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Sample records for 16o induced reactions

  1. Investigation of the role of break-up processes on the fusion of {sup 16}O induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Golda, K. S.; Kumar, Rakesh; Sinha, A. K.

    2009-07-15

    An experiment was carried out to explore heavy ion incomplete fusion reaction dynamics, within the framework of the break-up fusion model, at energies near and above the Coulomb barrier. Excitation functions for several radionuclides produced via xn, pxn, and {alpha}xn channels were measured in the {sup 16}O+{sup 181}Ta system at energies of {approx_equal}76-100 MeV. The experimental excitation functions were compared with those calculated using the theoretical model code PACE4. It was observed that excitation functions of xn/pxn channels are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. However, a significant enhancement in the measured excitation functions of {alpha}-emitting channels was observed and attributed to the incomplete fusion processes. The incomplete fusion fraction (F{sub ICF}) that gives the relative importance of complete and incomplete fusion processes was found to increase with energy. The results are discussed in terms of {alpha}-cluster structure of the projectile on various fusion reactions.

  2. Systematic study of pre-equilibrium emission at low energies in 12C- and 16O-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Pushendra P.; Singh, Devendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay Raj; Bala, Indu; Kumar, Rakesh; Unnati, Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of pre-equilibrium emission within the heavy-ion fusion process has not been fully characterized. An accurate description of this process is important for understanding the formation of the compound nucleus in fusion reactions. Purpose: We develop a systematic description, based on experimental measurements, of the strength of the pre-equilibrium process in heavy-ion fusion reactions. Method: With a view to study pre-equilibrium emission process, the excitation functions for some neutron emission channels occurring in the fusion of 12C with 128Te and 169Tm, and of 16O with 159Tb,169Tm, and 181Ta, respectively, have been measured at incident energies from near the Coulomb barrier to ≈7 MeV/nucleon. The off-line γ -ray spectrometry-based activation technique has been used for the measurements of excitation functions. The measured excitation functions have been compared with theoretical predictions based on pure statistical model code pace4 and Geometry Dependent Hybrid (GDH)-based code alice-91. The strength of pre-equilibrium emission has also determined from comparison of the experimental excitation functions and the pace4 calculations. Results: The measured excitation functions are satisfactorily reproduced by the pace4 calculations in the energy region up to the peak position. However, at relatively higher energies, the enhancement of experimental cross sections in the tail portion of excitation functions as compared to the theoretical predictions of code pace4 has been observed. The observed deviation may be attributed to the pre-equilibrium emission of particles during the thermalization of the compound nucleus. Further, alice-91 calculations which include PE emission satisfactorily reproduce the experimental data even at higher energies, indicating the significant contribution of pre-equilibrium emissions. Conclusions: Analysis of data clearly indicates that pre-equilibrium emission is an important reaction mechanism even at low

  3. Two-neutron transfer analysis of the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermamatov, M. J.; Cappuzzello, F.; Lubian, J.; Cubero, M.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Ferreira, J. L.; Foti, A.; Garcia, V. N.; Gargano, A.; Lay, J. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santagati, G.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently a quantitative description of the two-neutron transfer reaction 12C(18O,16O)14C was performed and the measured cross sections were successfully reproduced [M. Cavallaro et al., Phys. Rev. C 88, 054601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.054601]. This task was accomplished by combining nuclear structure calculations of spectroscopic amplitudes and a full quantum description of the reaction mechanism. Verification of such a theoretical approach to other heavy nuclear systems is mandatory in order to use (18O,16O ) reactions to assess pair configurations in nuclear states. In this work we apply this methodology to the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction at 84 MeV. Experimental angular distributions for the two-neutron transfer to the ground state and 21+ state of 18O were obtained using the MAGNEX spectrometer at INFN-LNS. The roles of one- and two-step processes are analyzed under the exact finite range coupled reaction channel and the second order distorted wave Born approximation. We conclude that the one-step transfer mechanism is dominant in this system.

  4. Indirect Study of the 16O+16O Fusion Reaction Toward Stellar Energies by the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Burtebayev, N.; Aimaganbetov, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Igamov, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kiss, G.; Kliczewski, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Piasecki, E.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Trzcińska, A.; Tumino, A.; Urkinbayev, A.

    2016-05-01

    The 16O+16O fusion reaction is important in terms of the explosive oxygen burning process during late evolution stage of massive stars as well as understanding of the mechanism of low-energy heavy-ion fusion reactions. We aim to determine the excitation function for the most major exit channels, α+28Si and p+31P, toward stellar energies indirectly by the Trojan Horse Method via the 16O(20Ne, α28Si)α and 16O(20Ne, p31P)α three-body reactions. We report preliminary results involving reaction identification, and determination of the momentum distribution of α-16O intercluster motion in the projectile 20Ne nucleus.

  5. {gamma}-ray production by proton and {alpha}-particle induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Belhout, A.; Kiener, J.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Fitoussi, C.; Gounelle, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Sereville, N. de; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Chabot, M.; Hammache, F.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.

    2007-09-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections for proton and {alpha}-particle interactions with {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe have been measured in the energy range 5-25 MeV with proton beams and 5-40 MeV with {alpha}-particle beams. Isotopically pure foils of {sup 24}Mg and foils of natural isotopical composition of C, MgO, and Fe have been used. {gamma}-ray angular distributions were obtained with five high-purity Ge detectors with bismuth germanate Compton shields placed at angles of 45 deg. to 157.5 deg. Cross sections for more than 50 different {gamma}-ray transitions were extracted, and for many of them no data have been published before. Comparison of present data with data available in the literature shows mostly good to excellent agreement. In addition to the production cross sections, high-statistics, low-background line shapes of the 4.438 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma} ray from inelastic scattering off {sup 12}C and spallation of {sup 16}O were obtained. Comparison with nuclear reaction calculations shows that these data place interesting constraints on nuclear reaction models.

  6. Excitation of the dynamical dipole in the charge asymmetric reaction 16O + 116Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, A.; Wieland, O.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giussani, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Moroni, A.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Di Toro, M.; Rizzo, C.; Colonna, M.; Baran, V.

    2009-08-01

    The γ-ray emission from the dynamical dipole formed in heavy-ion collisions during the process leading to fusion was measured for the N/Z asymmetric reaction 16O + 116Sn at beam energies of 8.1 and 15.6 MeV/nucleon. High-energy γ-rays and charged particles were measured in coincidence with the heavy recoiling residual nuclei. The data are compared with those from the N/Z symmetric reaction 64Ni + 68Zn at bombarding energies of 4.7 and 7.8 MeV/nucleon, leading to the same CN with the same excitation energies as calculated from kinematics. The measured yield of the high-energy γ-rays from the 16O-induced reaction is found to exceed that of the thermalized CN and the excess yield increases with bombarding energy. The data are in rather good agreement with the predictions for the dynamical dipole emission based on the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov model. In addition, a comparison with existing data in the same mass region is performed to extract information on the dipole moment dependence.

  7. STUDY OP THE 12C(α, γ)16O REACTION BY BREAKUP OF A 16O -BEAM AT 100 MeV/A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Aguer, P.; Angulo-Perez, C.; Bogaert, G.; Coc, A.; Disdier, D.; Ichihara, T.; Kraus, L.; Lefebvre, A.; Linck, I.; Mittig, W.; Motobayashi, T.; Oliveira, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Stephan, C.; Thibaud, J. P.

    We present some preliminary calculations on cross sections for the breakup of 16O around 100 MeV/A with emphasis on the effect of nuclear breakup on the angular distributions. Underlying the results of these calculations, the possibilities and problems of extracting the astrophysical S-factor for the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction at very low energies are discussed. Some considerations on the experimental conditions for a 16O breakup experiment aiming at this astrophysical information, are given.

  8. New determination of 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulebsir, N.

    2015-12-01

    The reaction 12C(α,γ)16O was investigated through the direct α-transfer reaction (7Li,t) at 28 and 34 MeV incident energies. We determined the reduced α-widths of the sub-threshold 2+ and 1- states of 16O from the DWBA analysis of the transfer reaction 12C(7Li,t)16O performed at two incident energies. The obtained result for the 2+ and 1- sub-threshold resonances as introduced in the R-matrix fitting of radiative capture and elastic-scattering data to determine the E2 and E1 S-factor from 0.01MeV to 4.2MeV in the center-of-mass energy. After determining the astrophysic factor of 12C(α,γ)16O S(E) with Pierre Descouvement code, I determined numerically the new reaction rate of this reaction at a different stellar temperature (0.06 Gk-2 GK). The 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate at T9 = 0.2 is [7.21-2.25+2.15] × 10-15 cm3 s-1 mol-1. Some comparisons and discussions about our new 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate are presented. The agreements of the reaction rate below T9 = 2 between our results and with those proposed by NACRE indicate that our results are reliable, and they could be included in the astrophysical reaction rate network.

  9. Measurement of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction at TRIAC

    SciTech Connect

    Makii, H.; Miyatake, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Imai, N.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Hirayama, Y.; Jeong, S. C.; Shima, T.; Nishinaka, I.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishio, K.; Chiba, S.

    2012-11-12

    We have measured the {gamma}-ray angular distribution of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction at TRIAC (Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex) to accurately determine the E1 and E2 cross sections. In this experiment, we used high efficiency anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometers to detect a {gamma}-ray from the reaction with large S/N ratio, intense pulsed {alpha}-beams to discriminate true event from background events due to neutrons from {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction with a time-of-flight (TOF) method. We succeeded in removing a background events due to neutrons and clearly detected {gamma}-ray from the {sup 12}C({alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction with high statistics.

  10. Multichannel study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O and {sup 16}O(n,{gamma}){sup 17}O reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, M.; Descouvemont, P.

    2005-07-01

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is investigated in a microscopic two-cluster model with an effective interaction recently developed for transfer reactions. The wave functions are defined in the generator coordinate method. The basis includes all {sup 13}C+{alpha} and {sup 16}O+n channels with {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O described in the p shell. Particle-hole excitations in the sd shell are also taken into account in order to include the {sup 16}O(3{sup -})+n channel. The {sup 17}O spectroscopy is in good agreement with experiment. In particular, the width of the astrophysically relevant 1/2{sub 2}{sup +} state is well reproduced ({gamma}=121 keV as compared to the experimental value {gamma}=124{+-}12 keV). The calculation of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O S factor shows the importance of the 3/2{sub 3}{sup +} resonance, and provides S(0.2 MeV)=2.1x10{sup 6} MeV b, slightly lower than the NACRE recommended value (2.5x10{sup 6} MeV b). The same model is applied to the {sup 16}O(n,{gamma}){sup 17}O radiative-capture reaction at thermal and astrophysical energies.

  11. Indirect study of 12C(α,γ)16O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Oulebsir, N.; Roussel, P.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Bouda, A.; Descouvemont, P.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Tatischeff, V.

    2016-01-01

    The radiative capture reaction 12C(α,γ)16O plays an important role in helium burning in massive stars and their subsequent evolution [1]. However, despite various experimental studies, the cross section of this reaction at stellar energies remains highly uncertain. The extrapolation down to stellar energy (Ecm˜300 keV) of the measured cross sections at higher energies is made difficult by the overlap of various contributions of which some are badly known such as that of the 2+ (Ex=6.92 MeV) and 1- (Ex=7.12 MeV) sub-threshold states of 16O. Hence, to further investigate the contribution of these two-subthreshold resonances to the 12C(α,γ)16O cross section, a new determination of their a-reduced widths and so their a- spectroscopic-factors was performed using 12C(7Li,t)16O transfer reaction measurements at two incident energies and a detailed DWBA analysis of the data [2]. The measured and calculated differential cross sections are presented as well as the obtained spectroscopic factors and the a- reduced widths as well as the assymptotic normalization constants (ANC) for the 2+ and 1- subthreshold states. Finally, the results obtained from the R-matrix calculations of the 12C(α,γ)16O cross section using our obtained a-reduced widths for the two sub-threshold resonances are presented and discussed.

  12. Two-neutron stripping in ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) and (t,p) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Garcia, V. N.

    2014-11-11

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reactions has been investigated at 84 MeV incident energy. The charged ejectiles produced in the reaction have been momentum analyzed and identified by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Q-value spectra have been extracted with an energy resolution of 160 keV (Full Width at Half Maximum) and several known bound and resonant states of {sup 14}C have been identified up to 15 MeV. In particular, excited states with dominant 2p - 4h configuration are the most populated. The absolute values of the cross sections have been extracted showing a striking similarity with those measured for the same transitions by (t,p) reactions. This indicates that the effect of the {sup 16}O core is negligible in the reaction mechanism.

  13. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  14. The ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) reaction as a probe for nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cappuzzello, F.; Bondì, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Linares, R.

    2014-11-11

    The response of nuclei to the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been systematically studied at the Catania INFN-LNS laboratory. The experiments were performed using several solid targets from light ({sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B, {sup 12,13}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si) to heavy ones ({sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 208}Pb). The {sup 16}O ejectiles were detected at forward angles by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Exploiting the large momentum acceptance (−10%, +14%) and solid angle (50 msr) of the spectrometer, energy spectra were obtained with a relevant yield up to about 20 MeV excitation energy. The application of the powerful trajectory reconstruction technique did allow to get energy spectra with energy resolution of about 150 keV and angular distributions with angular resolution better than 0.3°. A common feature observed with light nuclei is the appearance of unknown resonant structures at high excitation energy. The strong population of these latter together with the measured width can reveal the excitation of a collective mode connected with the transfer of a pair.

  15. Improved investigation of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R.; Hammer, J. W.; Jaeger, M.; Joos, K.-D.; Mayer, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Paradellis, Th.; Souliotis, G.; Staudt, G.

    2000-07-01

    The capture reaction 12C(α,γ)16O has been investigated in the energy range Ec.m.=0.96-2.6 MeV at the DYNAMITRON facility of the Institut für Strahlenphysik with an intense He+-beam of up to 480 μA. A setup of 3-4 HPGe detectors with active suppression on a turnable table has been used for the measurement of angular distributions, which is crucial to obtain information about E1 and E2 contributions.

  16. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  17. A study of the {sup 16}O (e, e'p) reaction at deep missing energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nilanga Liyanage

    1999-02-01

    The {sup 16}O(e,e'p) reaction was studied in the first physics experiment performed at Jefferson lab Hall A. In the quasielastic region cross sections were measured for both quasi parallel and perpendicular kinematics at q = 1000 MeV and {omega} = 445 MeV. From the data acquired in quasi parallel kinematics longitudinal and transverse response functions R{sub L} and R{sub T} were separated for E{sub miss} < 60 MeV. The perpendicular kinematics data were used to extract R{sub LT}, R{sub T}, and R{sub L } + V{sub TT}/V{sub L}R{sub TT} response functions for the same E{sub miss} range and for P{sub miss} < 310 MeV c. The {sub 16}O( e, e'p) cross section was measured in the dip region at q = 1026 MeV and {omega} = 586 MeV for 10 MeV < E{sub miss} < 320 MeV. This thesis presents the results for the missing energy continuum ( E{sub miss}>25 MeV) from this experiment.

  18. 12C\\(α,γ\\)16O: The Key Reaction in Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R.; Jaeger, M.; Mayer, A.; Hammer, J. W.; Staudt, G.; Harissopulos, S.; Paradellis, T.

    2001-04-01

    The angular distributions of γ rays from the 12C\\(α,γ\\)16O reaction have been measured at 20 energy points in the energy range Ecm = 0.95 to 2.8 MeV. The sensitivity of the present experiment compared to previous direct investigations was raised by 1-2 orders of magnitude, by using an array of highly efficient ( 100%) Ge detectors shielded actively with BGOs, as well as high beam currents of up to 500 μA that were provided by the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. The SE1 and SE2 factors deduced from the γ angular distributions have been extrapolated to the range of helium burning temperatures applying the R-matrix method, which yielded S300E1 = \\(76+/-20\\) keV b and S300E2 = \\(85+/-30\\) keV b.

  19. 12C(alpha,gamma)16O: the key reaction in stellar nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R; Jaeger, M; Mayer, A; Hammer, J W; Staudt, G; Harissopulos, S; Paradellis, T

    2001-04-01

    The angular distributions of gamma rays from the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction have been measured at 20 energy points in the energy range E(cm) = 0.95 to 2.8 MeV. The sensitivity of the present experiment compared to previous direct investigations was raised by 1-2 orders of magnitude, by using an array of highly efficient ( 100%) Ge detectors shielded actively with BGOs, as well as high beam currents of up to 500 microA that were provided by the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. The S(E1) and S(E2) factors deduced from the gamma angular distributions have been extrapolated to the range of helium burning temperatures applying the R-matrix method, which yielded S(300)(E1) = (76+/-20) keV b and S(300)(E2) = (85+/-30) keV b.

  20. Evidence of complete fusion in the subbarrier {sup 16}O+{sup 238}U reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K. Ikezoe, H.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Mitsuoka, S.; Tsuruta, K.; Satou, K.; Lin, C. J.; Ohsawa, T.

    2006-08-15

    Evaporation residue cross sections in the {sup 16}O+{sup 238}U reaction were measured for the energy range from above-to extreme subbarrier. We used a He-gas-jet system to transport the fusion products, and the {alpha} decay of the evaporation residues was measured by using a rotating wheel system. The measured cross sections for {sup 248,249,250}Fm are reproduced by a statistical model calculation, for which partial cross sections are calculated by a coupled-channel model taking into account the prolate deformation of {sup 238}U. We conclude that complete fusion is the main process in the subbarrier energy region, and quasifission is not an important channel.

  1. Comment on 'Low-energy cross sections in the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction'

    SciTech Connect

    Descouvemont, P.; Dufour, M.

    2010-02-15

    We show that the E1 and E2 S factors recommended by Katsuma [Phys. Rev. C 78, 034606 (2008)] do not include well-known constraints and that the model is inappropriate for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction.

  2. Actinides produced by /sup 12/C + /sup 242/Pu and /sup 16/O + /sup 238/U reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, N.; Usuda, S.; Ichikawa, S.; Suzuki, T.; Magara, M.; Okashita, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Horiguchi, T.; Iwata, Y.; Shibata, S.; and others

    1986-09-01

    The cross sections for /sup 250/Fm, /sup 244-246/Cf, /sup 242-244/Cm, and /sup 242/Am/sup g-italic/ produced by the /sup 12/C+ /sup 242/Pu and the /sup 16/O+ /sup 238/U reactions leading to the same compound nucleus of /sup 254/Fm have been measured by using radiochemical methods. The excitation functions show that the difference between the /sup 12/C+ /sup 242/Pu and the /sup 16/O+ /sup 238/U reactions can be attributed mainly to the Coulomb barriers. Our results were compared with others reported previously for /sup 22/Ne+ /sup 232/Th, /sup 12/C+ /sup 238/U, /sup 12/C+ /sup 240,241/Pu, /sup 13/C+ /sup 241/Pu, /sup 16/O+ /sup 233/U, and /sup 16/O+ /sup 242/Pu reaction systems, and support a mechanism involving transfer of ..cap alpha..-particle clusters (C,Be,He) from projectile to target for the production of Cf and Cm isotopes.

  3. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Determination of the stellar reaction rate for 12C(α, γ)16O: using a new expression with the reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Xu, Wang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Cai, Xiang-Zhou; Chen, Jin-Gen; Fan, Gong-Tao; Fan, Guang-Wei; Guo, Wei; Luo, Wen; Pan, Qiang-Yan; Shen, Wen-Qing; Yang, Li-Feng

    2009-04-01

    The astrophysical reaction rate of 12C(α, γ)16O plays a key role in massive star evolution. However, this reaction rate and its uncertainties have not been well determined yet, especially at T9 = 0.2. The existing results even disagree with each other to a certain extent. In this paper, the E1, E2 and total (E1+E2) 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rates are calculated in the temperature range from T9 = 0.3 to 2 according to all the available cross section data. A new analytic expression of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate is brought forward based on the reaction mechanism. In this expression, each part embodies the underlying physics of the reaction. Unlike previous works, some physical parameters are chosen from experimental results directly, instead of all the parameters obtained from fitting. These parameters in the new expression, with their 3σ fit errors, are obtained from fit to our calculated reaction rate from T9 = 0.3 to 2. Using the fit results, the analytic expression of 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate is extrapolated down to T9 = 0.05 based on the underlying physics. The 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate at T9 = 0.2 is (8.78 ± 1.52) × 1015 cm's-1 mol-1. Some comparisons and discussions about our new 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate are presented, and the contributions of the reaction rate correspond to the different part of reaction mechanism are given. The agreements of the reaction rate below T9 = 2 between our results and previous works indicate that our results are reliable, and they could be included in the astrophysical reaction rate network. Furthermore, we believe our method to investigate the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate is reasonable, and this method can also be employed to study the reaction rate of other astrophysical reactions. Finally, a new constraint of the supernovae production factor of some isotopes are illustrated according to our 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rates.

  4. Direct measurement of the 4He (12C, 16O) γ reaction cross section near stellar energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagara, Kenshi

    2014-09-01

    The 12C+4He-->16O + γ reaction is one of the key reactions in stellar He-burning, but its total cross section at stellar energy (Ecm = 0.3 MeV) has not been measured yet, in spite of many experiments made in the world for about a half century. At Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory (KUTL), we have been making direct measurement of the 4He (12C, 16O) γ total cross section below Ecm = 2.4 MeV for about 20 years. We have measured the total cross section at Ecm = 2.4, 1.5 and 1.2 MeV. Now we are preparing to measure the cross section at 1.0 MeV. The direct measurement was made from Ecm = 5 MeV down to 1.9 MeV at Ruhr University, Bochum. We use a pulsed 12C beam and a windowless 4He target, and detect all the 16O recoils in a charge state. A usually continuum 12C beam from our tandem accelerator is pulsed by a pre-buncher, a main buncher, and a beam chopper. Our tandem accelerator was designed to be used at the acceleration voltage of 6-10 MV. For the 4He (12C, 16O) γ experiment we need to use it at 1.3-1.8 MV where beam transmission is very low, then we have invented an acceleration-deceleration method for the tandem accelerator. We have developed a blow-in windowless He target based on an original idea. To separate 16O recoils from the 12C beam, we developed a recoil-mass separator. To reject 12C backgrounds, we developed a long-time chopper, and an ionization chamber. Now, we are preparing to measure time-of-flight of 16O recoils and 12C backgrounds. Many original instruments and the experimental results will be presented. Finally we discuss what are necessary for future direct measurement of the 4He (12C, 16O) γ total cross section below 1.0 MeV, down to 0.7 MeV. A dynamitron accelerator and hard-working researchers may be inevitable. The 12C+4He-->16O + γ reaction is one of the key reactions in stellar He-burning, but its total cross section at stellar energy (Ecm = 0.3 MeV) has not been measured yet, in spite of many experiments made in the world

  5. Low-energy cross sections in the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuma, M.

    2008-09-15

    The low-energy {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is analyzed with the potential model. The potentials are chosen from the deep potential describing the {alpha}-particle nuclear rainbow phenomena at high energies. Below E{sub c.m.}=1 MeV, the cross section is found to be dominated by the E2 transition to the ground state of {sup 16}O. No enhancement of the E1 component at low energies is predicted. The extrapolated astrophysical S-factors at E{sub c.m.}=0.3 MeV are S{sub E2}=150 keV b and S{sub E1}=3 keV b.

  6. {sup 16}O resonances near 4α threshold through {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-11-11

    Several narrow alpha resonant {sup 16}O states were detected through the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  7. Determination of astrophysical thermonuclear rates with a bubble chamber: The 12C(αγ)16O reaction case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGiovine, B.; Grames, J.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Meekins, D.; Poelker, M.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Suleiman, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2013-11-01

    The 12C(αγ)16O reaction rate is considered one of the most important unknown parameters in the physics of structure and evolution of massive stars. While extensive experimental campaigns have been performed trying to improve the quality of the measurements, the rate still holds very large uncertainties. Here we discuss a new experimantal scheme to measure the cross section of this reaction with a bubble chamber and a bremsstrahlung beam. The main advantage of the technique is a gain in the luminosity of several orders of magnitude when compared to other ongoing experiments.

  8. Measurement of the Cascade Transition via the First Excited State of {sup 16}O in the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O Reaction, and Its S Factor in Stellar Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, C.; Brune, C. R.; Buchmann, L.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Caggiano, J.; Laird, A.; Li, ZH.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Hannes, W. R.; Ruiz, C.; D'Auria, J.; Lamey, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wrede, C.; Chen, A. A.; Pearson, J.; Liu, WP.

    2006-12-15

    Radiative {alpha}-particle capture into the first excited, J{sup {pi}}=0{sup +} state of {sup 16}O at 6.049 MeV excitation energy has rarely been discussed as contributing to the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction cross section due to experimental difficulties in observing this transition. We report here measurements of this radiative capture in {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O for center-of-mass energies of E=2.22 MeV to 5.42 MeV at the DRAGON recoil separator. To determine cross sections, the acceptance of the recoil separator has been simulated in GEANT as well as measured directly. The transition strength between resonances has been identified in R-matrix fits as resulting both from E2 contributions as well as E1 radiative capture. Details of the extrapolation of the total cross section to low energies are then discussed [S{sub 6.0}(300)=25{sub -15}{sup +16} keV b] showing that this transition is likely the most important cascade contribution for {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O.

  9. Complete and incomplete fusion reactions in the {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm system: Excitation functions and recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Sharma, B.K.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K.S.

    2004-10-01

    With the view to study complete and incomplete fusion in heavy ion induced reactions, experiments have been carried out for measuring excitation functions for several reactions in the system {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm at energies near the Coulomb barrier to well above it, using an activation technique. The measured excitation functions have been compared with those calculated theoretically using three different computer codes viz., ALICE-91, CASCADE and PACE2. The enhancement of experimentally measured cross sections for alpha emission channels over their theoretical prediction has been attributed to the fact that these residues are formed not only by complete fusion but also through incomplete fusion. In order to separate out the relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion, the recoil range distributions of eight residues produced in the interaction of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm at {approx_equal}87 MeV have been measured. The recoil range distributions indicate significant contributions from incomplete fusion at {approx_equal}87 MeV for some of the channels.

  10. Direct Total Cross Section Measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne Reaction at Ec.m. = 2.26 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Ulrike; Brown, James R.; Buchmann, Lothar R.; Carmona-Gallardo, Mariano; Erikson, Luke E.; Fallis, Jennifer S.; Greife, Uwe; Hutcheon, Dave; Ottewell, Dave; Ruiz, Chris; Sjue, Sky; Vockenhuber, Cristof

    2011-08-23

    In stellar helium burning, (16)O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne at E(c.m.) = 2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  11. RCNP E398 {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(p,p’) experiment: Measurement of the γ-ray emission probability from giant resonances in relation to {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(ν,ν’) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, I.; Yamada, Y.; Mori, T.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Aoi, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Yamamoto, T.; Akimune, H.

    2015-05-15

    We propose to measure the γ-ray emission probability from excited states above 5 MeV including giant resonance of {sup 16}O and {sup 12}C as a function of excitation energy in 1-MeV step. Here, we measure both the excitation energy (E{sub x}=5-30MeV) at the forward scattering angles (0°-3°) of the {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C (p, p’) reaction using Grand-Raiden Spectrometer and the energy of γ-rays (E{sub γ}) using an array of NaI(Tl) counters. The purpose of the experiment is to provide the basic and important information not only for the γ-ray production from primary neutral-current neutrino-oxygen (-carbon) interactions but also for that from the secondary hadronic (neutron-oxygen and -carbon) interactions.

  12. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  13. Fission fragment angular distributions in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Pujari, P. K.; Goswami, A.; Ramachandran, K.

    2009-06-15

    Fission fragment angular distributions have been measured in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb to investigate the contribution from noncompound nucleus fission. Parameters for statistical model calculations were fixed using fission cross section data in the {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os reaction. Experimental anisotropies were in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the statistical saddle point model for both reactions. The present results are also consistent with those of mass distribution studies in the fission of {sup 202}Po, formed in the reactions with varying entrance channel mass asymmetry. However, the present studies do not show a large fusion hindrance as reported in the pre-actinide region based on the measurement of evaporation residue cross section.

  14. Reaction rate of the 13C(α,n)16O neutron source using the ANC of the -3 keV resonance measured with the THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2016-01-01

    The s-process is responsible of the synthesis of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208. It consists in a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays, since the neutron accretion rate is slower than the β-decay rate. Such small neutron flux is supplied by the 13C(α,n)16O reaction. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140-230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. In this work, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13C(6Li,n16O)d quasi-free reaction to extract the 6.356 MeV level resonance parameters, in particular the asymptotic normalization coefficient . A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to , slightly larger than the values in the literature. However, the deduced 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate is in agreement with most results in the literature at ˜ 108 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to our innovative approach merging together ANC and THM.

  15. The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction as a neutron source for the s-process in AGB low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M.R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for producing the main component of the s-process in low mass stars. In this paper we focus our attention on two of the main open problems concerning its operation as a driver for the slow neutron captures. Recently, a new measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction rate was performed via the Trojan Horse Method greatly increasing the accuracy. Contemporarily, on the modelling side, magnetic mechanisms were suggested to justify the production of the {sup 13}C pocket, thus putting the s-process in stars on safe physical ground. These inputs allow us to reproduce satisfactorily the solar distribution of elements.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using 16O /18O labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Tian, Changhai; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yongxiang; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Sharma, Seema; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Jialin; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2012-04-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) hold great promise for regenerative medicine as well as for investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. Understanding of key intracellular signaling pathways and protein targets that control development of iPSC from somatic cells is essential for designing new approaches to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here we report the development and application of an integrated quantitative proteomics platform for investigating differences in protein expressions between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and MEF-derived iPSC. This platform consists of 16O/18O labeling, multidimensional peptide separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and data analysis with UNiquant software. Using this platform a total of 2,481 proteins were identified and quantified from the 16O/18O-labeled MEF-iPSC proteome mixtures with a false discovery rate of 0.01. Among them, 218 proteins were significantly upregulated, while 247 proteins were significantly downregulated in iPSC compared to MEF. Many nuclear proteins, including Hdac1, Dnmt1, Pcna, Ccnd1, Smarcc1, and subunits in DNA replication and RNA polymerase II complex were found to be enhanced in iPSC. Protein network analysis revealed that Pcna functions as a hub orchestrating complicated mechanisms including DNA replication, epigenetic inheritance (Dnmt1) and chromatin remodeling (Smarcc1) to reprogram MEF and maintain stemness of iPSC.

  17. Quantum dynamics of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Guillon, G.; Honvault, P.

    2015-05-07

    We present quantum dynamical investigations of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions using a time-independent quantum mechanical method and an accurate global potential energy surface of ozone [Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)]. Initial state-selected integral cross sections, rate constants, and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are obtained and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical results. The computed thermal rate constants for the oxygen exchange reactions exhibit a negative temperature dependence, as found experimentally. They are in better agreement with the experiments than the previous studies on the same reactions.

  18. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  19. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 240}U using the ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T.; Asai, M.; Makishima, A.; Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M.; Hossain, I.

    2005-08-01

    In the two-neutron-transfer reaction of a 200-MeV {sup 18}O beam with a {sup 238}U target, deexcitation {gamma} rays in a neutron-rich nucleus of {sup 240}U were measured. The {gamma} rays in {sup 240}U were identified by taking coincidence with {sup 16}O, using Si {delta}E-E detectors. The kinetic energies of {sup 16}O particles allowed us to select the excitation energies of {sup 240}U below the neutron separation energy. The ground-state band and the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} octupole band of {sup 240}U were established up to 12{sup +} and 9{sup -}, respectively. The octupole-band head of {sup 240}U is about a hundred keV higher than those of {sup 236,238}U, suggesting that a secondary maximum of octupole correlations exists at N=144-146 in U isotopes.

  20. Determination of astrophysical thermonuclear rates with a bubble chamber: The {sup 12}C(αγ){sup 16}O reaction case

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Grames, J.; Meekins, D.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.; Robinson, A.; Ugalde, C.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2013-11-07

    The {sup 12}C(αγ){sup 16}O reaction rate is considered one of the most important unknown parameters in the physics of structure and evolution of massive stars. While extensive experimental campaigns have been performed trying to improve the quality of the measurements, the rate still holds very large uncertainties. Here we discuss a new experimantal scheme to measure the cross section of this reaction with a bubble chamber and a bremsstrahlung beam. The main advantage of the technique is a gain in the luminosity of several orders of magnitude when compared to other ongoing experiments.

  1. Reaction mechanism in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system: Measurements and analysis of excitation functions and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H. D.

    2007-06-15

    To study the dynamics of heavy ion fusion reactions in the lower mass region, experiments were carried out to measure the cross sections of radioactive residues produced in the interaction of the {sup 16}O ion with {sup 27}Al target nucleus at 19 different energies in very close intervals covering the energy range from {approx_equal}58 to 94 MeV, using the well-known recoil catcher off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique. The simulation of experimental data was performed using statistical-model-based computer codes, viz., CASCADE, PACE2, and ALICE-91. The analysis of measured excitation functions indicates that these residues are likely to be produced by complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and direct reaction processes. Furthermore, to confirm the contribution of different reaction channels, a complementary experiment was performed that measured the angular distributions of the residues produced in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system at 85 MeV beam energy. The analysis of the results of both experiments indicates that at these energies, the direct reactions compete with complete fusion and incomplete fusion reaction processes.

  2. NEW DETERMINATION OF THE {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O REACTION RATE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Y. J.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Fan, Q. W.; Jin, S. J.; Li, E. T.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Shu, N. C.; Lugaro, M.; Buntain, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Karakas, A. I.; Shi, J. R. E-mail: guobing@ciae.ac.cn; and others

    2012-09-10

    We present a new measurement of the {alpha}-spectroscopic factor (S{sub {alpha}}) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the 6.356 MeV 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O through the {sup 13}C({sup 11}B, {sup 7}Li){sup 17}O transfer reaction and we determine the {alpha}-width of this state. This is believed to have a strong effect on the rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction, the main neutron source for slow neutron captures (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Based on the new width we derive the astrophysical S-factor and the stellar rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction. At a temperature of 100 MK, our rate is roughly two times larger than that by Caughlan and Fowler and two times smaller than that recommended by the NACRE compilation. We use the new rate and different rates available in the literature as input in simulations of AGB stars to study their influence on the abundances of selected s-process elements and isotopic ratios. There are no changes in the final results using the different rates for the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction when the {sup 13}C burns completely in radiative conditions. When the {sup 13}C burns in convective conditions, as in stars of initial mass lower than {approx}2 M{sub Sun} and in post-AGB stars, some changes are to be expected, e.g., of up to 25% for Pb in our models. These variations will have to be carefully analyzed when more accurate stellar mixing models and more precise observational constraints are available.

  3. New Determination of the 13C(α, n)16O Reaction Rate and its Influence on the s-process Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Lugaro, M.; Buntain, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Fan, Q. W.; Jin, S. J.; Karakas, A. I.; Li, E. T.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Shi, J. R.; Shu, N. C.; Wang, B. X.; Wang, Y. B.; Zeng, S.; Liu, W. P.

    2012-09-01

    We present a new measurement of the α-spectroscopic factor (S α) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the 6.356 MeV 1/2+ subthreshold state of 17O through the 13C(11B, 7Li)17O transfer reaction and we determine the α-width of this state. This is believed to have a strong effect on the rate of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction, the main neutron source for slow neutron captures (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Based on the new width we derive the astrophysical S-factor and the stellar rate of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction. At a temperature of 100 MK, our rate is roughly two times larger than that by Caughlan & Fowler and two times smaller than that recommended by the NACRE compilation. We use the new rate and different rates available in the literature as input in simulations of AGB stars to study their influence on the abundances of selected s-process elements and isotopic ratios. There are no changes in the final results using the different rates for the 13C(α, n)16O reaction when the 13C burns completely in radiative conditions. When the 13C burns in convective conditions, as in stars of initial mass lower than ~2 M ⊙ and in post-AGB stars, some changes are to be expected, e.g., of up to 25% for Pb in our models. These variations will have to be carefully analyzed when more accurate stellar mixing models and more precise observational constraints are available.

  4. Effects of α-cluster potentials for the O16+O16 fusion reaction and S factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, G.; Karakoc, M.; Boztosun, I.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2010-02-01

    A joint analysis of the elastic-scattering angular distributions and fusion cross sections together with the S factor for the O16+O16 system near and below the Coulomb barrier is reported. To describe these observables within the framework of the optical model, a comparative study of microscopic α-α double-folding clusters and phenomenological shallow potentials with surface-transparent imaginary parts is performed. Although the phenomenological Woods-Saxon type of shallow real potentials is unable to provide a consistent explanation of these data, the α-α double-folding cluster potential obtained by considering the α-cluster structure of O16 provides a considerable improvement. The α-α double-folding cluster potential also reproduces the normalized resonant energy states of S32 for the N=24 cluster band.

  5. Analysis of Neutron and Singly Charged Particle Multiplicities Induced by Collision of 4.5A GeV/c 16O with Emulsion Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    El-Nagdy, M.S.; Abdel-Halim, S.M.; Nabil Yasin, M.

    2005-03-17

    The analysis of neutron n and singly charged particle Q=1 participated from 16O at 4.5A GeV/c interactions with emulsion nuclei are presented. The average multiplicities of shower particle for n and Q=1 stay more or less constant when compared with analogous data on P-A at similar momentum. The multiplicity distributions as well as the average values of the various secondary particles are studied, discussed and compared with the calculations according cascade evaporation model. The results lead to assume that the n and Q=1 from 16O tend to collide peripherally with target emulsion or in other words to make gentle reactions.

  6. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, D. Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  7. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  8. DEPENDENCE OF s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN MASSIVE STARS ON TRIPLE-ALPHA AND {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O REACTION RATE UNCERTAINTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tur, Clarisse; Austin, Sam M.; Heger, Alexander E-mail: austin@nscl.msu.edu

    2009-09-10

    We have studied the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars to {+-}2{sigma} variations in the rates of the triple-{alpha} and {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O reactions. We simulated the evolution of massive stars from H burning through Fe-core collapse, followed by a supernova explosion. We found that the production factors of s-process nuclides between {sup 58}Fe and {sup 96}Zr change strongly with changes in the He burning reaction rates; using the Lodders solar abundances rather than those of Anders and Grevesse reduces s-process nucleosynthesis; later burning phases beyond core He burning and shell C burning have a significant effect on post-explosive production factors. We also discuss the implications of the uncertainties in the helium burning rates for evidence of a new primary neutron capture process (LEPP) in massive stars.

  9. Study of 16O(12C,α20Ne)α for the investigation of carbon-carbon fusion reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bordeanu, C.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Nita, C.; Pantelica, D.; Petrascu, H.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Szücs, T.; Trache, L.; Tumino, A.; Velisa, G.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-carbon fusion reaction represents a nuclear process of great interest in astrophysics, since the carbon burning is connected with the third phase of massive stars (M > 8 M⊙) evolution. In spite of several experimental works, carbon-carbon cross section has been measured at energy still above the Gamow window moreover data at low energy present big uncertainty. In this paper we report the results about the study of the 16O(12C,α 20Ne)α reaction as a possible three-body process to investigate 12C(12C,α)20Ne at astrophysical energy via Trojan Horse Method (THM). This study represents the first step of a program of experiments aimed to measure the 12C+12C cross section at astrophysical energy using the THM.

  10. The dynamics of the quasielastic 16O(e,e'p) reaction at Q{sup 2} = 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Fissum for the JLAB Hall A Collaboration

    2004-01-01

    The physics program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab commenced in the summer of 1997 with a detailed investigation of the 16O(e,e'p) reaction in quasielastic, constant (q,w) kinematics at Q{sup 2} {approx} 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}, q {approx} 1 GeV/c, and w {approx} 445 MeV. Use of a self-calibrating, self-normalizing, thin-film waterfall target enabled a systematically rigorous measurement. Differential cross-section data for proton knockout were obtained for 0 < Emiss < 120 MeV and 0 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. These results have been used to extract the ALT asymmetry and the RL, RT, RLT, and RL+TT effective response functions. Detailed comparisons of the data with Relativistic Distorted-Wave Impulse Approximation, Relativistic Optical-Model Eikonal Approximation, and Relativistic Multiple-Scattering Glauber Approximation calculations are made. The kinematic consistency of the 1p-shell normalization factors extracted from these data with respect to all available 16O(e,e'p) data is examined. The Q2-dependence of the normalization factors is also discussed.

  11. Direct total cross section measurement of the {sup 16}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 20}Ne reaction at E{sub c.m.}=2.26 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, U.; Greife, U.; Brown, J. R.; Buchmann, L.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Erikson, L.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2011-08-15

    In stellar helium burning, {sup 16}O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne at E{sub c.m.}=2.26 MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  12. (e, e'p) reaction at true quasielastic kinematics in {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Herraiz, J. L.; Udias, J. M.; Weinstein, L.; Fissum, K.; Camsonne, A.; Saha, A.; Cornejo, J. C.; Aniol, K.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2010-04-26

    The reactions {sup 16}O(e,e'p) {sup 15}N, {sup 208}Pb(e,e'p) {sup 207}Tl and {sup 12}C(e,e'p) {sup 11}B were measured in experiments E00-102 and E06-007 performed at JLab (VA, USA) at true quasielastic kinematics (x{sub B} = 1) with constant energy (omega) and momentum (q) transferred over a wide p{sub miss} range. These experiments address several open issues in nuclear structure such as the role of relativity and of long-range correlations in the description of nuclei as well as a possible dependence of the spectroscopic factors on Q{sup 2}. Preliminary experimental results and theoretical predictions from a fully relativistic DWIA model carefully averaged over the experimental acceptances are shown.

  13. Sensitivity of fusion and quasi-elastic barrier distributions of {sub 16}O+{sub 144}Sm reaction on the coupling radius parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Zamrun, Muhammad; Usman, Ida; Variani, Viska Inda; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2014-03-05

    We study the heavy-ion collision at sub-barrier energies of {sub 16}O+{sub 144}Sm system using full order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the sensitivity of fusion and quasi-elastic barrier distributions for this system on the coupling radius parameter. We found that the coupled-channels calculations of the fusion and the quasi-elastic barrier distributions are sensitive to the coupling radius for this reaction in contrast to the fusion and quasi-elastic cross section. Our study indicates that the larger coupling radius, i.e., r{sub coup}=1.20, is required by the experimental quasi-elastic barrier distribution. However, the experimental fusion barrier distribution compulsory the small value, i.e., r{sub coup}=1.06.

  14. Astrophysical reaction rate for the neutron-generator reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O in asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E D; Rogachev, G V; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Baby, L T; Brown, S; Cluff, W T; Crisp, A M; Diffenderfer, E; Goldberg, V Z; Green, B W; Hinners, T; Hoffman, C R; Kemper, K W; Momotyuk, O; Peplowski, P; Pipidis, A; Reynolds, R; Roeder, B T

    2006-11-10

    The reaction 13C(alpha,n) is considered to be the main source of neutrons for the s process in asymptotic giant branch stars. At low energies, the cross section is dominated by the 1/2+ 6.356 MeV subthreshold resonance in (17)O whose contribution at stellar temperatures is uncertain by a factor of 10. In this work, we performed the most precise determination of the low-energy astrophysical S factor using the indirect asymptotic normalization (ANC) technique. The alpha-particle ANC for the subthreshold state has been measured using the sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer reaction ((6)Li,d). Using the determined ANC, we calculated S(0), which turns out to be an order of magnitude smaller than in the nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates.

  15. A proposed direct measurement of cross section at Gamow window for key reaction 19F(p,α) 16O in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars with a planned accelerator in CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, JianJun; Xu, ShiWei; Ma, ShaoBo; Hu, Jun; Zhang, LiYong; Fu, ChangBo; Zhang, NingTao; Lian, Gang; Su, Jun; Li, YunJu; Yan, ShengQuan; Shen, YangPing; Hou, SuQing; Jia, BaoLu; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Guo, Bing; Kubono, Shigeru; Liu, WeiPing

    2016-05-01

    In 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) approved the Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics laboratory (JUNA) project, which aims at direct cross-section measurements of four key stellar nuclear reactions right down to the Gamow windows. In order to solve the observed fluorine overabundances in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, measuring the key 19F(p,α)16O reaction at effective burning energies (i.e., at Gamow window) is established as one of the scientific research sub-projects. The present paper describes this sub-project in details, including motivation, status, experimental setup, yield and background estimation, aboveground test, as well as other relevant reactions.

  16. The possibility of a new resonance of three-body linear chain structure in the reaction 12C+16O at Ec.mapprox-33.5MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjing; P, L. Li; J, J. Kolata; A, Morsad; L, Goetting; R, A. Kryger; S, Dixit; R, Tighe; W, Chune

    1990-05-01

    There is a peak in the excitation function of total cross section of low energy α-particles in the reaction 12C+16O at Ec.m approx33.5MeV. The experimental distribution of α-particle emitted event has been obtained. The result of theoretical calculation roughly agrees with experimental data, gives an orientation where three-body resonances can be expected, and the information on internal structure of three-body linear chain molecule.

  17. Indirect study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction via the {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegriti, M. G.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Vilmay, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Stanoiu, M.

