansion in the quantity and quality of data has demanded new techniques, most notably automatic classification through supervised machine learning. I present a study on variable stars in the Kepler field using these techniques, and the novel work of unsupervised learning. I use new methods of characterization and multiple independent classifiers to produce an ensemble classifier that equals or matches existing classification abilities. I also explore the possibilities of unsupervised learning in making novel feature discovery in stars.

  19. The Kepler Q1 - Q16 Planet Candidate Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of the Kepler planet candidate catalog based on analysis of 16 quarters of data. The addition of one more year of data over that presented by Rowe et al. (2015) yields nearly 1500 new objects of interest, from which we identify over 500 new planet candidates. These new candidates are typically smaller, and have longer orbital periods than the KOI sets from our previous work. The full catalog is available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive. We discuss a few features of the catalog that may trip up an unsuspecting user, and highlight some interesting planet candidates.

  20. Characterizing the Period Ratio Distribution of Kepler Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, James L.; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    Many of the exoplanetary systems discovered by the Kepler space telescope demonstrate unusual properties which need to be explored in order to better understand planetary system formation and evolution. Among these interesting properties is an excess in the number of planets orbiting in resonance or near-resonance with their neighbors. The prevailing assumption in the planetary sciences community is that these are real features of the exoplanet population, but many theories developed on this assumption produce a resonance structure quite different from what we see. In our work we explore the possibility that the actual resonances may not be as we observe them, and may instead be explained by a combination of real resonance features and/or observational bias resulting from geometric effects. In particular, if the near-resonant systems have a different inclination distribution than other systems, then it is possible for them to be over or under-represented.We analyze the existing Kepler data and generate models which approximately represent the empirical period ratio distribution. The 2:1 and 3:2 just-wide-of-resonance excesses are included in the model, along with the deficit of period ratios just short of the 2:1 resonance. We test the Kepler data set against these models using the Python emcee package in order to determine the best-fit parameters for each model. We then address the inclination distribution question by generating two-planet systems with different inclination distributions for the near-resonant systems. We use the CORBITS package (https://github.com/jbrakensiek/CORBITS, Brakensiek & Ragozzine, submitted) to determine the probability of detecting both planets in transit. These tests adjust the relative sizes of the resonance excesses as well as orbital parameters (primarily inclination and nodal alignments) in order to determine which combinations of parameters would create in an observational bias resulting in the resonance excesses seen in the

  1. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of Fe73Si16B7Nb3Cu1-based composites mixed with fine charcoal powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-I.; Kim, Mi Rae; Sohn, Keun Yong; Park, Won-Wook

    2010-05-01

    Fe73Si16B7Nb3Cu1 soft magnetic powder was crystallized to obtain a nano grain structure and mixed with a fine charcoal powder. The mixtures were tape-cast with polymer-based organic binders to form a sheet-type electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption composite. The EM wave absorption properties of the sheets were investigated using a network analyzer. The results showed that addition of charcoal powder improved the EM-absorbing properties of the composite. The power loss of the EM wave was directly related to the imaginary part of the permeability and permittivity, and it was reviewed in detail. Excellent absorption properties were achieved by adding 5 wt % charcoal powder (-500 mesh) to the Fe-based sheets.

  2. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XIV. A joint photometric, spectroscopic, and dynamical analysis of the Kepler-117 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Santerne, A.; Diaz, R. F.; Deleuil, M.; Damiani, C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Montagnier, G.

    2015-01-01

    As part of our follow-up campaign of Kepler planets, we observed Kepler-117 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. This F8-type star hosts two transiting planets in non-resonant orbits. The planets, Kepler-117 b and c, have orbital periods ≃ 18.8 and ≃ 50.8 days, and show transit-timing variations (TTVs) of several minutes. We performed a combined Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fit on transits, radial velocities, and stellar parameters to constrain the characteristics of the system. We included the fit of the TTVs in the MCMC by modeling them with dynamical simulations. In this way, consistent posterior distributions were drawn for the system parameters. According to our analysis, planets b and c have notably different masses (0.094 ± 0.033 and 1.84 ± 0.18MJ) and low orbital eccentricities (0.0493 ± 0.0062 and 0.0323 ± 0.0033). The uncertainties on the derived parameters are strongly reduced if the fit of the TTVs is included in the combined MCMC. The TTVs allow measuring the mass of planet b although its radial velocity amplitude is poorly constrained. Finally, we checked that the best solution is dynamically stable. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgRadial velocity tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A124