    2008-04-15

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is considered the main neutron source for the s process in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In the Gamow peak, the cross section sensitively depends on the 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O (E{sub x}=6.356 MeV). In this work, we determined the astrophysical S factor through an evaluation of the {alpha} spectroscopic factor and the corresponding asymptotic normalization factor (ANC) of the 6.356 MeV state using the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O at two different incident energies. Our result confirms that the contribution of the 1/2{sup +} state is dominant at astrophysical energies. Our reaction rate at T=0.09 GK is slightly lower than the value adopted in the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates (NACRE), but two times larger than the one obtained in a recent ANC measurement.

  18. Isospin effects on fragmentation in the asymmetric reactions induced by neutron-rich targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arun

    2016-05-01

    To understand the isospin effects in terms of fragment's yield in the asymmetric reactions induced by neutron-rich targets, we perform a theoretical study using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. Simulations are carried out for reactions of 16O+Br80,84,92 and 16O+Ag108,113,122. We envision that fragments's yield in the asymmetric collisions induced by neutron-rich targets is better candidate to study isospin effects via symmetry energy and nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross-sections. Also, pronounced effects of symmetry energy and cross-sections can be found at lower and higher beam energies, respectively.

  19. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  20. Examination of the surrogate ratio method for the determination of the 93Zr(n ,γ )94Zr cross section with Zr,9290(18O,16O)Zr,9492 reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Nishio, K.; Makii, H.; Su, J.; Li, Y. J.; Nishinaka, I.; Hirose, K.; Han, Y. L.; Orlandi, R.; Shen, Y. P.; Guo, B.; Zeng, S.; Lian, G.; Chen, Y. S.; Bai, X. X.; Qiao, L. H.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-07-01

    The relative γ -decay probability ratios of the neutron resonance states in 94Zr and 92Zr populated via two-neutron transfer reactions, 92Zr(18O,16O)94Zr and 90Zr(18O,16O)92Zr , have been measured to test the validity of the surrogate ratio method (SRM) in determining the (n , γ ) reaction cross section. The cross sections of the 93Zr(n ,γ )94Zr reaction are derived from the experimentally obtained ratios and the cross sections of the 91Zr(n ,γ )92Zr reaction in the equivalent neutron energy range of En=0 -8 MeV . The deduced cross sections of 93Zr(n ,γ )94Zr reaction agree with the directly measured ones in the low-energy region, and with the evaluated ENDF/B-VII.1 data at higher energies of En>3 MeV . The agreement supports the concept of the SRM method to indirectly determine the (n ,γ ) reaction cross sections.

  1. In-beam {gamma}-ray study of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 240}U, {sup 246}Pu, and {sup 250}Cm produced by the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T. Shigematsu, S.; Makii, H.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shizuma, T.; Kaneko, J.; Hossain, I.; Toume, H.; Ohara, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Kohno, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2007-08-15

    We have measured deexcitation {gamma} rays in the neutron-rich nuclei of {sup 240}U, {sup 246}Pu, and {sup 250}Cm produced by the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reactions, in coincidence with the {sup 16}O particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. The {gamma} rays in these nuclei were identified by selecting the kinetic energies of {sup 16}O particles, which correspond to the excitation energies in the residual nuclei below the neutron separation energies. The ground-state bands of {sup 240}U, {sup 246}Pu, and {sup 250}Cm were established up to 12{sup +} states and the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup -} octupole band of {sup 240}U was established up to 9{sup -} states. The systematics of the moments of inertia of the ground-state bands for actinide nuclei shows that the deformed subshell closure at N = 152 is sustained for {sub 96}Cm isotopes and that it disappears for {sub 94}Pu isotopes.

  2. High resolution study of isovector negative parity states in the {sup 16}O({sup 3}He,t){sup 16}F reaction at 140 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujimura, H.; Fujita, K.; Hara, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Shimbara, Y.; Yoshifuku, M.; Rapaport, J.; Botha, N. T.; Kawabata, T.; Neveling, R.

    2009-02-15

    The isovector transitions from the ground state (g.s.) of {sup 16}O to the negative parity states in {sup 16}F, i.e., the J{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} g.s., the 0.193 MeV, 1{sup -} state, the 0.424 MeV, 2{sup -} state, the 0.721 MeV, 3{sup -} state, and the 4{sup -}''stretched'' state at 6.372 MeV, were studied by using a high resolution {sup 16}O({sup 3}He,t){sup 16}F reaction at 140 MeV/nucleon. With the help of high energy resolution, these states were, for the first time, clearly resolved in a charge exchange reaction at an intermediate energy, which favorably excites spin-flip states. Angular distributions of the reaction cross sections were measured in the laboratory frame from 0 deg. to 14 deg. Parameters of phenomenological effective interactions were derived so as to reproduce these angular distributions in distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations. The angular distribution of the 0{sup -} state could be reproduced well at {theta}{sub c.m.}<10 deg. The empirical values, however, are larger by a factor of 2-2.5 in the larger angle region, where the contribution of the so-called 'condensed pion field' is expected. The high resolution also enabled the decay widths of these states to be measured.

  3. Fragment angular correlation in the breakup of 16O ions at 95 MeV/A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Aguer, P.; Bogaert, G.; Coc, A.; Disdier, D.; Ichihara, T.; Kraus, L.; Lefebvre, A.; Linck, I.; Mittig, W.; Motobayashi, T.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Stephan, C.; Thibaud, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    Fragment angular correlations in projectile breakup reactions are very sensitive to interference between different multipolarities entering in the excitation-dissociation process of the projectile. In particular, it was proposed to disentangle L=1 and L=2 contributions in direct breakup reactions of 16O with low relative energy between the α and 12C fragment, which are of astrophysical interest. We studied the experimental aspects of extracting those angular correlations in extreme kinematical conditions usually encountered in breakup experiments of astrophysical interest. The breakup of 95 MeV/A 16O projectiles induced by a 208Pb target was measured using the high-resolution spectrometer SPEG at Ganil for the coincident detection of the fragments. Sequential breakup via the 12.53 MeV level of 16O is analyzed in this framework and it favors an one-step M2 excitation of this level.

  4. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  5. Incomplete fusion in 16O+159Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Bala, Indu; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, S.; Singh, D. P.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    In heavy-ion induced reactions, incomplete fusion (ICF) has been found to be a process of greater importance and of distinct nature even at slightly above the barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be dominant. However, the studies are limited to a few projectile target combinations only. To confirm the distinctly different decay patterns observed in case of CF and ICF residues, and to understand the role of high ℓ-values in the onset of ICF, a particle-γ-coincidence technique has been employed to measure spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles of CF and ICF residues populated via xn / pxn / αxn-channels in 16O+159Tb interactions at Elab ≈ 83.5 ± 1.5, 88.5 ± 1.5, 93.5 ± 1.5 and 97.6 ± 1.4 MeV. The Gamma Detector Array and the Charged Particles Detector Array have been used to detect prompt γ-rays in coincidence with charged particles (p and α). CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B)- and forward (F)-α-gated-γ-spectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns (thus, the feeding intensity profiles) have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be widely populated and strongly fed over a broad spin range. In case of ICF-α channels, narrow range feeding was observed only for high-spin states or the low spin states were not populated. The mean ℓ-values involved in the production of ICF- αxn-channels are found to be higher than those involved in the production of CF- αxn-channels associated with fusion-evaporation reactions.

  6. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  7. A density-functional theory based study on the 16O/18O-exchange reactions of the prototype iron-oxygen compounds FeO+ and FeOH+ with H2(18)O in the gas phase

    PubMed

    Barsch; Schroder; Schwarz

    2000-05-15

    The mechanism of the degenerate 16O/18O exchange in the reactions of FeO+ and FeOH+ with water is examined by density functional theory. Based on previous experimental work (Chem. Eur. J. 1999, 5, 1176), two possible reaction pathways are investigated for both systems. The first mechanism consists of one (for FeOH+ + H20) or two (for FeO+ + H20) 1,3-hydrogen migrations from one oxygen atom to the other; the iron atom is not directly involved in these OH bond activations. The second route comprises a series of two (for FeOH+ + H20) or four (for FeO+ + H20) 1,2-hydrogen migration steps which involve the intermediate formations of metal-hydrogen bonds. Both mechanisms are evaluated under consideration of the respective low- and high spin potential-energy surfaces. The computational results show a clear preference for the 1,3-routes occurring on the respective high-spin surfaces bypassing the intermediacy of high-valent iron compounds having FeH bonds.

  8. Fusion hindrance and quasi-fission in heavy-ion induced reactions: disentangling the effect of different parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Courtin, S.

    2006-04-26

    Experimental results on the fusion inhibition effect near the Coulomb barrier due to the onset of the quasi-fission mechanism are presented. The investigation was focused on reactions induced by 48Ca projectiles on different heavy targets and comparing them to reactions induced by light ions such as 12C and 16O leading to the same compound nuclei. Cross sections and angular distributions of evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured.

  9. Light-induced click reactions.

    PubMed

    Tasdelen, Mehmet Atilla; Yagci, Yusuf

    2013-06-01

    Spatial and temporal control over chemical and biological processes, both in terms of "tuning" products and providing site-specific control, is one of the most exciting and rapidly developing areas of modern science. For synthetic chemists, the challenge is to discover and develop selective and efficient reactions capable of generating useful molecules in a variety of matrices. In recent studies, light has been recognized as a valuable method for determining where, when, and to what extent a process is started or stopped. Accordingly, this Minireview will present the fundamental aspects of light-induced click reactions, highlight the applications of these reactions to diverse fields of study, and discuss the potential for this methodology to be applied to the study of biomolecular systems.

  10. 16O(n,α) cross section investigation using LENZ instrument at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. Y.; Mosby, S.; Haight, R. C.; White, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Importance of studying the 16O(n,α) reaction is motivated by multiple nuclear applications. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) produces a white neutron spectrum ranging from thermal to several hundreds of MeV energies. We have recently developed the LENZ (Low Energy NZ-neutron induced charged particle detection) capability to measure high-precision (n,α) cross sections. In order to provide more reliable data, we have enhanced solid angle coverage, and improved signal-to-noise ratios and time-of-flight resolution by implementing digitizer waveform analysis. The LENZ was commissioned by studying the 59Co(n,α) reaction with neutron beams in early 2015. For the 16O(n,α) reaction, we investigate solid oxygen targets and make a relative measurement to a better known cross section, such as the 6Li(n,α) reaction in order to further reduce systematic uncertainty. We will discuss the progress of the 16O(n,α) study at LANSCE and the outlook for improving Hauser-Feshbah prediction on (n,p) reaction cross sections.

  11. Peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Burks, W; Bannon, G A; Sicherer, S; Sampson, H A

    1999-07-01

    Food allergies, particularly to peanuts, are a common cause of anaphylaxis. Approximately 125 people die each year in the USA secondary to food-induced anaphylaxis. Clinical anaphylaxis is a syndrome of diverse etiology and dramatic presentation of symptoms associated with the classic features of type I, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity [1]. Typically the term anaphylaxis connotes an immunologically-mediated event that occurs after exposure to certain foreign substances. This reaction results from the generation and release of a variety of potent biologically active mediators and their concerted effects on various target organs. Anaphylaxis is recognized by cutaneous, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal signs and symptoms occurring singly or in combination. This article focuses on allergic reactions to peanuts that manifest as signs and symptoms involving multiple target organs or the cardiovascular system alone.

  12. Dynamics of the quasielastic {sup 16}O(e,e{sup '}p) reaction at Q{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Fissum, K.G.; Liang, M.; Cardman, L.S.; Chen, J.-P.; Jager, C.W. de; Domingo, J.; Gomez, J.; LeRose, J.J.; Michaels, R.; Nanda, S.; Saha, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Anderson, B.D.; Khayat, M.; Manley, D.M.; Petratos, G.G.; Prout, D.L.; Watson, J. W.; Aniol, K.A.; Auerbach, L.

    2004-09-01

    The physics program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab commenced in the summer of 1997 with a detailed investigation of the {sup 16}O(e,e{sup '}p) reaction in quasielastic, constant (q,{omega}) kinematics at Q{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}, q{approx_equal}1 GeV/c, and {omega}{approx_equal}445 MeV. Use of a self-calibrating, self-normalizing, thin-film waterfall target enabled a systematically rigorous measurement. Five-fold differential cross-section data for the removal of protons from the 1p-shell have been obtained for 0reaction is increasingly hidden by more complicated processes, and for 280

  13. Alpha decay widths of excited states of 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz; Wheldon, C.; Catford, W. N.; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.

    2010-03-01

    The 12C(13C, 9Be)16O reaction has been used to populate excited states in 16O. The 9Be nuclei were detected in a magnetic spectrometer and the 12C decay product of the recoiling excited 16O nucleus was detected in an array of silicon strip detectors. The large angular coverage of the strip detector array allowed the α-decay widths of the 14.66 MeV, 5-, and 16.275 MeV, 6+, states to be determined with good accuracy. The present results, together with earlier measurements, allow precise values for the branching ratios to be calculated: Ex(16O) = 14.66 MeV, Jπ = 5-, Γα0/Γ = 0.951 ± 0.049 and Γα1/Γ < 0.05; Ex(16O) = 16.275 MeV, Jπ = 6+, Γα0/Γ = 0.982 ± 0.048 and Γα1/Γ < 0.02.

  14. Study of Quasielastic 1p-shell proton Knockout in the {sup 16}O (e,e'p) reaction at Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Juncai Gao

    1999-06-01

    Coincidence cross sections and the structure functions R{sub L+TT}, R{sub T} and R{sub LT} have been obtained for the quasielastic {sup 16}O( e, e'p) reaction with the proton knocked out from the 1p{sub 1/2} and 1p{sub 3/2} states in perpendicular kinematics. The nominal energy transfer {omega} was 439 MeV the nominal Q{sup 2} was 0.8 ( GeV/ c){sup 2} and the kinetic energy of knocked- out proton was 427 MeV. The data was taken in Hall A Je erson Laboratory using two high resolution spectrometers to detect electrons and protons respectively. Nominal beam energies 845 MeV , 1645 MeV and 2445 MeV were employed. For each beam energy, the momentum and angle of electron arm were fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer {vector q} was varied to map out the missing momentum. R{sub LT} was separated out to ~350 MeV /c in missing momentum. R{sub L+TT} and R{sub T} were separated out to ~280 MeV/ c in missing momentum. R{sub L} and R{sub T} were separated at a missing momentum of 52.5 MeV/ c for the data taken with hadron arm along {vector q}. The measured cross sections and response functions agree with both relativistic and non relativistic DWIA calculations employing spectroscopic factors between 60-75% for 1 p{sub 1/2} and 1 p{sub 3/2} states. The left- right asymmetry does not support the non -relativistic DWIA calculation using the Weyl gauge. Also the left- right asymmetry measurement favors the relativistic calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup , the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the fi nal cross sec tions as well as the response functions and the comparison of the results with the theoretical calculations.

  15. Effective radii of deuteron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shintaro; Chiba, Satoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Minomo, Kosho

    2011-05-15

    The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) for exclusive reactions and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT) as an extension of CDCC to inclusive reactions are applied to deuteron-induced reactions. The CDCC result reproduces experimental data on the reaction cross section for d+{sup 58}Ni scattering at 200 MeV/nucleon, and ERT provides data on the neutron-stripping cross section for inclusive {sup 7}Li(d,n) reaction at 40 MeV. For deuteron-induced reactions at 200 MeV/nucleon, target-dependence of the reaction, elastic-breakup, nucleon-stripping, nucleon-removal, and complete- and incomplete-fusion cross sections is clearly explained by simple formulas. Accuracy of the Glauber model is also investigated.

  16. Quasielastic knockout of light fragments from {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei by intermediate-energy pions

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, B. M.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V. Martemianov, M. A.; Matsuk, M. A.; Tarasov, V. E.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2007-07-15

    Quasielastic deuteron and triton knockout from {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei has been studied infull kinematics using a 0.72-GeV/c pion beam. The momentum distributions of the intranuclear quasideuteron motion, excitation-energy spectra of the residual nuclei, and the effective numbers N{sub d}{sup eff} of quasideuterons are determined. The parameters of the quasideuteron intranuclear motion are in reasonable agreement with the results obtained in other beams. The N{sub d}{sup eff} in the nuclei from {sup 6}Li to {sup 16}O measured in full kinematics are virtually independent of the atomic number in contrast to the analogous values in the inclusive deuteron-knockout reaction induced by protons. The phenomenon of triton knockout from these nuclei is observed, which makes possible estimation of the cross section of backward pion-triton elastic scattering in yet unexplored regions of energy and momentum transfer.

  17. Management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective cancer treatment that not only offers cure but also excellent palliation of disease related symptoms and complications. Although radiotherapy is primarily an outpatient treatment, delivered within specialist centres, a diverse range of health professionals may be involved in the treatment pathway before, during and after treatment. Radiotherapy can, and does, make a significant contribution to improving a patient's wellbeing through effective symptom management. However, treatment-related side-effects do occur, with an acute skin reaction being one of the most common. It is imperative that radiotherapy-induced skin reactions are correctly assessed and appropriately managed in promoting patient comfort, treatment compliance and enhanced quality of life. This article describes how the use of a recognised assessment tool and evidence-based guidelines can facilitate consistent, high-quality care in the management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

  18. Cross sections of proton- and neutron-induced reactions by the Liège intranuclear cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Tiekuang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is mainly to test the validity of the Liège intranuclear cascade (INCL) model in calculating the cross sections of proton-induced reactions for cosmogenic nuclei using the newly compiled database of proton cross sections. The model calculations of 3He display the rising tendency of cross sections with the increase of energy, in accordance with the experimental data. Meanwhile, the differences between the theoretical results and experimental data of production cross sections (10Be and 26Al) are generally within a factor of 3, meaning that the INCL model works quite well for the proton-induced reactions. Based on the good agreement, we predict the production cross sections of 26Al from reactions n + 27Al, n + 28Si, and n + 40Ca and those of 10Be from reactions n + 16O and n + 28Si. The results also show a good agreement with a posteriori excitation functions.

  19. Permeability Changes in Reaction Induced Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[4], serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al.[3] and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al.[1]. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total reaction rate, as summarised by Kelemen et al.[2]. Røyne et al.[4] have shown that transport in fractures will have an effect on the fracture pattern formed. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing under compression, and it remains an open question how sensitive a fracture pattern is to permeability changes. In this work, we study the permeability of fractures formed under compression, and we use a 2D discrete element model to study the fracture patterns and total reaction rates achieved with different permeabilities. We achieve an improved understanding of the feedback processes in reaction-driven fracturing, thus improving our ability to decide whether industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock is a viable option for long-term handling of CO2. References [1] Jamtveit, B, Putnis, C. V., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., "Reaction induced fracturing during replacement processes," Contrib. Mineral Petrol. 157, 2009, pp. 127 - 133. [2] Kelemen, P., Matter, J., Streit, E. E., Rudge, J. F., Curry, W. B., and Blusztajn, J., "Rates and Mechanisms of Mineral Carbonation in Peridotite: Natural Processes and Recipes for Enhanced, in situ CO2 Capture and Storage," Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2011. 39:545-76. [3] Rudge, J. F., Kelemen, P. B., and

  20. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhigang Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  1. On the electron-induced isotope fractionation in low temperature (32)O(2)/(36)O(2) ices--ozone as a case study.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, B; Mebel, A M; Mason, N J; Babikov, D; Kaiser, R I

    2011-01-14

    The formation of six ozone isotopomers and isotopologues, (16)O(16)O(16)O, (18)O(18)O(18)O, (16)O(16)O(18)O, (18)O(18)O(16)O, (16)O(18)O(16)O, and (18)O(16)O(18)O, has been studied in electron-irradiated solid oxygen (16)O(2) and (18)O(2) (1 ∶ 1) ices at 11 K. Significant isotope effects were found to exist which involved enrichment of (18)O-bearing ozone molecules. The heavy (18)O(18)O(18)O species is formed with a factor of about six higher than the corresponding (16)O(16)O(16)O isotopologue. Likewise, the heavy (18)O(18)O(16)O species is formed with abundances of a factor of three higher than the lighter (16)O(16)O(18)O counterpart. No isotope effect was observed in the production of (16)O(18)O(16)O versus(18)O(16)O(18)O. Such studies on the formation of distinct ozone isotopomers and isotopologues involving non-thermal, non-equilibrium chemistry by irradiation of oxygen ices with high energy electrons, as present in the magnetosphere of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn, may suggest that similar mechanisms may contribute to the (18)O enrichment on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn such as Ganymede, Rhea, and Dione. In such a Solar System environment, energetic particles from the magnetospheres of the giant planets may induce non-equilibrium reactions of suprathermal and/or electronically excited atoms under conditions, which are quite distinct from isotopic enrichments found in classical, thermal gas phase reactions. PMID:21079822

  2. The absolute yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.

    1991-10-01

    Although the low lying resonances in the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction have been studied by many investigators in the past, only a few absolute determinations of the gamma-ray yield and branching ratios have been made. This is somewhat surprising in view of the widespread use of this reaction for the quantitative microanalysis of fluorine concentration profiles in the near surface regions of materials and for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors. In this work we report an absolute measurement of the yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction. Photons were produced by bombarding a semithick target of CaF 2 with protons from the Harwell 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. A 113 cm 3 HPGe spectrometer, with an energy resolution of 6.8 keV at 6129 keV, was used as the photon detector. This detector had previously been calibrated absolutely using a combination of radionuclide and thermal neutron capture gamma-ray sources at the neutron facility Badger, adjacent to the Harwell reactor DIDO. Measurements were made at seven angles in the range 0° - 150° permitting both differential and integral cross-sections to be derived. Geometrical correction factors were calculated using the Monte Carlo code EGS-4. A value for the reaction width was determined from the excitation curve. With conventional notation the principal results are as follows: γ1 : γ2 : γ3 = 0.9701:0.0033:0.0266; ΓCM = (2.08±0.13) keV; and Y( γ1) = (8.72±0.37)×10 4 6129 keV γμC -1as.

  3. Measurements and analysis of alpha-induced reactions of importance for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Messieres, Genevieve Escande

    2011-11-01

    Reactions during stellar helium burning are of primary importance for understanding nucleosynthesis. A detailed understanding of the critical reaction chain 4He(2alpha, gamma)12C( alpha, gamma)16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne is necessary both because it is the primary energy source and because it determines the ratio of 12C to 16O produced, which in turn significantly effects subsequent nucleosynthesis. Also during Helium burning, the reactions 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha, gamma )26Mg are crucial in determining the amount of neutrons available for the astrophysical s-process. This thesis presents new experimental results concerning the 16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne, 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg, and 22Ne(alpha, gamma)26Mg reaction rates. These results are then applied to the calculation of the associated stellar reaction rates in order to achieve better accuracy.

  4. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  5. [Immunoallergic reaction with hepatitis induced by minocycline].

    PubMed

    Pavese, P; Sarrot-Reynauld, F; Bonadona, A; Massot, C

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a 19-year old black West Indian woman who had been treated for acne for two years with oral minocycline (50 mg per day) and topical of benzoyle peroxide (5%). She was admitted for fatigue, arthralgia, myalgia and widespread pruritus. We observed several skin lesions of hyperpigmentation, biological signs of hepatitis, and significant levels of antinuclear, anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies. Minocycline was immediately stopped. Two months later, all of the biological abnormalities had disappeared but the skin lesions seemed to be irreversible. Minocycline is largely used for the treatment of acne and may induce severe immuno-allergic reactions. Several cases of induced lupus, autoimmune hepatitis, eosinophilic pneumonia, hypersensitivity syndrome, serum-sickness-like illness and Sweet's syndrome have already been described. These side effects are rare but may be life-threatening. So, minocycline should be used as a second-line treatment for acne and should be avoided in black people whom seem to be at risk of such reactions. If, despite those precautions, minocycline-induced immuno-allergic reactions occur, the treatment should be immediately stopped and never prescribed again.

  6. Fluid transport in reaction induced fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al. te{royne}, serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al. te{rudge} and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al. te{jamtveit}. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total rate of material conversion, as summarised by Kelemen et al. te{kelemen}. Ulven et al. te{ulven_1} have shown that for fluid-mediated processes the ratio between chemical reaction rate and fluid transport rate in bulk rock controls the fracture pattern formed, and Ulven et al. te{ulven_2} have shown that instantaneous fluid transport in fractures lead to a significant increase in the total rate of the volume expanding process. However, instantaneous fluid transport in fractures is clearly an overestimate, and achievable fluid transport rates in fractures have apparently not been studied in any detail. Fractures cutting through an entire domain might experience relatively fast advective reactant transport, whereas dead-end fractures will be limited to diffusion of reactants in the fluid, internal fluid mixing in the fracture or capillary flow into newly formed fractures. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing. In this work, we study the feedback between fracture formation during volume expansion and fluid transport in different fracture settings. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) describing a volume expanding process and the related fracture formation with different models that describe the fluid transport in the

  7. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  8. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  9. Heavy isotope production by multinucleon transfer reactions with /sup 254/Es. [101 MeV /sup 16/O, 98 MeV /sup 18/O, 127 MeV /sup 22/Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Schaedel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Bruegger, M.; Gaeggeler, H.; Moody, K.J.; Schardt, D.; Suemmerer, K.; Hulet, E.K.; Douran, A.D.; Dougan, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Fast automated on-line and quasi-on-line radiochemical techniques were applied to search for new isotopes, to measure their decay characteristics, and to study the cross sections of the heaviest, most neutron-rich actinide isotopes in reactions of /sup 16,18/O and /sup 22/Ne projectiles with /sup 254/Es as a target. The measured yields for isotopes up to Lr-260 are three or more orders of magnitude higher than in any other reaction used so far. A comparison with data for similar transfers from /sup 248/Cm targets is made. Transfer cross sections are extrapolated for the production of unknown, neutron-rich isotopes of elements 101 through 105, and the unique potential of /sup 254/Es as a target to make these exoctic nuclei accessible is demonstrated. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Alternate Alpha Induced Reactions for NIF Radiochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Bernstein, L A

    2010-02-26

    Radiochemical analysis of NIF capsule residues has been identified as a potential diagnostic of NIF capsule performance. In particular, alpha-induced nuclear reactions that occur on tracer elements added to the NIF capsule have been shown through simulation to be a very sensitive diagnostic for mix. The short range of the alpha particles makes them representative of the hot spot where they are created through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Reactions on elements doped into the innermost part of the capsule ablator would therefore be sensitive to material that had mixed into the hot spot. Radiochemical determinations of activated detector elements may perhaps be the only true measure of mix that occurs in a NIF capsule, particularly in cases when the capsule fails.

  11. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  12. Theory of photon and electron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Onley, D.S.; Wright, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    During the first year and half of the current grant from the Department of Energy we have made considerable progress on the following aspects of the general investigation of electron and photon induced reactions: (1) photo- and electro-production of mesons; (2) Coulomb distortion effects on (e,e{prime}{gamma}) and (e,e{prime}) and (e,e{prime}p) in the quasi-elastic region, (3) studies involving the relativistic shell model, and (4) quark models. We will report on each of these developments in this paper.

  13. Neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.; Weil, J.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Long-baseline experiments such as the planned deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) require theoretical descriptions of the complete event in a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since nuclear targets are used this requires a good understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Purpose: Develop a consistent theory and code framework for the description of lepton-nucleus interactions that can be used to describe not only inclusive cross sections, but also the complete final state of the reaction. Methods: The Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) implementation of quantum-kinetic transport theory is used, with improvements in its treatment of the nuclear ground state and of 2p2h interactions. For the latter an empirical structure function from electron scattering data is used as a basis. Results: Results for electron-induced inclusive cross sections are given as a necessary check for the overall quality of this approach. The calculated neutrino-induced inclusive double-differential cross sections show good agreement data from neutrino and antineutrino reactions for different neutrino flavors at MiniBooNE and T2K. Inclusive double-differential cross sections for MicroBooNE, NOvA, MINERvA, and LBNF/DUNE are given. Conclusions: Based on the GiBUU model of lepton-nucleus interactions a good theoretical description of inclusive electron-, neutrino-, and antineutrino-nucleus data over a wide range of energies, different neutrino flavors, and different experiments is now possible. Since no tuning is involved this theory and code should be reliable also for new energy regimes and target masses.

  14. Radiation-induced reactions in polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscoglio, Michael Benedict

    Since the 1950's, there has been a considerable interest in the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of polymer systems. Radiation induced chemical changes that were found to be helpful in producing specialty polymers, but also potentially harmful by degrading the physical performance of the material. Therefore, solute molecules, which act as excited state quenchers, and free radical scavengers, have been incorporated into the polymers in order to regulate the crosslinking, scission and desaturation reactions. This work is focused on using spectroscopic techniques to characterize the physical properties of polymeric media and the reactions occurring within them following pulsed radiolysis. This is done primarily by using arene doped polymer films which have highly absorbing excited states and radical ions that are easily monitored by transient studies. The probes are used to characterize the polymeric microenvironment, to monitor reaction rates, and to interfere in the radical reactions. Photophysical and photochemical characterization of partially crystalline polyethylene complements data previously obtained by conventional physical techniques for polymer characterization. Probe molecules are excluded from crystalline zones and distributed in a networked structure of amorphous zones. Upon high energy radiolysis, it is found that polyolefin systems efficiently donate all radical ions and excited states to the solute molecules, even when the energy is absorbed within the polymer crystalline zones. Studies of the subsequent reactions of the solute excited states and radical ions reveal information about their long term effectiveness as protectants. It is found that highly excited states formed by the recombination of solute radical ions are energetic enough to cause dissociation of halo-arenes. Also, arenes are found to become attached to the polymer chain through a polymer-aryl radical intermediate. These intermediates have been isolated and

  15. Linezolid Induced Adverse Drug Reactions - An Update.

    PubMed

    Kishor, Kamal; Dhasmana, Neha; Kamble, Shashank Shivaji; Sahu, Roshan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimen recommended for resistant tuberculosis consists of various drugs and these drugs are prescribed for at least 12-15 months. Such a long duration therapy and high dose of antibiotics result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs may lead to various complications in disease management like replacement of drugs, dose increment, therapy withdrawal, etc. Linezolid is one of those drugs, practiced as an anti-mycobacterial agent and it is an important member of drug regimen for MDR and XDR tuberculosis. Linezolid is a broad spectrum antibiotic known for its unique mechanism of inhibition of resistant pathogenic strains. However, it causes serious adverse effects like thrombocytopenia, optic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, lactic acidosis, etc. Literature suggests that Linezolid can cause severe ADRs which affect patient compliance and hinder in therapy to a larger extent. Recent studies confirm the possibility of ADRs to be predicted with genetic make-up of individuals. To effectively deliver the available treatment regimen and ensure patient compliance, it is important to manage ADRs more efficiently. The role of pharmacogenomics in reducing adverse drug effects has been recently explored. In the present review, we discussed about Linezolid induced adverse drug reactions, mechanisms and genetic associations. PMID:26424176

  16. Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion organogels for light induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Qipeng

    2016-03-25

    Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) organogels have been fabricated and investigated for light induced reactions. High transparency facilitates both the UV and visible light induced reactions within HIPE organogels. Transparent HIPE organogels are advantageous for light induced polymerizations, accelerating such polymerizations and enabling the preparation of large polyHIPE monoliths.

  17. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  18. Pediatric bupropion-induced serum sicknesslike reaction.

    PubMed

    Hack, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    This reports the first 2 cases of serum sicknesslike reaction to bupropion in children (age 12 and 14). Serum sicknesslike reactions are an example of immune-complex medicated disease. The cardinal symptoms of serum sickness are fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias or arthritis, and urticaria. Symptoms usually resolve without long-term sequela following discontinuation of the exogenous antigen. It is likely that serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion are either relatively rare or underrecognized and underreported. Between May 1998 and May 2001, GlaxoSmith Kline received 172 reports of seizures (a well-known adverse drug reaction) and only 37 reports of serum sicknesslike reactions (Wooltorton 2002). We do not know if children and adolescents are more prone than adults to develop serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion. Luckily, the reported cases of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion have not caused irreversible morbidity or mortality. Nevertheless, the symptoms are painful, temporarily disfiguring and disabling, and warrant prompt medical attention. Parents and patients should be educated about this potential side effect at the onset of treatment, because symptoms are similar to many infectious childhood illnesses, and the treatment of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion should include the discontinuation of bupropion.

  19. Nefazadone-induced acute dystonic reaction.

    PubMed

    Burda, A; Webster, K; Leikin, J B; Chan, S B; Stokes, K A

    1999-10-01

    A 53-y-o patient presented approximately 2 h after taking her first dose of nefazadone. Chief complaint was lip smacking with hand and arm gesturing. The patient also took 25 mg meclizine which she had used before with no adverse effects. Diphenhydramine followed by benztropine led to resolution of symptoms within 1 h. Patient subsequently used meclizine with no untoward reactions. Nefazadone should be added to the list of agents that cause acute dystonic reactions. PMID:10509438

  20. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  1. Photochemical fractionation of 16O in the space medium modeled by resonance excitation of CO by H-Lyman alpha.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, G; Corrigan, M J; Fitzgerald, R W

    1988-01-01

    Inferences about the formation of primordial matter in our solar system rest on analysis of the earliest preserved materials in meteorites, of the structure of the solar system today, and of matter in evolving stellar systems elsewhere. The isotope distribution in meteorites suggests that molecular excitation processes similar to those observed today in circumstellar regions and dark interstellar clouds were operating in the early solar nebula. Laboratory model experiments together with these observations give evidence on the thermal state of the source medium from which refractory meteoritic dust formed. They indicate that resonance excitation of the broad isotopic bands of molecules such as 12C16O, MgO, O2, AlO, and OH by strong UV line sources such as H-L alpha, Mg II, H beta, and Ca II may induce selective reactions resulting in the anomalous isotopic composition of oxygen and possibly other elements in refractory oxide condensates in meteorites.

  2. Large and unexpected enrichment in stratospheric 16O13C18O and its meridional variation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Affek, Hagit P; Hoag, Katherine J; Guo, Weifu; Wiegel, Aaron A; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Okumura, Mitchio; Boering, Kristie A; Eiler, John M

    2009-07-14

    The stratospheric CO(2) oxygen isotope budget is thought to be governed primarily by the O((1)D)+CO(2) isotope exchange reaction. However, there is increasing evidence that other important physical processes may be occurring that standard isotopic tools have been unable to identify. Measuring the distribution of the exceedingly rare CO(2) isotopologue (16)O(13)C(18)O, in concert with (18)O and (17)O abundances, provides sensitivities to these additional processes and, thus, is a valuable test of current models. We identify a large and unexpected meridional variation in stratospheric (16)O(13)C(18)O, observed as proportions in the polar vortex that are higher than in any naturally derived CO(2) sample to date. We show, through photochemical experiments, that lower (16)O(13)C(18)O proportions observed in the midlatitudes are determined primarily by the O((1)D)+CO(2) isotope exchange reaction, which promotes a stochastic isotopologue distribution. In contrast, higher (16)O(13)C(18)O proportions in the polar vortex show correlations with long-lived stratospheric tracer and bulk isotope abundances opposite to those observed at midlatitudes and, thus, opposite to those easily explained by O((1)D)+CO(2). We believe the most plausible explanation for this meridional variation is either an unrecognized isotopic fractionation associated with the mesospheric photochemistry of CO(2) or temperature-dependent isotopic exchange on polar stratospheric clouds. Unraveling the ultimate source of stratospheric (16)O(13)C(18)O enrichments may impose additional isotopic constraints on biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange, biosphere productivity, and their respective responses to climate change.

  3. Developmental Aspects of Reaction to Positive Inducements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindskold, Svenn; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Probes children's behavioral sensitivity to variation in reward probability and magnitude (bribes) and suggests that preadolescent children do respond to promises of positive inducements for cooperation in a mixed-motive situation. (WY)

  4. Alpha Cluster States and Condensation in ^{16}O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Y.; Yamada, T.; Horiuchi, H.; Röpke, G.; Schuck, P.; Tohsaki, A.

    Low density states near the 4α breakup threshold in ^{16}O is discussed in terms of the α-particle condensation. Calculations are performed with OCM (Orthogonality Condition Model) and GEM (Gauss Expansion Method). The 0_6^+ state in ^{16}O is shown to have a character of the 4α condensate, as an analogue to the Hoyle state in ^{12}C. The decay property of the s tate and the α + Hoyle-like rotatinal states are also investigated.

  5. Alpha-induced reactions in iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, M.K.; Rizvi, I.A.; Chaubey, A.K. )

    1992-05-01

    The excitation function of ({alpha},{ital xn}) reactions on {sup 191}Ir (abundance 37.3%) and on {sup 193}Ir (abundance 62.7%) has been measured for the 17--55 MeV alpha-particle bombarding energy range. The stacked foil activation technique and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy were used to determine the cross sections. The experimental data were compared with calculated values obtained by means of a geometry-dependent hybrid model. The initial exciton number {ital n}{sub 0}=4 with {ital n}=2, {ital p}=2, and {ital h}=0 gives the best agreements with the presently measured results. To calculate the excitation function theoretically a computer code was used. This set of excitation functions provides a data basis for probing the validity of combined equilibrium and preequilibrium reaction models in a considerable energy range.

  6. Airy structure in 16O+14C nuclear rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Airy structure in 16 O +14 C rainbow scattering is studied with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic realistic wave functions for 16 O by using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The experimental angular distributions at EL=132 , 281, and 382.2 MeV are well reproduced by the calculations. By studying the energy evolution of the Airy structure, the Airy minimum around θ =76∘ in the angular distribution at EL=132 MeV is assigned as the second-order Airy minimum A 2 in contrast to the recent literature which assigns it as the third order A 3 . The Airy minima in the 90∘ excitation function is investigated in comparison with well-known 16 O +16 O and 12 C +12 C systems. Evolution of the Airy structure into the molecular resonances with the 16 O +14 C cluster structure in the low-energy region around Ec .m .=30 MeV is discussed. It is predicted theoretically for the first time for a non-4 N 16O +14 C system that Airy elephants in the 90∘ excitation function are present.

  7. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  8. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  9. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  10. Exercise-induced anaphylactic reaction to shellfish.

    PubMed

    Maulitz, R M; Pratt, D S; Schocket, A L

    1979-06-01

    The syndrome of immediate type I food hypersensitivity, mediated by tissue-bound IgE antibody and mast cell histamine release, is well recorded in the medical literature. This case study represents a previously undescribed late food hypersensitivity, induced only by strenuous exercise. Identification of this new syndrome illustrates classical epidemiologic analysis, improves medical advice for the allergic and athletically inclined, and raises new questions in the areas of allergy and immunology.

  11. Cinnamon-induced Oral Mucosal Contact Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Ana P. M; Migliari, Dante A

    2015-01-01

    Contact stomatitis associated with consumption of cinnamon flavoring agents is a relatively uncommon disorder. Of relevance, both clinical features and the histopathologic findings of this condition are nonspecific, and, more importantly, may resemble some other inflammatory oral mucosa disorders, eventually making diagnosis difficult. Usually a patient exhibits a combination of white and erythematous patches of abrupt onset, accompanied by a burning sensation. To shed some light on this subject, a case of a 64-year-old woman with hypersensitivity contact reaction on the oral mucosa due to cinnamon mints is presented, with emphasis on differential diagnosis and the process for confirmation of the diagnosis. The treatment consists of discontinuing the use of cinnamon products. Clinicians will be able to recognize this disorder following a careful clinical examination and detailed history. This recognition is important in order to avoid invasive and expensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26312097

  12. Evidence of Vibrational-Induced Rotational Axis Switching for HD 12C 16O: New High-Resolution Analysis of the ν 5 and ν 6 Bands and First Analysis of the ν 4 Band (10-μm Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Smirnov, M.; Lock, M.

    2000-09-01

    Using new high-resolution Fourier transform spectra recorded in Giessen in the 8-12 μm region, a more extended analysis of the ν5 and ν6 bands and the first high-resolution study of the ν4 band of HDCO were performed. As pointed out previously [M. Allegrini, J. W. C. Johns, and A. R. W. McKellar, Can. J. Phys. 56, 859-864 (1978)], the energy levels of the 51 and 61 states are strongly coupled by A- and B-type Coriolis interactions. On the other hand, it appeared that weaker resonances involving the energy levels of the 41 state with those of the 51 and 61 states also had to be accounted for. Consequently, the calculation of the energy levels was performed taking into account the Coriolis-type resonances linking the energy levels of the {61, 51, 41} resonating states. Because of the unusually strong Coriolis interaction between ν5 and ν6, a nonclassical behavior of the rotational levels of the 51 and 61 states was observed and it was necessary to use a new Hamiltonian matrix which possesses, as usual, both A- and B-type Coriolis operators in the 51 ⇔ 61 and 61 ⇔ 41 off diagonal blocks but differs from the classical reduced Hamiltonian which is used commonly for planar Cs-type molecules. More precisely, it proved necessary to include non-orthorhombic terms in the expansion of the rotational Hamiltonian of the 51 and 61 states. According to the considerations developed by Watson [J. K. G. Watson, in 'Vibrational Spectra and Structure,' (J. Durig, Ed.), Chap. 1, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1977], these non-orthorhombic operators which are not symmetry forbidden are usually removed for semirigid Cs-type molecules by rotational contact transformations. In the present study, the occurrence of terms in {Jx, Jz} in the expansions of the rotational Hamiltonians for the 51 and 61 states indicates that the inertial system of HDCO differs for each of the three {61, 51, 41} resonating states. Therefore, HDCO becomes a good example of vibrational-induced rotational axis

  13. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from 16O*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid; Smith, Donald L.

    1997-02-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the 16O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non- intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the 19F(p,alpha)16O* reaction. Resonances in 19F(p,alpha)16O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of (gamma,n) and (gamma,fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  14. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from {sup 16}O*

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the {sup 16}O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non-intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* reaction. Resonances in {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of ({gamma}, n) and ({gamma}, fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  15. Low-energy electron-induced reactions in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumainayagam, Christopher R.; Lee, Hsiao-Lu; Nelson, Rachel B.; Haines, David R.; Gunawardane, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss post-irradiation analysis of low-energy (≤50 eV) electron-induced processes in nanoscale thin films. Because electron-induced surface reactions in monolayer adsorbates have been extensively reviewed, we will instead focus on low-energy electron-induced reactions in multilayer adsorbates. The latter studies, involving nanoscale thin films, serve to elucidate the pivotal role that the low-energy electron-induced reactions play in high-energy radiation-induced chemical reactions in condensed matter. Although electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments conducted during irradiation have yielded vital information relevant to primary or initial electron-induced processes, we wish to demonstrate in this review that analyzing the products following low-energy electron irradiation can provide new insights into radiation chemistry. This review presents studies of electron-induced reactions in nanoscale films of molecular species such as oxygen, nitrogen trifluoride, water, alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitriles, halocarbons, alkane and phenyl thiols, thiophenes, ferrocene, amino acids, nucleotides, and DNA using post-irradiation techniques such as temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), gel electrophoresis, and microarray fluorescence. Post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption, in particular, has been shown to be useful in identifying labile radiolysis products as demonstrated by the first identification of methoxymethanol as a reaction product of methanol radiolysis. Results of post-irradiation studies have been used not only to identify radiolysis products, but also to determine the dynamics of electron-induced reactions. For example, studies of the radiolysis yield as a function of incident electron energy have shown that dissociative

  16. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  17. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  18. Phototoxic reaction to xanthene dyes induced by visible light.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, F; Fukuda, M; Naganuma, M; Nakayama, Y

    1976-04-01

    Many dyes, for instance methylene blue, rose bengal, and eosin, are known as photosensitizers, and in the presence of molecular oxygen they induce cell lethality and skin photosensitivity (1-4). Several dyes are used in cosmetic products, particularly in lipsticks. Human lip skin is therefore exposed to potential danger from dye-sensitized phototoxic reactions. Using an in vivo system of mammalian skin, such as the abdominal skin of rabbits, we established screening tests for the phototoxic potential of synthetic dyes in two ways: (a) intracutaneous injection; (b) topical application with and without damaging the barrier property of the stratum corneum. In the intracutaneous injection assay, distinct phototoxic reactions were induced by rose bengal, eosin Y.S., and dibromofluorescein. When these dyes were applied topically to intact skin, no phototoxic reactions were observed. Phototoxic reactions were, however, elicited when the dye solutions were applied to abraded or scratched skin. The intensity of phototoxic reaction was found to be influenced by the vehicle in which the dyes were suspended. Phototoxic reaction to the dyes was induced by artificial light as well as by sunlight. By using commercially available fluorescent lamps with different spectral emissions, the action spectra for the phototoxic reaction to these dyes were investigated and it was found that the maximum phototoxicities of the dyes were manifested by light within a spectral range of 400-600 nm. Further studies on action spectra, using a monochromatic irradiation system, revealed a high correlation between the action spectra of the dyes and their absorption spectra. Maximum effective wavelength for the phototoxic reaction of eosin Y.S. was 525 nm. This topical as well as intradermal assay for assesing phototoxic reaction to synthetic dyes in living skin will be a practical and useful measure for studying the phototoxicity of the dyes.

  19. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  20. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Samantha; Bryan, Julie

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience a skin reaction to their treatment. In an attempt to assist clinicians in the recognition and care of these radiotherapy-induced skin reactions, an assessment and management tool has been designed for use. This patient-focused assessment tool has been distributed across the counties that the authors' trust serves. It has standardised the care of patients with these skin reactions, so that the patients can be treated with the same interventions whether they visit their GP, hospital or district nurse.

  1. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Samantha; Bryan, Julie

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience a skin reaction to their treatment. In an attempt to assist clinicians in the recognition and care of these radiotherapy-induced skin reactions, an assessment and management tool has been designed for use. This patient-focused assessment tool has been distributed across the counties that the authors' trust serves. It has standardised the care of patients with these skin reactions, so that the patients can be treated with the same interventions whether they visit their GP, hospital or district nurse. PMID:26911177

  2. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  3. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  4. 16O + 16O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in 34S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yasutaka

    2016-05-01

    The structures of excited states in 34S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method(GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity super de formed(SD) bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are δ2 and π2 for the positive-parity SD bands and π1δ1 for the negative parity SD band.

  5. Phenomenological and semi-microscopic analysis for 16O and 12C elastically scattering on the nucleus of 16O and 12C at Energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh; Burtebayev, N.; Amangeldi, N.; Gridnev, K. A.; Rusek, K.; Kerimkulov, Zh; Maltsev, N.

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear burning process proceeds from the conservation of the most abundant element hydrogen to helium, then from helium to carbon and oxygen, and then from these to heavier elements. Some of the key reactions for the carbon and oxygen burning stages of the nucleosynthesis are 12C+12C and 16O+16O leading to all possible final states. This paper contains the experimental measurements of 12C+12C and 16O+16O angular distributions performed at the cyclotron DC-60 in Astana, Kazakhstan. The extracted beam of 16O and 12C was accelerated up to two energies 1.75 and 1.5 MeV/n and then directed to an Al2O3 target of thickness 20 μg/cm2 and a carbon self-supporting target of thickness 17.4 μg/cm2. The angular distribution calculations were performed using both the phenomenological optical potential (SPI-GENOA) code and the double folding potential (FRESCO) code.

  6. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    van Willigen, H.

    1990-12-01

    During the period covered by this report research has been concerned with the application of Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) in the study of photo-induced electron transfer reactions. Donor molecules used in this investigation have been various porphyrins, whereas quinones were used as acceptor molecules.

  7. A non-terrestrial 16O-rich isotopic composition for the protosolar nebula.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Ko; Chaussidon, Marc

    2005-03-31

    The discovery in primitive components of meteorites of large oxygen isotopic variations that could not be attributed to mass-dependent fractionation effects has raised a fundamental question: what is the composition of the protosolar gas from which the host grains formed? This composition is probably preserved in the outer layers of the Sun, but the resolution of astronomical spectroscopic measurements is still too poor to be useful for comparison with planetary material. Here we report a precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind from particles implanted in the outer hundreds of nanometres of metallic grains in the lunar regolith. These layers of the grains are enriched in 16O by >20 +/- 4 per thousand relative to the Earth, Mars and bulk meteorites, which implies the existence in the solar accretion disk of reactions--as yet unknown--that were able to change the 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios in a way that was not dependent strictly on the mass of the isotope. Photochemical self-shielding of the CO gas irradiated by ultraviolet light may be one of these key processes, because it depends on the abundance of the isotopes, rather than their masses. PMID:15800617

  8. Drug-induced photosensitivity: Photoallergic and phototoxic reactions.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Filipe; Rato, Margarida; Martins, César

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced photosensitivity refers to the development of cutaneous disease due to the interaction between a given chemical agent and sunlight. Photosensitivity reactions can be classified as phototoxic or photoallergic. Sometimes, there is an overlap between these two patterns, making their distinction particularly difficult for the clinician. We review the drugs that have been implicated as photosensitizers, the involved mechanism, and their clinical presentations. The main topical agents that cause contact photosensitivity are the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, whereas the main systemic drugs inducing photosensitivity are antimicrobials, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, and cardiovascular drugs. Drug-induced photosensitivity remains a common clinical problem and is often underdiagnosed. PMID:27638435

  9. Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shi, Meng; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2015-03-15

    Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol has been studied. UV B, liquid state and sufficient exposure time are essential conditions to the photochemical change of trans-resveratrol. Three principal compounds, cis-resveratrol, 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione, were successively generated in the reaction solution of trans-resveratrol (0.25 mM, 100% ethanol) under 100 μW cm(-2) UV B radiation for 4h. cis-Resveratrol, originated from isomerization of trans-resveratrol, resulted in 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol through photocyclisation reaction meanwhile loss of 2 H. 2,4,6-Phenanthrenetriol played a role of photosensitizer producing singlet oxygen in the reaction pathway. The singlet oxygen triggered [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of trans-resveratrol, and then resulted in the generation of 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione through photorearrangement and oxidation reaction. The singlet oxygen reaction was closely related to the substrate concentration of trans-resveratrol in solution.

  10. Alpha Induced Reaction Cross Section Calculations of Tantalum Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Ugur, F. A.; Gokce, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    The fusion energy is attractive as an energy source because the fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and so fusion will not contribute to environmental problems, such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. The fusion reaction does not produce radioactive nuclides and it is not self-sustaining, as is a fission reaction when a critical mass of fissionable material is assembled. Since the fusion reaction is easily and quickly quenched the primary sources of heat to drive such an accident are heat from radioactive decay and heat from chemical reactions. Both the magnitude and time dependence of the generation of heat from radioactive decay can be controlled by proper selection and design of materials. Tantalum is one of the candidate materials for the first wall of fusion reactors and for component parts of irradiation chambers. Accurate experimental cross-section data of alpha induced reactions on Tantalum are also of great importance for thermonuclear reaction rate determinations since the models used in the study of stellar nucleosynthesis are strongly dependent on these rates (Santos et al. in J Phys G 26:301, 2000). In this study, neutron-production cross sections for target nuclei 181Ta have been investigated up to 100 MeV alpha energy. The excitation functions for (α, xn) reactions (x = 1, 2, 3) have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. And also neutron emission spectra for 181Ta (α, xn) reactions at 26.8 and 45.2 MeV have been calculated. The mean free path multiplier parameters has been investigated. The pre-equilibrium results have been calculated by using the hybrid model, the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in literature.

  11. Neutrino magnetic moment effects in neutrino nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Athar, M.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some low energy neutrino nucleus reactions induced by neutrinos (antineutrinos) having a magnetic moment of the order of 10{sup {minus}9}{minus}10{sup {minus}10} Bohr magneton are studied. It is found that in the case of {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, and {sup 16}O, the detection of very low energy scalar and isoscalar elastic and inelastic reactions induced by the isoscalar vector currents can provide a better limit on the neutrino magnetic moment.

  12. [Symptoms and treatment of radiation-induced reactions].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Idziak, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods of cancer treatment alone or in combination with chemotherapy. It is applied in about 60% of oncological patients. However, in spite of its clinical usefulness, radiotherapy is associated with a high risk of radiation-induced side effects, including dermatitis, enteritis, cystitis, pericarditis, pneumonia or depression, sexual function disorders, cardiomiopathy, coronary heart disease, anomalies of heart valves and development of second malignant tumor. The early diagnosis and proper treatment of radiation-induced side effects have a major impact on patients` quality of life and future prognosis. Radiation reactions can be categorized as acute or late, occurring before and after six months after radiotherapy. Among the most common acute reactions there were observed: skin rash, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, fever and radiation pneumonitis. Within reference to the late complications, we distinguish for instance fibrosis of organs, a radiation necrosis of bone, ulcers, fistulas, sexual dysfunction and the development of second malignant carcinomas. PMID:26039025

  13. Photodynamic reactions induced by compounds derived from lichens.

    PubMed

    Wennersten, G

    1979-01-01

    Contact dermatitis from lichens is now well documented but the possible influence of exposure to sunlight is less clear. Positive reactions on photopatch testing has recently been described, but whether this represented an unspecific exacerbation or a true photoallergic response was difficult to evaluate. In this study 13 different substances derived from lichens commonly found in nature were investigated with regard to their capacity to induce photo-oxidative membrane damage, as revealed by the photohemolysis technique. It was found that the earlier suggested ability to induce photosensitization could be confirmed for several of the lichen compounds investigated. It was also shown that singlet state excited oxygen may participate to some degree in some of these reactions.

  14. Neutrino-induced Reactions and Neutrino Scattering with Nuclear Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, Kyungsik; Kajino, T.

    2016-02-01

    We reviewed present status regarding experimental data and theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data. Finally, we discussed that one step-process in the reaction is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis.

  15. Including higher energy data in the R-matrix extrapolation of 12C(α , γ) 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, R.; Uberseder, E.; Azuma, R. E.; Best, A.; Brune, C.; Goerres, J.; Sayre, D.; Smith, K.; Wiescher, M.

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenological R-matrix technique has proved to be very successful in describing the cross sections of interest to nuclear astrophysics. One of the key reactions is 12C(α , γ) 16O, which has frequently been analyzed using R-matrix but usually over a limited energy range. This talk will present an analysis that, for the first time, extends above the proton and α1 separation energies taking advantage of a large amount of additional data. The analysis uses the new publicly released JINA R-matrix code AZURE2. The traditional reaction channels of 12C(α , γ) 16O, 12C(α ,α0) 12, and 16N(βα) 12C are included but are now accompanied by the higher energy reactions. By explicitly including higher energy levels, the uncertainty in the extrapolation of the cross section is significantly reduced. This is accomplished by more stringent constraints on interference combination and background poles by the additional higher energy data and by considering new information about subthresold states from transfer reactions. The result is the most comprehensive R-matrix analysis of the 12C(α , γ) 16O reaction to date. This research was supported in part by the ND CRC and funded by the NSF through Grant No. Phys-0758100, and JINA through Grant No. Phys-0822648.

  16. Discreteness-induced transitions in multibody reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yohei; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J

    2016-08-01

    A decrease in system size can induce qualitatively different behavior compared to the macroscopic behavior of the corresponding large-size system. The mechanisms of this transition, which is known as the small-size transition, can be attributed to either a relative increase in the noise intensity or to the discreteness of the state space due to the small system size. The former mechanism has been intensively investigated using several toy and realistic models. However, the latter has rarely been analyzed and is sometimes confused with the former, because a toy model that extracts the essence of the discreteness-induced transition mechanism is lacking. In this work, we propose a one- and three-body reaction system as a minimal model of the discreteness-induced transition and derive the conditions under which this transition occurs in more complex systems. This work enriches our understanding of the influence of small system size on system behavior. PMID:27627279

  17. Discreteness-induced transitions in multibody reaction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yohei; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2016-08-01

    A decrease in system size can induce qualitatively different behavior compared to the macroscopic behavior of the corresponding large-size system. The mechanisms of this transition, which is known as the small-size transition, can be attributed to either a relative increase in the noise intensity or to the discreteness of the state space due to the small system size. The former mechanism has been intensively investigated using several toy and realistic models. However, the latter has rarely been analyzed and is sometimes confused with the former, because a toy model that extracts the essence of the discreteness-induced transition mechanism is lacking. In this work, we propose a one- and three-body reaction system as a minimal model of the discreteness-induced transition and derive the conditions under which this transition occurs in more complex systems. This work enriches our understanding of the influence of small system size on system behavior.

  18. Reactions induced by 11Be beam at Rex-Isolde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pietro, A.; Amorini, F.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Papa, M.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Randisi, G.; Rizzo, F.; Santonocito, D.; Scalia, G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Perez-Bernal, F.; Borge, M. J. G.; Vidal, A. Maira; Tengblad, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Jeppesen, H.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Milin, M.; Raabe, R.; Zadro, M.

    2011-10-01

    The collision induced by the three Beryllium isotopes, 9,10,11Be, on a 64Zn target were investigated at Ec.m. ≈ 1.4 the Coulomb barrier. The experiments with the radioactive 10,11Be beams were performed at the Rex-Isolde facility at CERN. In the case of 9,10Be, elastic scattering angular distributions were measured whereas, in the 11Be case, the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. A strong damping of the quasielastic cross-section was observed in the 11Be case, in the angular range around the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. In this latter case a large total-reaction cross-section is found. Such a cross-section is more than a factor of two larger than the ones extracted in the reactions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the 11Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  19. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leclercq-Willain, C.; Coc, A.; Barhoumi, S.; Aguer, P.; Rolfs, C.; Kunz, R.; Hammer, J. W.; Mayer, A.; Paradellis, T.; Kossionides, S.; Chronidou, C.; Spyrou, K.; degl'Innocenti, S.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Providencia, C.; Wolters, H.; Soares, J.; Grama, C.; Rahighi, J.; Shotter, A.; Lamehi Rachti, M.

    1999-08-01

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 <=Z <=14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 106 K to 1010 K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  20. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    PubMed

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present. PMID:21175859

  1. Two-photon-induced cycloreversion reaction of chalcone photodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träger, J.; Härtner, S.; Heinzer, J.; Kim, H.-C.; Hampp, N.

    2008-04-01

    The photocleavage reaction of chalcone photodimers has been studied using a two-photon process. For this purpose, a novel chalcone dimer has been synthesized as a low molecular weight model substance for polymer bound chalcones and its photochemistry triggered by two-photon-absorption (2PA) has been investigated using a pulsed frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser. The 2PA-induced cycloreversion reaction selectively leads to the cleavage of the chalcone photodimers resulting in the formation of monomeric chalcone molecules. Hence, as an application chalcones can be used as a photosensitive linker which can be cleaved beyond an UV-absorbing barrier. The 2PA cross section of the chalcone photodimer was determined to be of 1.1 × 10 -49 cm 4 s photon -1 (11 GM).

  2. Establishing a theory for deuteron-induced surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-09-01

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the prior formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the 93Nb(d ,p )X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states. Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. Finally, we make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.

  3. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Potel, G; Nunes, F M; Thompson, I J

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the priormore » formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.« less

  4. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Potel, G; Nunes, F M; Thompson, I J

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the prior formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.

  5. Development of {gamma}-ray detectors for {sup 16}O(p,p'{gamma}) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Ou, I.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2012-11-12

    The {gamma} ray production in neutral-current (NC) neutrino-oxygen interaction is very important to the detection of neutrinos from supernova explosion in a neutrino experiment, since those {gamma} rays can become extra signals or unexpected background in the energy region from 5 MeV to 30 MeV. We propose the experiment to measure {gamma} rays in {sup 16}O(p,p') reaction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka) to provide good information on the {gamma}-ray emission spectra in neutrino-oxygen reactions. We present the design of {gamma}-ray detectors (NaI, CsI, HPGe), which will be used in proposed experiment.

  6. Spin Modes, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji

    2008-11-11

    Recent advances in shell model calculations of spin modes in nuclei with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians are discussed. Important roles of tensor interaction in shell evolutions toward drip-lines are pointed out. Electromagnetic transitions in exotic carbon isotopes are investigated. Anomalous supressions of transition strengths in the isotopes are found to be rather well explained. Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni are studied, and implications on production yields of heavy elements in stars are discussed.

  7. Exercise-induced anaphylactic reaction to grain flours.

    PubMed

    Armentia, A; Martin-Santos, J M; Blanco, M; Carretero, L; Puyo, M; Barber, D

    1990-08-01

    On rare occasions, reproducible exercise-induced anaphylactic reactions (EIA) occur in some patients only after certain foods have been eaten before exercise, yet eating these foods alone or exercising alone causes no symptoms. This special response has been evident sometimes with shellfish, nuts, and wheat. We describe a patient in whom grain flour was a triggering factor for EIA. Skin tests and RAST were positive for grain flours. Normally, the patient tolerated grain flours without symptoms and IgE mechanisms had not been suspected. Testing for food hypersensitivity may be important in patients with EIA.

  8. Shock induced chemical reactions in energetic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reding, Derek J.

    Energetic structural materials (ESMs) constitute a new class of materials that provide dual functions of strength and energetic characteristics. ESMs are typically composed of micron-scale or nano-scale intermetallic mixtures or mixtures of metals and metal oxides, polymer binders, and structural reinforcements. Voids are included to produce a composite with favorable chemical reaction characteristics. In this thesis, a continuum approach is used to simulate gas-gun or explosive loading experiments where a strong shock is induced in the ESM by an impacting plate. Algorithms are developed to obtain equations of state of mixtures. It is usually assumed that the shock loading increases the energy of the ESM and causes the ESM to reach the transition state. It is also assumed that the activation energy needed to reach the transition state is a function of the temperature of the mixture. In this thesis, it is proposed that the activation energy is a function of temperature and the stress state of the mixture. The incorporation of such an activation energy is selected in this thesis. Then, a multi-scale chemical reaction model for a heterogeneous mixture is introduced. This model incorporates reaction initiation, propagation, and extent of completed reaction in spatially heterogeneous distributions of reactants. A new model is proposed for the pore collapse of mixtures. This model is formulated by modifying the Carol, Holt, and Nesterenko spherically symmetric model to include mixtures and compressibility effects. Uncertainties in the model result from assumptions in formulating the models for continuum relationships and chemical reactions in mixtures that are distributed heterogeneously in space and in numerical integration of the resulting equations. It is important to quantify these uncertainties. In this thesis, such an uncertainty quantification is investigated by systematically identifying the physical processes that occur during shock compression of ESMs which are

  9. Acute skin reaction suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Sibaud, Vincent; David, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Resseguier, Sarah; Radut, Roxana; Attal, Justine; Meyer, Nicolas; Delord, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The combination of localized radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors represents a promising therapeutic strategy for various cancers, including metastatic melanoma. Radiation therapy may enhance tumor antigen presentation and cytokine release, which may optimize the systemic antitumor immune response induced by these immunotherapeutic antibodies, with a potential delayed abscopal effect. However, clinical experience of using immune checkpoint inhibitors with concurrent radiotherapy remains scarce. We report here for the first time a case suggestive of acute skin radiosensitization induced by pembrolizumab, with a suggestive time relationship between the completion of ionizing radiation, drug administration, and rapid onset of the skin reaction. This suggests that radiation therapy may also interact rapidly with anti-programmed-death 1 antibodies. Therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing this combination therapy in advanced cancers.

  10. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O with /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Welch, R.B.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 90- to 150-MeV /sup 16/O ions. A comparison of the maxima of the mass-yield curves measured in this experiment with those for the reactions of /sup 18/O ions with /sup 249/Cf shows different shifts from those that have been measured for reactions of the /sup 16,18/O and /sup 20,22/Ne ion pairs with /sup 248/Cm. However, the shifts appear similar to those recently measured for reactions of these ion pairs with /sup 254/Es.

  11. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  12. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan.

  13. Tigecycline-induced Drug Fever and Leukemoid Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qian-Qian; Qin, Ling; Ruan, Gui-Ren; Chen, Ru-Xuan; Luan, Zi-Jian; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we describe a patient in whom tigecycline-induced drug fever and leukemoid reaction (LR) after 3 weeks of therapy for pneumonia. A 62-year-old man developed aspiration pneumonia on February 1, 2015. He had received multiple antibiotics at another hospital, but did not respond well. Disease rapidly progressed, and he was referred to our department on February 14. We adjusted the antibiotic therapy to tigecycline + vancomycin, and added voriconazole to empiric antifungal therapy. Pneumonia largely improved, and we discontinued vancomycin and voriconazole on February 28. With tigecycline monotherapy, his clinical status remained stable. On March 7, he developed high fever and LR (white blood cell count: 38.25 × 109/L). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, and CD8+ T cells had been abnormally activated. After a careful physical examination and laboratory investigation, we confirmed that primary infection did not progress and no other cause was evident. So we figured fever and LR might be induced by tigecycline. After discontinuing tigecycline and adding low-dose steroid, fever and LR totally resolved in 3 days, which further confirmed our diagnosis. According to this case and literature review, drug-induced hypersensitivity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever and LR when the therapeutic duration of tetracycline approximates 3 weeks. Monitoring T-cell subsets may facilitate early diagnosis. When necessary, we should discontinue the suspected drug to confirm diagnosis. PMID:26559254

  14. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Shandilya, Bhavesh K; Sharma, Rahul; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O(18) + O(16)O(16) and O(16) + O(16)O(18)) in O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take. PMID:26472365

  15. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  16. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  17. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: prevention and cure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kàren

    This article describes the prophylactic use of Mepitel Film in three breast-cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. Each patient had significant risk factors for developing severe radiotherapy-induced skin reactions. This article details the experience encountered by these patients through their treatment courses, with observations by the review radiographers responsible for the care and support of these patients during their radiotherapy and the patients themselves. The film was found to be easy to use by the clinical team and resulted in a significant reduction in adverse side effects to the skin, with an associated improvement in patient satisfaction. There was found to be a financial benefit with the use of Mepitel Film when compared to the foam dressings often required for wound management if the patients had suffered moist desquamation. PMID:25203851

  18. Reaction-induced strain localization: Torsion experiments on dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Burlini, Luigi; Grobety, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of a dolomite marble from Mt. Frerone (Adamello, N-Italy) during decarbonation to calcite and periclase in torsion experiments. Tests were performed in a Paterson gas-medium apparatus on cylindrical samples of 10 mm diameter and 10 mm length. Experiments were conducted at 800 °C, 300 MPa confining pressure under both vented and non-vented conditions, up to a maximum bulk shear strain of about γ = 1.8, at different strain rates (3 × 10 - 5 s - 1 up to 3 × 10 - 4 s - 1 ). Under hydrostatic conditions the nominal equilibrium P(CO 2) should be around 100 MPa, but in the vented experiments the CO 2 was free to escape, causing the breakdown of dolomite. During the decomposition, deformation was systematically localized at the ends of the specimens, near the porous spacers into a fine-grained mixture of calcite and periclase. Due to the low permeability of the marble, pore fluid could not escape from the central part of the sample building up CO 2 pressure which suppressed the decarbonation reaction. The fluid pressure embrittled the material and caused the development of en-echelon tension fractures, inclined opposite to the sense of shear. We conclude that decarbonation produced a weak polyphase matrix composed of submicron sized reaction products. Such a small grain size induced strain localization which was probably promoted by a switch from grain-size insensitive to grain-size sensitive deformation mechanism.

  19. /sup 16/O(n, p)/sup 16/N: A fast neutron detector for rapid tissue inhomogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, J.L.; Watts, R.J.; Milavickas, L.R.

    1981-05-01

    We have devised a transit dose technique for fast neutron therapy treatment planning based on the /sup 16/O(n, p)/sup 16/N reaction in recirculating water, and have determined the effect of simulated bone and lung inhomogeneities in phantom. An effective threshold of 10.2 MeV in the /sup 16/O(n, p) reaction is exploited to detect transmitted neutrons without the need for detector collimation. This system has been demonstrated with 14 MeV (d, T) neutrons and with cyclotron produced p(42)+Be neutrons. /sup 16/N decays to the 6.13 MeV excited states of /sup 16/O in 7.14 s, allowing for easy identification by NaI(Tl) and for rapid recirculation. The transmission of fast neutrons can thus be related to an effective thickness of soft tissue, providing a rapid and direct measure of the effects of inhomogeneities under actual treatment conditions, with the 10 MeV threshold providing a useful degree of insensitivity to multiply scattered neutrons. Equivalent thicknesses of compact bone and lung relative to water were found to be 1.4 and 0.34 respectively, closely resembling the effective thicknesses for Cobalt-60 gamma rays.

  20. Elastic scattering of polarised deuterons from 16O at 200, 400 and 700 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sen, Nguyen; Yanlin, Ye; Arvieux, J.; Gaillard, G.; Bonin, B.; Boudard, A.; Bruge, G.; Lugol, J. C.; Hasegawa, T.; Soga, F.; Antonuk, L. E.; Cameron, J. M.; Lam, S. T.; Neilson, G. C.; Roy, G.; Sheppard, D. M.; Babinet, R.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions of cross section, and Ay and Ayy analysing powers were measured for polarised deuteron elastic scattering from 16O at 200, 400 and 700 MeV. The data at 200 MeV bear evidence of the nuclear rainbow phenomenon while those at 400 and 700 MeV are reminiscent of the proton scattering results at equivalent energies. The data were analysed in terms of the optical model. The real central potential shape changes from an attractive Woods-Saxon form at 200 MeV to a wine-bottle-bottom form with a repulsive interior at 700 MeV. The total reaction cross sections deduced display a clear nuclear transparency effect in the present energy domain in agreement with predictions from the Glauber theory optical limit. Comparison with previous results for 40Ca and 58Ni targets is made.

  1. The role of primary 16O as a neutron poison in AGB stars and fluorine primary production at halo metallicities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.

    The discovery of a historical bug in the s-post-process AGB code obtained so far by the Torino group forced us to reconsider the role of primary 16O in the 13C-pocket, produced by the 13C(alpha , n)16O reaction, as important neutron poison for the build up of the s-elements at Halo metallicities. The effect is noticeable only for the highest 13C-pocket efficiencies (cases ST*2 and ST). For Galactic disc metallicities, the bug effect is negligible. A comparative analysis of the neutron poison effect of other primary isotopes (12C, 22Ne and its progenies) is presented. The effect of proton captures, by 14N(n, p)14C, boosts a primary production of fluorine in halo AGB stars, with [F/Fe] comparable to [C/Fe], without affecting the s-elements production.

  2. Deformation effects on sub-barrier fusion cross sections in 16O+174,176Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbongshi, Tapan; Kalita, K.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Mukul, Ish; Dubey, R.; Madhavan, N.; Lin, C. J.; Shamlath, A.; Laveen, P. V.; Shareef, M.; Kumar, Neeraj; Jisha, P.; Sharma, P.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Couplings with various reaction channels are known to enhance sub-barrier fusion cross sections by several orders in magnitude. However, a few open questions still remain. For example, the influence of higher order static deformations on sub-barrier fusion cross sections is yet to be comprehensively understood. Purpose: We study the role of hexadecapole nuclear deformation effect on sub-barrier fusion cross sections. Also, this work aims to extract hexadecapole deformation (β4) in nuclei in the lanthanide region. Method: The evaporation residue (ER) excitation functions for 16O+174,176Yb were measured at laboratory beam energies (Elab) in the range of 64.6-103.6 MeV. Measurements were carried out by employing the recoil mass spectrometer Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer (HIRA) at IUAC, New Delhi. Fusion barrier distributions (BDs) were extracted from data. Results from the experiment were subjected to coupled-channels analysis, in which β4 was varied as a free parameter. Results: Experimental fusion cross sections at energies below the barrier expectedly showed strong enhancement compared to the predictions from the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. Data were satisfactorily reproduced after inclusion of negative β4 for both the targets in the coupled-channels calculation. Conclusions: The significant role of hexadecapole deformation was observed in the sub-barrier fusion of 16O+174,176Yb. The proposed value of β4 reproduced the measured fusion excitation function reasonably well. The BDs from these data were also extracted but no definitive conclusions could be drawn from them.

  3. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  4. A HETEROGENEOUS CHEMICAL ORIGIN FOR THE {sup 16}O-ENRICHED AND {sup 16}O-DEPLETED RESERVOIRS OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Gerardo

    2010-04-10

    The oldest solids formed in the solar system, calcium-aluminum inclusions, are {sup 16}O-enriched compared to chondrules, asteroids, Earth, and Mars. Based on the preliminary measurements of the solar wind by Genesis, the Sun also appears to be {sup 16}O-enriched. This distribution of oxygen isotopes in the solar system cannot be reconciled via conventional mass-dependent isotopic fractionation processes and instead require the existence and/or production of distinct {sup 16}O-enriched and {sup 16}O-depleted reservoirs in the early solar system. The origin of these distinct reservoirs is unknown, although several mechanisms have been proposed to date including the following: (1) the injection of pure {sup 16}O by a supernova into the protoplanetary disk or parent molecular cloud, (2) self-shielding of CO in the parent molecular cloud or protoplanetary disk, (3) symmetry-dependent chemical fractionation processes in the protoplanetary disk, and (4) Galactic chemical evolution. While some of these proposals have been ruled out, the validity of others is still open. Here I propose that the {sup 16}O-enriched and {sup 16}O-depleted reservoirs present in the early solar system originated in the parent molecular cloud via the heterogeneous chemical processes that form H{sub 2}O, a significant oxygen reservoir, on the surface of interstellar (IS) dust grains in dense molecular clouds, the astrophysical setting where star formation is observed to occur. As a consequence, this model predicts that molecular cloud H{sub 2}O and possibly other IS solids inherited from the molecular cloud were depleted in {sup 16}O compared to the bulk gas-phase O present, thus providing distinct {sup 16}O reservoirs at the earliest stages of planetary formation.

  5. Will water act as a photocatalyst for cluster phase chemical reactions? Vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Zeb C.; Takahashi, Kaito; Skodje, Rex T.; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-04-28

    The possibility of water catalysis in the vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol is investigated using ab initio dynamical simulations of small methanediol-water clusters. Quantum chemistry calculations employing clusters with one or two water molecules reveal that the barrier to dehydration is lowered by over 20 kcal/mol because of hydrogen-bonding at the transition state. Nevertheless, the simulations of the reaction dynamics following OH-stretch excitation show little catalytic effect of water and, in some cases, even show an anticatalytic effect. The quantum yield for the dehydration reaction exhibits a delayed threshold effect where reaction does not occur until the photon energy is far above the barrier energy. Unlike thermally induced reactions, it is argued that competition between reaction and the irreversible dissipation of photon energy may be expected to raise the dynamical threshold for the reaction above the transition state energy. It is concluded that quantum chemistry calculations showing barrier lowering are not sufficient to infer water catalysis in photochemical reactions, which instead require dynamical modeling.

  6. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  7. Model-independent analysis of Airy structures in the {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C and {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O elastic scattering differential cross sections at 13-22 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Korda, V. Yu.; Molev, A. S.; Klepikov, V. F.; Korda, L. P.

    2009-02-15

    We present the results of the model-independent analysis of Airy structures in the {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C and {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O elastic scattering differential cross sections at 13-22 MeV/nucleon. The analysis has been performed with help of a procedure based on the application of the evolutionary algorithm, which enables us to extract the nuclear part of the scattering matrix S{sub N}(l) as a complex function of angular momentum directly from the scattering data. Contrary to the commonly used model approaches, our procedure gives the better fits and leads to the S{sub N}(l) representations defined by the moduli and the nuclear phases exhibiting smooth monotonic dependencies on l.

  8. Excited states in neutron-rich 188W produced by an 18O-induced 2-neutron transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, T.; Ishii, T.; Makii, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Shigematsu, S.; Matsuda, M.; Ideguchi, E.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.; Morikawa, T.; Walker, P. M.; Oi, M.

    2006-11-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich 188W have been populated using a 186W(18O,16O) reaction. In-beam γ-rays were measured in coincidence with scattered particles detected by a high-resolution ΔE-E Si telescope. In this experiment, the ground-state band has been identified up to I π = 8+. The γ band, the K π = 2- octupole band, and a 2-quasiparticle state were also observed. The results are compared with predictions of self-consistent HFB cranking calculations and blocked-BCS multi-quasiparticle calculations.

  9. Evaluation on thermal explosion induced by slightly exothermic interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ma-Hong; Li, Yong-Fu; Sun, Jin-Hua; Hasegawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-09-10

    An asphalt-salt mixture (ASM), which once caused a fire and explosion in a reprocessing plant, was prepared by imitating the real bituminization process of waste on a lab scale to evaluate its actual thermal hazards. Heat flux reaction calorimeters were used to measure the release of heat for the simulated ASM at a constant heating rate and at a constant temperature, respectively. Experimental results show that the reaction in the ASM below about 250 degrees C is a slightly exothermic interface reaction between the asphalt and the salt particles contained in the asphalt, and that the heat release rate increases sharply above about 250 degrees C due to melting of the salt particles. The reaction rates were formulated on the basis of an assumed reaction model, and the kinetic parameters were determined. Using the model with the kinetic parameters, temperature changes with time and drum-radius axes for the ASM-filled drum were numerically simulated assuming a one-dimensional infinite cylinder system, where the drum was being cooled at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. The minimum filling temperature, at which the runaway reaction (MFTRR) can occur for the simulated ASM in the drum is about 194 degrees C. Furthermore, a very good linear correlation exists between this MFTRR and the initial radius of salt particles formed in the bituminization product. The critical filling temperature to the runaway reaction is about 162 degrees C for the asphalt-salt mixture, containing zero-size salt particles, filled in the same drum at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. Thus, the runaway reaction will never occur in the drum filled with the asphalt-salt mixture under the conditions of the filling temperature below 162 degrees C and a constant ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. As a consequence, the ASM explosion occurred in the reprocessing plant likely was due to a slightly exothermically reaction and self heating.

  10. Metal/metal exothermic reactions induced by low velocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, D.L.; Davis, J.J.; Miller, P.J.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses experimental results from an effort conducted to discern the basic mechanism of reactions in porous metal/metal compositions under rapid plastic flow conditions. Small-scale impact tests were performed on various intermetallic mixtures: 3CuO + 2Al, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2Al, Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si. The addition of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) to the metal/metal mixtures has been demonstrated to affect the extent of the reactions. Real-time emissivity and species evolution measurements of the reacting materials were used to discern the chemical reactions occurring under rapid plastic flow conditions.

  11. Ciprofloxacin induced bullous fixed drug reaction: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are seen in about 1–2% cases. Fixed drug reaction (FDR) is responsible for about 10% of all ADRs. It is a delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction that occurs as lesions recurs at the same skin site due to repeated intake of an offending drug. The most common drugs causing fixed drug eruption (FDE) are analgesics, antibiotics, muscle relaxants and anticonvulsants. FDE due to ciprofloxacin has been reported earlier also, but bullous variant of FDR is rare. We hereby report three case reports of bullous FDR caused due to ciprofloxacin. PMID:25949980

  12. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator ) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, (α,p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the 7Li+α resonance scatterings are presented.

  13. Levetiracetam Induced Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dar, Waseem Raja; Sofi, Najeebullah; Latief, Muzamil; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Kasana, Basharat Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity drug reaction, most frequently associated with antiepileptic drugs, characterized by skin rash, fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, and visceral organ involvement, typically presenting within 8 weeks of initiation of therapy. Management involves prompt withdrawal of the offending drug and use of systemic corticosteroids. We here present a rare case of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam. Only few case reports of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam have been published so far. PMID:27057042

  14. Allergic and pseudoallergic reactions induced by glucocorticoids: a review.

    PubMed

    Ventura, M T; Muratore, L; Calogiuri, G F; Dagnello, M; Buquicchio, R; Nicoletti, A; Altamura, M; Sabbà, C; Tursi, A

    2003-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) represent the most effective treatment for autoimmune and allergic diseases, even if collateral effects are not rare, especially endocrine and immunosuppressive manifestations. Moreover, these drugs can develop adverse immunological reactions of I, III or IV type. Though immediate adverse reactions caused by systemic therapy with GCs are not very frequent, the possible beginning of anaphylactic and pseudo-anaphylactic manifestations in patients undergoing therapy with these drugs has to be considered. It has been observed that immediate adverse reactions usually are happened in asthmatic patients and in patients obliged to assume GCs again and again because of their pathology (e.g, kidney transplant). Other risk factors resulted to be female sex and hypersensibility to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Both in the cases of pseudo-allergic and allergic reactions, the pharmacological principle is hardly the responsible agent for the reaction; instead the excipients in drugs are often implicated (succinate salt, sulphites and carboxy-methyl-cellulose). It is possible that the IgE-response is highly specific for a fixed GC molecule as well depending on the way of administration and its salification. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that in patients with a first type allergic reaction to GCs there is a fourth type, sensitization to GCs, which is not usually diagnosed and even comes before IgE sensitization. Third type hypersensibility reactions may occur, too. Since GCs are large-scale drugs, also in emergency medicine and reanimation, allergic sensitization towards them, although infrequent, gives many interventionist problems. In the light of this feature, it seems of crucial importance to verify the tolerance toward other GC molecules. And in particular, it has been noted that patients presenting immediate reactions to hydrocortisone (HC) and methylprednisolone (MP) could tolerate prednisone and prednisolone per os and second-generation GCs, such as

  15. [DRUG INDUCED EXANTHEMA AND SEVERE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTIONS].

    PubMed

    Bensaïd, Benoît; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) are delayed hypersensivities. Their clinical presentation and severity are very diverse ranging from the frequent and benign exanthemas to the rare but severe CADR involving deep organs in the case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or leading to skin bulla and epidermal detachment in toxic epidermal necrolysis. The main differential diagnoses are infections, especially viral ones, which could give clinical symptoms identical to those occurring in CADR.

  16. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha},p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Li+{alpha} resonance scatterings are presented.

  17. Role of breakup and direct processes in deuteron-induced reactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2015-08-01

    Background: Recent studies of deuteron-induced reactions around the Coulomb barrier B pointed out that numerical calculations for deuteron-induced reactions are beyond current capabilities. The statistical model of nuclear reactions was used in this respect since the compound-nucleus (CN) mechanism was considered to be responsible for most of the total-reaction cross section σR in this energy range. However, specific noncompound processes such as the breakup (BU) and direct reactions (DR) should be also considered for the deuteron-induced reactions, making them different from reactions with other incident particles. Purpose: The unitary and consistent BU and DR consideration in deuteron-induced reactions is proved to yield results at variance with the assumption of negligible noncompound components. Method: The CN fractions of σR obtained by analysis of measured neutron angular distributions in deuteron-induced reactions on 27Al, 56Fe, 63,63Cu, and 89Y target nuclei, around B , are compared with the results of an unitary analysis of every reaction mechanism. The latter values have been supported by the previously established agreement with all available deuteron data for 27Al 54,56,-58,natCu, 63,65,natCu and 93Nb. Results: There is a significant difference between the larger CN contributions obtained from measured neutron angular distributions and calculated results of an unitary analysis of every deuteron-interaction mechanism. The decrease of the latter values is mainly due to the BU component. Conclusions: The above-mentioned differences underline the key role of the breakup and direct reactions that should be considered explicitly in the case of deuteron-induced reactions.

  18. Perspective: Vibrational-induced steric effects in bimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kopin

    2015-02-28

    The concept of preferred collision geometry in a bimolecular reaction is at the heart of reaction dynamics. Exemplified by a series of crossed molecular beam studies on the reactions of a C–H stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) with F, Cl, and O({sup 3}P) atoms, two types of steric control of chemical reactivity will be highlighted. A passive control is governed in a reaction with strong anisotropic entry valley that can significantly steer the incoming trajectories. This disorientation effect is illustrated by the F and O({sup 3}P) + CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactions. In the former case, the long-range anisotropic interaction acts like an optical “negative” lens by deflecting the trajectories away from the favored transition-state geometry, and thus inhibiting the bond rupture of the stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}. On the contrary, the interaction between O({sup 3}P) and CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) behaves as a “positive” lens by funneling the large impact-parameter collisions into the cone of acceptance, and thereby enhances the reactivity. As for reactions with relatively weak anisotropic interactions in the entry valley, an active control can be performed by exploiting the polarization property of the infrared excitation laser to polarize the reactants in space, as demonstrated in the reaction of Cl with a pre-aligned CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactant. A simpler case, the end-on versus side-on collisions, will be elucidated for demonstrating a means to disentangle the impact-parameter averaging. A few general remarks about some closely related issues, such as mode-, bond-selectivity, and Polanyi’s rules, are made.

  19. Airy minimum crossing θcm = 90° at Elab = 124 MeV for the 16O + 16O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Sugiyama, Y.; Tomita, T.; Yamanouchi, Y.; Ikezoe, H.; Ideno, K.; Hamada, S.; Sugimitsu, T.; Hijiya, M.; Fujita, H.

    1996-02-01

    We have measured the elastic scattering angular distribution for the 16O + 16O system at Elab = 124 MeV, where a prominent minimum has been observed in the θcm = 90° excitation function. The measured angular distribution shows modulated Airy structures at large angles with a dip at θcm = 90°. It is concluded that the prominent minimum in the excitation function is due to an Airy minimum, most likely to be the third member, crossing 90° at that energy.

  20. Direct measurements of astrophysically important α-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Melina

    2016-03-01

    Understanding stellar evolution is one of the primary objectives of nuclear astrophysics. Reaction rates involving α-particles are often key nuclear physics inputs in stellar models. For instance, there are numerous (α , p) reactions fundamental for the understanding of X-ray bursts and the production of 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, some (α , n) reactions are considered as one of the main neutron sources in the s-process. However, direct measurements of these reactions at relevant astrophysical energies are experimentally challenging because of their small cross section and intensity limitation of radioactive beams. The active target system MUSIC offers a unique opportunity to study (α , p) and (α , n) reactions because its segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range in the excitation function with a single measurement. Recent results on the direct measurement of (α , n) and (α , p) measurements in the MUSIC detector will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User.

  1. Energies of molecular structures in 12C,16O,20Ne,24Mg, and 32S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, G.; Ramasamy, G.; Eudes, P.

    2015-11-01

    The energies of the 12C,16O,20Ne,24Mg, and 32S 4 n nuclei have been determined within a generalized liquid drop model and assuming different planar and three-dimensional shapes of the α molecules: linear chain, triangle, square, tetrahedron, pentagon, trigonal bipyramid, square pyramid, hexagon, octahedron, octagon, and cube. The potential barriers governing the entrance and decay channels via α absorption or emission as well as more symmetric binary and ternary reactions have been compared. The rms radii of the linear chains differ from the experimental rms radii of the ground states. The binding energies of the three-dimensional shapes at the contact point are higher than the ones of the planar configurations. The α particle plus A-4 daughter configuration leads always to the lowest potential barrier. The binding energy can be reproduced within the sum of the binding energy of n α particles plus the number of bonds multiplied by 2.4 MeV or by the sum of the binding energies of one α particle and the daughter nucleus plus the Coulomb energy and the proximity energy.

  2. Physiological environment induces quick response - slow exhaustion reactions.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Noriko; Lu, James; Iba, Keisuke; Tabira, Akito; Yamashita, Shuji; Okada, Yasunori; Flamm, Christoph; Oka, Kotaro; Köhler, Gottfried; Funahashi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    In vivo environments are highly crowded and inhomogeneous, which may affect reaction processes in cells. In this study we examined the effects of intracellular crowding and an inhomogeneity on the behavior of in vivo reactions by calculating the spectral dimension (d(s)), which can be translated into the reaction rate function. We compared estimates of anomaly parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) data with fractal dimensions derived from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image analysis. FCS analysis indicated that the anomalous property was linked to physiological structure. Subsequent TEM analysis provided an in vivo illustration; soluble molecules likely percolate between intracellular clusters, which are constructed in a self-organizing manner. We estimated a cytoplasmic spectral dimension d(s) to be 1.39 ± 0.084. This result suggests that in vivo reactions initially run faster than the same reactions in a homogeneous space; this conclusion is consistent with the anomalous character indicated by FCS analysis. We further showed that these results were compatible with our Monte-Carlo simulation in which the anomalous behavior of mobile molecules correlates with the intracellular environment, leading to description as a percolation cluster, as demonstrated using TEM analysis. We confirmed by the simulation that the above-mentioned in vivo like properties are different from those of homogeneously concentrated environments. Additionally, simulation results indicated that crowding level of an environment might affect diffusion rate of reactant. Such knowledge of the spatial information enables us to construct realistic models for in vivo diffusion and reaction systems. PMID:21960972

  3. Physiological Environment Induces Quick Response – Slow Exhaustion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hiroi, Noriko; Lu, James; Iba, Keisuke; Tabira, Akito; Yamashita, Shuji; Okada, Yasunori; Flamm, Christoph; Oka, Kotaro; Köhler, Gottfried; Funahashi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    In vivo environments are highly crowded and inhomogeneous, which may affect reaction processes in cells. In this study we examined the effects of intracellular crowding and an inhomogeneity on the behavior of in vivo reactions by calculating the spectral dimension (ds), which can be translated into the reaction rate function. We compared estimates of anomaly parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) data with fractal dimensions derived from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image analysis. FCS analysis indicated that the anomalous property was linked to physiological structure. Subsequent TEM analysis provided an in vivo illustration; soluble molecules likely percolate between intracellular clusters, which are constructed in a self-organizing manner. We estimated a cytoplasmic spectral dimension ds to be 1.39 ± 0.084. This result suggests that in vivo reactions initially run faster than the same reactions in a homogeneous space; this conclusion is consistent with the anomalous character indicated by FCS analysis. We further showed that these results were compatible with our Monte-Carlo simulation in which the anomalous behavior of mobile molecules correlates with the intracellular environment, leading to description as a percolation cluster, as demonstrated using TEM analysis. We confirmed by the simulation that the above-mentioned in vivo like properties are different from those of homogeneously concentrated environments. Additionally, simulation results indicated that crowding level of an environment might affect diffusion rate of reactant. Such knowledge of the spatial information enables us to construct realistic models for in vivo diffusion and reaction systems. PMID:21960972

  4. [IgE-induced anaphylactic reaction after eating lamb meat].