  3. Selenate as a novel ligand for keplerate chemistry. New {W72Mo60} keplerates with selenates inside the cavity.

    PubMed

    Korenev, Vladimir S; Abramov, Pavel A; Vicent, Cristian; Zhdanov, Artem A; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Sokolov, Maxim N; Fedin, Vladimir P

    2015-05-21

    The synthesis and characterization of three novel keplerate-type compounds containing the {W72Mo60} mixed-metal core are reported. Complexes (NH4)72[{W6O21(H2O)6}12{Mo2O4(SeO4)}30]·150H2O·6(NH4)2SeO4 (1a) and (NH4)25(NH2Me2)47[{W6O21(H2O)6}12{Mo2O4(SeO4)}30]·130H2O·3(NH4)2SeO4 (1b) were prepared by ligand substitution from the acetate anionic complex [{W6O21(H2O)5(CH3COO)0.5}12{Mo2O4(CH3COO)}30](48-) and selenate. The selenate anions in keplerate ions [{W6O21(H2O)6}12{Mo2O4(SeO4)}30](72-) are very labile and easily aquate with the formation of [{W6O21(H2O)6}12{Mo2O4}30(SeO4)20(H2O)20](52-), which was isolated as (NH4)20(NH2Me2)32[{W6O21(H2O)6}12{Mo2O4}30(SeO4)20(H2O)20]·150H2O (2) and structurally characterized. In the crystal structure of 2 selenate has several coordination modes, preferentially bonding to the {Mo2O4}(2+) units, and, additionally, to the {(W)W5} pentagonal blocks. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, Raman, IR and (77)Se NMR spectroscopy, and by ESI mass spectrometry. Capillary electrophoresis was used for characterization of keplerates in solution for the first time.

  4. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program. I. A Catalog of Companions to Kepler Stars from High-Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Everett, M. E.; Saylors, M.; Teske, J. K.; Horch, E. P.; Howell, S. B.; van Belle, G. T.; Hirsch, L. A.; Gautier, T. N., III; Adams, E. R.; Barrado, D.; Cartier, K. M. S.; Dressing, C. D.; Dupree, A. K.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lillo-Box, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present results from high-resolution, optical to near-IR imaging of host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), identified in the original Kepler field. Part of the data were obtained under the Kepler imaging follow-up observation program over six years (2009–2015). Almost 90% of stars that are hosts to planet candidates or confirmed planets were observed. We combine measurements of companions to KOI host stars from different bands to create a comprehensive catalog of projected separations, position angles, and magnitude differences for all detected companion stars (some of which may not be bound). Our compilation includes 2297 companions around 1903 primary stars. From high-resolution imaging, we find that ∼10% (∼30%) of the observed stars have at least one companion detected within 1″ (4″). The true fraction of systems with close (≲4″) companions is larger than the observed one due to the limited sensitivities of the imaging data. We derive correction factors for planet radii caused by the dilution of the transit depth: assuming that planets orbit the primary stars or the brightest companion stars, the average correction factors are 1.06 and 3.09, respectively. The true effect of transit dilution lies in between these two cases and varies with each system. Applying these factors to planet radii decreases the number of KOI planets with radii smaller than 2 {R}\\oplus by ∼2%–23% and thus affects planet occurrence rates. This effect will also be important for the yield of small planets from future transit missions such as TESS.

  5. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of some novel 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazoles and 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazines carrying thioalkyl and sulphonyl phenoxy moieties.