    PubMed

    Johansen, Kasper Lorenz; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2014-08-25

    This article presents the case of a 54-year-old male, who was admitted to hospital after suffering a severe anaphylactic reaction after tasting a spoonful of chili con carne and four months later after eating lamb meat. Galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose allergy was suspected and the subsequent blood test showed highly elevated specific IgE levels. Delayed allergy to meat is a relatively new type of allergy and the delayed onset of allergic symptoms poses a diagnostic challenge to the physician. This type of allergy should be considered when there has been no obvious allergen exposition prior to the allergic reaction. PMID:25293709

  5. Relativity versus exchange currents in 16O(e ,e'p )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, J.; Halderson, Dean

    2016-07-01

    Background: The 16O(e ,e'p ) reaction in the quasielastic region has been studied in several experiments to determine spectroscopic factors, hence, the degree to which 16O looks like a closed shell. By varying the kinematics, experimentalists are able to extract response functions which comprise the cross section. However, analysis of the response functions separately produces very different spectroscopic factors. Two calculations led to different conclusions as to whether exchange currents can eliminate the discrepancies. Neither calculation considered relativistic corrections. Purpose: The purpose of the article is to investigate the disagreement as to whether exchange currents are the solution to obtaining consistent spectroscopic factors and to show that relativistic corrections have a much greater influence on providing this consistency. Methods: This calculation employs the recoil corrected continuum shell model, a model that uses a realistic interaction and produces nonspurious scattering states that are solutions to the coupled-channel problems. Pionic and pair contributions to the exchange currents were calculated as developed by Dubach et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 271, 279 (1976), 10.1016/0375-9474(76)90246-3]. Relativistic effects are included by use of the direct Pauli reduction. Results: Contributions of the exchange currents are shown to be insufficient to provide consistent spectroscopic factors. However, the inclusion of relativistic corrections produces spectroscopic factors from the different responses and cross sections which are very similar for both the p1 /2 and the p3 /2 states and both the (|q |,ω )=(460 MeV /c ,100 MeV ) and (|q |,ω )=(570 MeV /c ,172 MeV ) data. The influence of channel coupling is also shown to be significant. Tests of current conservation show that inclusion of the direct Pauli reduction produces small increases in its violation. Conclusions: Results are model dependent. Meson-exchange current contributions are not sufficient

  6. Low-energy deuteron-induced reactions on 93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, P.; Fischer, U.; Honusek, M.; Koning, A. J.; Mrázek, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.; Závorka, L.

    2013-07-01

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2n), (d,2np+nd+t), (d,2nα), and (d,pα) reactions on 93Nb were measured in the energy range from 1 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Then, within a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering and reaction data, the available elastic-scattering data analysis was carried out in order to obtain the optical potential for reaction cross-section calculations. Particular attention was paid to the description of the breakup mechanism and direct reaction stripping and pick-up, followed by pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus calculations. The measured cross sections as well as all available deuteron activation data of 93Nb were compared with results of local model calculations carried out using the codes fresco and stapre-h and both default and particular predictions of the code talys-1.4 and tendl-2012-evaluated data.

  7. New trimethylaluminum-induced mannich-type reaction of hydrazones.

    PubMed

    El Kaim, Laurent; Grimaud, Laurence; Perroux, Yannick; Tirla, Cornelia

    2003-10-31

    Trimethylaluminum addition to N-monoalkyl or N-monoaryl hydrazones followed by aldehyde addition leads to the formation of N-alkylated hydrazones in a new formal Mannich-type process. Addition compounds were also obtained in moderate yields with ketones. The mechanism as well as possible intermediates involved in the reaction are discussed.

  8. Unexpected death due to cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongmei; Zhang, Ji; Ren, Liang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cefuoxime, a second-generation cephalosporin, is used in the treatment of Gram-positive infections. Here, we report a case cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction which led to sudden death of the patient.

  9. Rheological monitoring of phase separation induced by chemical reaction in thermoplastic-modified epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vinh-Tung, C.; Lachenal, G.; Chabert, B.

    1996-12-31

    The phase separation induced by chemical reaction in blends of tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resin with an aromatic diamine hardener and a thermoplastic was monitored. Rheological measurements and morphologies are described.

  10. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  11. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  12. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  13. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the `cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  14. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  15. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  16. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  17. Robotic reactions: Delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  18. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation. PMID:20365620

  19. Kinetics Of Isomerisation Reaction Of Oriented Polyacetylene Induced By Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mammeri, S.; Belloum, M.; Tabacik, V.

    2008-09-23

    The impact of a laser's photons ({lambda} = 514.5 nm) on the surface of polyacetylene films (PA), composed of macromolecules PAcis and PAtrans produces simultaneously thermal and Raman diffusion [1]. The thermal effect initializes the isomerization of macromolecules PAcis to PAtrans [2]; this reaction is exothermic. Samples are polyacetylene oriented films synthesized horizontally or vertically in cis configuration and are subject to different laser powers during intervals of time which vary between 20 s and 250 s. The power (P ({lambda}), mW) of the laser is equivalent to the temperature T, of isomerization [3]. Isotherms are constructed and are characterized by the laser power applied. We have established theoretical models calculations with the aim of determining the kinetic parameters of the reaction of isomerization: the activation energy (Ea), the frequency factor of Arrhenius (A), and the rate constant (k). We concluded that even in the field of seconds, the isomerization is a complex process different from a reaction of order: 1, 7/10, 2/3, 3/5, 1/2, 2/5 and 1/4. The order 2/3 being the most suitable. The study determined, among others, the rate constants k 2/3 (T)(of the order 2/3 of the isomerization reaction)= 0.003337244, 0.0052149, 0.0209636, 0.043727 s-1 respectively for Laser powers 30, 120, 200 and 300 mW; activation energy 17.7844 kcal/mol and a factor of collision 19.066816 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. These results are found to be close to the experimental results studied.

  20. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  1. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  2. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  3. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    PubMed Central

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the ‘cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  4. SET-Induced Biaryl Cross-Coupling: An SRN1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The SET-induced biaryl cross-coupling reaction is established as the first example of a Grignard SRN1 reaction. The reaction is examined within the mechanistic framework of dissociative electron transfer in the presence of a Lewis acid. DFT calculations show that the reaction proceeds through a radical intermediate in the form of an Mg ion-radical cage, which eludes detection in trapping experiments by reacting quickly to form an MgPh2 radical anion intermediate. A new mechanism is proposed. PMID:24564385

  5. [Adverse reaction induced by licorice preparations: clinical analysis of 93 cases].

    PubMed

    Mao, Min; Li, Wei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shu-Xia; Lu, Jin; Chang, Zhang-Fu

    2013-11-01

    Licorice is a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used in clinic. The products,what contain licorice or licorice extract, has early been involved in the field of cosmetics except for the field of pharmaceuticals and food. Consequently, the reporting on adverse reactions induced by licorice preparations are more frequent. Based on the clinical data of licorice preparations adverse reactions, we described the characteristics of the licorice-related adverse reactions, and proposed specific measures to reduce the incidence of adverse reactions, provided a reference for the rational use of licorice preparations. PMID:24494570

  6. Energy dependence of incomplete fusion processes in the {sup 16}O+{sup 181}Ta system: Measurement and analysis of forward-recoil-range distributions at E{sub lab}<=7 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati,; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Golda, K. S.; Kumar, Rakesh; Sinha, A. K.

    2010-05-15

    To study the energy dependence of incomplete fusion processes, the recoil range distributions for the reactions {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,xn), {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,pxn), {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,alphan), {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,alpha2n), {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,alpha3n), and {sup 181}Ta({sup 16}O,2alpha3n) have been measured at approx =81-, 90-, and 96 MeV beam energies. The disentanglement of the complete and incomplete fusion processes have been done in terms of full and partial linear momentum transfer from the projectile to the target nucleus. The measurements have been done using recoil catcher technique. The experimentally measured forward recoil range distributions have been interpreted in terms of breakup fusion model. Detailed analysis of the data indicates that incomplete fusion processes have significant contribution at energies as low as approx =5 MeV/nucleon and their contribution is found to increase with energy.

  7. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  8. Minocycline-induced drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome with persistent myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Kerry K; Bouchard, Susan M; Mohr, Melinda R; Herre, John M; Salkey, Kimberly S

    2010-02-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare serious adverse effect associated with a variety of medications. We present a case of minocycline-induced DRESS syndrome, which resulted in acute renal failure, transient thyroiditis, and transaminitis, and a persistent lymphocytic myocarditis resulting in congestive heart failure. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of minocycline-induced myocarditis. Additionally, we report successful plasmapheresis and rituximab treatment for minocycline-induced myocarditis associated with the DRESS syndrome.

  9. Superheavy nuclei from 48Ca-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Utyonkov, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery and investigation of the new region of superheavy nuclei at the DGFRS separator based on fusion reactions of 48Ca with 238U-249Cf target nuclei are reviewed. The production cross sections and summaries of the decay properties, including the results of the posterior experiments performed at the SHIP, BGS, and TASCA separators, as well as at the chemistry setups, are discussed and compared with the theoretical calculations and the systematic trends in the α-decay and spontaneous fission properties. The properties of the new nuclei, isotopes of elements 112-118, and their decay products demonstrate significant increases in the stability of the heaviest nuclei with increasing neutron number and closer approach to magic number N = 184.

  10. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  11. Experimental evidence of reaction-induced fracturing during olivine carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenlu; Fusseis, Florian; Lisabeth, Harrison; Xing, Tiange; Xiao, Xianghui; De Andrade, Vincent; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Mineral carbonation, a process that binds CO2 in the form of carbonates by silicate weathering, is widespread on the Earth's surface. Because of the abundance of silicate rocks and the permanence of the carbonated solids, sequestering CO2 via mineral carbonation has generated lots of interests. However, it is unclear how the fluid-rock reaction proceeds to completion in spite of an increasing solid volume. We conducted a mineral carbonation experiment in which a sintered olivine aggregate reacted with a sodium bicarbonate solution at reservoir conditions. Time-resolved synchrotron X-ray microtomographic images show cracks in polygonal patterns arising in the surface layers and propagating into the interior of the olivine aggregate. The nanotomography data reveal that the incipient cracks intersect at right angles. We infer that stretching due to nonuniform volume expansion generates polygonal cracking of the surfaces. Our data shed new lights on the processes that control hydration and carbonation of peridotite.

  12. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  13. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  14. Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Dietrich

    2012-09-07

    This is a personal account of the development of the title subject which is the broader field encompassing surface photochemistry. It describes the early times when the main interest centered on desorption induced by slow electrons, follows its evolution in experiment (use of synchrotron radiation and connections to electron spectroscopies; use of lasers) and mechanisms, and briefly mentions the many different subfields that have evolved. It discusses some practically important aspects and applications and ends with an account of an evolving new subfield, the application to photochemistry on nanoparticles.

  15. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  16. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVinduced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  17. Delay-induced Turing instability in reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tonghua; Zang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Time delays have been commonly used in modeling biological systems and can significantly change the dynamics of these systems. Quite a few works have been focused on analyzing the effect of small delays on the pattern formation of biological systems. In this paper, we investigate the effect of any delay on the formation of Turing patterns of reaction-diffusion equations. First, for a delay system in a general form, we propose a technique calculating the critical value of the time delay, above which a Turing instability occurs. Then we apply the technique to a predator-prey model and study the pattern formation of the model due to the delay. For the model in question, we find that when the time delay is small it has a uniform steady state or irregular patterns, which are not of Turing type; however, in the presence of a large delay we find spiral patterns of Turing type. For such a model, we also find that the critical delay is a decreasing function of the ratio of carrying capacity to half saturation of the prey density. PMID:25493859

  18. Delay-induced Turing instability in reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tonghua; Zang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Time delays have been commonly used in modeling biological systems and can significantly change the dynamics of these systems. Quite a few works have been focused on analyzing the effect of small delays on the pattern formation of biological systems. In this paper, we investigate the effect of any delay on the formation of Turing patterns of reaction-diffusion equations. First, for a delay system in a general form, we propose a technique calculating the critical value of the time delay, above which a Turing instability occurs. Then we apply the technique to a predator-prey model and study the pattern formation of the model due to the delay. For the model in question, we find that when the time delay is small it has a uniform steady state or irregular patterns, which are not of Turing type; however, in the presence of a large delay we find spiral patterns of Turing type. For such a model, we also find that the critical delay is a decreasing function of the ratio of carrying capacity to half saturation of the prey density.

  19. Facility for neutron induced few body reactions at Bochum University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannach, B.; Bodek, K.; Börker, G.; Kamke, D.; Krug, J.; Lekkas, P.; Lübcke, W.; Stephan, M.

    1987-02-01

    A facility is described which is designed for the measurement of neutron induced three-body breakup. It has been used for the breakup of deuterium and of the nucleus 9Be. Neutrons are produced by a pulsed beam of deuterons from the Bochum 4MV Dynamitron-Tandem accelerator by bombarding a thick tritium-titanium target or a deuterium gas target. The outgoing beam is collimated by a 4π shielding to a solid angle of about 1 msr. In most cases, a liquid scintillator (NE232 or a mixture of NE232/NE213) serves as a target for the neutron beam. Scattered neutrons are detected by NE213-detectors of different sizes. For testing purposes the differential elastic n-d cross section and simultaneously the response of NE232 have been measured at 22.4 and 7.9 MeV.

  20. Pressure-induced metathesis reaction to sequester Cs.

    PubMed

    Im, Junhyuck; Seoung, Donghoon; Lee, Seung Yeop; Blom, Douglas A; Vogt, Thomas; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    We report here a pressure-driven metathesis reaction where Ag-exchanged natrolite (Ag16Al16Si24O80·16H2O, Ag-NAT) is pressurized in an aqueous CsI solution, resulting in the exchange of Ag(+) by Cs(+) in the natrolite framework forming Cs16Al16Si24O80·16H2O (Cs-NAT-I) and, above 0.5 GPa, its high-pressure polymorph (Cs-NAT-II). During the initial cation exchange, the precipitation of AgI occurs. Additional pressure and heat at 2 GPa and 160 °C transforms Cs-NAT-II to a pollucite-related, highly dense, and water-free triclinic phase with nominal composition CsAlSi2O6. At ambient temperature after pressure release, the Cs remains sequestered in a now monoclinic pollucite phase at close to 40 wt % and a favorably low Cs leaching rate under back-exchange conditions. This process thus efficiently combines the pressure-driven separation of Cs and I at ambient temperature with the subsequent sequestration of Cs under moderate pressures and temperatures in its preferred waste form suitable for long-term storage at ambient conditions. The zeolite pollucite CsAlSi2O6·H2O has been identified as a potential host material for nuclear waste remediation of anthropogenic (137)Cs due to its chemical and thermal stability, low leaching rate, and the large amount of Cs it can contain. The new water-free pollucite phase we characterize during our process will not display radiolysis of water during longterm storage while maintaining the Cs content and low leaching rate. PMID:25515673

  1. Direct Measurement of the 4He(12C, 16O)γ Total Cross Section Near Stellar Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kunihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Ban, Tadahiko; Hamamoto, Kenichi; Narikiyo, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nariaki; Sagara, Kenshi

    2015-05-01

    A cross section measurement employing a direct 16O detection method for the reaction energies from Ecm = 2.4 to 0.7 MeV is planned at Kyushu University Tandem Laboratory (KUTL). To perform this experiment and to obtain quantitative information about the cross section to within an error of 10%, we have developed several instruments, including a blow-in type windowless gas target, a recoil mass separator and a RF-deflector. The measurements at Ecm = 2.4 and 1.5 MeV have been performed with these instruments. For measuring at Ecm < 1.2 MeV, a hybrid detector employing both, an ionization chamber and a silicon detector was developed to reduce the carbon backgrounds more efficiently. The oxygen ions were clearly separated from carbon background by using the energy deposit in the ionization chamber. Experiment of Ecm = 1.2 MeV was performed and the cross section was obtained.

  2. Crystal blocking in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    del Campo, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal blocking technique, used to measure very short lifetime (10/sup -18/ sec), was developed during the 1960's primarily in connection with the study of the channeling effect. Early blocking lifetime measurements involved light ion resonance reactions yielding typical lifetime values down to the order of 10/sup -17/ sec. Recently, studies of heavy-ion induced fission and fusion have extended the technique into the 10/sup -18/ to 10/sup -19/ sec scale. In this work measurements of fusion for /sup 16/O + Ge and deep inelastic reactions for /sup 28/Si + Ge are presented for bombarding energies around 8 nucleon. Also measurements of the projectile fragmenatation of 44 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar + Ge are discussed. In all reactions studied the presence of particle evaporation is the dominant mechanism that determines the reaction times of about 10/sup -18/ sec extracted with the blocking technique. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-06-15

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (straetlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies.

  4. An Experimental Study on What Controls the Ratios of 18O/16O and 17O/16O of O2 During Microbial Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Ward, B. B.; Fischer, W. W.; Bender, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios of atmospheric and dissolved oceanic O2 are key biogeochemical tracers of total photosynthesis and respiration on global to local length scales and glacial/interglacial time scales (Luz et al., 1999). Critical to the use of these ratios as biogeochemical tracers is knowledge of how they are affected by production, consumption, and transport of O2. We present new measurements of O2 respiration by E. coli and N. oceanus, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, to test three assumptions of isotopically enabled models of the O2 cycle: (i) laboratory-measured respiratory 18O/16O isotope effects (18α) of microorganisms are constant under all experimental and natural conditions (e.g., temperature and growth rate); (ii) the respiratory 'mass law' relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O [17α = (18α)β] is universal; and (iii) 18α and β for aerobic ammonia and organic carbon oxidation are identical. For E. coli, we find that both 18α and β are variable. From 37°C to 15°C, 18α varies linearly with temperature from 17 to 14‰, and β varies linearly from 0.513 to 0.508. 18α and β do not appear to vary with growth rate (as tested using different carbon sources). Both 18α and β are lower than previous observations for bacteria: 18α = 17-20‰ (Kiddon et al., 1993) and β = 0.515 (Luz and Barkan, 2005). We were able to simulate the observed temperature dependence of 18α and β using a model of respiration with two isotopically discriminating steps: O2 binding to cytochrome bo oxidase (the respiratory enzyme) and reduction of O2 to H2O. Finally, initial results on N. oceanus suggest it has similar values for 18α and β as previously studied aerobic bacteria that consume organic carbon, providing the first support for assumption (iii). Based on these results, isotopically constrained biogeochemical models of O2 cycling may need to consider a temperature dependence for 18α and β for microbial respiration. For example, these results may

  5. Helium Burning Reaction Rate Uncertainties and Consequences for Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, C.; Heger, A.; Austin, S. M.

    2007-10-01

    The triple alpha and ^12C(,)^16O reaction rates determine the carbon to oxygen ratio at the completion of core helium burning in stars, which, in turn, influences the later stellar burning stages. We explored the dependence of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis yields on the experimental uncertainties in the triple alpha rate (10 to 12%) and the ^12C(,)^16O rate (25 to 35%) using full stellar models followed to core collapse and including supernova explosion. The production factors of medium-weight elements obtained by using the Lodders (2003) solar abundances for the initial star composition, rather than the abundances of Anders & Grevesse (1989), provide a less stringent constraint on the ^12C(,)^16O rate. Variations within the current uncertainties in both reaction rates, however, induce significant changes in the central carbon abundance at core carbon ignition and in the mass of the supernova remnant. An experiment is being carried out by an NSCL/WMU collaboration to improve the accuracy of the triple alpha reaction rate.

  6. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  7. Systematic trends in photonic reagent induced reactions in a homologous chemical family.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-08-29

    The growing use of ultrafast laser pulses to induce chemical reactions prompts consideration of these pulses as "photonic reagents" in analogy to chemical reagents. This work explores the prospect that photonic reagents may affect systematic trends in dissociative ionization reactions of a homologous family of halomethanes, much as systematic outcomes are often observed for reactions between homologous families of chemical reagents and chemical substrates. The experiments in this work with photonic reagents of varying pulse energy and linear spectral chirp reveal systematic correlations between observable ion yields and the following set of natural variables describing the substrate molecules: the ionization energy of the parent molecule, the appearance energy of each fragment ion, and the relative strength of carbon-halogen bonds in molecules containing two different halogens. The results suggest that reactions induced by photonic reagents exhibit systematic behavior analogous to that observed in reactions driven by chemical reagents, which provides a basis to consider empirical "rules" for predicting the outcomes of photonic reagent induced reactions.

  8. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined. PMID:27590551

  9. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  10. Radiative Neutron Capture on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O at Thermal and Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Afanasyeva, Nadezhda

    2013-10-01

    The total cross-sections of the radiative neutron capture processes on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O are described in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. The continued interest in the study of these reactions is due, on the one hand, to the important role played by this process in the analysis of many fundamental properties of nuclei and nuclear reactions, and, on the other hand, to the wide use of the capture cross-section data in the various applications of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, and, also, to the importance of the analysis of primordial nucleosynthesis in the Universe. This article is devoted to the description of results for the processes of the radiative neutron capture on certain light atomic nuclei at thermal and astrophysical energies. The considered capture reactions are not part of stellar thermonuclear cycles, but involve in the reaction chains of inhomogeneous Big Bang models.

  11. Large-Amplitude Deformation and Bond Breakage in Shock-Induced Reactions of Explosive Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey

    The response of explosive molecules to large-amplitude mechanical deformation plays an important role in shock-induced reactions and the initiation of detonation in explosive materials. In this presentation, the response of a series of explosive molecules (nitromethane, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene [TNT], and 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene [TATB]) to a variety of large-amplitude deformations are examined using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Large-amplitude motions that result in bond breakage are described, and the insights these results provide into both previous experimental observations and previous theoretical predictions of shock-induced reactions are discussed.

  12. Neutron-induced reactions on AlF3 studied using the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Lv, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zuo, Jia-Xu

    2015-08-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 27Al and 19F nuclei are investigated using the optical model implemented in the TALYS 1.4 toolkit. Incident neutron energies in a wide range from 0.1 keV to 30 MeV are calculated. The cross sections for the main channels (n, np), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), and (n, γ) and the total reaction cross section (n, tot) of the reactions are obtained. When the default parameters in TALYS 1.4 are adopted, the calculated results agree with the measured results. Based on the calculated results for the n + 27Al and n + 19F reactions, the results of the n + 27Al19F reactions are predicted. These results are useful both for the design of thorium-based molten salt reactors and for neutron activation analysis techniques.

  13. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  14. Geometry and microwave rotational spectrum of the FC16O18O• radical.

    PubMed

    Koucký, Jan; Kania, Patrik; Uhlíková, Tereza; Kolesniková, Lucie; Beckers, Helmut; Willner, Helge; Urban, Stěpán

    2013-10-01

    The rotational spectrum of an asymmetrically substituted isotopologue of the fluoroformyloxyl radical FC(16)O(18)O(•) with resolved fine and hyperfine structures were measured and analyzed for the very first time. The molecular parameters of this radical obtained from the spectral analysis were processed along with the symmetrical isotopologues FC(16)O2(•) and FC(18)O2(•) and accurate substitution geometry was attained. In addition to those, coupled cluster quantum chemistry calculations were used to scale the experimental parameters, and in this manner, trustworthy values of the equilibrium and ground state geometries were derived.

  15. Spectral linelist of HD16O molecule based on VTT calculations for atmospheric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, B. A.

    2014-11-01

    Three version line-list of dipole transition for isotopic modification of water molecule HD16O are presented. Line-lists have been created on the basis of VTT calculations (Voronin, Tennyson, Tolchenov et al. MNRAS, 2010) by adding air- and self-broadening coefficient, and temperature exponents for HD16O-air case. Three cut-of values for the line intensities were used: 1e-30, 1e-32 and 1e-35 cm/molecule. Calculated line-lists are available on the site ftp://ftp.iao.ru/pub/VTT/VTT-296/.

  16. Double Folding Potential of Different Interaction Models for 16O + 12C Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Bondok, I.; Abdelmoatmed, M.

    2016-08-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system have been analyzed using double folding potential of different interaction models: CDM3Y1, CDM3Y6, DDM3Y1 and BDM3Y1. We have extracted the renormalization factor N r for the different concerned interaction models. Potential created by BDM3Y1 model of interaction has the shallowest depth which reflects the necessity to use higher renormalization factor. The experimental angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system in the energy range 115.9-230 MeV exhibited unmistakable refractive features and rainbow phenomenon.

  17. Elastic {sup 16}O{sup 16}O scattering at E({sup 16}O) = 350 MeV and new method for a model-independent determination of the scattering matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Korda, V. Yu.; Molev, A. S.; Korda, L. P.

    2007-06-15

    A new approach that can be used to extract the scattering matrix S(l) as a complex-valued function of the orbital angular momentum l directly from experimental data on elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies without resort to additional model assumptions is developed on the basis of the evolutionary algorithm. Owing to the fact that the behavior of the derivatives of S(l) is automatically monitored within this approach, the scattering matrix obtained for {sup 16}O{sup 16}O interaction at an energy of 350 MeV is determined by its absolute value and the nuclear phase shift, which are smooth monotonic functions of the orbital angular momentum. Moreover, the result involves no distortions, the form of the quantum deflection function being typical of the nuclear-rainbow pattern. It is shown that the ultimate form of S(l) is independent of input representations of the scattering matrix, which were usually taken on the basis of various phenomenological models.

  18. CO2 pressure broadening and shift coefficients for the 2-0 band of 12C16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, R.; Predoi-Cross, A.; Dudaryonok, A. S.; Lavrentieva, N. N.; Vandaele, A. C.; Vander Auwera, J.

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform absorption spectra of the 2-0 band of 12C16O mixed with CO2 have been recorded at total pressures from 156 to 1212 hPa and at 4 different temperatures between 240 K and 283 K. CO2 pressure-induced line broadening and line shift coefficients, and the temperature dependence of the former have been measured including line mixing using a multi-spectrum non-linear least squares fitting technique. Different line shape models have been considered to take into account the Dicke narrowing or speed dependence effects. Measured line-shape parameters were compared with theoretical values, calculated for individual temperatures using a semi-empirical method and the Exponential Power Gap (EPG) law.

  19. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  20. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics. PMID:23240622

  1. Thermally-induced amphibole reaction rim development: EBSD insights into microlite orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Sarah; Lavallée, Yan; Larsen, Jessica; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km), temperature less than ~860-870 oC, and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. The thickness, texture, and mineralogy of these rims are thought to be reflective of the process driving amphibole disequilibrium (e.g. heating, decompression, etc). However, significant overlap in rim thicknesses and microlite textures means that distinguishing between processes it not simple. This study employed backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to examine both experimental heating-indced amphibole reaction rims and natural amphibole reaction rim from Augustine Volcano. We collected crystal orientation maps of amphibole reaction rims to investigate if different types of disequilibrium produce different patterns of microlite orientation. We identified two types of reaction rim: Type 1- reaction rim microlites are generally oriented at random and share little or no systematic relationship with the crystallographic orientation of the host amphibole, and; Type 2- reaction rim microlites exhibit a topotactic relationship with the host amphibole (they share the same crystallographic orientation). Experimentally produced heating reaction rims are without exception Type 2. However the natural reaction rims are evenly distributed between Types 1 and 2. Further experimental data on decompression induced reaction rim formation is needed to investigate if Type 1 reaction rims resemble the breakdown of amphibole due to decompression. If so, reaction rim microlite orientation could provide a clear method for distinguishing between heating and decompression processes in amphibole bearing magmas.

  2. Childhood Reactions to Terrorism-Induced Trauma: A Review of the Past 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont, Wanda P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the literature about the clinical presentation and treatment interventions of childhood reactions to terrorism-induced trauma. Method: The literature on children's responses to terrorist activities was reviewed. Results: Over the past 10 years, more research has emerged on the subject of terrorism in children. Many of the…

  3. Evidence for a Long Duration of the 16O-Rich Reservoir in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushikubo, T.; Tenner, T. J.; Hiyagon, H.; Kita, N. T.

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios and 26Al-26Mg systematics of a pyroxene-anorthite-rich CAI from Acfer 094 suggest decomposition of melilite occurred in an 16O-rich environment at ~2.3 million years after normal CAI formation.

  4. Systemic hydrocortisone/cortisol induces allergic skin reactions in presensitized subjects.

    PubMed

    Lauerma, A I; Reitamo, S; Maibach, H I

    1991-02-01

    To determine whether systemic hydrocortisone can elicit allergic skin reactions in patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone, we studied four patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone-17-butyrate and two patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone-17-butyrate but not to hydrocortisone. Open oral provocation with 100 or 250 mg hydrocortisone in patients with hydrocortisone contact hypersensitivity elicited cutaneous reactions at sites of previous allergic dermatitis caused by hydrocortisone in two patients and at sites of earlier allergic patch test reactions caused by hydrocortisone in the other two patients. Provocations in two patients with contact hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone-17-butyrate but not to hydrocortisone remained negative. To determine whether the adrenal cortical hormone cortisol, which is identical to hydrocortisone, could induce similar skin reactions, one patient with hydrocortisone contact hypersensitivity underwent adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation tests; as a control, one hydrocortisone-sensitive patient underwent analogous provocations with placebo. After an 8-hour infusion with the adrenocorticotropic hormone analog tetracosactide, a similar skin reaction to that seen with oral hydrocortisone was observed, whereas provocations with placebo remained negative. We conclude that both oral hydrocortisone and intrinsic cortisol are able to induce allergic skin reactions in presensitized subjects.

  5. Eosinophilic follicular reaction induced by Demodex folliculorum mite: a different disease from eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, V; Escutia-Muñoz, B; Botella-Estrada, R

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is an idiopathic dermatitis included in the spectrum of eosinophilic pustular follicular reactions. Demodex folliculorum has been implicated as contributing to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated EF, but it has not been described outside this context. We present an immunocompetent 65-year-old white man with a 5-year history of recurrent pruritic erythematous and oedematous lesions on his face, neck and scalp. Histopathologically, an eosinophilic microabcess with Demodex folliculorum mite within a pilosebaceous follicle was seen, and considered the causal agent. There were also accumulations of eosinophil granules on collagen bundles, and flame figure formations in the dermis. We believe that 'eosinophilic follicular reaction' is an appropriate term to describe this case of EF induced by D. folliculorum and thus distinguish it from the idiopathic form of EF. Moreover, this case suggests that D. folliculorum can sometimes induce an eosinophilic immune reaction. PMID:25623943

  6. Determination of the delta(18O/16O)of Water: RSIL Lab Code 489

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described by the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 489 is to present a method to determine the delta(180/160), abbreviated as delta-180, of water. This delta-18O measurement of water also is a component of National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL in USGS) schedules 1142 and 1172. Water samples are loaded into glass sample containers on a vacuum manifold to equilibrate gaseous CO2 at constant temperature (25 deg C) with water samples. After loading water samples on the vacuum manifold, air is evacuated through capillary to avoid evaporation, and CO2 is added. The samples are shaken to increase the equilibration rate of water and CO2. When isotopic equilibrium has been attained, an aliquot of CO2 is extracted sequentially from each sample container, separated from water vapor by means of a dry ice trap, and introduced into a dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (DI-IRMS) for determination of the delta-18O value. There is oxygen isotopic fractionation between water and CO2, but it is constant at constant temperature. The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. It has a double collector. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other ion beams are collected in the front collector. The instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 44 and 45 or 44 and 46 by changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44=CO2=12C16O16O, m/z 45=CO2=13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2=12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates delta-18O values.

  7. Low and medium energy deuteron-induced reactions on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Bem, P.; Simeckova, E.; Honusek, M.; Fischer, U.; Simakov, S. P.; Forrest, R. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Obreja, A. C.; Roman, F. L.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2009-04-15

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2p), and (d,p{alpha}) reactions on {sup 27}Al were measured in the energy range from 4 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foils technique. Following a previous extended analysis of elastic scattering, breakup, and direct reaction of deuterons on {sup 27}Al, for energies from 3 to 60 MeV, the preequilibrium and statistical emissions are considered in the same energy range. Finally, all deuteron-induced reactions on {sup 27}Al including the present data measured up to 20 MeV deuteron energy are properly described due to a simultaneous analysis of the elastic scattering and reaction data.

  8. Fluctuation Induced Structure in Chemical Reaction with Small Number of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    We investigate the behaviors of chemical reactions of the Lotka-Volterra model with small number of molecules; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We model it by using Abstract Rewriting System on Multisets, ARMS; ARMS is a stochastic method of simulating chemical reactions and it is based on the reaction rate equation. We confirmed that the magnitude of fluctuations on periodicity of oscillations becomes large, as the number of involved molecules is getting smaller; and these fluctuations induce another structure, which have not observed in the reactions with large number of molecules. We show that the underling mechanism through investigating the coarse grained phase space of ARMS.

  9. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer-monomer surface reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Wang, Hua

    2012-06-01

    The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer-monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker-Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  10. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  11. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  12. Measurement of the isotopic ratio distribution of HD16O and H2 16O in the 20-38 km altitude range from far-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Lepri, Gianmarco; Carlotti, Massimo; Carli, Bruno; Mencaraglia, Francesco; Ridolfi, Marco; Nolt, Ira G.; Ade, Peter A. R.

    1997-08-01

    The altitude distribution of the isotopic ratio between HD16O and H216O in the stratosphere is derived by retrieving the mixing ratio profiles (from 20 km to 38 km of altitude) of the two isotopic species from far-infrared emission spectra. The measurements were made with a balloon-borne Fourier Transform Spectrometer capable of 0.0025 cm-1 spectral resolution during the IBEX 92 campaign. The retrievals were carried out using the global-fit procedure on a statistically significant number of spectra for each isotope, in the 40-75 cm-1 spectral region. This measurement determines the D/H ratio in stratospheric water over an altitude range larger than that of previous measurements. The value of the HD16O/H216O ratio, normalized to the standard value, ranges from 0.4 to 0.5 (with a 10% random error) in the altitude range studied and is in good agreement with the values previously measured.

  13. Elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O at energies E/A between 5 and 8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, M. P.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R. M.; Aissaoui, N.; Beck, C.; Elanique, A.; Nouicer, R.; Morsad, A.; Szilner, S.; Basrak, Z.

    1999-12-01

    The elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O has been measured at nine energies between E{sub lab}=75 and 124 MeV. The data cover up to 100 degree sign in the c.m. and can be described in terms of phenomenological and folding model potentials which reproduce the main features observed. In agreement with studies at higher energies in this and similar systems, refractive effects are present in the angular distributions at all energies. In particular, the passage of Airy minima through 90 degree sign at E{sub c.m.}=40, 47.5, and 62 MeV explains the deep minima observed in the excitation function. The real part of the optical potential is found to vary very little with energy over the studied interval, but the imaginary part shows a rapid change in its shape at incident energy about 90 MeV. Nonetheless, the energy dependence of the volume integral of the real and imaginary parts is in agreement with dispersion relation predictions. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  14. Deuteron-induced reactions on Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Šimečková, E.; Fischer, U.; Mrázek, J.; Novak, J.; Štefánik, M.; Costache, C.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2016-07-01

    Background: The high complexity of the deuteron-nucleus interaction from the deuteron weak binding energy of 2.224 MeV is also related to a variety of reactions induced by the deuteron-breakup (BU) nucleons. Thus, specific noncompound processes as BU and direct reactions (DR) make the deuteron-induced reactions so different from reactions with other incident particles. The scarce consideration of only pre-equilibrium emission (PE) and compound-nucleus (CN) mechanisms led to significant discrepancies with experimental results so that recommended reaction cross sections of high-priority elements as, e.g., Ni have mainly been obtained by fit of the data. Purpose: The unitary and consistent BU and DR account in deuteron-induced reactions on natural nickel may take advantage of an extended database for this element, including new accurate measurements of particular reaction cross sections. Method: The activation cross sections of 64,61,60Cu, Ni,5765, and 55,56,57,58,59m,60Co nuclei for deuterons incident on natural Ni at energies up to 20 MeV, were measured by the stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma spectrometry using U-120M cyclotron of CANAM, NPI CAS. Then, within an extended analysis of deuteron interactions with Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV, all processes from elastic scattering until the evaporation from fully equilibrated compound system have been taken into account while an increased attention is paid especially to the BU and DR mechanisms. Results: The deuteron activation cross-section analysis, completed by consideration of the PE and CN contributions corrected for decrease of the total-reaction cross section from the leakage of the initial deuteron flux towards BU and DR processes, is proved satisfactory for the first time to all available data. Conclusions: The overall agreement of the measured data and model calculations validates the description of nuclear mechanisms taken into account for deuteron-induced reactions on Ni, particularly the BU and

  15. Huge Quantum Symmetry Effect in the O + O2 Exchange Reaction.

    PubMed

    Rao, Tammineni Rajagopala; Guillon, Grégoire; Mahapatra, Susanta; Honvault, Pascal

    2015-02-19

    We report extensive, full quantum-mechanical calculations for the (16)O + (16)O(16)O → (16)O(16)O + (16)O collisions, for both inelastic and atom exchange processes, using a time-independent method based on hyperspherical coordinates. The rates obtained in the present study are much larger than the previously reported ones for this system. The discrepancy is attributed to a huge symmetry effect that was missing in the studies so far. This effect differs from the well-known isotope effect. Importance of this quantum effect is further confirmed by comparison with results for the (16)O + (18)O(18)O → (16)O(18)O + (18)O, exchange reaction.

  16. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  17. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  18. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  19. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  20. HLA-A★3101 and Carbamazepine-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Mark; Alfirevic, Ana; Bourgeois, Stephane; Farrell, John J.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Carrington, Mary; Sills, Graeme J.; Marson, Tony; Jia, Xiaoming; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Molokhia, Mariam; Johnson, Michael R.; O’Connor, Gerard D.; Chaila, Elijah; Alhusaini, Saud; Shianna, Kevin V.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Walley, Nicole; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pichler, Werner; Park, B. Kevin; Depondt, Chantal; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.; Deloukas, Panos; Delanty, Norman; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B★1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS–TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. METHODS We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. RESULTS The HLA-A★3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P = 3.5×10−8). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A★3101 allele (P = 1.1×10−6). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS–TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). CONCLUSIONS The presence of the HLA-A★3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.) PMID:21428769

  1. Formation Of Vinyl Chloride And Vinylidene Fluoride By UV-Laser Induced Chain Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfrum, J.; Schneider, M.

    1984-05-01

    Thermal elimination of hydrogen chloride from 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,1,1-chlorodifluoroethane is a main industrial route to some important monomer compounds. Two reaction paths are possible - unimolecular four-center-elimination and a radical chain mechanism. The latter is started by the endothermic C-Cl bond rupture, followed by the chain consisting of an abstraction reaction and a monomolecular decomposition step. Inducing the chain by photo-initiation offers the advantage that the monomolecular process becomes the rate determining step leading to a lower activation energy for the total reaction. This allows lower process temperatures, therefore decreasing energy expense and avoiding the high temperature formation of byproducts. In our investigation we used as photolysis source several lines of an UV-Exciplex-Laser which provide short pulses of monochromatic UV-radiation with high energy. It was possible to study the effects of initial radical concentration on the quantum yield 0 as function of the temperature. Long reaction chains and a decrease of 0 inversely proportional to the square root of irradiation intensity were observed. The formation of the monomers was detected by a time-resolved UV-absorption technique. Experimental results were analysed in order to yield information about the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate determining reaction. By application of our data in computer simulations wP were able to extrapolate the reaction behaviour to various technical conditions.

  2. Dynamics of the induced acrosome reaction in boar sperm evaluated by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Birck, Anders; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Christensen, Preben

    2009-10-01

    The present study investigated the dynamics of the in vitro induced acrosome reaction (AR) in boar sperm in response to medium composition, incubation time and ionophore concentration. The AR is a prerequisite for normal sperm fertilizing capability and can be studied in vitro following induction by various agents. The ability of a sperm population to undergo the AR in vivo is expected to influence male fertilizing potential, and attempts to relate the in vitro induced AR to fertility has been reported. However, to relate the induced AR to fertility one should be aware of the dynamics of the in vitro induced AR. A detailed description of the dynamics of sperm viability and acrosomal status of boar sperm following in vitro induction of the AR has to our knowledge not previously been conducted. In the present study, a triple color flow cytometric detection technique was used, which gave simultaneous information on sperm viability and acrosomal status. The ionophore induced AR was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+), but could be easily induced in boar sperm without capacitation. Capacitation-associated plasma membrane phospholipid scrambling was assessed and a medium specific ability to induce these membrane changes was observed. Both sperm viability and the induced AR were significantly affected by sperm capacitation, incubation time and ionophore concentration. The results lead to suggestions for an optimized AR induction protocol that takes both sperm viability and the effectiveness of AR induction into consideration. PMID:19084358

  3. One-two step transfer observed in 16O+11B nuclear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Burtebayev, N.

    2015-06-01

    The angular distribution measurements for 16O ion beam elastically scattered from 11B target of thickness 32.9μg/cm2 at energy 22.4 MeV had been performed in the cyclotron DC-60 INP NNC RK. The previous measurements for 16O+11B nuclear system at energies 27, 30, 32.5 and 35 MeV showed an increase in the differential cross-section at backward angles due to the contribution of cluster transfer. Such transfer process could not be described in terms of optical model (OM); it could be described within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation method implemented in FRESCO code. Both one (5Li) and two-step transfer (proton transfer followed by Alpha transfer) were taken into considerations. We have extracted the spectroscopic amplitude (SA) for the configuration 16O→11B+5Li.

  4. Isotopic diversity in interplanetary dust particles and preservation of extreme 16O-depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Lee, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    Two interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) investigated by NanoSIMS reveal diverse oxygen isotope compositions at the micrometre-scale. The oxygen isotope values recorded at different locations across the single IDP fragments cover a wider range than the bulk values available from all IDPs and bulk meteorites measured to date. Measurement of H, C, and N isotopes by NanoSIMS, and the use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to determine elemental compositions and textural information allows for a better understanding of the lithologies and organic signatures associated with the oxygen isotope features. IDP Balmoral, a ∼15 μm-sized fragment with a chondritic porous (CP)-IDP-like texture, contains a region a few micrometres in size characterised by 16O-depleted isotope signatures in the range δ17O, δ18O = +80‰ to +200‰. The remainder of the fragment has a more 16O-rich composition (δ18O = 0-20‰), similar to many other IDPs and bulk meteorites. Other than in discrete pre-solar grains, such extreme 16O-depletions have only been observed previously in rare components within the matrix of the Acfer 094 meteorite. However, TEM imaging and FeO/MgO/Si ion ratios indicate that the 16O-depleted regions in Balmoral did not form by the same mechanism as that proposed for the 16O-depleted phases in Acfer 094. As the level of 16O depletion is consistent with that expected from isotope selective self-shielding, it is likely that the 16O-depleted reservoir was located close to that where oxygen self-shielding effects were most pronounced (i.e., the outer solar nebula or even interstellar medium). Individual regions within IDP Lumley cover a range in δ18O from -30‰ to +19‰, with the oxygen isotope values broadly co-varying with δD, δ13C, δ15N, light-element ratios and texture. The relationships observed in Lumley indicate that the parent body incorporated material at the micrometre-scale from discrete diverse isotopic reservoirs, some of

  5. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales. PMID:19658764

  6. [Analysis of 103 cases with adverse drug reactions induced by sanqizongzaogan injection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yamei; Li, Yaowang; Zhu, Guanghui

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics and relative factors of adverse drug reactions (ADR) induced by sanqizongzaogan injection, in order to provide reference for the clinical use of sanqizongzaogan injection properly. The 103 reported cases of ADR induced by sanqizongzaogan injection in China over 15 years were retrospectively analyzed. The 103 ADR cases, 41.7% occurred in patients aged above 60. The most common presentation of ADR was drug eruption, followed by allergic reactions (20.4%) and allergic shock (9.7%). The occurrence of ADR is affected by many factors. We should control the drug indication strictly, check patients drug allergy history carefully before prescription, monitor ADR afterwards, promote clinical rational drug-usage. PMID:20394303

  7. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation.

  8. Threshold and spin factors in the yield of bremsstrahlung-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.

    2013-12-15

    Relative yields of photon-induced reactions are systematized in a function of the threshold parameter for moderately heavy targets at the bremsstrahlung end-point energy lower than 30 MeV. Regular dependence is established for the group of (γ, n), (γ, p), and (γ, d) reactions, while the yields of (γ, 2n) and (γ,α) reactions deviate from the regularity. Physical conclusions are discussed and possible application of this systematic for data processing is proposed. In particular, the constituent threshold and spin factors in the isomer-to-ground-state ratio could be isolated separately. For spin dependence of the yields, a new regularization parameter is introduced and previously hidden peculiarities are concluded.

  9. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  10. Propranolol-induced gingival hyperplasia with Nager syndrome: A rare adverse drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Raheel, Syed Ahamed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Tarakji, Bassel; Umar, Dilshad; Ibrahim, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Drug reactions are a group of reactionary lesions generally show their manifestations in the oral cavity. The drug reactions may vary from local rashes to well-developed swellings in the oral cavity especially involving the gingiva. Most of the drug reactions are asymptomatic and commonly triggered from the active metabolite of a drug used for a long time. Nager syndrome is a group of acrofacial dysostosis that usually results in craniofacial and limb malformations. The craniofacial defects are very similar to the mandibulofacial dysostosis. A very early intervention is needed for the habilitation of the patient especially when it is concerned with speech and language development. This paper reports a case of a 32-year-old female with craniofacial, limb, and skeletal abnormalities along with a drug-induced gingival hyperplasia.

  11. Alpha-adrenergic receptors mediate imipramine/alarm substance-induced reaction in rats.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L

    1994-08-01

    The mechanism of adverse imipramine-induced reactions (jitteriness, convulsions) was investigated by precipitating such reactions in rats with three injections (IP) of imipramine (5-40 mg/kg) at 24, 5, and 1 h before testing, and comparing their occurrence with comparable treatments using specific noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake inhibitors [nortriptyline (10 or 30 mg/kg, IP), citalopram (0.5-5.0 mg/kg, IP)]. This initial study indicated that these reactions were mediated by imipramine's noradrenergic effects. Subsequent combinations of imipramine and an alpha 2 agonist (clonidine, 5 mg/kg) and antagonist (yohimbine, 2 mg/kg), and a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol, 2 or 5 mg/kg) (all administered IP 0.5 h after the last injection of imipramine) suggested imipramine's adverse effects were mediated by alpha 2 receptors. The possible involvement of the locus ceruleus in these effects was considered.

  12. Propranolol-induced gingival hyperplasia with Nager syndrome: A rare adverse drug reaction

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahamed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Tarakji, Bassel; Umar, Dilshad; Ibrahim, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Drug reactions are a group of reactionary lesions generally show their manifestations in the oral cavity. The drug reactions may vary from local rashes to well-developed swellings in the oral cavity especially involving the gingiva. Most of the drug reactions are asymptomatic and commonly triggered from the active metabolite of a drug used for a long time. Nager syndrome is a group of acrofacial dysostosis that usually results in craniofacial and limb malformations. The craniofacial defects are very similar to the mandibulofacial dysostosis. A very early intervention is needed for the habilitation of the patient especially when it is concerned with speech and language development. This paper reports a case of a 32-year-old female with craniofacial, limb, and skeletal abnormalities along with a drug-induced gingival hyperplasia. PMID:27144155

  13. Factors influencing the 18O/16O-ratio in meat juices.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Ines; Lüpke, Matthias; Seifert, Hermann

    2004-09-01

    With respect to the question of whether the 18O/16O-ratio of meat water could be used for meat origin analysis, factors influencing its delta18O-value have been examined. The 18O/16O-ratio of meat water differs geographically, similar to known differences in precipitation and ground water. In Great Britain higher enrichments in 18O were found in southern samples and in Germany in northern samples. However, it was not possible to distinguish between British and German beef: their 18O/16O-ratios overlapped. British bovine samples the variation range of delta18O-values was 2.8 per thousand; in porcine samples it was 2.0 per thousand. British meat liquids from beef were enriched in 18O by 1.3 +/- 0.3 per thousand compared with pork. In porcine samples of litter mates with identical breeding and age at slaughter, the range in the delta18O-values among individuals was 2.4 per thousand. Experiments revealed significant influences of the meat's storage and handling conditions on the 18O/16O-ratio. After 10 h at 21.5 or 18.5 degrees C the delta18O-value increased by 0.4 or 0.3 per thousand per h, respectively, in samples (50 g) of chopped meat. The observed magnitude of changes might compensate for the geographical and seasonal differences. A precise origin assignment of the affected specimen on the base of delta18O-values of meat water is hence bound to be impossible.

  14. Neutral Current {nu} Induced Reactions in Nuclei at Supernova Neutrino Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate cross sections for the neutral current induced neutrino/antineutrino reaction from {sup 208}Pb target and applied it to study Supernova neutrino event rates. The calculations are done in local density approximation taking into account Pauli blocking, Fermi motion effects and renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium. The numerical results for the neutrino nucleus total cross sections have been averaged over the various Supernova neutrino/antineutrino fluxes available in literature.

  15. A case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with piperazine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Jo, Eun-Jung; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up

    2013-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is an uncommon adverse drug reaction caused by delayed cell-mediated hypersensitivity. Levocetirizine is an active (R)-enatiomer of cetirizine and there have been a few reports of fixed drug eruption related to these antihistamines. We experienced a case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with other piperazine derivatives confirmed by patch test. A 73-year-old female patient presented with recurrent generalized itching, cutaneous bullae formation, rash and multiple pigmentation at fixed sites after taking drugs for common cold. She took bepotastine besilate (Talion®) and levocetirizine (Xyzal®) as antihistamine. She took acetaminophen, pseudoephedrine 60 mg / triprolidine 2.5 mg (Actifed®), dihydrocodeinebitartrate 5 mg / di-methylephedrine hydrochloride 17.5 mg / chlorpheniramine maleate 1.5 mg / guaifenesin 50 mg (Codening®) and aluminium hydroxide 200 mg / magnesium carbonate 120 mg (Antad®) at the same time. Patch test was done with suspected drugs and the result was positive with levocetirizine. We additionally performed patch test for other antihistamines such as cetirizine, hydroxyzine, fexofenadine and loratadine. Piperazine derivatives (cetirizine and hydroxyzine) were positive, but piperidine derivatives (fexofenadine and loratadine) were negative to patch test. There was no adverse drug reaction when she was challenged with fexofenadine. We report a case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption confirmed by patch test. Cross-reactions were only observed in the piperazine derivatives and piperidine antihistamine was tolerant to the patient. PMID:24260733

  16. A case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with piperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Jo, Eun-Jung; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-10-01

    Fixed drug eruption is an uncommon adverse drug reaction caused by delayed cell-mediated hypersensitivity. Levocetirizine is an active (R)-enatiomer of cetirizine and there have been a few reports of fixed drug eruption related to these antihistamines. We experienced a case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with other piperazine derivatives confirmed by patch test. A 73-year-old female patient presented with recurrent generalized itching, cutaneous bullae formation, rash and multiple pigmentation at fixed sites after taking drugs for common cold. She took bepotastine besilate (Talion®) and levocetirizine (Xyzal®) as antihistamine. She took acetaminophen, pseudoephedrine 60 mg / triprolidine 2.5 mg (Actifed®), dihydrocodeinebitartrate 5 mg / di-methylephedrine hydrochloride 17.5 mg / chlorpheniramine maleate 1.5 mg / guaifenesin 50 mg (Codening®) and aluminium hydroxide 200 mg / magnesium carbonate 120 mg (Antad®) at the same time. Patch test was done with suspected drugs and the result was positive with levocetirizine. We additionally performed patch test for other antihistamines such as cetirizine, hydroxyzine, fexofenadine and loratadine. Piperazine derivatives (cetirizine and hydroxyzine) were positive, but piperidine derivatives (fexofenadine and loratadine) were negative to patch test. There was no adverse drug reaction when she was challenged with fexofenadine. We report a case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption confirmed by patch test. Cross-reactions were only observed in the piperazine derivatives and piperidine antihistamine was tolerant to the patient. PMID:24260733

  17. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: a review of concepts regarding a dangerous adverse drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Daniela Rezende Garcia; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Perini, Edson

    2013-01-01

    Heparin is a natural agent with antithrombotic action, commercially available for therapeutic use as unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious adverse reaction to heparin that promotes antibody-mediated platelet activation. HIT is defined as a relative reduction in platelet count of 50% (even when the platelet count at its lowest level is above>150 x 10(9)/L) occurring within five to 14 days after initiation of the therapy. Thrombocytopenia is the main feature that directs the clinical suspicion of the reaction and the increased risk of thromboembolic complications is the most important and paradoxical consequence. The diagnosis is a delicate issue, and requires a combination of clinical probability and laboratory tests for the detection of platelet activation induced by HIT antibodies. The absolute risk of HIT has been estimated between 1% and 5% under treatment with unfractionated heparin, and less than 1% with low molecular weight heparin. However, high-quality evidence about the risk of HIT from randomized clinical trials is scarce. In addition, information on the frequency of HIT in developing countries is not widely available. This review aims to provide a better understanding of the key features of this reaction and updated information on its frequency to health professionals and other interested parties. Knowledge, familiarity, and access to therapeutic options for the treatment of this adverse reaction are mandatory to minimize the associated risks, improving patient safety.

  18. Hypothesis for synergistic toxicity of organophosphorus poisoning-induced cholinergic crisis and anaphylactoid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Shih, T.M.; Lenz, D.E.; Madsen, J.M.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    The neurotoxicity of organophosphorus (OP) compounds Involves the Inhibition of acetylchollnesterase (AChE), causing accumulation of acetyicholine (ACh) at synapses. However, cholinergic crisis may not be the sole mechanism of OP toxicity. Adverse drug reactions caused by synergistic toxicity between drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms are a common problem. Likewise, the multiple pharmacological activities of a single molecule might also contribute to either toxicity or efficacy. For example, certain OP compounds (e.g. soman) exhibit anti-AChE activity and also act as secretagogues by inducing mast cell degranulation with associated autacoid release and anaphylactoid reactions. Anaphylactoid shock can produce a lethal syndrome with symptoms of respiratory failure and circulatory collapse similar to the physiological sequelae observed for OP poisoning. Moreover, the major classes of drugs used as antidotes for OP intoxication can affect anaphylaxis. Acetylcholine can act as an agonist of autacoid release, and autacoids such as histamine can augment soman-Induced bronchial spasm. In concert with the demonstrably critical role of cholinergic crisis In OP toxicity, the precepts of neuroimmunology indicate that secondary adverse reactions encompassing anaphylactold reactions may complicate OP toxicity.

  19. Trehalose enhances osmotic tolerance and suppresses lysophosphatidylcholine-induced acrosome reaction in ram spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, E; Naseer, Z; Aksoy, M; Küçük, N; Uçan, U; Serin, I; Ceylan, A

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of trehalose on osmotic tolerance and the ability of ram spermatozoon to undergo acrosome reaction induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In experiment 1, the diluted ejaculates were exposed to anisosmotic fructose solutions (70, 500, 750 and 1000 mOsm l(-1) ) with or without 50 mm trehalose. The presence of trehalose in hyperosmotic conditions enhanced (P < 0.05) the percentage of live, live-intact and intact spermatozoa. Similarly, trehalose enhanced (P < 0.05) the live and live-intact spermatozoa during hypo-osmotic conditions. In experiment 2, the centrifuged ejaculates were diluted with TCG only or TCG containing either 50 or 100 mm trehalose. The acrosome reaction was induced by LPC. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoon was less (P < 0.05) in trehalose-supplemented groups compared to control. In experiment 3, the ejaculates were cryopreserved in an extender containing 0 mm (control), 50 mm or 100 mm trehalose. Supplementation of extender with trehalose, either 50 mm or 100 mm, enhanced the cryosurvival rate (P < 0.05) compared to the control. In conclusion, the presence of trehalose in anisosmotic conditions enhances the osmotic tolerance, cryosurvival rate of ram spermatozoon and suppresses their ability to undergo LPC and cryo-induced acrosome reaction. PMID:25269572

  20. Trehalose enhances osmotic tolerance and suppresses lysophosphatidylcholine-induced acrosome reaction in ram spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, E; Naseer, Z; Aksoy, M; Küçük, N; Uçan, U; Serin, I; Ceylan, A

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of trehalose on osmotic tolerance and the ability of ram spermatozoon to undergo acrosome reaction induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In experiment 1, the diluted ejaculates were exposed to anisosmotic fructose solutions (70, 500, 750 and 1000 mOsm l(-1) ) with or without 50 mm trehalose. The presence of trehalose in hyperosmotic conditions enhanced (P < 0.05) the percentage of live, live-intact and intact spermatozoa. Similarly, trehalose enhanced (P < 0.05) the live and live-intact spermatozoa during hypo-osmotic conditions. In experiment 2, the centrifuged ejaculates were diluted with TCG only or TCG containing either 50 or 100 mm trehalose. The acrosome reaction was induced by LPC. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoon was less (P < 0.05) in trehalose-supplemented groups compared to control. In experiment 3, the ejaculates were cryopreserved in an extender containing 0 mm (control), 50 mm or 100 mm trehalose. Supplementation of extender with trehalose, either 50 mm or 100 mm, enhanced the cryosurvival rate (P < 0.05) compared to the control. In conclusion, the presence of trehalose in anisosmotic conditions enhances the osmotic tolerance, cryosurvival rate of ram spermatozoon and suppresses their ability to undergo LPC and cryo-induced acrosome reaction.

  1. Negative binomial fits to multiplicity distributions from central collisions of {sup 16}O + Cu at 14.6A GeV/c and intermittency

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1994-10-14

    An `intermittency` analysis of charged particle multiplicity data from the target multiplicy array (TMA) in central collisions of {sup 16}O+Cu at 14.6 A{times}GeV/c has been published by the AGS-E802 collaboration. The centrality cut was made using the Zero degree Calorimeter and requiring that the forward energy be less than one projectile nucleon (i.e. T{sub ZCAL} <13.6 GeV). In agreement with previous measurements, an apparent power-law growth of Normalized Factorial moments with decreasing pseudorapidity interval was observed in the range 1.0{ge}{delta}{eta}{ge}0.1. In the present work, multiplicity distributions in individual pseudorapidity bins are presented for the same data. These distributions are excellently fit by Negative Binomial Distributions (NBD) in all {delta}{eta} bins, allowing, for the first time, a systematic formulation of the subject of `intermittency` in terms of distributions, rather than moments. In agreement with all previous measurements of NBD fits to multiplicity distributions in hadron and lepton reactions, the k parameter of the NBD fit for central {sup 16}O+Cu collisions is found to exhibit an apparently linear increase with the {delta}{eta} interval, albeit with a much steeper slope than for the other reactions, and a non-zero intercept, k(0){ne}0. True intermittency, {xi}{yields}0, would occur if the intercept k(0){yields}0, which is not observed in any experiment. The correlation length for central {sup 16}O+Cu collisions, although smaller than expected, is quite finite and can be measured - which means that a length scale exists in these collisions and therefore there is no intermittency in the multiplicity fluctuations.

  2. Relationship between serum acetaminophen concentration and N-acetylcysteine-induced adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Awang, Rahmat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Khan, Halilol Rahman Mohamed; Sawalha, Ansam F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous N-acetylcysteine is usually regarded as a safe antidote. However, during the infusion of the loading dose, different types of adverse drug reactions (ADR) may occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between the incidence of different types of ADR and serum acetaminophen concentration in patients presenting to the hospital with acetaminophen overdose. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital for acute acetaminophen overdose over a period of 5 years (1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008). Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to test differences between groups depending on the normality of the data. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis. Of 305 patients with acetaminophen overdose, 146 (47.9%) were treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and 139 (45.6%) were included in this study. Different types of ADR were observed in 94 (67.6%) patients. Low serum acetaminophen concentrations were significantly associated with cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions but not other types of ADR. Low serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly associated with flushing (p < 0.001), rash (p < 0.001) and pruritus (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in serum acetaminophen concentrations between patients with and without the following ADR: gastrointestinal reactions (p = 0.77), respiratory reactions (p = 0.96), central nervous reactions (p = 0.82) and cardiovascular reactions (p = 0.37). In conclusion, low serum acetaminophen concentrations were associated with higher cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions. Such high serum acetaminophen concentrations may be protective against N-acetylcysteine-induced cutaneous ADR. PMID:20374238

  3. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    DOE PAGES

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fsmore » of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.« less

  4. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fs of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.

  5. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  6. Effect of ultraviolet B on nonimmunologic contact reactions induced by dimethyl sulphoxide, phenol and sodium lauryl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Larmi, E; Lahti, A; Hannuksela, M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of ultraviolet light B (UVB) on immediate and delayed irritant reactions induced by dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), phenol, and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was studied in 12 volunteers. One half of the upper back was irradiated with 0.16 J/cm2 of UVB. Patch tests for immediate reactions were performed using dilution series of test substances on the 3rd, 9th and 15th days and for delayed reactions on the 2nd, 8th and 14th days after irradiation both on the UV-exposed and non-exposed areas of the back. The occlusion time was 20 min for immediate reactions and 20 h for delayed ones. Changes in the skin blood flow of the test sites were monitored using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and erythema and edema reactions were observed visually. Both immediate and delayed reactions were caused by DMSO and phenol; SLS elicited only delayed reactions. UVB diminished immediate reactions induced by phenol for at least 15 days after irradiation. Immediate reactions to DMSO were diminished 40 min after application on the UV-exposed area on the 3rd day. UVB diminished the delayed reactions from SLS and DMSO but not reactions induced by phenol.

  7. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  8. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-titanium interface reaction induced by keV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.

    1992-03-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite bioceramic, 5-50 Å in thickness, have been deposited on ion cleaned titanium surfaces to study the chemical-physical adhesion of metal-ceramic interfaces of biomedical devices (orthopaedic and dentistry prosthesis). Film deposition was performed in ultrahigh vacuum condition (10 -10 mbar) using 5 keV argon sputtering of hydroxyapatite matrix; the film thickness was measured in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-titanium interface was irradiated with an electron beam of 0.5-5 keV energy and 0.2-2 A/cm 2 current density. During electron irradiation, Auger spectra show chemical shifts of phosphorus, titanium and oxygen peaks. The released electron energy induces modifications in the tetraedric phosphorus-oxygen groups with production of new chemical bonds between phosphorus, oxygen and titanium. Oxygen, for example, diffuses into the titanium interface forming titanium oxide. Chemical reactions induced by electron irradiation are driven by the metal-ceramic interface. Near the interface a strong and fast effect is observed while far from the interface a weak and slow effect occurs. Chemical reactions depend on the electron irradiation dose showing an inhibition threshold at about 10 19 e/cm 2 and, near the interface, a saturation condition at about 5 × 10 20 e/cm 2. Titanium-ceramic chemical reactions are inhibited if the substrate titanium surface is rich in oxide.

  10. Role of solution conductivity in reaction induced charge auto-electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jeffrey L.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2014-04-01

    Catalytic bimetallic Janus particles swim by a bipolar electrochemical propulsion mechanism that results from electroosmotic fluid slip around the particle surface. The flow is driven by electrical body forces which are generated from a coupling of a reaction-induced electric field and net charge in the diffuse layer surrounding the particle. This paper presents simulations, scaling, and physical descriptions of the experimentally observed trend that the swimming speed decays rapidly with increasing solution conductivity. The simulations solve the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations with multiple ionic species, a cylindrical particle in an infinite fluid, and nonlinear Butler-Volmer boundary conditions to represent the electrochemical surface reactions. The speed of bimetallic particles is reduced in high-conductivity solutions because of reductions in the induced electric field in the diffuse layer near the rod, the total reaction rate, and the magnitude of the rod zeta potential. This work suggests that the auto-electrophoretic mechanism is inherently susceptible to speed reductions in higher ionic strength solutions.

  11. 16O excesses in olivine inclusions in Yamato-86009 and Murchison chondrites and their relation to CAIs.

    PubMed

    Hiyagon, H; Hashimoto, A

    1999-02-01

    In situ ion microprobe analyses of oxygen isotopes in Yamato-86009 and Murchison chondrites show that they contain abundant olivine-rich inclusions that have large oxygen-16 (16O) excesses, similar to those in spinel grains in calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions in Allende and other carbonaceous chondrites. The existence of 16O-enriched olivine-rich inclusions suggests that oxygen isotopic anomalies were more extensive in the early solar system than was previously thought and that their origin may be attributed to a nebular chemical process rather than to an unidentified 16O-rich carrier of presolar origin.

  12. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  13. The enzymatic reaction-induced configuration change of the prosthetic group PQQ of methanol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Gan, Jian-Hua; Mathews, F Scott; Xia, Zong-Xiang

    2011-03-25

    Methanol dehydrogenase is a heterotetrameric enzyme containing the prosthetic group pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), which catalyzes the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. The crystal structure of methanol dehydrogenase from Methylophilus W3A1, previously determined at high resolution, exhibits a non-planar configuration of the PQQ ring system and lends support for a hydride transfer mechanism of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. To investigate why PQQ is in the C5-reduced form and to better understand the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, three structures of this enzyme in a new crystal form have been determined at higher resolution. Two of the three crystals were grown in the presence of 1 and 50 mM methanol, respectively, both structures of which show non-planar configurations of the PQQ ring system, confirming the previous conclusion; the other was crystallized in the presence of 50 mM ethanol, the structure of which displays a planar ring system for PQQ. Comparison of these structures reveals that the configuration change of PQQ is induced by the enzymatic reaction. The reaction takes place and the C5-reduced PQQ intermediate is produced when the enzyme co-crystallizes with methanol, but the enzymatic reaction does not take place and the PQQ ring retains a planar configuration of the oxidized orthoquinone form when ethanol instead of methanol is present in the crystallization solution.

  14. Age and size at maturity: a quantitative review of diet-induced reaction norms in insects.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tiit; Vellau, Helen; Tammaru, Toomas

    2014-11-01

    Optimality models predict that diet-induced bivariate reaction norms for age and size at maturity can have diverse shapes, with the slope varying from negative to positive. To evaluate these predictions, we perform a quantitative review of relevant data, using a literature-derived database of body sizes and development times for over 200 insect species. We show that bivariate reaction norms with a negative slope prevail in nearly all taxonomic and ecological categories of insects as well as in some other ectotherm taxa with comparable life histories (arachnids and amphibians). In insects, positive slopes are largely limited to species, which feed on discrete resource items, parasitoids in particular. By contrast, with virtually no meaningful exceptions, herbivorous and predatory insects display reaction norms with a negative slope. This is consistent with the idea that predictable resource depletion, a scenario selecting for positively sloped reaction norms, is not frequent for these insects. Another source of such selection-a positive correlation between resource levels and juvenile mortality rates-should similarly be rare among insects. Positive slopes can also be predicted by models which integrate life-history evolution and population dynamics. As bottom-up regulation is not common in most insect groups, such models may not be most appropriate for insects.

  15. Low energy electron induced reactions in fluorinated acetamide - probing negative ions and neutral stable counterparts*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopyra, Janina; König-Lehmann, Constanze; Illenberger, Eugen; Warneke, Jonas; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact to trifluoroacetamide (CF3CONH2, TFAA) in the energy range 0-12 eV leads to a variety of negative fragment ions which are formed via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The underlying reactions range from single bond cleavages to remarkably complex reactions that lead to loss of the neutral units HF, H2O and HNCO as deduced from their directly observed ionic counterparts (M - H2O)-, (M - HF)- and (M - HNCO)-. Also formed are the pseudo-halogen ions CN- and OCN-. All these reactions proceed dominantly via a resonance located near 1 eV, i.e., electrons at subexcitation energies trigger reactions involving multiple bond cleavages. The electron induced generation of the neutral molecules HF, H2O and HNCO in condensed TFAA films is probed by temperature controlled thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) which can be viewed as a complementary techniques to gas-phase experiments in DEA to directly probe the neutral counterparts. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. Observations of shock-induced reaction in liquid bromoform up to 11 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Alcon, R. R.

    1996-05-01

    Shock measurements on bromoform (CHBr3) over the past 33 years at Los Alamos have led to speculation that this material undergoes a shock-induced reaction. Ramsay observed that it became opaque after a 1 to 2 μs induction time when shocked to pressures above 6 GPa (1). McQueen and Isaak observed that it is a strong light emitter above 25 GPa (2). Hugoniot data start to deviate from the anticipated liquid Hugoniot at pressures above 10 GPa. We have used electromagnetic particle velocity gauging to measure wave profiles in shocked liquid bromoform. At pressures below 9 GPa, there is no mechanical evidence of reaction. At a pressure slightly above 10 GPa, the observed wave profiles are similar to those observed in initiating liquid explosives such as nitromethane. Their characteristics are completely different from the two-wave structures observed in shocked liquids where the products are more dense than the reactants. As with explosives, a reaction producing products which are less dense than the reactants is indicated. BKW calculations also indicate that a detonation type reaction may be possible.

  17. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  18. Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Balazs, Anna [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

    2016-07-12

    Computer simulations reveal how photo-induced chemical reactions can be exploited to create long-range order in binary and ternary polymeric materials. The process is initiated by shining a spatially uniform light over a photosensitive AB binary blend, which undergoes both a reversible chemical reaction and phase separation. We then introduce a well-collimated, higher-intensity light source. Rastering this secondary light over the sample locally increases the reaction rate and causes formation of defect-free, spatially periodic structures. These binary structures resemble either the lamellar or hexagonal phases of microphase-separated di-block copolymers. We measure the regularity of the ordered structures as a function of the relative reaction rates for different values of the rastering speed and determine the optimal conditions for creating defect-free structures in the binary systems. We then add a non-reactive homo-polymer C, which is immiscible with both A and B. We show that this component migrates to regions that are illuminated by the secondary, higher-intensity light, allowing us to effectively write a pattern of C onto the AB film. Rastering over the ternary blend with this collimated light now leads to hierarchically ordered patterns of A, B, and C. The findings point to a facile, non-intrusive process for manufacturing high-quality polymeric devices in a low-cost, efficient manner.

  19. Observations of shock-induced reaction in liquid bromoform up to 11 GPA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R.

    1995-09-01

    Shock measurements on bromoform (CHBr{sub 3}) over the past 33 years at Los Alamos have led to speculation that this material undergoes a shock-induced reaction. Ramsay observed that it became opaque after a 1 to 2 {micro}s induction time when shocked to pressures above 6 GPa. McQueen and Isaak observed that it is a strong light emitter above 25 GPa. Hugoniot data start to deviate from the anticipated liquid Hugoniot at pressures above 10 GPa. The authors have used electromagnetic particle velocity gauging to measure wave profiles in shocked liquid bromoform. At pressures below 9 GPa, there is no mechanical evidence of reaction. At a pressure slightly above 10 GPa, the observed wave profiles are similar to those observed in initiating liquid explosives such as nitromethane. Their characteristics are completely different from the two-wave structures observed in shocked liquids where the products are more dense than the reactants. As with explosives, a reaction producing products which are less dense than the reactants is indicated. BKW calculations also indicate that a detonation type reaction may be possible.

  20. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions.

  1. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  2. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:17025732

  3. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  4. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  5. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  6. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  7. Neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering with nuclei in low and high neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, K. S.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed present status regarding theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. We also discussed that one step-process estimated by the DWBA is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data.

  8. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  9. Possible mechanisms of fragmentation of {sup 16}O nuclei with a momentum of 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon in track emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotikov, E. A.

    2013-06-15

    The angular distributions of doubly charged fragments of {sup 16}O nuclei having a momentum of 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon and interacting with track-emulsion nuclei were studied. The experimental angular distributions of doubly charged fragments of a {sup 16}O nucleus are not described by the statistical model of the fragmentation of nuclei. The possible channels of fragmentation of {sup 16}O nuclei may include {sup 16}O {yields} 2{sup 8}Be {yields} 4{alpha}, {sup 16}O {yields} {sup 8}Be +{sup 8} Be* {yields} 4{alpha}, {sup 16}O {yields} 2{sup 8}Be* {yields} 4{alpha}, {sup 16}O {yields} {alpha}+{sup 12}C, {sup 16}O {yields} {alpha} +{sup 12}C* {yields} {alpha} + 3{alpha}, {sup 16}O {yields} {alpha} +{sup 12}C* {yields} {alpha} + p{alpha}{sup 7}Li, {sup 16}O {yields} {alpha} +{sup 12}C* {yields} {alpha} + 2{sup 6}Li, {sup 16}O {yields} {alpha} +{sup 12}C* {yields} {alpha} + pt2{alpha}, {sup 16}O {yields} Li + B, and {sup 16}O {yields} Li* + B*.

  10. Quercetin effectively quells peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions in the peanut sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Shishehbor, Farideh; Behroo, Lotfollah; Ghafouriyan Broujerdnia, Mehri; Namjoyan, Forough; Latifi, Seiyed-Mahmoud

    2010-03-01

    Peanut allergy is the major leading cause of fatal or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions to foods. At present, there is no remedy for this condition. The applied pharmaceutical cares are merely palliative, while their deleterious side effects have already been established. Hence, many sufferers search for complementary and alternative medicines. A versatile-, "flavonol" subgroup-member of the flavonoid family, quercetin, is of paramount interest to investigators. In this study the effects of quercetin on peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions were investigated in a rat model of peanut allergy. Wistar rats were sensitized with crude peanut extract in the presence of Cholera toxin and Aluminium hydroxide. Sensitized rats were then allotted into three groups; Positive control, Quercetin-treatment and Sham, (n=7, each). Naive rats (n=7) served as negative controls. One week post-sensitization period, the rats in treatment group were treated with quercetin at a dose of 50 mg/kg(Body Weight)/mL Di-methyl-sulfoxide 5%/rat, over a period of four weeks. Subsequently, rats were challenged, and anaphylactic reaction parameters including variations in plasma histamine levels, vascular permeability, systemic anaphylaxis scores, and total serum Immunoglobulin E levels were measured. After daily-gavaging for four weeks, quercetin completely abrogated peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions following challenges, so that the mean of plasma histamine levels in the quercetin-treated rats, were lower significantly (p=0.004) as compared with positive control group. Our findings suggest that the flavonoid quercetin is potent enough to suppress the on-going Immunoglobulin E responses against peanut proteins, and can be propounded as an alternative medicine to protect against Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergies.

  11. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  12. Proton rapidity distributions from 60 GeV/n sup 16 O + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, S.

    1990-05-01

    An analysis of the proton rapidity distribution in central {sup 16} O + Au collisions at 60 GeV/n measured in the NA35 streamer chamber detector at the CERN SPS is presented. The charge excess of positive particles over negative particles was measured. The rapidity distribution of the charge excess which can be associated with the primordial protons in the collision is studies in terms of the nuclear stopping power and is compared to the predictions of various models. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Proton rapidity distributions from 60 GeV/n sup 16 O+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, J.; Hoffman, M.; Runge, K.; Schmoetten, E. . Fakultaet fuer Physik); Bartke, J.; Gladysz, E. ); Bialkowska, H. ); Bock, R.; Brockmann, R.; Guerra, C.; Humanic, T.; Sandoval, A. ); Buncic, P.; Ljubicic, A.

    1990-05-01

    An analysis of the proton rapidity distribution in central {sup 16}O+Au collisions at 60 GeV/n measured in the NA35 streamer chamber detector at the CERN SPS is presented. The charge excess of positive particles over negative particles was measured. The rapidity distribution of the charge excess which can be associated with the primordial protons in the collision is studied in terms of the nuclear stopping power and is compared to the predictions of various models. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time. PMID:25182866

  15. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  16. Theory of photon and electron induced reactions. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Onley, D.S.; Wright, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    During the first year and half of the current grant from the Department of Energy we have made considerable progress on the following aspects of the general investigation of electron and photon induced reactions: (1) photo- and electro-production of mesons; (2) Coulomb distortion effects on (e,e{prime}{gamma}) and (e,e{prime}) and (e,e{prime}p) in the quasi-elastic region, (3) studies involving the relativistic shell model, and (4) quark models. We will report on each of these developments in this paper.

  17. Development of CNS Active Target for Deuteron Induced Reactions with High Intensity Exotic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shinsuke; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C. S.; Kojima, R.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Corsi, A.; Dozono, M.; Gibelin, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, S.; Kubono, S.; Kubota, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Nishi, T.; Obertelli, A.; Otsu, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Takaki, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Leung, T.; Uesaka, T.; Yako, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.; Takada, E.

    An active target system called CAT, has been developed aiming at the measurement of deuteron induced reactions with high intensity beams in inverse kinematics. The CAT consists of a time projection chamber using THGEM and an array of Si detectors or NaI scintilators. The effective gain for the recoil particle is deisgned to be 5 - 10 × 103, while one for the beam is reduced by 102 using mesh grid to match the amplified signal to the dynamic range same as the one for recoil particle. The structure of CAT and the effect of the mesh grid are reported.

  18. Deformation-induced nanoscale mixing reactions in Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2013-11-04

    During the repeated cold rolling of Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers, a solid solution forms at the interfaces as nanoscale layer structure with a composition that replicates the overall multilayer composition. The interfacial mixing behavior was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. During deformation induced reaction, the intermixing behavior of the Cu/Ni and Ag/Pd multilayers is in contrast to thermally activated diffusion behavior. This distinct behavior can provide new kinetic pathways and offer opportunities for microstructure control that cannot be achieved by thermal processing.

  19. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  20. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  1. Measurement of the Induced Proton Polarization Pn in the 12C(e, e', p) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R J; Barkhuff, David; Bertozzi, William; Chen, Jian-ping; Dale, Dan; Dodson, G; Dow, K A; Epstein, Marty; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Finn, Mike; Gilad, Shalev; Jones, Mark K; Joo, Kyungseon; Kelly, James; Kowalski, Stanley; Lourie, Bob; Madey, Richard; Margaziotis, Dimitri; Markowitz, Pete; McIntyre, Justin; Mertz, Christoph; Milbrath, Brian; Mitchell, Joseph; Perdrisat, Charles F; Punjabi, Vina; Rutt, Paul; Sarty, Adam; Tieger, D; Tschalaer, C; Turchinetz, William; Ulmer, Paul E; Van Verst, S P; Vellidis, C; Warren, Glen; Weinstein, Lawrence

    1998-01-19

    The first measurements of the induced proton polarization Pn for the 12C(e,e',p) reaction are reported. The experiment was performed at quasifree kinematics for energy and momentum transfer (w,q) = (294 MeV, 765 MeV/c) and sampled a missing momentum range of 0-250 MeV/c. The induced polarization arises from final-state interactions and for these kinematics is dominated by the real part of the spin-orbit optical potential. The distorted-wave impulse approximation provides good agreement with data for the 1 p3/2 shell. The data for the continuum suggest that both the 1s1/2 shell and underlying l > 1 configurations contribute.

  2. Study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The experimental study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,α{sup 14}C){sup 1}H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J{sup π}=5{sup −}), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  3. H2 16O line list for the study of atmospheres of Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentieva, N. N.; Voronin, B. A.; Fedorova, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an important method of remote measurement of H2 16O content in planetary atmospheres with initial spectroscopic information from the HITRAN, GEISA, etc., databases adapted for studies in the Earth's atmosphere. Unlike the Earth, the atmospheres of Mars and Venus mainly consist of carbon dioxide with a CO2 content of about 95%. In this paper, the line list of H2 16O is obtained on the basis of the BT2 line list (R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris, et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 368, 1087 (2006)). The BT2 line list containing information on the centers, intensities, and quantum identification of lines is supplemented with the line contour parameters: the self-broadening and carbon dioxide broadening coefficients and the temperature dependence coefficient at 296 K in the range of 0.001-30000 cm-1. Transitions with intensity values 10-30, 10-32, and 10-35 cm/molecule, the total number of which is 323310, 753529, and 2011072, respectively, were chosen from the BT2 line list.

  4. Local inflammatory reaction induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Louise Faggionato; Prezotto-Neto, José Pedro; Távora, Bianca de Carvalho Lins Fernandes; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Knysak, Irene; Gióia Guizze, Samuel Paulo; Santoro, Marcelo Larami; Barbaro, Katia Cristina

    2013-12-15

    Centipede envenomation is generally mild, and human victims usually manifest burning pain, erythema and edema. Despite the abundance and ubiquity of these animals, centipede venom has been poorly characterized in literature. For this reason, the aim of this work was to investigate local inflammatory features induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede envenomation in mice, evaluating edema formation, leukocyte infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators, and also performing histological analysis. The highest edematogenic activity induced by the venom, determined by plethysmometry, was noticed 0.5 h after injection in mice footpad. At 24 h, edema was still detected in animals that received 15 and 60 μg of venom, and at 48 h, only in animals injected with 60 μg of venom. In relation to leukocyte count, S. viridicornis venom induced cell recruitment, mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, in all doses and time periods analyzed in comparison with PBS-injected mice. An increase in lymphocytes was detected especially between 1 and 24 h at 60 μg dose. Besides, eosinophil recruitment was observed mainly for 15 and 60 μg doses in early time periods. Edema formation and cell recruitment were also confirmed by histological analysis. Moreover, S. viridicornis venom stimulated the release of IL-6, MCP-1, KC, and IL-1β. Conversely, S. viridicornis venom did not induce the release of detectable levels of TNF-α. We demonstrated that the edematogenic activity induced by S. viridicornis venom was of rapid onset, and the venom stimulated secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators which contribute to the inflammatory reaction induced by S. viridicornis venom in an experimental model.

  5. Local inflammatory reaction induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Louise Faggionato; Prezotto-Neto, José Pedro; Távora, Bianca de Carvalho Lins Fernandes; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Knysak, Irene; Gióia Guizze, Samuel Paulo; Santoro, Marcelo Larami; Barbaro, Katia Cristina

    2013-12-15

    Centipede envenomation is generally mild, and human victims usually manifest burning pain, erythema and edema. Despite the abundance and ubiquity of these animals, centipede venom has been poorly characterized in literature. For this reason, the aim of this work was to investigate local inflammatory features induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede envenomation in mice, evaluating edema formation, leukocyte infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators, and also performing histological analysis. The highest edematogenic activity induced by the venom, determined by plethysmometry, was noticed 0.5 h after injection in mice footpad. At 24 h, edema was still detected in animals that received 15 and 60 μg of venom, and at 48 h, only in animals injected with 60 μg of venom. In relation to leukocyte count, S. viridicornis venom induced cell recruitment, mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, in all doses and time periods analyzed in comparison with PBS-injected mice. An increase in lymphocytes was detected especially between 1 and 24 h at 60 μg dose. Besides, eosinophil recruitment was observed mainly for 15 and 60 μg doses in early time periods. Edema formation and cell recruitment were also confirmed by histological analysis. Moreover, S. viridicornis venom stimulated the release of IL-6, MCP-1, KC, and IL-1β. Conversely, S. viridicornis venom did not induce the release of detectable levels of TNF-α. We demonstrated that the edematogenic activity induced by S. viridicornis venom was of rapid onset, and the venom stimulated secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators which contribute to the inflammatory reaction induced by S. viridicornis venom in an experimental model. PMID:24140924

  6. Reactivity impact of {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering nuclear data for some numerical and critical benchmark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.; Roubtsov, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.

    2012-07-01

    The thermal neutron-elastic-scattering cross-section data for {sup 16}O used in various modern evaluated-nuclear-data libraries were reviewed and found to be generally too high compared with the best available experimental measurements. Some of the proposed revisions to the ENDF/B-VII.0 {sup 16}O data library and recent results from the TENDL system increase this discrepancy further. The reactivity impact of revising the {sup 16}O data downward to be consistent with the best measurements was tested using the JENDL-3.3 {sup 16}O cross-section values and was found to be very small in MCNP5 simulations of the UO{sub 2} and reactor-recycle MOX-fuel cases of the ANS Doppler-defect numerical benchmark. However, large reactivity differences of up to about 14 mk (1400 pcm) were observed using {sup 16}O data files from several evaluated-nuclear-data libraries in MCNP5 simulations of the Los Alamos National Laboratory HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments, which were performed in the 1950's. The latter result suggests that new measurements using HEU in a heavy-water-moderated critical facility, such as the ZED-2 zero-power reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories, might help to resolve the discrepancy between the {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering cross-section values and thereby reduce or better define its uncertainty, although additional assessment work would be needed to confirm this. (authors)

  7. Gas-phase reactions of charged phenyl radicals with neutral biomolecules evaporated by laser-induced acoustic desorption.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christopher J; Ramírez-Arizmendi, Luis E; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Pérez, James; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2002-02-01

    A generally applicable method for the study of phenyl radicals' reactions with neutral biomolecules in the gas phase is demonstrated. Neutral biomolecules were evaporated into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and subsequently reacted with trapped charged phenyl radicals. The structural integrity of the evaporated alanylalanine molecules was verified by reaction with dichlorophosphenium ions. Examination of the reactions of charged phenyl radicals with alanylalanine and thymidine evaporated via LIAD revealed hydrogen atom abstraction for both alanylalanine and thymidine as well as an addition/elimination product for the reaction with thymidine. These reactions are consistent with the results obtained by others in solution. Further, a previously unstudied reaction of the nucleotide of thymine (T1) with charged phenyl radical was found to yield analogous products as the reaction with thymidine.

  8. Investigation of proton induced reactions on niobium at low and medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Corniani, E.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Csikai, J.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2009-10-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 88,89Zr and 88Y in the energy range 0-37 MeV. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-3, TALYS and with the literature data. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  9. Pharmacogenomics of severe cutaneous adverse reactions and drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kaniwa, Nahoko; Saito, Yoshiro

    2013-06-01

    Rare but severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important issue in drug development and in the proper usage of drugs during the post-approval phase. The ability to predict patient susceptibility to severe ADRs would prevent drug administration to high-risk patients. This would save lives and ensure the quality of life for these patients, but occurrence of idiosyncratic severe ADRs had been very difficult to predict for a long time. However, in this decade, genetic markers have been found for several ADRs, especially for severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) and drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In this review, we summarize recent progress in identifying genetic markers for SCARS and DILI, and discuss issues that remain unresolved. As for SCARs, associations of HLA-B*15:02 or HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*58:01 have been revealed for carbamazepine- and allopurinol-related Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal neclolysis, respectively. HLA-B*57:01 is strongly associated with abacavir-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Several HLA alleles also demonstrate drug-specific associations with DILI, such as HLA-A*33:03 for ticlopidine, HLA-B*57:01 for flucloxacillin and HLA-DQA1*02:01 for lapatinib. Efforts should be continued to find other genetic markers to achieve high predictability for ADRs, with the goal being development of genetic tests for use in clinical settings.

  10. PKA activation in concert with ARIS and asterosap induces the acrosome reaction in starfish.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Sadiqul; Kawase, O; Hase, S; Hoshi, M; Matsumoto, M

    2006-11-01

    The acrosome reaction (AR) is a fundamental event for fertilization, which is induced in concert with acrosome reaction-inducing substance (ARIS) and asterosap, both of which are components of starfish egg jelly (EJ). During the AR, a spermatozoon undergoes a series of physiological changes, such as in intracellular cGMP concentration ([cGMP]i), pHi and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Affinity purification of cGMP-binding protein resulted in the isolation of a regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), suggesting the involvement of a cAMP-dependent pathway in the AR. By using a cAMP enzyme immunoassay, [cAMP]i was found to increase in starfish spermatozoa when stimulated with ARIS and asterosap. ARIS could also increase the [cAMP]i in the presence of high pH seawater. Pretreatment of spermatozoa with two specific and cell-permeable PKA inhibitors, H89 and KT5720, prevented the induction of the AR in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that PKA activity participates in the induction of the AR with ARIS and asterosap. To investigate this, we have cloned a gene that encodes a regulatory subunit of PKA that had been identified in starfish spermatozoa.

  11. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  12. Rapamycin protects neurons from brain contusion-induced inflammatory reaction via modulation of microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QI; XIE, DUJIANG; PAN, SHIYONG; XU, WEIJUN

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory reaction is important in secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Rapamycin has been demonstrated as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of TBI, however, there is a lack of data regarding the effects of rapamycin on the inflammatory reaction following TBI. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the effects of treatment with rapamycin on inflammatory reactions and examine the possible involvement of microglial activation following TBI. Male imprinting control region mice were randomly divided into four groups: Sham group (n=23), TBI group (n=23), TBI + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group (n=31) and TBI + rapamycin group (n=31). Rapamycin was dissolved in DMSO (50 mg/ml) and injected 30 min after TBI (2 mg/Kg; intraperitoneally). A weight-drop model of TBI was induced, and the brain tissues were harvested 24 h after TBI. The findings indicated that the administration of rapamycin following TBI was associated with decreased levels of activated microglia and neuron degeneration at the peri-injury site, reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased neurobehavioral function, possibly mediated by inactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The results of the present study offer novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of rapamycin, possibly involving the modulation of microglial activation. PMID:26458361

  13. Chemical reactions between CF2HCl and NH3 induced by IR double-beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigüenza, C. L.; Simeonov, S. A.; Díaz, L.; González-Díaz, P. F.

    1993-06-01

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation experiments with two wavelengths in different mixtures of chlorodifluoromethane and ammonia have been carried out. It is shown that the presence of ammonia in the sample induces a decrease in the chlorodifluoromethane dissociation yield. It has been observed that the distinct chemical reaction channels are differently activated as the time delay between the two laser pulses is varied. The ratio of the obtained products in the infrared multiphoton dissociation changes with the composition of the initial mixture and are not compatible with the mechanism suggested by Sugita and Arai for this reaction in single IR wavelength excitation if it is assumed to be the only contributing mechanism other than that for direct CF2HCl dissociation and subsequent C2F4 formation from the resulting CF2 radicals. It appears that, although for simultaneous two-wavelength irradiation the presence of an accumulated solid NH4Cl deposit does not significantly influence the reaction, this is no longer the case when time delays are introduced between the two beams.

  14. Bayesian Evaluation Including Covariance Matrices of Neutron-induced Reaction Cross Sections of {sup 181}Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, H. Schnabel, G.; Srdinko, Th.; Wildpaner, V.

    2015-01-15

    A new evaluation of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 181}Ta using a consistent procedure based on Bayesian statistics is presented. Starting point of the evaluation is the description of nuclear reactions via nuclear models implemented in TALYS 1.4. A retrieval of experimental data was performed and covariance matrices of the experiments were generated from an extensive study of the corresponding literature. All reaction channels required for a transport file up to 200 MeV have been considered and the covariance matrices of cross section uncertainties for the most important channels are determined. The evaluation has been performed in one step including all available experimental data. A comparison of the evaluated cross sections and spectra with experimental data and available evaluations is performed. In general the evaluated cross section reflect our best knowledge and give a fair description of the observables. However, there are few deviations from expectation which clearly indicate the impact of the prior and the need to account for model defects. Using the results of the evaluation a complete ENDF-file similarly to those of the TENDL library is generated.

  15. Liquid-phase reactions induced by atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. We used an H-shaped glass reactor to observe the effects of electron irradiation and positive-ion irradiation on the liquid-phase reaction separately and simultaneously. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, HAuCl4, and FeCl2 are used as the electrolyte. Solutions of AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are used for the generation of Ag and Au nanoparticles, respectively. Solution of FeCl2 is used for the generation of ferromagnetic particles. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH- in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. We also showed that the control of reductive and oxidative environment in the liquid is possible not only by the gas composition for the plasma generation but also by the liquid composition.

  16. Parameterization of fusion barriers for light-projectiles-induced reactions using the proximity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Sheibani, J.