    PubMed

    Karabasanagouda, T; Adhikari, Airody Vasudeva; Shetty, N Suchetha

    2007-04-01

    Thirty one new 6-aryl-3-{(4-substituted phenoxy) methyl}-1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazoles (6a-s) and 6-aryl-3-[(4-substituted phenoxy methyl]-7H-1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazines (7a-l) have been synthesized from 4-thioalkyl phenols (1a-b) through a multi-step reaction sequence. Compounds 1a-b reacted with ethyl chloroacetate in presence of acetone and potassium carbonate to give ethyl [4-(thioalkyl) phenoxy] acetates (2a-b). Further, 2a was oxidized to [4-(methyl sulphonyl) phenoxy] acetate (2c) using hydrogen peroxide in acetic acid. Reactions of (2a-c) with hydrazine hydrate in alcoholic medium furnished 2-[4-thiosubstituted phenoxy] acetohydrazides (3a-b) and 2-[4-methyl sulphonyl phenoxy] acetohydrazide (3c) which on treatment with carbon disulphide and methanolic potassium hydroxide yielded corresponding potassium dithiocarbazates (4a-c). They were then converted to 4-amino-5-[(4-thioalkyl phenoxy) methyl]-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiols (5a-b) and 4-amino-5-[(4-methyl sulphonyl phenoxy) methyl]-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (5c) by refluxing them with aqueous hydrazine hydrate. The title compounds 6a-s were prepared by condensing 5a-c with various aromatic carboxylic acids in presence of phosphorus oxychloride. The intermediates 5a-c, on condensation with various substituted phenacyl bromides afforded a series of title compounds (7a-l). The structures of new compounds 2a-7l were established on the basis of their elemental analysis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral data. All the title compounds were subjected to in vitro antibacterial testing against four pathogenic strains and antifungal screening against three fungi. Preliminary results indicate that some of them exhibited promising activities and they deserve more consideration as potential antimicrobials.

  6. Photometry of very bright stars with Kepler and K2 smear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, B. J. S.; White, T. R.; Huber, D.; Murphy, S. J.; Bedding, T. R.; Caldwell, D. A.; Sarai, A.; Aigrain, S.; Barclay, T.

    2016-01-01

    High-precision time series photometry with the Kepler satellite has been crucial to our understanding both of exoplanets, and via asteroseismology, of stellar physics. After the failure of two reaction wheels, the Kepler satellite has been repurposed as Kepler-2 (K2), observing fields close to the ecliptic plane. As these fields contain many more bright stars than the original Kepler field, K2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study nearby objects amenable to detailed follow-up with ground-based instruments. Due to bandwidth constraints, only a small fraction of pixels can be downloaded, with the result that most bright stars which saturate the detector are not observed. We show that engineering data acquired for photometric calibration, consisting of collateral `smear' measurements, can be used to reconstruct light curves for bright targets not otherwise observable with Kepler/K2. Here we present some examples from Kepler Quarter 6 and K2 Campaign 3, including the δ Scuti variables HD 178875 and 70 Aqr, and the red giant HR 8500 displaying solar-like oscillations. We compare aperture and smear photometry where possible, and also study targets not previously observed. These encouraging results suggest this new method can be applied to most Kepler and K2 fields.

  7. PLANET HUNTERS: ASSESSING THE KEPLER INVENTORY OF SHORT-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Simpson, Robert J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of {>=}2 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets on short-period (<15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} Planet Hunters {>=}85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} short-period planets is nearly complete.

  8. Determining the architecture of the Kepler-297 system using transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Ballard, Sarah; Agol, Eric; Bean, Jacob; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to explore the architectures of exoplanetary systems as we attempt to understand planet formation histories and determine the rate of occurrence of habitable-zone rocky planets. We focus on the Kepler-297 system which hosts three transiting planets, Kepler-297b, Kepler-297c, and KOI-1426.03. We re-analyze extant Kepler data of the system, as well as new Spitzer data of Kepler-297c, to constrain the transit time variations (TTVs) of the three transiting planets in the system. We feed these results into a dynamical analysis in which the TTVs of the transiting planets constrain their orbital parameters, as well as those of potential non-transiting planets. The gravitational interactions between the Kepler-297 planets allow us to derive their mass ratios. We find that the orbital parameters of the three transiting planets are well-fit by a model that includes a non-transiting fourth planet outside of the three transitors. We are also able to constrain the orbital parameters of the outer-most transitor, thereby confirming it as the planet Kepler-297d.

  9. Characterization of Kepler-91b and the Investigation of a Potential Trojan Companion Using EXONEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.; Angerhausen, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2015-12-01

    Presented here is an independent re-analysis of the Kepler light curve of Kepler-91 (KIC 8219268). Using the EXONEST software package, which provides both Bayesian parameter estimation and Bayesian model testing, we were able to re-confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b. In addition to the primary and secondary eclipses of Kepler-91b, a third dimming event appears to occur approximately 60o away (in phase) from the secondary eclipse, leading to the hypothesis that a Trojan planet may be located at the L4 or L5 Lagrange points. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of four possibilities to explain the observed dimming event using all available photometric data from the Kepler Space Telescope, recently obtained radial velocity measurements, and N-body simulations. We find that the photometric model describing Kepler-91b and a Trojan planet is highly favored over the model involving Kepler-91b alone. However, it predicts an unphysically high temperature for the Trojan companion, leading to the conclusion that the extra dimming event is likely a false-postive.

  10. DEEP GALEX UV SURVEY OF THE KEPLER FIELD. I. POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Manuel; Chávez, Miguel; Bertone, Emanuele; Lloyd, James; Mamajek, Eric E.; Martin, D. Christopher; Neill, James D.

    2015-11-10

    We report observations of a deep near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of the Kepler field made in 2012 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Complete All-Sky UV Survey Extension (CAUSE). The GALEX-CAUSE Kepler survey (GCK) covers 104 square degrees of the Kepler field and reaches a limiting magnitude of NUV ≃ 22.6 at 3σ. Analysis of the GCK survey has yielded a catalog of 669,928 NUV sources, of which 475,164 are cross-matched with stars in the Kepler Input Catalog. Approximately 327 of 451 confirmed exoplanet host stars and 2614 of 4696 candidate exoplanet host stars identified by Kepler have NUV photometry in the GCK survey. The GCK catalog should enable the identification and characterization of UV-excess stars in the Kepler field (young solar-type and low-mass stars, chromospherically active binaries, white dwarfs, horizontal branch stars, etc.), and elucidation of various astrophysics problems related to the stars and planetary systems in the Kepler field.

  11. Planet Hunters: Assessing the Kepler Inventory of Short-period Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of >=2 R ⊕ planets on short-period (<15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, >=4 R ⊕ Planet Hunters >=85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler >=4 R ⊕ planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of >=4 R ⊕ short-period planets is nearly complete.

  12. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler IV: Planet Sample from Q1-Q8 (22 Months)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Mullally, F.; Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Chaplin, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cochran, William D.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Havel, Mathieu; Henze, Christopher E.; Howell, Steve B.; Huber, Daniel; Latham, David W.; Li, Jie; Morehead, Robert C.; Morton, Timothy D.; Pepper, Joshua; Quintana, Elisa; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E.; Shah, Yash; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wolfgang, Angie

    2014-02-01

    We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon nearly two years of high-precision photometry (i.e., Q1-Q8). From an initial list of nearly 13,400 threshold crossing events, 480 new host stars are identified from their flux time series as consistent with hosting transiting planets. Potential transit signals are subjected to further analysis using the pixel-level data, which allows background eclipsing binaries to be identified through small image position shifts during transit. We also re-evaluate Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) 1-1609, which were identified early in the mission, using substantially more data to test for background false positives and to find additional multiple systems. Combining the new and previous KOI samples, we provide updated parameters for 2738 Kepler planet candidates distributed across 2017 host stars. From the combined Kepler planet candidates, 472 are new from the Q1-Q8 data examined in this study. The new Kepler planet candidates represent ~40% of the sample with R P ~ 1 R ⊕ and represent ~40% of the low equilibrium temperature (T eq < 300 K) sample. We review the known biases in the current sample of Kepler planet candidates relevant to evaluating planet population statistics with the current Kepler planet candidate sample.

  13. Compositional Constraints on the Best Characterized Rocky Exoplanet, Kepler-36 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie; Deck, Katherine; Lissauer, Jack J.; Carter, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-36 is an extreme planetary system, consisting of two transiting sub-Neptune-size planets that revolve around a sub-giant star with orbital periods of 13.84 and 16.24 days. Mutual gravitational interactions between the two planets perturb the planets' transit times, allowing the planets' masses to be measured. Despite the similarity of their masses and orbital radii, the planets show a stark contrast in their mean densities; the inner planet (Kepler-36 b) is more than eight times as dense as its outer companion planet (Kepler-36 c). We perform a photo-dynamical analysis of the Kepler-36 system based on more than three years of Kepler photometry. With N-body integrations of initial conditions sampled from the photo-dynamical fits, we further refine the properties of the system by ruling out solutions that show large-scale instability within 5 Giga-days. Ultimately, we measure the planets' masses within 4.2% precision, and the planets' radii with 1.8% precision. Kepler-36 b is currently the rocky exoplanet with the most precisely measured mass and radius. Kepler-36 b's mass and radius are consistent with an Earth-like composition, and an iron-enhanced Mercury-like composition is ruled out.