    2016-05-01

    In this article we propose a pocket formula for fusion barriers calculated by three versions of the proximity formalism, namely AW 95, Bass 80 and Prox. 2010 potentials, for fusion reactions involving the collisions of the proton and helium projectiles with different targets in mass ranges 51≤ AT ≤ 130 and 40≤ AT ≤ 233 , respectively. For the first type of the colliding systems, it is shown that the proposed pocket formulas are able to predict the actual values of RB and VB within accuracies of ±0.4% and ±0.45% , respectively. Moreover, for the second type of the selected reactions, these accuracies are obtained ±0.24% and ±0.36% , respectively. In this study, the ability of the present pocket formulas is also demonstrated to predict the exact values of the fusion cross sections for our selected mass ranges. A comparison with the results of the previous pocket formulas reveals that our parameterized forms are more successful to reproduce the empirical data of the barrier height and position in the proton- and helium-induced reactions.

  17. β-delayed α decay of {sup 16}N and the {sup 12}C(α,γ){sup 16}O cross section at astrophysical energies: A new experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, S.; Cherubini, S.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Hayakawa, S.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Gulino, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Ushio, K.; Teranishi, T.; Mazzocco, M.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 12}C(α,γ){sup 16}O reaction at energies corresponding to the quiescent helium burning in massive stars is regarded as one of the most important processes in nuclear astrophysics. Although this process has being studied for over four decades, our knowledge of its cross section at the energies of interest for astrophysics is still widely unsatisfactory. Indeed, no experimental data are available around 300 keV and in the energy region of astrophysical interest extrapolations are performed using some theoretical approaches, usually R-matrix calculations. Consequently, the published astrophysical factors range from 1 to 288 keVb for S{sub E1}(300) and 7 to 120 keVb for S{sub E2}(300), especially because of the unknown contribution coming from subthreshold resonances. To improve the reliability of these extrapolations, data from complementary experiments, such as elastic and quasi- elastic α scattering on {sup 12}C, α-transfer reactions to {sup 16}O, and {sup 16}N decay are usually included in the analysis. Here the β-delayed α decay of {sup 16}N is used to infer information on the {sup 12}C(α,γ){sup 16}O reaction and a new experimental technique is suggested.

  18. The influence of composition of porous copolyester scaffolds on reactions induced by irradiation sterilization.

    PubMed

    Odelius, Karin; Plikk, Peter; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2008-01-01

    In our previous work regarding radiation sterilization of porous scaffolds we have concluded that the composition and microstructure of the polymer chain are a key factor influencing the degradation reactions occurring upon irradiation. In this work we in contrast reported on the effects of high-energy irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties. Electron beam (EB)- and gamma-irradiation sterilization were used in order to finalize the properties of a series of porous scaffolds comprised of different aliphatic polyester copolymers. The results presented here show that, for both sterilization methods, the crystallinity increased for all copolymers of 1,5-dioxepan-2-one (DXO) and l,l-lactide (LLA) at the minimum sterilization dose. The same was true of the epsilon-caprolactone (CL)- and LLA-containing copolymers upon EB sterilization, while a reduction in crystallinity were found upon gamma-irradiation. As was anticipated, it was shown that crystallinity also is a characteristic of the copolymer influencing the effects of the irradiation-induced reactions. Both the onset temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum rate of weight loss increased after irradiation and hence the thermal stability was increased. This is a result of a simultaneous lengthening of the chains by cross-linking reactions and a shortening by random chain-scissions occurring throughout the molecule, which lead to the formation of new endgroups with higher thermal stability. Scaffolds of crystalline polymers retained more of their initial tensile properties after irradiation compared to amorphous materials. The result previously published, showing that the composition was a key factor influencing the degradation reactions occurring upon irradiation, was augmented here. PMID:17936898

  19. [Occupationally-induced contact dermatitis and bronchial asthma in a unusual delayed reaction to hydroxychloroquine].

    PubMed

    Meier, H; Elsner, P; Wüthrich, B

    1999-09-01

    dermatitis to this substance has not yet been reported. It is noteworthy that the patch test reactions were pustular and of multiform morphology and that bronchial exposure to the allergen resulted in asthma and a generalized drug reaction. Pathogenetically the asthmatic reaction seems to be on a delayed-type mechanism as is also seen with ampicillin, cobalt and nickel induced asthma. PMID:10501684

  20. Production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; von Gunten, H.; Jacak, B.; Nurmia, M.; Liu, Y.; Luo, C.; Seaborg, G.T.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for the production of isotopes of Bk through No in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne ions at energies near the Coulomb barrier. In general, the peak of the mass-yield curve for each element is about two mass units larger for /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne than for /sup 16/O and /sup 20/Ne, reflecting the neutron excess of the projectiles. The production cross sections and maxima of the actinide isotopic distributions are at least as favorable for production of neutron-rich actinides as those measured for irradiation of /sup 238/U and /sup 248/Cm with very heavy ions. The observation of so many neutron-rich products between the masses of the target and compound nucleus suggests a direct transfer reaction in which the product nuclide is formed with relatively low excitation which minimizes depletion from prompt fission.

  1. Use of microgravity sensors for quantification of space shuttle orbiter vernier reaction control system induced environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    In the modeling of spacecraft dynamics it is important to accurately characterize the environment in which the vehicle operates, including the environments induced by the vehicle itself. On the Space Shuttle these induced environmental factors include reaction control system plume. Knowledge of these environments is necessary for performance of control systems and loads analyses, estimation of disturbances due to thruster firings, and accurate state vector propagation. During the STS-71 mission, while the Orbiter was performing attitude control for the mated Orbiter/Mir stack, it was noted that the autopilot was limit cycling at a rate higher than expected from pre-flight simulations. Investigations during the mission resulted in the conjecture that an unmodelled plume impingement force was acting upon the orbiter elevons. The in-flight investigations were not successful in determining the actual magnitude of the impingement, resulting in several sequential post-flight investigations. Efforts performed to better quantify the vernier reaction control system induced plume impingement environment of the Space Shuttle orbiter are described in this paper, and background detailing circumstances which required the more detailed knowledge of the RCS self impingement forces, as well as a description of the resulting investigations and their results is presented. The investigations described in this paper applied microgravity acceleration data from two shuttle borne microgravity experiments, SAMS and OARE, to the solution of this particular problem. This solution, now used by shuttle analysts and mission planners, results in more accurate propellant consumption and attitude limit cycle estimates in preflight analyses, which are critical for pending International Space Station missions.

  2. [Analysis on 315 cases of clinical adverse drug reaction/event induced by gastrodin].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang-yang; Dong, Zhi; Lu, Xiao-qin; Xia, Yong-peng; Zhu, Shu-bing

    2015-05-01

    With patients' general situation, medication use, occurrence time of adverse drug reaction/event (ADR/ADE), clinical manifestations and prognosis as reference items, a retrospective study was made for 315 cases with ADR/ADE induced by Gastrodin in Chongqing from January 2008 to June 2014, in order to analyze the characteristics of ADR/ADE and provide reference for rational clinical medication. The results showed that among the 315 cases with ADR/ADE, 143 cases (45.4%) were males and 172 cases (54.6%) were females, most of them (74.9%) were aged above 45; 60 cases (19.0%) with ADE were caused by off-label indications and 66 cases (21.0%) with ADE were caused by over dosage; ADR/ADE cases induced by intravenous drip mainly happened within 30 min (85.5%), ADR/ADE cases induced by oral administration mainly happened within 2 h (74.4%), and all of ADR/ ADE cases induced by intramuscular injection happened within 10 min. Totally 593 ADR/ADE cases were reported, which were mainly damages in gastrointestinal system, skin and its adnexa; And 61.9% of ADR/ADE cases were newly reported. It is suggested that medical workers shall learn about the regularity and characteristics of ADR/ADE induced by gastrodin, apply it in clinic with standards, pay close attention to changes of patients' situations and attach importance to the monitoring of ADR/ADE, so as to enhance the safety of medication.

  3. ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O S-FACTOR AT NEGATIVE ENERGIES AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE s-PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2013-11-10

    The {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process, responsible for the production of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ∼< A ∼< 208. This reaction takes place inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ∼< 10{sup 8} K, corresponding to an energy interval where the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction is effective in the range of 140-230 keV. In this regime, the astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the –3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O, giving rise to a steep increase in the S-factor. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through the R-matrix and indirect techniques such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. The discrepancy amounts to a factor of three or more precisely at astrophysical energies. To provide a more accurate S-factor at these energies, we have applied the Trojan horse method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li, n {sup 16}O)d quasi-free reaction. The ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM as well as the n-partial width, allowing us to attain unprecedented accuracy for the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O astrophysical factor. A larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured with respect to the ones in the literature, (C-tilde{sub α{sup 1}{sup 3}C}{sup 17O(1/2+)2} = 7.7 ± 0.3{sub stat} {sub -1.5}{sup +1.}|6 norm fm{sup –1}, yet in agreement with the preliminary result given in our preceding letter, indicating an increase of the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction rate below about 8 × 10{sup 7} K if compared with the recommended values. At ∼10{sup 8} K, our reaction rate agrees with most of the results in the literature and the accuracy is greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach.

  4. Hydrochemistry and 18O/16O and 2H/1H Ratios of Ugandan Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, M. G.; Jasechko, S.

    2013-12-01

    Today, 70% of the 35 million people living in Uganda have access to an improved water source, ranking Uganda 148 out of 179 nations reporting in 2010 (Millennium Development Goals Indicators). 80% of Ugandans rely on groundwater as their primary drinking water source, collecting at springs or from shallow wells. Similarly, 80% of Ugandans rely upon agriculture - usually rain fed - as their primary income source. Despite lack of access to protected water sources faced by 10 million Ugandans, and the importance of the blue economy to Uganda's continued development, a country-wide investigation of the chemistry and the stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of waters has yet to be completed. Here we present 250 analyses of 18O/16O, 2H/1H and dissolved ion concentrations of Ugandan lakes, rivers, groundwaters and springs collected during July, 2013. We use the new data to characterize regional scale groundwater recharge sources, advection pathways and interactions with surface waters. Large lakes - Albert, Edward and Victoria - show increases in 18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios consistent with open water evaporation, and are shown to be distinct from nearby groundwaters, suggesting minimal recharge from large lakes to the subsurface. Salinities of eastern Ugandan groundwaters are elevated relative to samples collected from the central and western regions, suggesting that longer groundwater residence times and enhanced water-rock interactions characterize these waters. Springs from western Uganda show a shift in 18O/16O to higher values as a result of hydrothermal water-rock exchanges. Dissolved ion and noble gas concentrations show potential for use in assessing geothermal energy resources, perhaps aiding the Ugandan Ministry for Energy, Minerals and Development to meet their goal of increasing renewable energy from 4% (current) to 61% of total use by 2017 (Nyakabwa-Atwoki, 2013). Millennium Development Goals Indicators. mdgs.un.org/unsd/mdg/data.aspx Nyakabwa

  5. Tigecycline-induced Drug Fever and Leukemoid Reaction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qian-Qian; Qin, Ling; Ruan, Gui-Ren; Chen, Ru-Xuan; Luan, Zi-Jian; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we describe a patient in whom tigecycline-induced drug fever and leukemoid reaction (LR) after 3 weeks of therapy for pneumonia.A 62-year-old man developed aspiration pneumonia on February 1, 2015. He had received multiple antibiotics at another hospital, but did not respond well. Disease rapidly progressed, and he was referred to our department on February 14. We adjusted the antibiotic therapy to tigecycline + vancomycin, and added voriconazole to empiric antifungal therapy. Pneumonia largely improved, and we discontinued vancomycin and voriconazole on February 28. With tigecycline monotherapy, his clinical status remained stable.On March 7, he developed high fever and LR (white blood cell count: 38.25 × 10(9)/L). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, and CD8+ T cells had been abnormally activated. After a careful physical examination and laboratory investigation, we confirmed that primary infection did not progress and no other cause was evident. So we figured fever and LR might be induced by tigecycline. After discontinuing tigecycline and adding low-dose steroid, fever and LR totally resolved in 3 days, which further confirmed our diagnosis.According to this case and literature review, drug-induced hypersensitivity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever and LR when the therapeutic duration of tetracycline approximates 3 weeks. Monitoring T-cell subsets may facilitate early diagnosis. When necessary, we should discontinue the suspected drug to confirm diagnosis.

  6. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Sen, Shrabani; Sharma, Rahul; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O{sup 18} + O{sup 16}O{sup 16} and O{sup 16} + O{sup 16}O{sup 18}) in O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take.

  7. Five-body calculation with Pauli constraint for shell- and cluster-structure in 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Wataru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    A 12C+four-nucleon (4N) five-body model is applied for the ground and first excited states of 16O. The 4N configurations are selected in a wide Hilbert space under the fulfillment of the Pauli principle excluding the occupied orbits in 12C. The energies of both the states are obtained in excellent agreement with experiment. Analysis of the wave functions indicates a spatially localized alpha-particle-like cluster structure for the excited state and a shell-model-like delocalized structure for the ground state. The difficulty of describing the cluster structure by a standard shell model approach is discussed by calculating components of the harmonic-oscillator quanta in the wave functions.

  8. Chemical reaction networks as a model to describe UVC- and radiolytically-induced reactions of simple compounds.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Daniele; Merli, Daniele; Albini, Angelo; Zeffiro, Alberto; Serpone, Nick

    2012-05-01

    When a chemical system is submitted to high energy sources (UV, ionizing radiation, plasma sparks, etc.), as is expected to be the case of prebiotic chemistry studies, a plethora of reactive intermediates could form. If oxygen is present in excess, carbon dioxide and water are the major products. More interesting is the case of reducing conditions where synthetic pathways are also possible. This article examines the theoretical modeling of such systems with random-generated chemical networks. Four types of random-generated chemical networks were considered that originated from a combination of two connection topologies (viz., Poisson and scale-free) with reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. The results were analyzed taking into account the number of the most abundant products required for reaching 50% of the total number of moles of compounds at equilibrium, as this may be related to an actual problem of complex mixture analysis. The model accounts for multi-component reaction systems with no a priori knowledge of reacting species and the intermediates involved if system components are sufficiently interconnected. The approach taken is relevant to an earlier study on reactions that may have occurred in prebiotic systems where only a few compounds were detected. A validation of the model was attained on the basis of results of UVC and radiolytic reactions of prebiotic mixtures of low molecular weight compounds likely present on the primeval Earth.

  9. The 3 A Band System in the Spectrum of the 13C 16O Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, R.; Kępa, R.; Rytel, M.; Zachwieja, M.

    1999-10-01

    In the emission spectrum of the carbon monoxide 13C16O isotopic molecule three bands comprising about 1820 lines of the 3A band system (c3Π-a3Π) were recorded and analyzed. The 0-0 and 0-1 bands of this system were photographed for the first time and the 0-2 band was rephotographed by using methods of conventional high-resolution spectroscopy. The result of the rotational band analysis includes expanding of the spectrum interpretation up to J = 25 as well as the identification of four previously unobserved branches P13, R13, P31, and R31. Because of strong perturbations in the c3Π (v = 0) state, the calculation of the rovibronic structure constants was performed only for the lower a3Π state. By using a calculation based on a nonlinear least-squares method, an effective Hamiltonian of Brown [J. M. Brown, E. A. Colbourn, J. K. G. Watson, and F. D. Wayne, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 74, 294-318 (1979)] and a separative procedure proposed by Curl-Dane-Watson [R. F. Curl and C. B. Dane, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 128, 406-412 (1988); J. K. G. Watson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 138, 302-308 (1989)], it was possible to derive the rotational structure constants for the v = 0, 1, and 2 levels for the a3Π state in the 13C16O isotopic molecule. Term values for the c3Π (v = 0) level and the equilibrium molecular constants for the a3Π state also are reported.

  10. The 3A Band System in the Spectrum of the (13)C(16)O Molecule.

    PubMed

    Hakalla; Kepa; Rytel; Zachwieja

    1999-10-01

    In the emission spectrum of the carbon monoxide (13)C(16)O isotopic molecule three bands comprising about 1820 lines of the 3A band system (c(3)Pi-a(3)Pi) were recorded and analyzed. The 0-0 and 0-1 bands of this system were photographed for the first time and the 0-2 band was rephotographed by using methods of conventional high-resolution spectroscopy. The result of the rotational band analysis includes expanding of the spectrum interpretation up to J = 25 as well as the identification of four previously unobserved branches P(13), R(13), P(31), and R(31). Because of strong perturbations in the c(3)Pi (v = 0) state, the calculation of the rovibronic structure constants was performed only for the lower a(3)Pi state. By using a calculation based on a nonlinear least-squares method, an effective Hamiltonian of Brown [J. M. Brown, E. A. Colbourn, J. K. G. Watson, and F. D. Wayne, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 74, 294-318 (1979)] and a separative procedure proposed by Curl-Dane-Watson [R. F. Curl and C. B. Dane, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 128, 406-412 (1988); J. K. G. Watson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 138, 302-308 (1989)], it was possible to derive the rotational structure constants for the v = 0, 1, and 2 levels for the a(3)Pi state in the (13)C(16)O isotopic molecule. Term values for the c(3)Pi (v = 0) level and the equilibrium molecular constants for the a(3)Pi state also are reported. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Robust MS quantification method for phospho-peptides using 18O/16O labeling

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Claus A; Gotta, Stefano; Magnoni, Letizia; Raggiaschi, Roberto; Kremer, Andreas; Terstappen, Georg C

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative measurements of specific protein phosphorylation sites, as presented here, can be used to investigate signal transduction pathways, which is an important aspect of cell dynamics. The presented method quantitatively compares peptide abundances from experiments using 18O/16O labeling starting from elaborated MS spectra. It was originally developed to study signaling cascades activated by amyloid-β treatment of neurons used as a cellular model system with relevance to Alzheimer's disease, but is generally applicable. Results The presented method assesses, in complete cell lysates, the degree of phosphorylation of specific peptide residues from MS spectra using 18O/16O labeling. The abundance of each observed phospho-peptide from two cell states was estimated from three overlapping isotope contours. The influence of peptide-specific labeling efficiency was removed by performing a label swapped experiment and assuming that the labeling efficiency was unchanged upon label swapping. Different degrees of phosphorylation were reported using the fold change measure which was extended with a confidence interval found to reflect the quality of the underlying spectra. Furthermore a new way of method assessment using simulated data is presented. Using simulated data generated in a manner mimicking real data it was possible to show the method's robustness both with increasing noise levels and with decreasing labeling efficiency. Conclusion The fold change error assessable on simulated data was on average 0.16 (median 0.10) with an error-to-signal ratio and labeling efficiency distributions similar to the ones found in the experimentally observed spectra. Applied to experimentally observed spectra a very good match was found to the model (<10% error for 85% of spectra) with a high degree of robustness, as assessed by data removal. This new method can thus be used for quantitative signal cascade analysis of total cell extracts in a high throughput mode

  12. Reaction-induced fracturing during olivine serpentinization: A mechanistic investigation at the interface scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, O.; Røyne, A.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; King, H. E.; Jamtveit, B.

    2012-04-01

    -normal scaling behavior following a hierachical fracturing model, (4) etch pit development at olivine-lizardite reaction interfaces, (5) crack initiation at these surface perturbations and (6) amorphous layer formation during olivine dissolution prior to serpentine nucleation (e.g., Rumori et al. 2004). Based on these observations we propose an entirely self-propagating reaction-driven fracturing process, where fractures nucleate at dissolution-induced surface perturbations assisted by a molecular wedge of amorphous 'gel', followed by further olivine dissolution and serpentine (±brucite) reprecipitation coupled with the force of crystallization. This process results in the observed hierarchical fracture network. Our results suggest that the mechanical force needed to advance serpentinization at the grain-scale does not rely on external forces but is due to interface-coupled, chemomechanical feedback during olivine re-equilibration in the presence of a fluid phase. Nevertheless, the influence of tectonic forces will need to be accounted for at larger scales.

  13. Experimental elaboration of faulting induced by fluid-releasing mineral reactions in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.; Zhang, J.; Jung, H.; Dobrzinetskaya, L.

    2003-04-01

    Dehydration embrittlement has been cited repeatedly as a potential mechanism for triggering earthquakes at depths where unassisted brittle failure is impossible due to the normal-stress-dependence of friction. We are investigating two different aspects of this problem in the laboratory: (i) dehydration of antigorite under stress where the ΔV of reaction varies from strongly positive to distinctly negative; (ii) deformation of eclogite in which the nominally anhydrous minerals contain small amounts of dissolved H_2O that can lead to faulting induced by very small amounts of melting stimulated by exsolution of H_2O. (i) Antigorite has the largest stability field of the serpentines and is often cited as potentially being the source of most or all mantle earthquakes to a depth of over 200 km. However, like other low-pressure hydrous phases, the net volume change accompanying antigorite dehydration varies from strongly positive at low P to negative at P > ˜2-2.5 GPa. Fracture mechanics theory predicts that dehydration should not induce shear failure if ΔV<0. To test the effect of ΔV on faulting, we have deformed an extensively-serpentinized peridotite at P = 1-6 GPa. We conducted constant strain rate experiments in a Griggs-type apparatus at P = 1.0 - 3.4 GPa and rapid-pumping experiments in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus, culminating in pressures as high as 6 GPa. Independent of the sign of ΔV, specimens subjected to stress during dehydration yielded extremely thin zones of reaction products with shear offset across them. Some were clearly faults whereas others could be precursors to faulting. Fluid released at grain boundaries between antigorite and relict olivine locally produced Mode I cracks &fluid inclusions. (ii) Deformation of "wet" eclogite at 3 GPa and temperatures between the wet and dry solidi induced exsolution of H_2O and formation of very small amounts (<1%) of melt, leading to faulting. At lower temperature the rock was extremely strong but

  14. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  15. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  16. Neutrino-Induced Neutral-Current Reaction Cross Sections for r-PROCESS Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langanke, K.; Kolbe, E.

    2002-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions play an important role during and after the r-process, if the latter occurs in an environment with extreme neutrino fluxes such as the neutrino-driven wind model or neutron star mergers. Recently we have evaluated the charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections relevant for r-process simulations. We extend our approach here to the neutral-current cross sections. Our tabulation considers neutron-rich nuclei with neutron numbers N=41-135 and charge numbers Z=21-82 and lists total as well as partial neutron spallation cross sections. The calculations have been performed within the random phase approximation considering multipole transitions with J<=3 and both parities. The supernova neutrino spectrum is described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution with various temperature parameters between T=2.8 MeV and T=10 MeV and with the degeneracy parameters α=0 and α=3.

  17. Nuclear Reaction Models Responsible for Simulation of Neutron-induced Soft Errors in Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y. Abe, S.

    2014-06-15

    Terrestrial neutron-induced soft errors in MOSFETs from a 65 nm down to a 25 nm design rule are analyzed by means of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulation using the PHITS-HyENEXSS code system. Nuclear reaction models implemented in PHITS code are validated by comparisons with experimental data. From the analysis of calculated soft error rates, it is clarified that secondary He and H ions provide a major impact on soft errors with decreasing critical charge. It is also found that the high energy component from 10 MeV up to several hundreds of MeV in secondary cosmic-ray neutrons has the most significant source of soft errors regardless of design rule.

  18. Noise-induced convergence of the low flow rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Minoru; Nakaiwa, Masaru; Akiya, Takaji; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    The effect of noise on the low flow-rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was studied. The chaos was simulated using the three-variable model of Györgyi and Field. Gaussian white noise was imposed on the flow-rate of the reactant solutions fed into CSTR to simulate the so-called type P noise. The range of average noise amplitudes was chosen between 0.01% and 1% related to the inverse residence time. The calculated time series were analyzed on the basis of their Fourier spectra, maximum Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov entropies, return maps and invariant density. We found that the noise induces partial order of the period-3-like oscillations in the low flowrate chaos.

  19. Calculated cross sections for neutron induced reactions on sup 19 F and uncertainties of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.X. . Inst. of Atomic Energy); Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear model codes were used to calculate cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on {sup 19}F for incident energies from 2 to 20 MeV. The model parameters in the codes were adjusted to best reproduce experimental data and are given in this report. The calculated results are compared to measured data and the evaluated values of ENDF/B-V. The covariance matrix for several of the most sensitive model parameters is given based on the scatter of measured data around the theoretical curves and the long-range correlation error of measured data. The results of these calculations form the basis for the new ENDF/B-VI fluorine evaluation. 44 refs., 64 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Neutron- and proton-induced reactions for analysis of bioenvironmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Spyrou, N.M.; Altaf, W.J.; Khrbish, Y.S. )

    1988-01-01

    The study of the elemental composition of bioenvironmental samples is of continuing interest in a wide variety of medical and environmental investigations, be it as environmental monitors or as indicators of the state of health and disease of an individual or a population. Nuclear activation methods play an important role in these studies as research tools and in certain cases are employed as rapid, routine analytical techniques. Although the authors have been using instrumental neutron activation analysis as the main technique for obtaining information about elemental composition and concentration, they have also developed techniques, for further or complementary analysis, in which proton-induced reactions have been exploited. Two recent studies, in which the composition of human lung tissue and the elemental concentration in plant samples were determined, have been selected as illustrations of the techniques employed.

  1. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  2. 7Li-induced reactions for fast-timing with LaBr3:Ce detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. J. R.; Podolyàk, Zs.; Mǎrginean, N.; Regan, P. H.; Alexander, T.; Algora, A.; Alharbi, T.; Bowry, M.; Britton, R.; Bucurescu, D.; Bruce, A. M.; Bunce, M.; Cǎta-Danil, G.; Cǎta-Danil, I.; Cooper, N.; Deleanu, D.; Delion, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gelletly, W.; Glodariu, T.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghiťǎ, D.; Ilie, G.; Ivanova, D.; Kisyov, S.; Lalkovski, S.; Lica, R.; Liddick, S. N.; Mǎrginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mulholland, K.; Negret, A.; Nita, C. R.; Rice, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Sava, T.; Smith, J. F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stevenson, P. D.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Townsley, C.; Werner, V.; Wilson, E.; Wood, R. T.; Zamfir, N. V.; Zhekova, M.

    2012-10-01

    7Li induced-reactions have been used with a 186W target to populate nuclei around A˜180-190 at the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest, Romania. An array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) detectors have been used to measure sub-nanosecond half-lives with fast-timing techniques. The yrast 2+ state in 190Os was measured to be t1/2 = 375(20)ps, in excellent agreement with the literature value. The previously unreported half-life of the 564-keV state in 189Ir has also been measured and a value of t1/2 = 540(100)ps ps obtained.

  3. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  4. Modelling complex organic molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruaud, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gratier, P.; Hersant, F.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-03-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of complex organic molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and pre-stellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed `warm-up' scenario cannot explain these observations. In this paper, we study the effect of Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments, we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of COMs in the gas phase at temperatures as low as 10 K.

  5. Nucleon and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Guo, Hairui; Nagaoka, Kohei; Matsumoto, Takuma; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Nucleon (N) and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li at an incident energy of 14 MeV are analyzed by using three-body continuum discretized coupled channels method (CDCC), final state interaction (FSI) model, and sequential decay (SD) model. The CDCC is used to describe nucleon and triton production via breakup continuum channels, 7Li(N,N')7Li*→ t + α. Triton production from p(n) + 7Li → t + 5Li(5He) channel and nucleon production from sequential decay of the ground-state 5Li(5He) are calculated by the FSI model and the SD model, respectively. The calculated double differential cross sections for both nucleon and triton production are in good agreement with experimental ones except at relatively low nucleon emission energies.

  6. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  7. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-07-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of (197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192)Hg, (196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum))Au, (191(cum))Pt and (192)Ir were measured up to 65MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code. PMID:27156194

  8. Study of proton induced reactions on niobium targets up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Baba, M.; Corniani, E.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As Niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the integral excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 86,88,89Zr, 86,87mg,88Y and 85Sr in the energy range 30-70 MeV, some measured for the first time at this energy range. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE and with the literature data. The calculations have been carried out without any parameter adjustment. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  9. Ion irradiation induced solid-state amorphous reaction in Ni/Ti multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Momir; Toprek, Dragan; Obradović, Marko; Grce, Ana; Peruško, Davor; Dražič, Goran; Kovač, Janez; Homewood, Kevin P.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of Ar ion irradiation on interfacial reactions induced in Ni/Ti multilayers were investigated. Structures consisting of 10 alternate Ni (˜26 nm) and Ti (˜20 nm) layers of a total thickness ˜230 nm were deposited by ion sputtering on Si (1 0 0) wafers. Argon irradiations were done at 180 keV, to the doses of 1-6 × 1016 ions/cm2, the samples being held at room temperature. The projected implanted ion range is 86 ± 36 nm, maximum energy loss is closer to the surface, and maximum displacements per atom (dpa) from 47 to 284 for Ni and 26 to 156 for Ti. Characterizations of samples were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). It is shown that ion irradiation induced a progressed intermixing in the mostly affected zone already for the lowest dose, the thickness of the mix increasing linearly with the irradiation dose. The mixed phase is fully amorphous, starting with a higher concentration of Ni (which is the diffusing species) from the initial stages, and saturating at Ni:Ti˜66:34. A thick amorphous layer (˜127 nm) formed towards the surface region of the structure for the irradiation dose of 4 × 1016 ions/cm2 remains stable with increasing the dose to 6 × 1016 ions/cm2, which introduces up to 6-7 at.% of Ar within the mix. The results are discussed in light of the existing models. They can be interesting for introducing a selective and controlled solid-state reaction and towards further studies of ion irradiation stability of amorphous Ni-Ti phase.

  10. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy {sup 129}Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions on {sup nat}Cu, {sup 89}Y, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  11. Evidence for the Slow Reaction of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase 2 with Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Flashman, Emily; Hoffart, Lee M.; Hamed, Refaat B.; Bollinger, J. Martin; Krebs, Carsten; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The response of animals to hypoxia is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Human HIF is regulated by four Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenases: Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs or EGLNs) 1–3 catalyse hydroxylation of two prolyl-residues in HIF, triggering its degradation by the proteasome. Factor inhibiting HIF (FIH) catalyses hydroxylation of an asparagine-residue in HIF, inhibiting its transcriptional activity. Collectively, the HIF hydroxylases negatively regulate HIF in response to increasing oxygen concentration. Prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD2) is the most important oxygen sensor in human cells; however the underlying kinetic basis of the oxygen sensing function of PHD2 is unclear. We report analyses of the reaction of PHD2 with oxygen. Chemical quench/mass spectrometry experiments showed that reaction of a complex of PHD2, Fe(II), 2OG and the C-terminal oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-α (CODD) with oxygen to form hydroxylated CODD and succinate is much slower (~100 fold) than for other similarly studied 2OG oxygenases. Stopped flow/UV-visible spectroscopy experiments showed that the reaction produces a relatively stable species absorbing at 320nm; Mössbauer spectroscopic experiments implied that this species is likely not a Fe(IV)=O intermediate, as observed for other 2OG oxygenases. Overall the results suggest that, at least compared to other studied 2OG oxygenases, PHD2 reacts relatively slowly with oxygen, a property that may be associated with its function as an oxygen sensor. PMID:20840591

  12. Lectin staining and flow cytometry reveals female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and surface carbohydrate reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Larma, Irma; Linden, Matthew; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    All cells are covered by glycans, an individually unique layer of oligo- and polysaccharides that are critical moderators of self-recognition and other cellular-level interactions (e.g. fertilization). The functional similarity between these processes suggests that gamete surface glycans may also have an important, but currently overlooked, role in sexual selection. Here we develop a user-friendly methodological approach designed to facilitate future tests of this possibility. Our proposed method is based on flow cytometric quantification of female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and sperm surface glycan modifications in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this species, as with many other taxa, eggs release water-soluble factors that attract conspecific sperm (chemoattraction) and promote potentially measurable changes in sperm behavior and physiology. We demonstrate that flow cytometry is able to identify sperm from other seawater particles as well as accurately measure both acrosome reaction and structural modifications in sperm glycans. This methodological approach can increase our understanding of chemically-moderated gamete-level interactions and individual-specific gamete recognition in Mytilus sp. and other taxa with similar, easily identifiable acrosome structure. Our approach is also likely to be applicable to several other species, since carbohydrate-mediated cellular-level interactions between gametes are universal among externally and internally fertilizing species. PMID:26470849

  13. Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Reaction Rates for r-PROCESS Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langanke, K.; Kolbe, E.

    2001-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions play an important role during and after the r-process if it occurs in an environment with extreme neutrino fluxes, as in the neutrino-driven wind model or neutron star mergers. The neutrino reactions can excite the daughter nucleus above the neutron threshold, which is quite low for r-process nuclei. Thus the daughter nucleus will decay by emission of one or several neutrons. We have calculated the relevant total (νe, e-) cross sections as well as the partial neutron spallation cross sections for r-process nuclei with neutron numbers N=41-135 and proton numbers Z=21-82. The supernova neutrino spectrum is described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution with various temperature parameters between T=2.8 MeV and T=10 MeV and with the degeneracy parameters α=0 and α=3. Our calculations of the nuclear response are based on the random phase approximation and consider allowed as well as forbidden transitions.

  14. Cephalosporin Induced Disulfiram-Like Reaction: A Retrospective Review of 78 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shiyan; Cao, Yuxia; Zhang, Xiuwei; Jiao, Shichen; Qian, Songyi; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant ingestion of alcohol and cephalosporin may cause a disulfiram-like reaction; however its fatal outcomes are not commonly known. We retrospectively reviewed 78 patients who had cephalosporin induced disulfiram-like reaction (CIDLR). The patients who had a negative skin test to cephalosporin prior to intravenous antibiotics were included, and those who were allergic to either alcohol or antibiotics were excluded. The average age of 78 patients was 37.8±12.2 (21–60) years. Of the 78 patients, 93.58% of the patients were males, 70.51% of the patients consumed alcohol after use of antibiotics, and 29.49% patients consumed alcohol initially, followed by intravenous antibiotics; however, no significant difference of morbidity was observed in these two groups. All patients were administered antibiotics intravenously. Five of 78 patients (6.41%) developed severe CIDLR too urgently to be rescued successfully. In conclusion, it is important for clinicians to educate patients that no alcohol should be used if one is taking cephalosporin. Also, clinicians should keep in mind that cephalosporin should not be prescribed for any alcoholics. PMID:24670024

  15. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (bio)sensing through hydrogen evolution reaction induced by gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Chamorro-Garcia, Alejandro; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-05-15

    A new gold nanoparticle (AuNP) based detection strategy using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) through hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is proposed. This EIS-HER method is used as an alternative to the conventional EIS based on [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) or [Ru(NH3)6](3+/2+) indicators. The proposed method is based on the HER induced by AuNPs. EIS measurements for different amounts of AuNP are registered and the charge transfer resistance (Rct) was found to correlate and be useful for their quantification. Moreover the effect of AuNP size on electrical properties of AuNPs for HER using this sensitive technique has been investigated. Different EIS-HER signals generated in the presence of AuNPs of different sizes (2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 50 nm) are observed, being the corresponding phenomena extendible to other nanoparticles and related catalytic reactions. This EIS-HER sensing technology is applied to a magneto-immunosandwich assay for the detection of a model protein (IgG) achieving improvements of the analytical performance in terms of a wide linear range (2-500 ng mL(-1)) with a good limit of detection (LOD) of 0.31 ng mL(-1) and high sensitivity. Moreover, with this methodology a reduction of one order of magnitude in the LOD for IgG detection, compared with a chroamperometric technique normally used was achieved. PMID:24953452

  16. Drug-reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2014-02-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a rare, severe cutaneous adverse reaction characterised by fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia and/or other leukocyte abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and often has a relapsing-remitting course despite withdrawal of the drug. The drugs that are most implicated include aromatic anticonvulsants, allopurinol, sulphonamides, antiretrovirals (abacavir and nevirapine), and minocycline. The pathogenesis of DRESS/DIHS is far from clear but probably involves a combination of impaired pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of drug metabolites, the sequential reactivation of the herpesvirus family and genetic susceptibility conferred by the association with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The strong association between abacavir and HLA-B*5701 has enabled pharmacogenetics screening to be employed successfully to minimise the occurrence of hypersensitivity. A prolonged course of oral corticosteroids is required to treat DRESS/DIHS, given the relapsing-remitting nature of the condition with i.v. immunoglobulin and valgangciclovir reserved for refractory or life-threatening cases.

  17. Ultrafast photo-induced reaction dynamics in bacteriorhodopsin and its Trp mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, Julien; Léonard, Jérémie; Haacke, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    This review paper presents the recent advances made in observing and understanding the ultrafast photo-reaction dynamics in retinal proteins, in particular bacteriorhodopsin (bR), with a special emphasis on the retinal-protein interactions and the mechanisms of protein activation on a sub-picosecond timescale. We review our latest results obtained on wild-type (wt) bR, and on two tryptophan mutants W86F and W182F, obtained by femtosecond pump-probe experiments. It was shown that light-induced charge translocations and modifications of the protein electrostatics can be monitored by the near-UV differential absorption of Trp86, which experiences a linear intra-protein Stark effect. In the same spectral region, non-exponential wavepacket-like dynamics was found for the formation of the 13-cis retinal isomer in wt-bR. The present paper highlights how this finding is underpinned by the experiments on the mutants. New results are presented regarding the reaction dynamics in the Trp mutants, studied in the vis/near-IR by transient absorption. Interestingly, W86F displays a faster excited state decay and photoproduct formation than wt-bR. This is tentatively attributed to an all-trans/13-cis ground state mixture known to occur in the light-adapted state in this special mutant, due to increased conformational flexibility of the retinal chromophore.

  18. The Modulatory Effect of Ischemia and Reperfusion on Arginine Vasopressin-Induced Arterial Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Malinowski, Bartosz; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Grześk, Grzegorz; Gajdus, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of ischemia and reperfusion on the resistance of arteries to AVP (arginine vasopressin), with a particular emphasis on the role of smooth muscle cells in the action of vasopressin receptors and the role of the cGMP-associated signalling pathway. Materials and Methods. Experiment was performed on the perfunded tail arteries from male Wistar rats. The constriction triggered by AVP after 30 minutes of ischemia and 30 and 90 minutes of reperfusion was analysed. Analogous experiments were also carried out in the presence of 8Br-cGMP. Results. Ischemia reduces and reperfusion increases in a time-dependent manner the arterial reaction to AVP. The presence of 8Br-cGMP causes a significant decrease of arterial reactivity under study conditions. Conclusions. Ischemia and reperfusion modulate arterial contraction triggered by AVP. The effect of 8Br-cGMP on reactions, induced by AVP after ischemia and reperfusion, indicates that signalling pathway associated with nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP regulates the tension of the vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:27563664

  19. Chemical reactions in liquid induced by atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shimokawa, Yudai; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, and HAuCl4 are used as the electrolyte. We measured the pH and conductivity in the liquid at approximately 1 cm below the solution surfaces. OH radical generation in the liquid was observed by a chemical probe method. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH- in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. In particular, the contribution of charge transfer collision between impinging low-energy positive ions and water molecules to the ionic species in the liquid is used to explain the overall tendency of the experimental results.

  20. Can we improve the calculation of some excitation functions for deuteron-induced reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Chau, Huu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the CDCC* approach to calculate (d,p) excitation functions. Starting from the CDCC* results, we derive some (d,p) differential and integrated cross sections, then using a simple semi-phenomenological model, we calculate the excitation functions for this process. We compare our calculations with the experimental cross sections for the 27Al (d, p)28Al, 58Fe(d, p)59Fe, 59Co(d, p)60Co, 75As(d, p)76As, 81Br(d, p)82Br, 84Kr(d, p)85Kr, 86Kr(d, p)87Kr, 108Pd (d, p)109Pd, 140Ce(d, p)141Ce, 142Ce(d, p)143Ce, 141Pr(d, p)142Pr, 165Ho(d, p)166Ho, and 180Hf (d, p)181Hf reactions. We plan to include these cross sections into evaluations of d-induced reactions and this could be a first step for improving of the quality of the next decade cross sections libraries.

  1. The Modulatory Effect of Ischemia and Reperfusion on Arginine Vasopressin-Induced Arterial Reactions.

    PubMed

    Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Malinowski, Bartosz; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Grześk, Grzegorz; Wiciński, Michał; Gajdus, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of ischemia and reperfusion on the resistance of arteries to AVP (arginine vasopressin), with a particular emphasis on the role of smooth muscle cells in the action of vasopressin receptors and the role of the cGMP-associated signalling pathway. Materials and Methods. Experiment was performed on the perfunded tail arteries from male Wistar rats. The constriction triggered by AVP after 30 minutes of ischemia and 30 and 90 minutes of reperfusion was analysed. Analogous experiments were also carried out in the presence of 8Br-cGMP. Results. Ischemia reduces and reperfusion increases in a time-dependent manner the arterial reaction to AVP. The presence of 8Br-cGMP causes a significant decrease of arterial reactivity under study conditions. Conclusions. Ischemia and reperfusion modulate arterial contraction triggered by AVP. The effect of 8Br-cGMP on reactions, induced by AVP after ischemia and reperfusion, indicates that signalling pathway associated with nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP regulates the tension of the vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:27563664

  2. Spin Responses in Nuclei, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2010-05-12

    New evaluations of neutrino-nucleus reaction rates are made for f p-shell and light p-shell nuclei as well as {sup 4}He based on new shell model Hamiltonians, which give good account of spin dependent properties such as Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and magnetic moments in the nuclei. The reaction cross sections in light nuclei are found to be enhanced compared with those obtained by conventional Hamiltonians and previous calculations. The production yields of {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B during supernova explosions are found to be enhanced. The GT strengths in Fe and Ni isotopes are found to be more fragmented than those by conventional Hamiltonians. In particular, this results in an enhancement of the neutrino-induced cross section on {sup 56}Ni for proton emission channel, and also an enhanced production yield of {sup 55}Mn in population III stars. Electron capture rates on Fe and Ni isotopes in astrophysical environment are studied, and they are found to be reduced systematically compared with those by conventional Hamiltonians.

  3. Modelling and analysis of nucleon emission from deuteron-induced reactions at incident energies up to 100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Kouno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwamoto, Osamu; Ye, Tao; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We have so far developed a computational code system dedicated to deuteron-induced reactions in combination with some theoretical models. In our previous works, the code system was successfully applied to systematic analyses of double-differential cross sections (DDXs) of (d,xp) reactions for 12C, 27Al, and 58Ni at incident energies up to 100 MeV. In the present work, we apply the code system to neutron emission from deuteron-induced reactions. Since there is few experimental data of DDXs of (d,xn) reactions, double-differential thick target neutron yields (TTNYs) are calculated and compared with experimental data instead of DDXs. The calculation using the code system reproduces the measured TTNYs for carbon at incident energies up to 50 MeV.

  4. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  5. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  6. The roles of fluid transport and surface reaction in reaction-induced fracturing, with implications for the development of mesh textures in serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The distinct element method was used to simulate chemical-mechanical-hydraulic processes that occur during serpentinization (volume-increasing hydration) within the oceanic lithosphere. The proposed model considers water transported in two ways: advective flow along fractures and through matrices. Variations in fracture pattern and system evolution were examined using two nondimensional parameters: the ratios of the rates of flow in fracture ( Ψ F) and matrix ( Ψ M) to the surface reaction rate. In cases of fixed Ψ F and Ψ M with sufficiently low reaction rates, the fracture pattern is not dependent on the surface reaction rate. Otherwise, the fracture pattern varies systematically as a function of Ψ F and Ψ M. At low Ψ F (≤1) and low Ψ M (≤1), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms fine fractures layer by layer. At high Ψ F (≥10,000) and low Ψ M (≤10), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms polygonal fracture networks. As Ψ M increases (>100), the reaction tends to proceed homogeneously from the boundaries without fracturing. A comparison of natural and simulated textures reveals that the following conditions are necessary to develop mesh textures during serpentinization in the oceanic lithosphere. (1) The surface reaction rate must be similar to or higher than the fluid flow rate in the matrix (or than the diffusive transport of water), and much lower than the fluid flow rate along fractures. (2) Original olivine grain boundaries act as pathways for fluid transport; these pathways may result from thermal or tectonic stress-induced cracking prior to serpentinization.

  7. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  8. Etching characteristics of chromium thin films by an electron beam induced surface reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Griffis, D. P.; Garcia, R.; Russell, P. E.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the etching of chromium (Cr) film on quartz through a surface reaction induced by an electron beam and enhanced with XeF2 gas. We have studied the influences of the electron beam energy, the gas flow rate and the specimen composition on the etch rate. The electron beam energy has significant influence on the etch rate. The etch rate made by an electron beam of 20 keV is five times higher compared to that made by a beam of 10 keV. The XeF2 gas flow rate shows little effect on the etch rate when the gas pressure is higher than 2 × 10-6 Torr. The structure and grain size of the Cr film did not show any apparent change under exposure to XeF2 or when irradiated by an electron beam, while the composition of Cr has a significant effect on the etch process. The material removal of Cr induced by an electron beam means that it can be applied to the direct fabrication of microstructures on Cr films and that it solves the contamination problem in Cr mask repair.

  9. Induced conformational changes upon Cd2+ binding at photosynthetic reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2005-01-01

    Cd2+ binding at the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (bRC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is known to inhibit proton transfer (PT) from bulk solvent to the secondary quinone QB. To elucidate this mechanism, we calculated the pKa for residues along the water channels connecting QB with the stromal side based on the crystal structures of WT-bRC and Cd2+-bound bRC. Upon Cd2+ binding, we observed the release of two protons from His-H126/128 at the Cd2+ binding site and significant pKa shifts for residues along the PT pathways. Remarkably, Asp-L213 near QB, which is proposed to play a significant role in PT, resulted in a decrease in pKa upon Cd2+ binding. The direct electrostatic influence of the Cd2+-positive charge on these pKa shifts was small. Instead, conformational changes of amino acid side chains induced electrostatically by Cd2+ binding were the main mechanism for these pKa shifts. The long-range electrostatic influence over ≈12 Å between Cd2+ and Asp-L213 is likely to originate from a set of Cd2+-induced successive reorientations of side chains (Asp-H124, His-H126, His-H128, Asp-H170, Glu-H173, Asp-M17, and Asp-L210), which propagate along the PT pathways as a “domino” effect. PMID:16254054

  10. Fluorescence observations of LDEF exposed materials as an indicator of induced material reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.