  14. Compositional Constraints on the Best Characterized Rocky Exoplanet, Kepler-36 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, L.; Deck, K.; Lissauer, J. J.; Carter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Kepler-36 is an extreme planetary system, consisting of two transiting sub-Neptune-size planets that revolve around a sub-giant star with orbital periods of 13.84 and 16.24 days. Mutual gravitational interactions between the two planets perturb the planets' transit times, allowing the planets' masses to be measured. Despite the similarity of their masses and orbital radii, the planets show a stark contrast in their mean densities; the inner planet (Kepler-36 b) is more than eight times as dense as its outer companion planet (Kepler-36 c). We perform a photo-dynamical analysis of the Kepler-36 system based on more than three years of Kepler photometry. With N-body integrations of initial conditions sampled from the photo-dynamical fits, we further refine the properties of the system by ruling out solutions that show large scale instability within 5 Giga-days. Ultimately, we measure the planets' masses within 4.2% precision, and the planets' radii with 1.8% precision. Kepler-36 b is currently the rocky exoplanet with the most precisely measured mass and radius. Kepler-36 b's mass and radius are consistent with a Earth-like composition, and an iron-enhanced Mercury-like composition is ruled out.

  15. Compositional Constraints on the Best Characterized Rocky Exoplanet, Kepler-36 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie Anne; Deck, Katherine; Lissauer, Jack; Carter, Joshua

    2015-08-01

    Kepler-36 is an extreme planetary system, consisting of two transiting sub-Neptune-size planets that revolve around a sub-giant star with orbital periods of 13.84 and 16.24 days. Mutual gravitational interactions between the two planets perturb the planets' transit times, allowing the planets' masses to be measured. Despite the similarity of their masses and orbital radii, the planets show a stark contrast in their mean densities; the inner planet (Kepler-36 b) is more than eight times as dense as its outer companion planet (Kepler-36 c). We perform a photo-dynamical analysis of the Kepler-36 system based on more than three years of Kepler photometry. With N-body integrations of initial conditions sampled from the photo-dynamical fits, we further refine the properties of the system by ruling out solutions that show large scale instability within 5 Giga-days. Ultimately, we measure the planets' masses within 4.2% precision, and the planets' radii with 1.8% precision. Kepler-36 b is currently the rocky exoplanet with the most precisely measured mass and radius. Kepler-36 b’s mass and radius are consistent with a Earth-like composition, and an iron-enhanced Mercury-like composition is ruled out.

  16. Compositional Constraints on the Best-Characterized Rocky Exoplanet, Kepler-36 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rogers, Leslie; Deck, Katherine M.; Carter, Joshua A.

    2014-11-01

    Kepler-36 is an extreme planetary system, consisting of two transiting sub-Neptune-size planets orbiting around a sub-giant star with periods of 13.84 and 16.24 days. Mutual gravitational interactions between the two planets perturb the planets' transit times, allowing the planets' masses to be measured. Despite the similarity of their masses and orbital radii, the planets show a stark contrast in their mean densities: The inner planet (Kepler-36 b) is more than eight times as dense as its outer companion planet (Kepler-36 c). We perform a photo-dynamical analysis of the Kepler-36 system based on more than three years of Kepler photometry. With N-body integrations of initial conditions sampled from the photo-dynamical fits, we further refine the properties of the system by ruling out solutions that show large scale instability within 5 billion days. Ultimately, we measure the planets' masses with 4.2% precision and the planets' radii with 1.8% precision. Kepler-36 b is the rocky exoplanet with the most precisely measured mass and radius. Kepler-36 b's mass and radius are consistent with an Earth-like composition, whereas an iron-enhanced Mercury-likecomposition is ruled out.