    1993-01-01

    Observations and measurements of induced changes in the fluorescent emission of materials exposed to the space environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have revealed systematic patterns of material-dependent behavior. These results have been supplemented by inspection of similar materials exposed on previous Space Shuttle Missions and in laboratory testing. The space environmental factors affecting the fluorescence of exposed materials have been found to include (but are not necessarily limited to) solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, atomic oxygen (AO), thermal vacuum exposure, and synergistic combinations of these factors. Observed changes in material fluorescent behavior include stimulation, quenching, and spectral band shifts of emission. For example, the intrinsic yellow fluorescence of zinc oxide pigmented thermal control coatings undergoes quenching as a result of exposure, while coloration is stimulated in the fluorescent emission of several polyurethane coating materials. The changes in fluorescent behavior of these materials are shown to be a revealing indicator of induced material reactions as a result of space environmental exposure.

  11. Stirring-induced bifurcation driven by the chaotic regime in the Belousov—Zhabotinsky reaction in a CSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizhak, Peter E.

    1995-09-01

    The stirring-induced bifurcation at low stirring rate S 0 = 23 rpm of the reaction volume has been observed for the chaotic regime in the Belousov—Zhabotinsky oscillating chemical reaction (malonic acidbromatecerium(III)sulfuric acid) in a continuously stirred tank reactor in premixing mode. This bifurcation is characterized by a stepwise growth of the macroscopic spatial concentration gradients that is shown by the use of the time dependencies of the potential difference between two platinum electrodes.

  12. Ascorbic acid-induced crosslinking of lens proteins: evidence supporting a Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; Olesen, P R

    1988-08-31

    The incubation of calf lens extracts with 20 mM ascorbic acid under sterile conditions for 8 weeks caused extensive protein crosslinking, which was not observed with either 20 mM sorbitol or 20 mM glucose. While no precipitation was observed, ascorbic acid did induce the formation of high-molecular-weight protein aggregates as determined by Agarose A-5m chromatography. Proteins modified by ascorbic acid bound strongly to a boronate affinity column, however, crosslinked proteins were present mainly in the unbound fraction. These observations suggest that the cis-diol groups of ascorbic acid were present in the primary adduct, but were either lost during the crosslinking reaction or sterically hindered from binding to the column matrix. The amino acid composition of the ascorbic acid-modified proteins was identical to controls except for a 15% decrease in lysine. Amino acid analysis after borohydride reduction, however, showed a 25% decrease in lysine, a 7% decrease in arginine and an additional peak which eluted between phenylalanine and histidine. Extensive browning occurred during the ascorbic acid-modification reaction. This resulted in protein-bound chromophores with a broad absorption spectrum from 300 to 400 nm, and protein-bound fluorophores with excitation/emission maxima of 350/450 nm. A 4 week incubation of dialyzed crude lens extract with [1-14C]ascorbic acid showed increased incorporation for 2 weeks, followed by a decrease over the next 2 weeks as crosslinking was initiated. The addition of cyanoborohydride to the reaction mixture completely inhibited crosslinking and increased [1-14C]ascorbic acid incorporation to a plateau value of 180 nmol per mg protein. Amino acid analysis showed a 50% loss of lysine, and 8% decrease in arginine and the presence of a new peak which eluted slightly earlier than methionine. These data are consistent with the non-enzymatic glycation of lens proteins by either ascorbic acid or an oxidation product of ascorbic acid via

  13. Evidence for a dynamically refracted primary bow in weakly bound 9Be rainbow scattering from 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We present for the first time evidence for the existence of a dynamically refracted primary bow for 9Be+16O scattering. This is demonstrated through the use of coupled channel calculations with an extended double folding potential derived from the density-dependent effective two-body force and precise microscopic cluster wave functions for 9Be. The calculations reproduce the experimental Airy structure in 9Be+16O scattering well. It is found that coupling of a weakly bound 9Be nucleus to excited states plays the role of a booster lens, dynamically enhancing the refraction over the static refraction due to the Luneburg lens mean field potential between the ground states of 9Be and 16O.

  14. Analysis of the adverse reactions induced by natural product-derived drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhi-Ping; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the therapeutic effects of established medicinal drugs, it is often considered that natural product-derived drugs are of a more benign nature in side-effects, which has made natural medicines become a popular form of therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is generally considered as being natural and harmless. TCM has been paid much more attention than before and widely used for the treatment nowadays. However, with the increasing cases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), the ADRs induced by TCM are becoming more widely recognized. Some ADRs are sometimes even life-threatening. This article reviews literatures on ADRs induced by TCM which was published in the past 10 years. A total of 3122 cases including complete data are selected for the present analysis. From the data of the 3122 cases, statistics is carried out to the distribution of administration routes and time of the occurrence of ADRs, the prognosis of ADRs, sex and age factors, types and clinical symptoms of ADRs, and drugs involved in ADRs. In addition, occurrence and influencing factors of TCM-induced diseases are also analysed, which includes spices confusion, processing drugs improperly, toxic components, long-term medication, improper concerted application, interaction of TCM and Western medicine. It is concluded that the efficacy and toxicity of TCM, often using the compound prescription involving various plants and animals, resulted from a variety of chemical constituents, which lead to a comprehensive response in the human body. The ‘toxicity’ of TCM should be correctly recognized and reasonably utilized. PMID:20233209

  15. A biomolecule-compatible visible-light-induced azide reduction from a DNA-encoded reaction-discovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiyun; Kamlet, Adam S.; Steinman, Jonathan B.; Liu, David R.

    2011-02-01

    Using a system that accelerates the serendipitous discovery of new reactions by evaluating hundreds of DNA-encoded substrate combinations in a single experiment, we explored a broad range of reaction conditions for new bond-forming reactions. We discovered reactivity that led to a biomolecule-compatible, Ru(II)-catalysed azide-reduction reaction induced by visible light. In contrast to current azide-reduction methods, this reaction is highly chemoselective and is compatible with alcohols, phenols, acids, alkenes, alkynes, aldehydes, alkyl halides, alkyl mesylates and disulfides. The remarkable functional group compatibility and mild conditions of the reaction enabled the azide reduction of nucleic acid and oligosaccharide substrates, with no detectable occurrence of side reactions. The reaction was also performed in the presence of a protein enzyme without the loss of enzymatic activity, in contrast to two commonly used azide-reduction methods. The visible-light dependence of this reaction provides a means of photouncaging functional groups, such as amines and carboxylates, on biological macromolecules without using ultraviolet irradiation.

  16. A Biomolecule-Compatible Visible Light-Induced Azide Reduction from a DNA-Encoded Reaction Discovery System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyun; Kamlet, Adam S.; Steinman, Jonathan B.; Liu, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Using a system that accelerates the serendipitous discovery of new reactions by evaluating hundreds of DNA-encoded substrate combinations in a single experiment, we explored a broad range of reaction conditions for new bond-forming reactions. We discovered reactivity that led to a biomolecule-compatible, Ru(II)-catalyzed, visible light-induced azide reduction reaction. In contrast with current azide reduction methods, this reaction is highly chemoselective and is compatible with alcohols, phenols, acids, alkenes, alkynes, aldehydes, alkyl halides, alkyl mesylates, and disulfides. The remarkable functional group compatibility and mild conditions of this reaction enabled azide reduction to be performed on nucleic acid and oligosaccharide substrates without the detectable occurrence of side reactions. The reaction was also performed in the presence of a protein enzyme without loss of enzymatic activity, in contrast with two commonly used azide reduction methods. The visible light dependence of this reaction provides a means of photouncaging functional groups such as amines and carboxylates on biological macromolecules without using UV irradiation. PMID:21258388

  17. Sulfated polysaccharides from the egg jelly layer are species-specific inducers of acrosomal reaction in sperms of sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Alves, A P; Mulloy, B; Diniz, J A; Mourão, P A

    1997-03-14

    We have characterized the fine structure of sulfated polysaccharides from the egg jelly layer of three species of sea urchins and tested the ability of these purified polysaccharides to induce the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. The sea urchin Echinometra lucunter contains a homopolymer of 2-sulfated, 3-linked alpha-L-galactan. The species Arbacia lixula and Lytechinus variegatus contain linear sulfated alpha-L-fucans with regular tetrasaccharide repeating units. Each of these sulfated polysaccharides induces the acrosome reaction in conspecific but not in heterospecific spermatozoa. These results demonstrate that species specificity of fertilization in sea urchins depends in part on the fine structure of egg jelly sulfated polysaccharide.

  18. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lesher, S R; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J; Younes, W

    2009-10-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,{gamma}) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  19. A case of hydrocortisone desensitization in a patient with radiocontrast-induced anaphylactoid reaction and corticosteroid allergy.

    PubMed

    Lee-Wong, Mary; McClelland, Suzanne; Chong, Kaman; Fernandez-Perez, Evans R; Fernandez, Evans

    2006-01-01

    Allergic reactions and systemic desensitization to corticosteroids have been documented rarely in English language literature. These reactions appear more often when the agent is applied topically and may lead to dangerous complications in patients if administered i.v. Therefore, the safety and efficacy of using an i.v. corticosteroid for desensitization in a patient who has a history of allergy to corticosteroid must be weighed carefully, especially when the aim of its use is to prevent an allergic reaction from a second drug. We report a case of successful systemic hydrocortisone desensitization in a patient with radiocontrast-induced anaphylactoid reaction and corticosteroid allergy. Sensitization to corticosteroids was determined through skin testing. The patient was desensitized to hydrocortisone and premedicated with hydrocortisone and diphenhydramine and subsequently underwent cardiac catheterization with radiocontrast without adverse reaction.

  20. Silicate-metal reaction-induced snow atop the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Labrosse, S.; Houser, C. T.; Hirose, K.; Caracas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experiments and thermodynamical models indicate that typical iron-bearing rocks at the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB) should readily react with outer core fluid to produce a layer more enriched in light elements (primarily oxygen, and possibly silicon) than the freely convecting fluid at depth which comprises the bulk of Earth's outer core. If the metallic reaction products are fluid, the resultant density anomaly atop the core is expected to be many orders of magnitude larger (on the order of a percent) than the density fluctuations driving core convection at depth (order 10 ppb), thus a gravitational stratification atop the core is inevitable if these experimental inferences are robust. On the other hand, early work by Knittle and Jeanloz on CMB reactions suggested that such reaction products could instead be solid, giving rise to an accumulation of FeO and FeSi sediments at the CMB. Buffett et al. (Science, 2000) offered a model in which FeO and/or FeSi sediments crystallize from the ambient outer core to form an electrically conducting layer at the CMB, which could help explain decadal variations in length of day. However, new constraints on the phase diagram in systems like Fe-FeO indicate that the average outer core is on the Fe-side of the eutectic, with a eutectic temperature much smaller than plausible at the CMB, which implies that such a model is impossible. Assuming that the basic experimental constraints are robust, I will argue that: 1) CMB reactions in the hotter early Earth led to the formation of a buoyant fluid layer atop the core enriched in oxygen, and 2) this enrichment in oxygen allows for crystallization on the FeO side of the eutectic at later times in Earth's evolution following sufficient secular cooling. The "snow" that crystallizes in the stratified layer can either rise and compact onto the CMB or sink and melt at depth depending upon the degree of light alloy enrichment induced by CMB reactions, and in either case will

  1. Effects of local and systemic budesonide on allergen-induced airway reactions in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Fornhem, C.; Dahlbäck, M.; Kumlin, M.; Lundberg, J. M.; Alving, K.

    1996-01-01

    changes in these parameters. However, budesonide aerosol or infusion did not inhibit the late vasodilation in the bronchial circulation. 5. Histamine and cysteinyl-leukotrienes were released during the acute reaction as measured by urinary concentration of methylhistamine and leukotriene E4 respectively. There was no release of histamine during the late reaction. A late increase in leukotriene E4 was observed in 2 of the budesonide infusion and 3 of the budesonide vehicle pigs, whereas no such increase was seen in any of the budesonide aerosol pigs. 6. Budesonide concentration in lung tissue, but not in plasma at 8 h correlated negatively with the late increase in RL (P < 0.05, r = -0.53, n = 10), whereas budesonide concentration in plasma but not in lung tissue correlated negatively with the late decrease in dynamic compliance (P < 0.05, r = -0.67, n = 12). 7. This study has shown that a single low dose of locally administered budesonide can inhibit the late allergic reaction in the pig lower airways. If budesonide was given as an intravenous infusion in a dose yielding a plasma concentration similar to that seen after the aerosol treatment, the protective effect of budesonide was poor. It may be suggested that the tissue-bound portion of budesonide affects local mechanisms involved in the development of late changes in the airways (RL), although it does not affect the late increase in bronchial blood flow. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of budesonide on the allergen-induced late reaction in the pig airways relates to tissue-bound steroid, and that the systemic component is of less importance. PMID:8799573

  2. Haptoglobin alters oxygenation and oxidation of hemoglobin and decreases propagation of peroxide-induced oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Jia, Yiping; Siburt, Claire J Parker; Abraham, Bindu; Wood, Francine; Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Alayash, Abdu I

    2012-09-15

    We compared oxygenation and anaerobic oxidation reactions of a purified complex of human hemoglobin (Hb) and haptoglobin (Hb-Hp) to those of uncomplexed Hb. Under equilibrium conditions, Hb-Hp exhibited active-site heterogeneity and noncooperative, high-affinity O(2) binding (n(1/2)=0.88, P(1/2)=0.33 mm Hg in inorganic phosphate buffer at pH 7 and 25 °C). Rapid-reaction kinetics also exhibited active-site heterogeneity, with a slower process of O(2) dissociation and a faster process of CO binding relative to uncomplexed Hb. Deoxygenated Hb-Hp had significantly reduced absorption at the λ(max) of 430 nm relative to uncomplexed Hb, as occurs for isolated Hb subunits that lack T-state stabilization. Under comparable experimental conditions, the redox potential (E(1/2)) of Hb-Hp was found to be +54 mV, showing that it is much more easily oxidized than uncomplexed Hb (E(1/2)=+125 mV). The Nernst plots for Hb-Hp oxidation showed no cooperativity and slopes less than unity indicated active-site heterogeneity. The redox potential of Hb-Hp was unchanged by pH over the range of 6.4-8.3. Exposure of Hb-Hp to excess hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced ferryl heme, which was found to be more kinetically inert in the Hb-Hp complex than in uncomplexed Hb. The negative shift in the redox potential of Hb-Hp and its stabilized ferryl state may be central elements in the protection against Hb-induced oxidative damage afforded by formation of the Hb-Hp complex. PMID:22841869

  3. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T(CIVD, min), where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T(CIVD,min) was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T(CIVD,min) at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T(CIVD,min).

  4. Resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.J.; Henning, W.; Ernst, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jachcinski, C.; Kovar, D.G.; Paul, M.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of heavy-ion resonance structures using the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 16/O, /sup 12/C)/sup 28/Si reaction is presented. The data are analyzed in the context of Breit-Wigner resonances added to a direct-reaction background.

  5. Effect of cyclosporin A on the allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sihra, B. S.; Kon, O. M.; Durham, S. R.; Walker, S.; Barnes, N. C.; Kay, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction (LAR) is associated with mucosal inflammation involving several cell types including activated T lymphocytes and eosinophils. In contrast, the early asthmatic reaction (EAR) is considered to results from rapid allergen-induced release of bronchoconstrictor mediators from IgE sensitised mast cells. Cyclosporin A has efficacy in chronic severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma and is believed to act principally by inhibiting cytokine mRNA transcription in T lymphocytes. However, it has effects on other cell types in vitro, including the inhibition of exocytosis/degranulation events in mast cells. It was therefore hypothesised that cyclosporin A would attenuate both the EAR and LAR in subjects with mild asthma. METHODS: Twelve sensitised atopic asthmatic subjects with documented dual asthmatic responses were studied in a double blind, placebo controlled, crossover trial. On two separate study visits subjects received two oral doses of either cyclosporin A or matched placebo before inhaled allergen challenges. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured half hourly for eight hours and blood eosinophil counts were analysed three, six, and 24 hours after the challenge. Treatment effects on blood eosinophil counts as well as the EAR and LAR, respectively defined as the areas under the curve (AUC) of FEV1 changes from baseline between 0-1 and 4-8 hours after challenge, were compared by non-parametric crossover analysis. RESULTS: Cyclosporin A reduced both the LAR (median AUC -41.9 1.h (interquartile range -82.7 to -12.4) for cyclosporin A and -84.5 1.h (-248.9 to -39.1) for placebo; p = 0.007) and the late increase in blood eosinophils (median 0.2 x 10(9)/1 (0.15 to 0.4) for cyclosporin A and 0.4 x 10(9)/1 (0.25 to 0.55) for placebo; p = 0.024) but had no effect on the EAR. The reduction of the LAR by cyclosporin A correlated significantly with prechallenge blood concentrations of cyclosporin A (r

  6. Numerical modelling of shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Siva Prasad A. V.; Basu, Sumit

    2015-10-01

    Shock compaction of reactive powder mixtures to synthesize new materials is one of the oldest material processing techniques and has been studied extensively by several researchers over the past few decades. The quantitative connection between the shock energy imparted and the extent of reaction that can be completed in the small time window associated with the passage of the shock wave is complicated and depends on a large variety of parameters. In particular, our understanding of the complex interplay between the thermo-elasto-viscoplastic behaviour of the granular constituents and their temperature dependent, diffusion-limited reaction mechanism may be enriched through careful numerical simulations. A robust numerical model should be able to handle extremely large deformations coupled with diffusion mediated fast reaction kinetics. In this work, a meshfree discrete particle numerical method based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures is proposed. We present a numerical strategy to carry out reactions between reactant powder particles and partition the obtained products between the particles in a manner that accounts for the requirement that the total mass of the entire system remains constant as the reactions occur. Instead of solving the reaction-diffusion problem, we propose a ‘pseudo-diffusion’ model in which a distance dependent reaction rate constant is defined to carry out chemical reaction kinetics. This approach mimics the actual reaction-diffusion process at short times. Our numerical model is demonstrated for the well-studied reaction system Nb  +  2Si \\rightleftharpoons NbSi 2 . The predicted mass fractions of the product obtained from the simulations are in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the effects of impact speed, particle arrangement and mixing ratio on the predicted product mass fractions are discussed.

  7. Determination of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Kilner, J. A.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2012-10-08

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He{sup +} scattered by {sup 18}O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for E{sub i} < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for E{sub i} > 2 keV. The ion fractions P{sup +} were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  8. Photo-SRM: laser-induced dissociation improves detection selectivity of Selected Reaction Monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Simon, Romain; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Redon, Sébastien; Ayhan, Mehmet Menaf; Darbour, Florence; Chambert, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Yann; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2011-11-30

    Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) carried out on triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers coupled to liquid chromatography has been a reference method to develop quantitative analysis of small molecules in biological or environmental matrices for years and is currently emerging as a promising tool in clinical proteomic. However, sensitive assays in complex matrices are often hampered by the presence of co-eluted compounds that share redundant transitions with the target species. On-the-fly better selection of the precursor ion by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) or increased quadrupole resolution is one way to escape from interferences. In the present work we document the potential interest of substituting classical gas-collision activation mode by laser-induced dissociation in the visible wavelength range to improve the specificity of the fragmentation step. Optimization of the laser beam pathway across the different quadrupoles to ensure high photo-dissociation yield in Q2 without detectable fragmentation in Q1 was assessed with sucrose tagged with a push-pull chromophore. Next, the proof of concept that photo-SRM ensures more specific detection than does conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based SRM was carried out with oxytocin peptide. Oxytocin was derivatized by the thiol-reactive QSY® 7 C(5)-maleimide quencher on cysteine residues to shift its absorption property into the visible range. Photo-SRM chromatograms of tagged oxytocin spiked in whole human plasma digest showed better detection specificity and sensitivity than CID, that resulted in extended calibration curve linearity. We anticipate that photo-SRM might significantly improve the limit of quantification of classical SRM-based assays targeting cysteine-containing peptides. PMID:22002689

  9. Gas-phase reactions of [VO2(OH)2]- and [V2O5(OH)]- with methanol: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Harris, Benjamin L; Waters, Tom; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2013-02-14

    The gas-phase reactivity of the vanadium hydroxides [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) and [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) toward methanol was examined using a combination of ion-molecule reactions (IMRs) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Isotope-labeling experiments with CD(3)OH, (13)CH(3)OH, and CH(3)(18)OH were used to confirm the stoichiometry of ions and the observed sequence of reactions. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations, carried out at the B3LYP/SDD6-311++G** level of theory. While [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) is unreactive, [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) undergoes a metathesis reaction to yield [V(2)O(5)(OCH(3))](-). The DFT calculations reveal that the metathesis reaction of methanol with [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) suffers from a barrier of +0.52 eV (relative to separated reactants) but that the reaction of [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) with methanol readily proceeds via addition/elimination reactions with both transition states being below the energy of the separated reactants. CID of [V(2)O(5)(OCH(3))](-) (m/z 213) yields three ions arising from activation of the methoxo ligand: [V(2), O(6), C, H](-) (m/z 211); [V(2), O(5), H](-) (m/z 183); and [V(2), O(4), H](-) (m/z 167). Additional experiments and DFT calculations suggest that these ions arise from losses of H(2), formaldehyde and the sequential losses of H(2) and CO(2), respectively. The use of an (18)O-labeled methoxo ligand in [V(2)O(5)((18)OCH(3))](-) (m/z 215) showed the competing losses of H(2)C(16)O and H(2)C(18)O and [H(2) and C(16)O(18)O] and [H(2) and C(16)O(2)], highlighting that (16)O/(18)O exchange between the methoxo ligand and the vanadium oxide occurs prior to the subsequent fragmentation of the ligand. DFT calculations reveal that a key step involves hydrogen atom transfer from the methoxo ligand to the oxo ligand of the same vanadium center, producing the intermediate [V(2)O(4)(OH)(OCH(2))](-) containing a ketyl radical ligand and a hydroxo ligand

  10. Difunctionalization of Alkenes via the Visible-Light-Induced Trifluoromethylarylation/1,4-Aryl Shift/Desulfonylation Cascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lewei; Yang, Chao; Xu, ZhaoZhong; Gao, Fei; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-06-01

    A novel visible-light-induced trifluoromethylarylation/1,4-aryl shift/desulfonylation cascade reaction using CF3SO2Cl as CF3 source was described. The protocol provides an efficient approach for the synthesis of α-aryl-β-trifluoromethyl amides and/or CF3-containing oxindoles as well as the isoquinolinediones under benign conditions.

  11. Revised Calculations of the Production Rates for Co Isotopes in Meteorites Using New Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Brooks, F. D.; Buffler, A.; Allie, M. S.; Herbert, M. S.; Nchodu, M. R.; Makupula, S.; Ullmann, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Jones, D. T. L.

    2002-01-01

    New cross section measurements for reactions induced by neutrons with energies greater than 70 MeV are used to calculate the production rates for cobalt isotopes in meteorites and these new calculations are compared to previous estimates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Kinetic stabilization against the oxidation reaction induced by a silaalkane cage in a thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Setaka, Wataru; Ohmizu, Soichiro; Kira, Mitsuo

    2014-02-01

    Macrocage molecules with a bridged rotor have been synthesized as molecular gyroscopes. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction of the thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope, whose thiophene ring was bridged inside a silaalkane cage, was investigated. A remarkable kinetic stabilization against the oxidation of the thiophene moiety induced by the molecular cage framework was observed.

  13. Investigation of Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Instrumented Experiments with PVDF Stress Gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Thadhani, N N

    2001-05-29

    Shock-induced chemical reactions in {approx}58% dense Mo+2Si powder mixtures were investigated using time-resolved instrumented experiments, employing PVDF-piezoelectric stress gauges placed at the front and rear surfaces of the powders to measure the input and propagated stresses, and wave speed through the powder mixture. Experiments performed on the powders at input stresses less than 4 GPa, showed characteristics of powder densification and dispersed propagated wave stress profiles with rise time > {approx}40 nanoseconds. At input stress between 4-6 GPa, the powder mixtures showed a sharp rise time (<{approx}10 ns) of propagated wave profile and an expanded state of products revealing evidence of shock-induced chemical reaction. At input stresses greater than 6 GPa, the powder mixtures showed a slower propagated-stress-wave rise time and transition to a low-compressibility (melt) state indicating lack of shock-induced reaction. The results illustrate that premature melting of Si, at input stresses less than the crush-strength of the powder mixtures, restricts mixing between reactants and inhibits ''shock-induced'' reaction initiation.

  14. Cell killing, nuclear damage and apoptosis in Chinese hamster V79 cells after irradiation with heavy-ion beams of (16)O, (12)C and (7)Li.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rupak; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Sarma, Asiti; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2007-08-15

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to high LET (linear energy transfer) (16)O-beam (625keV/mum) radiation in the dose range of 0-9.83Gy. Cell survival, micronuclei (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and induction of apoptosis were studied as a follow up of our earlier study on high LET radiations ((7)Li-beam of 60keV/mum and (12)C-beam of 295keV/mum) as well as (60)Co gamma-rays. Dose dependent decline in surviving fraction was noticed along with the increase of MN frequency, CA frequency as well as percentage of apoptosis as detected by nuclear fragmentation assay. The relative intensity of DNA ladder, which is a useful marker for the determination of the extent of apoptosis induction, was also increased in a dose dependent manner. Additionally, expression of tyrosine kinase lck-1 gene, which plays an important role in response to ionizing radiation induced apoptosis, was increased with the increase of radiation doses and also with incubation time. The present study showed that all the high LET radiations were generally more effective in cell killing and inflicting other cytogenetic damages than that of low LET gamma-rays. The dose response curves revealed that (7)Li-beam was most effective in cell killing as well as inducing other nuclear damages followed by (12)C, (16)O and (60)Co gamma-rays, in that order. The result of this study may have some application in biological dosimetry for assessment of genotoxicity in heavy ion exposed subjects and in determining suitable doses for radiotherapy in cancer patients where various species of heavy ions are now being generally used.

  15. R-Matrix Evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections up to 6.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Spencer, R.R.; and Wright, R.Q.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper the authors describe an evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were performed with the computer code SAMMY [LA98] which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least squares technique.

  16. Redox reactions induced by nitrosative stress mediate protein misfolding and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zezong; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A

    2010-06-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through beta-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  17. The implication of combat-induced stress reaction, PTSD, and attachment in parenting among war veterans.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Estee; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2011-10-01

    This study examined parental functioning, parental satisfaction, and concern for offspring during their child's military service, among war veterans, some of whom suffered from acute combat-induced stress reaction (CSR) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, we examined the additive and interactive contributions of CSR, PTSD and attachment dimensions to parenting measures. The sample consisted of 477 participants divided into two groups: a clinical group of veterans who had been diagnosed with CSR on the battlefield (N = 267), and a matched control group of veterans who did not suffer from CSR (NCSR; N = 210). CSR, PTSD, avoidant-attachment, and anxious-attachment, were all related to lower levels of parental functioning and satisfaction. Veterans who suffered from both CSR and PTSD reported more concern for their offspring during their child's military service compared to veterans with PTSD but without antecedent CSR. Attachment dimensions and specifically attachment-avoidance, made the greatest contribution to parenting measures, followed by posttraumatic symptoms. In addition, attachment-avoidance moderated the relationship between posttraumatic symptoms and parental functioning. Theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  18. Novel Collimated Beam Setup to Study the Kinetics of VUV-Induced Reactions.

    PubMed

    Duca, Clara; Imoberdorf, Gustavo; Mohseni, Madjid

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum UV (VUV) process is an incipient advanced oxidation process, which can be used for water treatment. This process relies on the formation of hydroxyl radicals through the VUV-induced photolysis of water. In particular, the use of ozone-generating mercury vapor lamps, which emit 10% of the radiation at 185 nm and 90% at 254 nm, is showing very promising results for the degradation of micropollutants. The kinetics of VUV process has been studied in batch- and flow-through reactors, but the effect of 254 and 185 nm photons cannot be isolated, mass transfer resistances can take place and the interpretation of the results is complex. In this technical note, a new VUV collimated beam to conduct kinetic tests is presented, which offers several advantages: (1) it allows the irradiation of samples with 185, 254 nm photons, or both, (2) the concentration of reagents is uniform in the reaction volume and (3) it allows to change the fluence rate by changing the distance between the lamp and the photoreactor. Details of the geometry are presented, as well as an analysis of the collimation and uniformity of the radiation of the new VUV-collimated beam setup. PMID:23952050

  19. Production ratio of meta-stable isomer in {sup 180}Ta by neutrino-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-05-12

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This isomer residual ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  20. Redox Reactions Induced by Nitrosative Stress Mediate Protein Misfolding and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through β-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  1. Role of Surface Energy Coefficients and Temperature in the Fusion Reactions Induced by Weakly Bound Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; O. N., Ghodsi

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study is provided to analyze the behaviors of the interaction potential and complete fusion cross section which are influenced by the effects of the surface energy coefficients γ and temperature T. Our framework is restricted to the proximity formalism for fusion reactions induced by weakly bound projectiles 6Li, 7Li and 9Be. The different surface energy coefficients (γ-MN76, γ-MN95, γ-MS00 and γ-PD03) are used to study the role of the parameter γ in the proximity potentials AW 95 and BW 91. Comparison of the theoretical and the experimental values of the barrier characteristics (barrier heights and its positions) indicates that the modified versions AW 95 (γ-MS00) and BW 91 (γ-MS00) give the least deviations for fusion barrier heights. Moreover, it is shown that the temperature-dependence improves the calculated barrier heights based on the potentials AW 95 and BW 91. In the present study, the analysis of the mentioned effects on the complete fusion cross sections has been also discussed for the systems of interest. The obtained results reveal that the above-modified versions provide a more accurate description for behavior of the complete fusion cross sections than the original potentials at above-barrier energies. It is demonstrated that the increase of the temperature T enhances the complete fusion suppression at this energy range.

  2. Overtone spectroscopy of H2D+ and D2H+ using laser induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Müller, Frank; Kühnemann, Frank; Schiller, Stephan; Tennyson, Jonathan; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The method of laser induced reaction is used to obtain high-resolution IR spectra of H2D+ and D2H+ in collision with n-H2 at a nominal temperature of 17K. For this purpose three cw-laser systems have been coupled to a 22-pole ion trap apparatus, two commercial diode laser systems in the ranges of 6100-6600cm-1 and 6760-7300cm-1, respectively, and a high-power optical parametric oscillator tunable in the range of 2600-3200cm-1. In total, 27 new overtone and combination transitions have been detected for H2D + and D2H+, as well as a weak line in the ν1 vibrational band of H2D+ (220←101) at 3164.118cm-1. The line positions are compared to high accuracy ab initio calculations, showing small but mode-dependent differences, being largest for three vibrational quanta in the ν2 symmetric bending of H2D+. Within the experimental accuracy, the relative values of the ab initio predicted Einstein B coefficients are confirmed.

  3. Laser-induced reactions in a deep UV resist system: Studied with picosecond infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Koskelo, A.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most technologically important uses of organic photochemistry is in the imaging industry where radiation-sensitive organic monomers and polymers are used in photoresists. A widely-used class of compounds for imaging applications are diazoketones; these compounds undergo a photoinduced Wolff rearrangement to form a ketene intermediate which subsequently hydrolyses to a base-soluble, carboxylic acid. Another use of organic molecules in polymer matrices is for dopant induced ablation of polymers. As part of a program to develop diagnostics for laser driven reactions in polymer matrices, we have investigated the photoinduced decomposition of 5-diazo-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (5-diazo Meldrum`s acid, DM) in a PMMA matrix using picosecond infrared spectroscopy. In particular, irradiation of DM with a 60 ps 266 nm laser pulse results in immediate bleaching of the diazo infrared band ({nu} = 2172 cm{sup -1}). Similarly, a new band appears within our instrument response at 2161 cm{sup -1} (FWHM = 29 cm{sup -1}) and is stable to greater than 6 ns.; we assign this band to the ketene photoproduct of the Wolff rearrangement. Using deconvolution techniques we estimate a limit for its rate of formation of {tau} < 20 ps. The linear dependence of the absorbance change with the pump power (266 nm) even above the threshold of ablation suggest that material ejection take place after 6ns.

  4. Isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions in CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Petaev, Michail I.

    2012-04-01

    In situ oxygen-isotope measurements of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites Isheyevo (CH/CB-like), Acfer 214 paired with Acfer 182 (CH), QUE 94411 paired with QUE 94627 (CBb), and Hammadah al Hamra 237 (CBb) revealed the presence of a common population of igneous, isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted inclusions: Δ17O (average ± 2 standard deviations) = -7 ± 4‰, -6 ± 5‰, and -8 ± 3‰, respectively. All CAIs from CBs and a significant fraction of those from CHs and Isheyevo are 16O-depleted. Most of the 16O-depleted CAIs consist of Ti-poor Al-diopside, spinel, melilite, and forsterite and surrounded by a single- and double-layered rim of forsterite ± diopside. The 16O-depleted CAIs composed of hibonite, grossite, melilite, and spinel, and surrounded by the multilayered melilite + diopside ± forsterite rims are less common. Some of the 16O-depleted refractory igneous inclusions composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, and ±spinel have chondrule-like textures (skeletal or barred). They are mineralogically most similar to Al-diopside-rich chondrules found in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites and composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene, ±glassy mesostasis, and ±spinel, suggesting there is a continuum between these objects. We suggest that (i) most of the isotopically uniform and 16O-depleted CAIs resulted from remelting of pre-existing, possibly 16O-rich refractory inclusions. The remelting may have occurred during formation of the magnesian, non-porphyritic (cryptocrystalline and skeletal) chondrules in CHs, CBs, and Isheyevo either by an unspecified, late, single-stage, highly-energetic event or in an impact-generated plume previously hypothesized for their origin; both mechanisms probably occurred in the solar nebula (i.e., in the presence of the nebula gas). The forsterite ± pyroxene rims around 16O-depleted CAIs may have resulted from evaporation-recondensation of silicon and magnesium

  5. Grape Marc Extract-Induced Defense Reactions and Protection against Phytophthora parasitica Are Impaired in NahG Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Benouaret, Razik; Goupil, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    Grape marc extract (GME) acts as an elicitor of plant defense responses. This study analyzed GME-induced plant defense reactions in NahG transgenic tobacco. Leaf infiltration of NahG leaves revealed HR-like reactions with reduced lesions and weak deployment of autofluorescent compounds in the surrounding infiltrated tissues. The β-1,3-glucanase PR2-, endochitinase PR3-, and osmotin PR5-target transcript levels were strongly lowered in NahG leaves, and the mutant failed to accumulate the antimicrobial PR1 transcripts. GME-induced protection against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) was evaluated on tobacco leaves. The antimicrobial properties of GME against Ppn were evidenced using a range of in vitro tests. GME-sprayed wild-type leaves showed reduced infection areas, whereas GME failed to induce a protective effect against Ppn in NahG leaves. The results suggest that GME-induced plant defense reactions in tobacco plants was mediated by salicylic acid (SA) and that GME-induced protection against Ppn could be the combined result of antimicrobial and defense actions.

  6. Using 16O/18O to Determine the Evolutionary History of the R Coronae Borealis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey; Geballe, Tom; Welch, Douglas; Tisserand, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Of the Galactic hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) and R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars for which oxygen isotopic ratios can be measured, all of them show 16O/18O < 5, values that are orders of magnitude lower than measured in other stars (the Solar value is 500). This suggests that most if not all HdC and RCB stars are highly enriched in 18O. This is an important clue in determining the evolutionary pathways of HdC and RCB stars, for which two models have been proposed: the double degenerate (white dwarf (WD) merger), and the final helium-shell flash (FF). No overproduction of 18O is expected in the FF scenario. However, some RCB stars also show characteristics, such as 13C and Lithium, seen in FF stars. Therefore, we are conducting a survey all the RCB stars in the LMC and SMC for the characteristics of a WD merger or a FF. Most of the stars have been surveyed for 13C already and we plan to survey them for Lithium in the future. This proposal is to use Gemini/Flamingos-2 to survey all the stars, which are cool enough to show CO bands, for the presence of 18O near 2.3 micron. The Magellanic Clouds provide an unbiased, relatively complete sample of RCB stars which are at a known distance so their bolometric luminosities can be used in our stellar evolution models. This survey, combined with our models, will reveal the true fraction of RCB stars formed by each of the proposed scenarios.

  7. Using 16O/18O to Determine the Evolutionary History of the R Coronae Borealis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey; Geballe, Tom; Welch, Douglas; Tisserand, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    All of the Galactic hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) and R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars for which oxygen isotopic ratios can be measured, show 16O/18O < 5, values that are orders of magnitude lower than measured in other stars (the Solar value is 500). This suggests that most if not all HdC and RCB stars are highly enriched in 18O. This is an important clue to determining the evolutionary pathways of HdC and RCB stars, for which two models have been proposed: the double degenerate (white dwarf (WD) merger), and the final helium-shell flash (FF). No overproduction of 18O is expected in the FF scenario. However, some RCB stars also show characteristics, such as 13C and Lithium, seen in FF stars. Therefore, we are conducting a survey of all the RCB stars in the LMC and SMC for the characteristics of a WD merger or a FF. Most of the stars have been surveyed for 13C already, and we are also planning to survey them for Lithium. But no RCB star in the Magellanic Clouds has been observed for 18O. The Magellanic Clouds provide an unbiased, relatively complete sample of RCB stars which are at a known distance so their bolometric luminosities can be used in our stellar evolution models. This proposal is to use Gemini/Flamingos-2 to survey all of the Magellanic Cloud stars, which are cool enough to show CO bands, for the presence of 18O near 2.3 micron. This survey, combined with our stellar evolution models, will reveal the true fraction of RCB stars formed by each of the proposed scenarios.

  8. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  9. The chemical mediation of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. I. Purification of a macrophage-chemotactic factor from bovien gamma-globulin-induced skin reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T.; Ueda, K.; Maeda, S.

    1977-01-01

    A macrophage-chemotactic factor (MCFS) was extracted in the pseudoglobulin fraction from delayed hypersensitivity skin lesions induced by bovine gamma-globulin in guinea pigs. Its chemotactic activity was estimated by a modification of Boyden's method using Nuclepore filter. After chromatography of the protein fraction using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose, in that order, two chemotactic fractions were obtained. The chemotactic factor with stronger activity (MCFS-1) was further highly purified (488-fold) by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. This factor migrated in a single band on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was found to be a protein that was free of nucleic acid. Gel filtration showed that its molecular weight was similar to that of IgG. Its chemotactic activity was heat labile. Intradermal injection of this factor into normal guinea pigs induced a pronounced mononuclear cell emigration from venules. These findings are pertinent to understanding macrophage reaction in the delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Am J Pathol 87:359-374, 1977). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:66878

  10. Air-Broadened Line Parameters for the 2←0 Bands of 13C16O and 12C18O at 2.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.

    2012-06-01

    Air-broadened line shape parameters were determined for the first time in the 2←0 bands of 13C16O near 4166.8 cm-1 and 12C18O near 4159.0 cm-1. Spectra were recorded at 0.005 cm-1 resolution using a coolable absorption cell in the sample compartment of the Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Gas temperatures and pressures ranged from 150 to 298 K and 20 to 700 Torr, respectively. Line parameters were determined by broad-band multispectrum least-squares fitting of the 4000-4360 cm-1 region in 16 spectra simultaneously; each set included 4 isotope-enriched pure sample scans and 12 air+CO samples (13CO or C18O, as appropriate). The air-broadened parameters measured were Lorentz half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents; pressure-induced shift coefficients, their temperature dependences; and off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements. Speed dependence parameters were included to minimize the fit residuals. For both isotopologues the individual line positions and intensities were constrained to their theoretical relationships in order to obtain the rovibrational (G, B, D, and H) and band intensity parameters, including Herman-Wallis coefficients. The results for 13C16O and 12C18O are compared with those for the 12C16O 2←0 band and discussed. K. Sung, A. W. Mantz, M. A. H. Smith, et al., JMS 262 (2010) 122-134. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith and D. A. Atkins, JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. V. Malathy Devi, D. C. Benner, L. R. Brown, C. E. Miller and R. A. Toth, JMS 242 (2007) 90-117. V. Malathy Devi, D. C. Benner, M. A. H. Smith, et al., JQSRT (2012) in press. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O2 plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  12. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  13. Examining of athermal effects in microwave-induced glucose/glycine reaction and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Liu, Shulan; Qin, Xiaopei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Owusu, John

    2013-08-14

    Many reports claim the existence of athermal effects in microwave-induced reactions, and this challenge the assumption that the thermal effect (heating) is the sole factor in microwave heating. Therefore, microwave-induced Maillard reaction of d-glucose/glycine and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis (PSPY) were investigated. Browning reactions were monitored by measuring heating rate, UV-absorbance and brown color, UV-vis and synchronous fluorescence spectra, GC/MS analysis and intrinsic viscosity of degradation. Heating of d-glucose/glycine solution produced brown compounds which were detected at A420, and the intermediate products, 2-acetylfuran and 5-methylfurfural, whose fluorescence intensity evidenced their formation. Maximum emission of synchronous fluorescence spectra of samples were at 430-440 nm and 370-390 nm. Both microwave and water bath heating did not cause any compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. All data failed to show any significant athermal effects of compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. It can be inferred that some of the reports suggesting the existence of athermal effects, which could ascribe to the different set-up obtained in not well temperature controlled microwave heating systems. PMID:23769514

  14. Examining of athermal effects in microwave-induced glucose/glycine reaction and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Liu, Shulan; Qin, Xiaopei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Owusu, John

    2013-08-14

    Many reports claim the existence of athermal effects in microwave-induced reactions, and this challenge the assumption that the thermal effect (heating) is the sole factor in microwave heating. Therefore, microwave-induced Maillard reaction of d-glucose/glycine and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis (PSPY) were investigated. Browning reactions were monitored by measuring heating rate, UV-absorbance and brown color, UV-vis and synchronous fluorescence spectra, GC/MS analysis and intrinsic viscosity of degradation. Heating of d-glucose/glycine solution produced brown compounds which were detected at A420, and the intermediate products, 2-acetylfuran and 5-methylfurfural, whose fluorescence intensity evidenced their formation. Maximum emission of synchronous fluorescence spectra of samples were at 430-440 nm and 370-390 nm. Both microwave and water bath heating did not cause any compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. All data failed to show any significant athermal effects of compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. It can be inferred that some of the reports suggesting the existence of athermal effects, which could ascribe to the different set-up obtained in not well temperature controlled microwave heating systems.

  15. Ampelopsis japonica Makino Extract Inhibits the Inflammatory Reaction Induced by Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns in Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Ra; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Kim, Ki-Duck; Kim, Sue Jeong; Kim, Dong-Il; Im, Myung; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratinocytes are the major cells in epidermis, providing barrier components such as cornified cells through the sophisticated differentiation process. In addition, keratinocytes exerts their role as the defense cells via activation of innate immunity. It has been known that pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) including double-strand RNA and nucleotides can provoke inflammatory reaction in keratinocytes. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Ampelopsis japonica Makino extract (AE) on PAMPs-induced inflammatory reaction of keratinocytes. Methods The effects of AE were determined using poly (I:C)-induced inflammation and imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis models. Results In cultured keratinocytes, AE significantly inhibited poly(I:C)-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α. AE significantly inhibited poly(I:C)-induced release of caspase-1 active form (p20), and down-regulated nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. In imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis model, topical application of AE resulted in significant reduction of epidermal hyperplasia. Conclusion These results suggest that AE may be a potential candidate for the treatment of skin inflammation. PMID:27274634

  16. Sulfated Astragalus polysaccharide can regulate the inflammatory reaction induced by LPS in Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Siyu; Li, Yulong; Wang, Fei; Yang, Xiaojun; Yao, Junhu

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluates the effect of sulfated Astragalus polysaccharide (SAPS) on inflammatory reaction induced by LPS in Caco2 cells. Sulfated modification was conducted using the chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method. Caco2 cells were cultured with 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL SAPS or 100 μg/mL Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) for 24 h. Then, 1 μg/mL LPS was added for the next 24 h to trigger an inflammatory response. DMEM culture medium was used as a blank control. In present study, LPS stimulation significantly increased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TLR4, and reduced the expression of ZO-1 and occludin. Compared with the LPS control group, APS (100 μg/mL) or SAPS (100 μg/mL) administration decreased the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8. Moreover, 25 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL SAPS down-regulated TNF-α and IL-1β expression. APS administration (100 μg/mL) up-regulated occludin expression, but did not affect ZO-1 expression. However, the expression of ZO-1 and occludin was up-regulated by lower dose SAPS administration (25 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL). Compared with the other groups, the expression of TLR4 was lower in the SAPS group at all concentrations of SAPS. These results suggest that SAPS was to be a more effective anti-inflammatory agent than APS in vitro.

  17. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-04-15

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant color change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays.