  17. Rotation Periods of Wide Binaries in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a search of proper motion catalogs for common proper motion stars in the field of the Kepler spacecraft I identified 93 likely binary systems. A comparison of their rotation periods is a test of the gyrochronology concept. To find their periods I calculated the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Kepler mission photometry for each star. In most systems for which good periods can be found, the cooler star has a longer period than the hotter component, in general agreement with models. However, there is a wide range in the gradients of lines connecting binary pairs in a period–color diagram. Furthermore, near the solar color, only a few stars have longer periods than the Sun, suggesting that they, and their cooler companions, are not much older than the Sun. In addition, there is an apparent gap at intermediate periods in the period distribution of the late K and early M stars. Either star formation in this direction has been variable, or stars evolve in period at a non-uniform rate, or some stars evolve more rapidly than others at the same mass. Finally, using the ACF as a measure of the activity level, I found that while the F, G, and early K stars become less active as their periods increase, there is no correlation between period and activity for the mid K to early M stars.

  18. Exploring exoplanet populations with NASA’s Kepler Mission

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Natalie M.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a function of size, orbital period, star type, and insolation flux. The mission has made significant progress toward achieving that goal. Over 3,500 transiting exoplanets have been identified from the analysis of the first 3 y of data, 100 planets of which are in the habitable zone. The catalog has a high reliability rate (85–90% averaged over the period/radius plane), which is improving as follow-up observations continue. Dynamical (e.g., velocimetry and transit timing) and statistical methods have confirmed and characterized hundreds of planets over a large range of sizes and compositions for both single- and multiple-star systems. Population studies suggest that planets abound in our galaxy and that small planets are particularly frequent. Here, I report on the progress Kepler has made measuring the prevalence of exoplanets orbiting within one astronomical unit of their host stars in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s long-term goal of finding habitable environments beyond the solar system. PMID:25049406

  19. Analyses of the Variability Asymmetry of Kepler AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Jun-Xian

    2015-05-01

    The high-quality light curves from the Kepler space telescope make it possible to analyze the optical variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with unprecedented time resolution. Studying the asymmetry in variations could provide independent constraints on physical models for AGN variability. In this paper, we use Kepler observations of 19 sources to perform analyses of the variability asymmetry of AGNs. We apply smoothing correction to light curves to deduct their bias toward high-frequency variability asymmetry caused by long-term variations that have been poorly sampled due to the limited length of light curves. A parameter β based on structure functions is introduced to quantitively describe the asymmetry and its uncertainty is measured using extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Individual sources show no evidence of asymmetry at timescales of 1˜ 20 days and there is no general trend toward positive or negative asymmetry over the whole sample. Stacking the data from all 19 AGNs, we derive an averaged \\bar{β } of 0.00 ± 0.03 and -0.02 ± 0.04 over timescales of 1 ˜ 5 days and 5 ˜ 20 days, respectively, which are statistically consistent with zero. Quasars and Seyfert galaxies show similar asymmetry parameters. Our results indicate that short-term optical variations in AGNs are highly symmetric.

  20. Confirming sub-Neptunian Transiting Exoplanets with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission, launched in March 2009, uses transit photometry to detect and characterize exoplanets with the objective of determining the frequency of earth-size planets in the habitable zone. The instrument is a wide field-of-view (115 square degrees) photometer comprised of a 0.95-meter effective aperture Schmidt telescope feeding an array of 42 CCDs that continuously and simultaneously monitors the brightness of up to 170,000 stars. In January, 2010, the team announced its first 5 planet discoveries identified in the first 43 days of data and confirmed by radial velocity follow-up. The "first five" are all short-period giant planets, the smallest being comparable in size to Neptune. Collectively, they are similar to the sample of transiting exoplanets that have been identified to date, the roster of which currently hovers around 100. In August 2010, an additional two planets, each orbiting the star Kepler-9, were confirmed by a combination of radial velocity and transit timing measurements. A third, smaller planet in the same system was validated stastistically by probing the parameter space for potential false-positives. Throughout 2010, a concerted effort was made to push radial velocity confirmation down toward the smaller planets. Recent progress on our efforts to confirm such candidates is discussed.