  18. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  19. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Measurement of the D/H, 18O/16O, and 17O/16O Isotope Ratios in Water by Laser Absorption Spectroscopy at 2.73 μm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Weidong; Fertein, Eric; Masselin, Pascal; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Yingjian; Koeth, Johannes; Brückner, Daniela; He, Xingdao

    2014-01-01

    A compact isotope ratio laser spectrometry (IRLS) instrument was developed for simultaneous measurements of the D/H, 18O/16O and 17O/16O isotope ratios in water by laser absorption spectroscopy at 2.73 μm. Special attention is paid to the spectral data processing and implementation of a Kalman adaptive filtering to improve the measurement precision. Reduction of up to 3-fold in standard deviation in isotope ratio determination was obtained by the use of a Fourier filtering to remove undulation structure from spectrum baseline. Application of Kalman filtering enables isotope ratio measurement at 1 s time intervals with a precision (<1‰) better than that obtained by conventional 30 s averaging, while maintaining a fast system response. The implementation of the filter is described in detail and its effects on the accuracy and the precision of the isotope ratio measurements are investigated. PMID:24854363

  1. α and 2p2n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on Ni60

    DOE PAGES

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'α) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  2. Recent insight into the mechanism of proton-induced composite particle emission in inclusive reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, A. A.; Dimitrova, S. S.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; van Zyl, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent results for the inclusive reaction 93Nb(p,α) between incident energies of 65 and 160 MeV are shown to be consistent with a competition between knockout and pickup. The pre-equilibrium statistical multistep process terminates in either mechanism. The incident-energy dependence of the reaction reflects the dynamics of the participating reaction components. It is consequently not surprising to observe knockout to dominate at the lower and highest incident energies, with pickup very prominent in between.

  3. Two-nucleon spectral function of the 16O nucleus using the lowest-order constrained variational state-dependent correlation functions of the Reid and Av18 interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Younesizadeh, Y.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the two-nucleon spectral functions (TNSFs) are defined in terms of the state- and the density-dependent correlation functions in the framework of the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method to calculate the TNSF of the 16O nucleus in the 16O(e,e'NN)14C reaction. The Reid soft-core (Reid68) and the Av18 potentials are used as the internucleon interactions. Since, the short-range correlation effects are imposed on the wave functions for the individual channels (e.g., the 1S0 and 3PJ channels); therefore, the defect wave functions are obtained for various channels such that the high relative momenta (p>4fm-1) are ignored. The resulting TNSFs for the 16O nucleus are compared with those of the dressed random phase approximation (DRPA) calculations of Geurts and the experimental predictions, especially those of Onderwater , (NIKHEF group), where reasonable agreement is found. It is shown that the optimized state-dependent defect wave functions have substantial effects on the TNSF and it is not justified to use the simplified parametrized two-body correlation functions in all of the channels. In agreement with the experimental data of Onderwater , the knockout of a 1S0 pair proton dominates the above reaction cross section. Finally, it is demonstrated that the 0+ and 2+ peaks, which are expected to be observed in the above reaction cross section, are moved to the lower momenta of out-going protons when the state-dependent correlation functions are imposed.

  4. Examining the effect of nonlocality in (d ,n ) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A.; Titus, L. J.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    Background: In the past year we have been exploring the effect of the explicit inclusion of nonlocality in (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: The goal of this paper is to extend previous studies to (d ,n ) reactions, which, although similar to (d ,p ) reactions, have specific properties that merit inspection. Method: We apply our methods (both the distorted-wave Born approximation and the adiabatic wave approximation) to (d ,n ) reactions on 16O,40Ca,48Ca,126Sn,132Sn , and 208Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Results: We look separately at the modifications introduced by nonlocality in the final bound and scattering states as well as the consequences reflected on the differential angular distributions. The cross sections obtained when using nonlocality explicitly are significantly different than those using the local approximation, just as in (d ,p ) reactions. Due to the particular role of the Coulomb force in the bound state, often we found the effects of nonlocality to be larger in (d ,n ) than in (d ,p ) reactions. Conclusions: Our results confirm the importance of including nonlocality explicitly in deuteron-induced reactions.

  5. Chirality and polarity in the f-block borates M4[B16O26(OH)4(H2O)3Cl4] (M = Sm, Eu, Gd, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf).

    PubMed

    Polinski, Matthew J; Pace, Kristen A; Stritzinger, Jared T; Lin, Jian; Cross, Justin N; Cary, Samantha K; Van Cleve, Shelley M; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-08-01

    The reactions of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with molten boric acid in high chloride concentrations result in the formation of M4[B16O26(OH)4(H2O)3Cl4] (M = Sm, Eu, Gd, Pu, Am, Cm, Cf). This cubic structure type is remarkably complex and displays both chirality and polarity. The polymeric borate network forms helical features that are linked via two different types of nine-coordinate f-element environments. The f-f transitions are unusually intense and result in dark coloration of these compounds with actinides. PMID:25042434

  6. Carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction: role of IgE-dependent basophil activation and FcεRI.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takuya; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Natsuki; Sugimoto, Hiroko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Basophil activation was observed in patients with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction (HR). However, the precise mechanism by which carboplatin induces basophil activation and the associated surrogate markers remains to be elucidated. To investigate whether IgE-dependent mechanisms, including the overexpression of FcεRI, participate in carboplatin-induced basophil activation, 13 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled: 5 with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction within the past 2 years, and 8 with no such history. The expression levels of FcεRI, IgE, and CD203c on basophils were measured using a flow cytometer. Immunoglobulin E-dependent basophil activation was evaluated by testing for IgE passive sensitization using lactic acid, and by testing for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition, using wortmannin. In three patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity, pretreatment with wortmannin almost completely inhibited carboplatin-induced basophil activation (P < 0.05). In a healthy control subject, whose own IgE showed no response to carboplatin, acquired reactivity to carboplatin when exposed to plasma from patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. This did not occur when the same experiment was carried out using plasma from the patients negative for carboplatin hypersensitivity. Moreover, pretreatment with omalizumab, a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody, almost completely blocked carboplatin-induced basophil activation in the plasma of patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. On further investigation, the HR-positive group had significantly higher levels of FcεRI compared with the negative group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, an IgE-dependent mechanism incorporating FcεRI overexpression participates in carboplatin-induced severe HR. These results establish the relevance of monitoring the pharmacodynamic changes of basophils to prevent carboplatin-induced severe HR.

  7. A precise extraction of the induced polarization in the 4He(e,e'p)3H reaction

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Malace, M. Paolone, S. Strauch

    2011-01-01

    We measured with unprecedented precision the induced polarization Py in 4He(e,e'p)3H at Q^2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)^2 and 1.3 (GeV/c)^2. The induced polarization is indicative of reaction-mechanism effects beyond the impulse approximation. Our results are in agreement with a relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation calculation but are over-estimated by a calculation with strong charge-exchange effects. Our data are used to constrain the strength of the spin independent charge-exchange term in the latter calculation.

  8. Reaction analogues in the radiation-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of bio-organic molecules 2: Oxygenated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    The OH-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of simple peptides and phosphate esters in oxygenated solutions involve the fomation and subsequent degradation of the perodyl radicals RCONHC()dot O))R/sub 2/ and )bigcircreverse arrowP) OC()dot O)/sub 2/)R/sub 2/ respectively. Reaction analogues in the degradation of peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals in these two systems are evaluated with reference to the OH-induced main-chain cleavage of protein and DNA. 25 refs.

  9. Neutron, Proton and Alpha Emission Spectra of Nickel Isotopes for Proton Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2012-06-01

    The fusion energy is attractive as an energy source because the fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and so fusion will not contribute to environmental problems, such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. The fusion reaction does not produce radioactive nuclides and it is not self-sustaining, as is a fission reaction when a critical mass of fissionable material is assembled. Since the fusion reaction is easily and quickly quenched the primary sources of heat to drive such an accident are heat from radioactive decay and heat from chemical reactions. Both the magnitude and time dependence of the generation of heat from radioactive decay can be controlled by proper selection and design of materials. Nickel (Ni) is an important structural material in fusion (and also fission) reactor technologies and many other fields. So, the working out the reaction cross sections of the Ni isotopes is very important for selection of the fusion materials. In this study, 58Ni(p,xn), 58Ni(p,xp), 60Ni(p,xp), 60Ni(p,xα) and 62Ni(p,xp) reactions have been investigated using nuclear reaction models. And also the 58Ni(p,xn) reaction has been calculated through a method of offered by Tel et al. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR database.

  10. Identification of Maillard reaction induced chemical modifications on Ara h 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maillard reaction is a non-enzymatic glycation reaction between proteins and reducing sugars that can modify nut allergens during thermal processing. These modifications can alter the structural and immunological properties of these allergens, and may result in increased IgE binding. Here, we ...

  11. 2p1v states populated in 135Te from 9Be induced reactions with a 132Sn beam

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Brown, Alex; Beene, James R; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Gross, Carl J; Liang, J Felix; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ayres, A.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Jones, K. L.; Manning, Brett M; Mueller, Paul Edward; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, William A; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Stone, N. J.; Stracener, Daniel W; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray transitions in $^{134}$\\textrm{Te}, $^{135}$\\textrm{Te}, and $^{136}$\\textrm{Te} were measured from $^{9}$\\textrm{Be} induced reactions with a radioactive $^{132}$\\textrm{Sn} beam at a sub-Coulomb barrier energy of $3$~MeV per nucleon using particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence spectroscopy. The transitions were selected by gating on alpha-like particles in a \\textrm{CsI} detector following a combination of ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 1n$), ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 2n$), and ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 3n$) reactions. Distorted wave Born approximation calculations suggest little to no contribution from the ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{7}$\\textrm{He}), ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{6}$\\textrm{He}), and ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{5}$\\textrm{He}) direct reactions. Gamma-ray transitions from previously known $2^+\\otimes \

  12. Cross section measurements of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium up to 34 MeV.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-09-01

    Experimental cross sections for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 34 MeV with beams provided by the ARRONAX cyclotron. The experimental cross section values were monitored using the (nat)Ti(d,x)(48)V reaction, recommended by the IAEA. The excitation functions for (nat)Ti(d,x)(44m,46,47,48)Sc are presented and compared with the existing ones and with the TALYS 1.6 code calculations using default models. Our experimental values are in good agreement with data found in the literature. TALYS 1.6 is not able to give a good estimation of the production cross sections investigated in this work. These production cross sections of scandium isotopes fit with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to expand the database of monitor reactions. PMID:26103622

  13. Micro-radiosurgery: a new concept for radiotherapy based upon low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B. L.

    1993-06-01

    Traditionally, proton radiotherapy has required the use of high energy proton beams (50-200 MeV) which can penetrate into a patient's body to the site of a tumor that is to be destroyed through irradiation. However, substantial damage is still done to healthy tissue along the path of the incident proton beam, as much as 30% of that done at the tumor site. We propose a new concept for the production and delivery of energetic protons for use in medical radiotherapy, based upon the fact that low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions can produce radiation products suitable for use in radiotherapy applications. By employing specially fabricated "conduit needles" to deliver beams of energetic ions to selected target materials plugging the end of the needle, ion beam-induced nuclear reactions can be generated at the needle tip, emitting reaction-specific radiation products directly at the tumor site. In this paper, we show that the 13.6 MeV protons produced by the d( 3He, p) 4He nuclear reaction can deliver a lethal dose (7 krad) of radiation to a 4.4 mm diameter sphere of tissue in only 30 s using a 1 μA, 800 keV 3He ion beam. If also proven clinically feasible, the use of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions would allow the utilization of relatively inexpensive, compact, low energy ion accelerators for proton radiotherapy and minimize unintended radiation damage to healthy tissue by providing much greater precision in controlling the irradiated volume.

  14. Low and medium energy deuteron-induced reactions on {sup 63,65}Cu nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Simeckova, E.; Bem, P.; Honusek, M.; Stefanik, M.; Fischer, U.; Simakov, S. P.; Forrest, R. A.; Koning, A. J.; Sublet, J.-C.; Avrigeanu, M.; Roman, F. L.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2011-07-15

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2n), (d,3n), and (d,2p) reactions on {sup 63,65}Cu were measured in the energy range from 4 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Then, following the available elastic-scattering data analysis that provided the optical potential for reaction cross-section calculations, an increased effort was devoted to the breakup mechanism, direct reaction stripping, and pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus cross-section calculations, corrected for the breakup and stripping decrease of the total reaction cross section. The overall agreement between the measured and calculated deuteron activation cross sections proves the correctness of the nuclear mechanism account, next to the simultaneous analysis of the elastic-scattering and reaction data.

  15. Improved Data Set for the Herzberg Band Systems of 16O 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mérienne, Marie-France; Jenouvrier, Alain; Coquart, Bernard; Carleer, Michel; Fally, Sophie; Colin, Reginald; Vandaele, A. C.; Hermans, Christian

    2001-05-01

    Total number of files: 3+README.TXT Filenames: O2_HERZB.TXT NON_ATT.TXT O2_PARAM.TXT Filetypes: ASCII I-O2_HERZB.TXT The assignments and intensities in the 41261-34000 cm-1 region include the data from ref.1 and 2, and additional data from revisited spectra (ref.3). 1-FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY OF THE O2 HERZBERG BANDS I. ROTATIONAl ANALYSIS A. Jenouvrier, M-F. Merienne, B. Coquart, M. Carleer, S. Fally, A.C. Vandaele, C. Hermans and R. Colin Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 198,136-162 (1999) 2-FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY OF THE O2 HERZBERG BANDS II. BAND OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS AND TRANSITION MOMENTS M-F. Merienne, A. Jenouvrier, B. Coquart, M. Carleer, S. Fally, R. Colin, A.C. Vandaele and C. Hermans Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 202, 171-193 (2000) 3-IMPROVED DATA SET FOR THE HERZBERG BAND SYSTEMS OF {16}O2 M-F. Merienne, A. Jenouvrier, B. Coquart, M. Carleer, S. Fally, R. Colin, A.C. Vandaele and C. Hermans Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy DESCRIPTION: Columns: 1-Wavenumber in cm-1. 'c' denotes a calculated value for a blended line. 2-Integrated line cross section in 10-26 cm2 cm-1 molecule-1. '*' denotes a saturated line for which the value has been calculated. 3-Assignment in the order : electronic transition, vibrational band v'-0, branch, rotational assignment (N"). For the overlapped lines, the value in [ ] is the estimated integrated cross section. II-NON_ATT.TXT Lines which cannot be identified as {16}O2 transitions. DESCRIPTION: Columns: 1-Wavenumber in cm-1. 2-Integrated line cross section in 10-26 cm2 cm-1 molecule-1. III-O2_PARAM.TXT This file contains tables for the molecular parameters and the transition moments. table 1: A(3)Sigma(u)+ parameters (in cm-1): the numbers in parentheses are two standard deviations (2sigma) in units of the last digits. DESCRIPTION: Columns: 1-Vibrational quantum number v. 2-Band origin T(v) referred to the hypothetical X(3)Sigma(g)-, F2, N = J = 0 level. 3-Rotational constant B(v). 4-Rotational centrifugal

  16. Non-thermal processes in standard big bang nucleosynthesis: I. In-flight nuclear reactions induced by energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, V. T.; Nakao, Y.; Nakamura, M.

    2008-05-01

    The standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) relies on a nuclear reaction network operating with thermal reactivities for Maxwellian plasma. In the primordial plasma, however, a number of non-thermal processes triggered by energetic particles of various origins can take place. In the present work we examine in-flight nuclear reactions induced in the plasma by MeV protons generated in D(d, p)T and 3He(d, p)4He fusions. We particularly focus on several low threshold endoergic processes. These are reactions omitted in the standard network—proton-induced break-ups of loosely bound D, 7Li, 7Be nuclei—and the 3H(p, n)3He charge-exchange reaction important for the interconversion of A = 3 nuclei in the early universe. It is found that the break-up processes in the plasma take the form of Maxwellian processes at temperatures T>70 keV, while in the lower temperature range they proceed as non-thermal reactions. It is shown that at T<70 keV the in-flight reaction channels can enhance the break-up reactivities by several orders of magnitude. The levels of these reactivities however remain insufficiently high to affect BBN kinetics and change the standard prediction of light element abundances. The abundances are found to be: Yp = 0.2457, D/H = 2.542 × 10-5, 3He/H = 1.004 × 10-5, 7Li/H = 4.444 × 10-10. Future steps in the study of non-thermal processes in the primordial plasma are briefly discussed.

  17. Estimating diffusivity along a reaction coordinate in the high friction limit: Insights on pulse times in laser-induced nucleation.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Duff, Nathan; Doherty, Michael F; Peters, Baron

    2009-12-14

    In the high friction limit of Kramers' theory, the diffusion coefficient for motion along the reaction coordinate is a crucial parameter in determining reaction rates from mean first passage times. The Einstein relation between mean squared displacement, time, and diffusivity is inaccurate at short times because of ballistic motion and inaccurate at long times because trajectories drift away from maxima in the potential of mean force. Starting from the Smoluchowski equation for a downward parabolic barrier, we show how drift induced by the potential of mean force can be included in estimating the diffusivity. A modified relation between mean squared displacement, time, and diffusivity now also includes a dependence on the barrier curvature. The new relation provides the diffusivity at the top of the barrier from a linear regression that is analogous to the procedure commonly used with Einstein's relation. The new approach has particular advantages over previous approaches when evaluations of the reaction coordinate are costly or when the reaction coordinate cannot be differentiated to compute restraining forces or velocities. We use the new method to study the dynamics of barrier crossing in a Potts lattice gas model of nucleation from solution. Our analysis shows that some current hypotheses about laser-induced nucleation mechanisms lead to a nonzero threshold laser pulse duration below which a laser pulse will not affect nucleation. We therefore propose experiments that might be used to test these hypotheses. PMID:20001029

  18. Development of a measurement system for the determination of (n , γ) cross-sections using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makii, H.; Ota, S.; Ishii, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Furutaka, K.; Nishio, K.; Nishinaka, I.; Chiba, S.; Igashira, M.; Czeszumska, A.

    2015-10-01

    We have installed a new experimental apparatus to measure γ-rays from highly excited states populated by the multi-nucleon transfer reactions with heavy-ion projectiles to determine the (n, γ) cross-sections by means of the surrogate reaction method. An apparatus consists of two anti-Compton LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers to measure the γ-rays and a Si ΔE-E detector system to detect outgoing projectile-like particles. Reactions of 153-MeV 18O beams with 155Gd and 157Gd targets were used to study the performance of apparatus. By using the LaBr3(Ce) scintillators with relatively large volume (101.6 mm in diameter and 127 mm in length), we have successfully measured γ-rays from the compound nuclei, which have excitation energy above neutron separation energy, populated by 155Gd(18O, 16O)157Gd and 157Gd(18O, 16O)159Gd two-neutron transfer reactions. To measure in-beam γ-rays through heavy-ion-induced transfer reaction, it is important to assign the reaction channel clearly, since the cross-sections of the transfer reactions are much smaller than those of competing reactions such as Coulomb excitation and fusion reactions. The Si ΔE-E detector system was used to separate outgoing particles. The present study has demonstrated high capability of apparatus to measure the de-excitation γ-rays in the compound nuclei produced by the multi-nucleon transfer reactions for determination of the (n, γ) cross-sections by using the surrogate reaction method.

  19. Dynamics of surface-migration: Electron-induced reaction of 1,2-dihaloethanes on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; MacLean, Oliver; Guo, Si Yue; McNab, Iain R.; Ning, Zhanyu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Ji, Wei; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-10-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy was used to investigate the electron-induced reaction of 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) on Si(100).We observed a long-lived physisorbed molecular state of DBE at 75 K and of DCE at 110 K. As a result we were able to characterize by experiment and also by ab initio theory the dynamics of ethylene production in the electron-induced surface-reaction of these physisorbed species. For both DBE and DCE the ethylene product was observed to migrate across the surface. In the case of DBE the recoil of the ethylene favored the silicon rows, migrating by an average distance of 22 Å, and up to 100 Å. Trajectory calculations were performed for this electron-induced reaction, using an 'Impulsive Two-State' model involving an anionic excited state and a neutral ground-potential. The model agreed with experiment in reproducing both migration and desorption of the ethylene product. The computed migration exhibited a 'ballistic' launch and subsequent 'bounces', thereby accounting for the observed long-range migratory dynamics.

  20. Experimental and Computational Induced Aerodynamics from Missile Jet Reaction Controls at Angles of Attack to 75 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Ashbury, Scott C.; Deere, Karen A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine induced aerodynamic effects from jet reaction controls of an advanced air-to-air missile concept. The 75-percent scale model featured independently controlled reaction jets located near the nose and tail of the model. Aerodynamic control was provided by four fins located near the tail of the model. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.60, at angles of attack up to 75 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios up to 90. Jet-reaction thrust forces were not measured by the force balance but jet-induced forces were. In addition, a multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method was used to calculate the flowfield of the missile at angles of attack up to 40 deg. Results indicate that large interference effects on pitching moment were induced from operating the nose jets with the the off. Excellent correlation between experimental and computational pressure distributions and pitching moment were obtained a a Mach number of 0.35 and at angles of attack up to 40 deg.

  1. Elastic deuteron scattering on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei in the alpha-cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, Yu. A.; Mikhailyuk, V. P.; Pilipenko, V. V. Fedorchenko, D. V.

    2013-07-15

    On the basis of the dispersive alpha-cluster model for target nuclei and the theory of multiple diffractive scattering, differential cross sections and analyzing powers for the elastic scattering of 400 and 700-MeV deuterons on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O target nuclei were calculated in the pointlike-deuteron approximation. In these calculations, the amplitude for incident-deuteron scattering on nuclei was constructed with the aid of amplitudes for d{alpha} scattering that were obtained from a fit to data on d{sup 16}O scattering. The same features were calculated on the basis of the diffraction approximation with allowance for the internal deuteron structure by using the amplitudes obtained earlier for nucleon scattering on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei within the same dispersive alpha-clustermodel. The latter made it possible to perform calculations without employing adjustable parameters. The observables calculated on the basis of either approach agree with available experimental data.

  2. Reactivity Impact of 2H and 16O Elastic Scattering Nuclear Data on Critical Systems with Heavy Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubtsov, D.; Kozier, K. S.; Chow, J. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.; Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of deuterium nuclear data is important for reactor physics simulations of heavy water (D2O) reactors. The elastic neutron scattering cross section data at thermal energies, σs,th, have been observed to have noticeable impact on the reactivity values in simulations of critical systems involving D2O. We discuss how the uncertainties in the thermal scattering cross sections of 2H(n,n)2H and 16O(n,n)16O propagate to the uncertainty of the calculated neutron multiplication factor, keff, in thermal critical assemblies with heavy water neutron moderator/reflector. The method of trial evaluated nuclear data files, in which specific cross sections are individually perturbed, is used to calculate the sensitivity coefficients of keff to the microscopic nuclear data, such as σs(E) characterized by σs,th. Large reactivity differences of up to ≃ 5-10 mk (500-1000 pcm) were observed using 2H and 16O data files with different elastic scattering data in MCNP5 simulations of the LANL HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments included in the ICSBEP handbook.

  3. Interplay of the elastic and inelastic channels in the 16O+27Al scattering at Elab = 280 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; de Faria, P. N.; Foti, A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent data indicated a nuclear rainbow-like pattern in the elastic scattering of 16O + 27Al at E_{lab}=100 MeV that arises from couplings of the ground to the low-lying states of the 27Al nucleus. Similar effect was identified in the elastic angular distribution of 16O + 12C at E_{lab}=281 and 330 MeV. These experiments show a crucial role of microscopic details of nuclear structure in the elastic scattering of heavy ions at energies well above the Coulomb barrier. In this work we investigate the 16O + 27Al system at E_{lab}=280 MeV for which a coupled channel calculation predicts a pronounced nuclear rainbow-like structure. Obtained experimental data show evidences of an important coupling of the elastic channel to the inelastic. Coupled channel calculations reproduce the experimental angular distributions when a re-normalization factor on the real part of the optical potential is introduced. A proper theoretical approach still requires a high degree of accuracy for the nuclear structure models and new tools to deal with collective excitations.

  4. Measurements and Modeling of 16O12C17O Spectroscopic Parameters at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, David; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Coleman, Max; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    Nearly 1000 line intensities of 16O12C17O between 4604 and 5126 wn were measured using an isotopically-enriched mixture sample having 40 % (determined by mass spectrometry). Spectra were recorded at 0.0056 wn resolution with a Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL) configured to a Herriott cell with a 20.946 m absorption path. Since collisional narrowing effects were observed, the Rautian profile was systematically applied (instead of the Voigt profile) using a multispectrum retrieval procedure. Transition dipole moments and Herman-Wallis factors were derived for 15 bands, and a global comparison with theoretical calculations and predictions was obtained. Accuracies for the line intensities ranged between 2 - 3 % for strong bands and 6 - 30 % for weak bands. Retrieved line positions were calibrated using CO, HCl and some well-known 16O12C16O transitions. For both measured and calculated line positions, the accuracies fell between 0.1 - 1×10-3 wn. Self-broadening was also obtained for a few bands. Complete line lists were generated to support atmospheric remote sensing of the Earth (e.g., OCO-2 mission), Mars and Venus. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Quantum confinement effect of CdSe induced by nanoscale solvothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Im, Jeong-Hyuk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    We report a novel method, nanoscale solvothermal reaction (NSR), to induce the quantum confinement effect of CdSe on nanostructured TiO2 by solvothermal route. The time-dependent growth of CdSe is observed in solution at room temperature, which is found to be accomplished instantly by heat-treatment in the presence of solvent at 1 atm. However, no crystal growth occurs upon heat-treatment in the absence of solvent. The nanoscale solvothermal growth of CdSe quantum dot is realized on the nanocrystalline oxide surface, where Cd(NO3)2.4H2O and Na2SeSO3 solutions are sequentially spun on nanostructured TiO2, followed by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 250 °C. Size of CdSe increases from 4.4 nm to 5.3 nm, 8.7 nm and 14.8 nm, which results in decrease in optical band gap from 2.19 eV to, 1.95 eV, 1.74 eV and 1.75 eV with increasing the NSR temperature from 100 °C to 150 °C, 200 °C and 250 °C, respectively, which is indicative of the quantum confinement effect. Thermodynamic studies reveal that increase in the size of CdSe is related to increase in enthalpy, for instance, from 3.77 J mg-1 for 100 °C to 8.66 J mg-1 for 200 °C. Quantum confinement effect is further confirmed from the CdSe-sensitized solar cell, where onset wavelength in external quantum efficiency spectra is progressively shifted from 600 nm to 800 nm as the NSR temperature increases, which leads to a significant improvement of power conversion efficiency by a factor of more than four. A high photocurrent density of 13.7 mA cm-2 is obtained based on CdSe quantum dot grown by NSR at 200 °C.

  6. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    can be summarised, that mainly the differences between wells treated with chemical foams (to enhance the gas lift) and such without this treatment have to take into account. The autoclave experiments for the Schneeren site show the importance of biogeochemical reactions for the long-term pressure behaviour of the storage unit. During autotrophic (CO2 consuming) metabolic activities a CO2 turnover into the liquid and solid phase takes place (DOC increase, carbonate phase formation). Without the knowledge of these biogeochemical induced processes the accompanied decreasing pressure can be interpreted wrongly as a leaky storage unit. That's why a well-founded biogeochemical process understanding is important.

  7. Statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory with width-fluctuation correction including direct reaction channels for neutron-induced reactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, T.; Capote, R.; Hilaire, S.; Chau Huu-Tai, P.

    2016-07-01

    A model to calculate particle-induced reaction cross sections with statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory including direct reactions is given. The energy average of the scattering matrix from the coupled-channels optical model is diagonalized by the transformation proposed by Engelbrecht and Weidenmüller [C. A. Engelbrecht and H. A. Weidenmüller, Phys. Rev. C 8, 859 (1973), 10.1103/PhysRevC.8.859]. The ensemble average of S -matrix elements in the diagonalized channel space is approximated by a model of Moldauer [P. A. Moldauer, Phys. Rev. C 12, 744 (1975), 10.1103/PhysRevC.12.744] using the newly parametrized channel degree-of-freedom νa to better describe the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) reference calculations. The Moldauer approximation is confirmed by a Monte Carlo study using a randomly generated S matrix, as well as the GOE threefold integration formula. The method proposed is applied to the 238U(n ,n' ) cross-section calculation in the fast-energy range, showing an enhancement in the inelastic scattering cross sections.

  8. No-capture breakup and incomplete fusion reactions induced by stable weakly bound nucleus 9Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyyedi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The reactions including the stable weakly bound nucleus 9Be have been studied using the classical trajectory model accompanied with the experimental breakup function and the Aage-Winther interaction potential (AW95). In these calculations, the no-capture breakup and the incomplete fusion cross-sections as well as their competition at around the Coulomb barrier have been investigated. Our calculations showed that at a given far-Coulomb-barrier energy the incomplete fusion reaction in different distributions of angular momentum and energies can dominate the no-capture breakup reaction. This dominating process is reversed at the near-barrier energies.

  9. Buoyancy-driven instabilities induced by chemical reactions in vertical porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarcha, C.; Trevelyan, P. M. J.; de Wit, A.

    2008-11-01

    Classical Rayleigh-Taylor or double diffusive instabilities can be triggered by a simple A+B->C chemical reaction when two miscible solutions each containing one reactant are put in contact in the gravity field. A linear stability analysis of the evolving base state profiles is performed using a quasi-steady state approximation. This allows one to classify the various sources of instabilities as a function of the parameters which are the Rayleigh numbers and the ratio of diffusion coefficients of the chemical species. The resulting nonlinear dynamics due to this chemo-hydrodynamic feedback are then systematically analyzed to highlight how the chemical reaction can trigger or modify the hydrodynamical instabilities. It is also shown to what extent the resulting buoyancy-driven instabilities enhance the total reaction rate. Finally, related experiments are also performed in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell with an acid-base reaction.

  10. Investigation of Shock-Induced Reactions in a Ni+Al Powder Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Eakins, D. E.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2006-07-28

    The shock-compression and reaction response of equi-volumetric micron-scale ({approx}50-60% dense) spherical nickel and aluminum powder mixtures is investigated in the range of the calculated crush-up pressure (P = 0.4 GPa) and up to 6 GPa. Time resolved stress measurements (using PVDF gauges) coupled with VISAR data is used to determine the shock states. Evidence of reaction or lack thereof is inferred by comparing the measured states with calculated Hugoniot state of reaction products based on the ballotechnic model proposed by Bennett and Horie, (Shock Waves 4:127-136). Post-impact micro-structural analysis of recovered material and comparison of calculated and measured product states is used to establish the criterion for reaction occurring in the shock or post-shock states.

  11. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  12. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect

    Delis, D.N.

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A {sup 197}Au + {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  13. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  14. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  15. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  16. Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions at MeV Region based on New Shell-Model Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions at MeV region are evaluated by using new shell model Hamiltonians, which are found to improve the description of spin degrees of freedom in nuclei as well as shell evolutions. The light element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the use of the new reaction cross sections for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He. Possible constraints on the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the neutrino mass hierarchy are pointed out to be imposed by the production yields of {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B. Spin-dipole transition strengths in {sup 16}O and neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 16}O are investigated with the new improved Hamiltonian. The Gamow-Teller transition strength in {sup 56}Ni for the new Hamiltonian, which is more fragmented compared to previous calculations, is found to lead to the enhancement of the production yield of {sup 55}Mn in population III stars.

  17. Modification of structural and magnetic properties of soft magnetic multi-component metallic glass by 80 MeV 16O6+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. N.; Shah, M.; Satalkar, M.; Gehlot, K.; Kulriya, P. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Modak, S. S.; Ghodke, N. L.; Reddy, V. R.; Varga, L. K.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of 80 MeV 16O6+ ion irradiation in amorphous Fe77P8Si3C5Al2Ga1B4 alloy is reported. Electronic energy loss induced modifications in the structural and, magnetic properties were monitored by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), Mössbauer and, magnetic measurements. Broad amorphous hump seen in SXRD patterns reveals the amorphous nature of the studied specimens. Mössbauer measurements suggest that: (a) alignment of atomic spins within ribbon plane, (b) changes in average hyperfine field suggests radiation-induced decrease in the inter atomic distance around Mössbauer (Fe) atom, (c) hyperfine field distribution confirms the presence of non-magnetic elements (e.g. - B, P, C) in the first near-neighbor shell of the Fe atom, thus reducing its magnetic moment, and (d) changes in isomer shift suggests variation in average number of the metalloid near neighbors and their distances. Minor changes in soft magnetic behavior - watt loss and, coercivity after an irradiation dose of 2 × 1013 ions/cm2 suggests prospective application of Fe77P8Si3C5Al2Ga1B4 alloy as core material in accelerators (radio frequency cavities).

  18. Theoretical modeling of yields for proton-induced reactions on natural and enriched molybdenum targets.

    PubMed

    Celler, A; Hou, X; Bénard, F; Ruth, T

    2011-09-01

    Recent acute shortage of medical radioisotopes prompted investigations into alternative methods of production and the use of a cyclotron and ¹⁰⁰Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction has been considered. In this context, the production yields of (99m)Tc and various other radioactive and stable isotopes which will be created in the process have to be investigated, as these may affect the diagnostic outcome and radiation dosimetry in human studies. Reaction conditions (beam and target characteristics, and irradiation and cooling times) need to be optimized in order to maximize the amount of (99m)Tc and minimize impurities. Although ultimately careful experimental verification of these conditions must be performed, theoretical calculations can provide the initial guidance allowing for extensive investigations at little cost. We report the results of theoretically determined reaction yields for (99m)Tc and other radioactive isotopes created when natural and enriched molybdenum targets are irradiated by protons. The cross-section calculations were performed using a computer program EMPIRE for the proton energy range 6-30 MeV. A computer graphical user interface for automatic calculation of production yields taking into account various reaction channels leading to the same final product has been created. The proposed approach allows us to theoretically estimate the amount of (99m)Tc and its ratio relative to (99g)Tc and other radioisotopes which must be considered reaction contaminants, potentially contributing to additional patient dose in diagnostic studies.

  19. Water transport during metamorphic vein formation: the role of reaction-induced pressure buildup during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    At slow-spreading ridges, the extension is accommodated both by an exhumation of mantle rocks and a magmatic input. The heat released during the crystallization of the magmas is evacuated through the hydrothermal circulation transporting high-temperature fluids up to mantle rocks which can be hydrated through a serpentinization reaction. At the millimetre scale, water transport is also accommodated by advection in the highly permeable fracture network typically found in serpentinized peridotites. This high permeability is the consequence of fracturing processes related to lithospheric scale deformation, thermal contraction or a pressure build-up associated with the positive volume increase occurring during the reaction. If the relationship between pressure increase and fracturing has been studied in details, the impact of this pressure increases on the fluid flow is still unclear. Therefore, we used existing data on the texture and composition of serpentine veins (mm to µm scale) found in peridotites to identify the physical processes involved in the transport of water during the reaction. A finite difference model was then developed to investigate the couplings between pressure increase and fluid flow at the scale of the vein. This model will allow us to probe the influence on the reaction of parameters such as the kinetics of the reaction, the geometry and the texture of the veins, the amount of the volume increase, or the external forces.

  20. Convection-Induced Fingering Fronts in the Chlorite-Trithionate Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Wenxiu; Zheng, Ting; Zhao, Yuemin; Gao, Qingyu; Pan, Changwei; Horváth, Attila K

    2016-04-28

    Based upon a former study, the chlorite-trithionate reaction can avoid the side reactions arising from the well-known alkaline decomposition of polythionates, making it a suitable candidate for investigating spatial front instabilities in a reaction-diffusion-convection system. In this work, the chlorite-trithionate reaction was investigated in a Hele-Shaw cell, in which fingering patterns were observed over a wide range of reactant concentrations. A significant density increment crossing the propagating front indicates that the fingering pattern is generated as a consequence of the buoyancy-driven instability due to the density changes of solute when the gap thickness is less than 4 mm. The velocity of the steepest descent in the propagating front depends almost linearly on the gap thickness but displays a saturation-like profile on the trithionate concentration as well as a maximum on the chlorite concentration. Numerical simulation using the Stokes-Brinkman Equation coupled to the reaction-diffusion processes, including hydrogen ion autocatalysis and consumption, reproduces the observed fingering fronts. PMID:27059304

  1. Vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal JB6 P+ cells via hydrogen peroxide-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Ding, M; Leonard, S S; Robinson, V A; Millecchia, L; Zhang, X; Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Shi, X

    1999-12-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism for the control of DNA integrity in mammalian cells. Vanadium induces both DNA damage and apoptosis. It is suggested that vanadium-induced apoptosis serves to eliminate DNA-damaged cells. This study is designed to clarify a role of reactive oxygen species in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by vanadium. We established apoptosis model with murine epidermal JB6 P+ cells in the response to vanadium stimulation. Apoptosis was detected by a cell death ELISA assay and morphological analysis. The result shows that apoptosis induced by vanadate is dose-dependent, reaching its saturation level at a concentration of 100 microM vanadate. Vanadyl (IV) can also induce apoptosis albeit with lesser potency. A role of reactive oxygen species was analyzed by multiple reagents including specific scavengers of different reactive oxygen species. The result shows that vanadate-induced apoptosis is enhanced by NADPH, superoxide dismutase and sodium formate, but was inhibited by catalase and deferoxamine. Cells exposed to vanadium consume more molecular oxygen and at the same time, produce more H2O2 as measured by the change in fluorescence of scopoletin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. This change in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production is enhanced by NADPH. Taken together, these results show that vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal cells and H2O2 induced by vanadate plays a major role in this process. PMID:10705990

  2. Formation of indoor nitrous acid (HONO) by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions with white wall paint.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Vincent; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Alvarez, Elena Gómez; Gandolfo, Adrien; Strekowski, Rafal; Quivet, Etienne; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) represents an oxidant that is present in relatively high concentrations in various indoor settings. Remarkably increased NO2 levels up to 1.5 ppm are associated with homes using gas stoves. The heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with adsorbed water on surfaces lead to the generation of nitrous acid (HONO). Here, we present a HONO source induced by heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with selected indoor paint surfaces in the presence of light (300 nm<λ<400 nm). We demonstrate that the formation of HONO is much more pronounced at elevated relative humidity. In the presence of light (5.5 W m(-2)), an increase of HONO production rate of up to 8.6·10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) was observed at [NO2]=60 ppb and 50% relative humidity (RH). At higher light intensity of 10.6 (W m(-2)), the HONO production rate increased to 2.1·10(10) molecules cm(-2) s(-1). A high NO2 to HONO conversion yield of up to 84% was observed. This result strongly suggests that a light-driven process of indoor HONO production is operational. This work highlights the potential of paint surfaces to generate HONO within indoor environments by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions.

  3. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Junhua; Tuo Fei; Kong Xiangzhong

    2009-05-15

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,n{sup '}{alpha}), (n,t), (n,d{sup '}), and (n,{alpha}) reactions have been measured on tantalum isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.7 MeV using the activation technique. Data are reported for the following reactions: {sup 181}Ta(n,2n){sup 180}Ta{sup g}, {sup 181}Ta(n,p){sup 181}Hf, {sup 181}Ta(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 177}Lu{sup m}, {sup 181}Ta(n,t){sup 179}Hf{sup m2}, {sup 181}Ta(n,d{sup '}){sup 180}Hf{sup m}, and {sup 181}Ta(n,{alpha}){sup 178}Lu{sup m}. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  4. Competition between fusion and quasi-fission in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1986-09-01

    Quantitative analyses of angular distributions and angle-mass correlations have been applied to the U + Ca reaction to obtain upper limit estimates for the cross sections for complete fusion near or below the interaction barrier. Extrapolating to the systems Ca + Cm and Ca + Es using the well established scaling properties of the extra push model, an estimate of the cross sections relevant to the efforts of synthesizing super-heavy elements in the region Z = 116 and N = 184 via heavy-ion fusion reactions are obtained. A simple evaporation calculation using properties of the super heavy elements shows that the failure to observe super-heavy elements with the Ca + Cm reaction is consistent with estimates of the complete fusion process. 33 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Deuteron Induced ( d,p) and ( d,2p) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, M.; Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have shown that the nuclear reactions of charged particles with nuclei are very important in many fields of nuclear physics. The interactions of deuterons with nuclei have been especially the subject of common research in the history of nuclear physics. Moreover, the knowledge of cross section for deuteron-nucleus interactions are required for various application such as space applications, accelerator driven sub-critical systems, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission reactors and controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. Particularly, the future of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors is largely dependent on the nuclear reaction cross section data and the selection of structural fusion materials. Finally, the reaction cross section data of deuteron induced reactions on fusion structural materials are of great importance for development and design of both experimental and commercial fusion devices. In this work, reaction model calculations of the cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on structural fusion materials such as Al ( Aluminium), Ti ( Titanium), Cu ( Copper), Ni ( Nickel), Co ( Cobalt), Fe ( Iron), Zr ( Zirconium), Hf ( Hafnium) and Ta ( Tantalum) have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al( d,2p) 27 Mg, 47 Ti( d,2p) 47 Sc, 65 Cu( d,2p) 65 Ni, 58 Ni( d,2p) 58 Co, 59 Co( d,2p) 59 Fe, 58 Fe( d,p) 59 Fe, 96 Zr( d,p) 97 Zr, 180 Hf ( d,p) 181 Hf and 181 Ta( d,p) 182 Ta have been carried out for incident deuteron energies up to 50 MeV. In these calculations, the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium effects for ( d,p) and ( d,2p) reactions have been investigated. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing ( WE) Model. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the Geometry Dependent Hybrid Model ( GDH) and Hybrid Model. In the calculations the program code ALICE/ASH was used. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the

  6. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (α, p) reactions, and other types of measurements (β-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Li+α/7Be+α resonant scatterings are presented.

  7. Analysis of {alpha}-induced reactions on {sup 151}Eu below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2011-01-15

    Novel measurements of ({alpha},{gamma}) and ({alpha},n) reaction cross sections on the target nucleus {sup 151}Eu, close to the reaction thresholds, support the choice of recently proposed parameters of the {alpha}-particle optical model potential below the Coulomb barrier. A better understanding of the {alpha}-particle optical potential at these energies leads to a statistical model analysis of additional partial cross sections that were measured but not considered within a former model analysis. On this basis we have tentatively assigned a modified J{sup {pi}}=9{sup -} spin and parity to the 22.7-h isomer in {sup 154}Tb.

  8. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  9. The influence of {sup 18}F induced reactions in the hot CNO cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Roberts, A.D.; Jiang, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The contribution of the {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}) reaction to the production of {sup 19}Ne, which is an important isotope in connection with the breakout from the hot CNO cycle, has been investigated in experiments with {sup 18}F beams. Measurements of the cross sections for the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19 }Ne reactions indicate that the contribution of the {sup 18}F(p, {gamma}) route to the formation or {sup 19}Ne is small.

  10. [Hypersensitive reaction after application of heparin with activation heparin induced trombocytopenia in initiation of intermittent haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Masopust, Jan; Charvát, Jiří; Mokrá, Dana; Hloch, Ondřej; Háša, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Our report describes the case of patient with hypersensitive reaction regularly arising early after initiation of haemodialysis. This characteristic reaction with pletoric face coloration, bronchospasm, increase of blood pressure, anxiety and decrease of blood oxygen saturation at the consequence and central cyanosis was regularly present without dependence on type of dialysis membrane, drug premedication or prophylactic flushing haemodialysis system by isotonic natrium chloride solution. Low platelet value and trouble-free haemodialysis realized without heparin showed real cause of patients problem. Resolution of this state was regional citrate anticoagulation during intermitent haemodialysis. PMID:25873123

  11. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  12. Overcoming Strain-Induced Rearrangement Reactions: A Mild Dehydrative Aromatization Protocol for Synthesis of Highly Distorted p-Phenylenes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Nirmal K; Meudom, Rolande; Corzo, Hector H; Gorden, John D; Merner, Bradley L

    2016-03-01

    A series of p-terphenyl-based macrocycles, containing highly distorted p-phenylene units, have been synthesized. Biaryl bonds of the nonplanar p-terphenyl nuclei were constructed in the absence of Pd-catalyzed or Ni-mediated cross-coupling reactions, using 1,4-diketones as surrogates to strained arene units. A streamlined synthetic protocol for the synthesis of 1,4-diketo macrocycles has been developed, using only 2.5 mol % of the Hoveyda-Grubbs second-generation catalyst in both metathesis and transfer hydrogenation reactions. Under protic acid-mediated dehydrative aromatization conditions, the central and most strained benzene ring of the p-terphenyl systems was susceptible to rearrangement reactions. To overcome this, a dehydrative aromatization protocol using the Burgess reagent was developed. Under these conditions, no strain-induced rearrangement reactions occur, delivering p-phenylene units with up to 28.4 kcal/mol strain energy and deformation angles that sum up to 40°.

  13. Nucleon-induced reactions at intermediate energies: New data at 96 MeV and theoretical status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blideanu, V.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lefort, T.; Marie, N.; Ataç, A.; Ban, G.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Dangtip, S.; Elmgren, K.; Eudes, Ph.; Foucher, Y.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Jonsson, O.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Klug, J.; Le Brun, Ch.; Lebrun, C.; Louvel, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nilsson, L.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Rivière, G.; Slypen, I.; Stuttgé, L.; Tippawan, U.; Österlund, M.

    2004-07-01

    Double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production (up to A=4 ) were measured in 96 MeV neutron-induced reactions, at the TSL Laboratory Cyclotron in Uppsala (Sweden). Measurements for three targets, Fe , Pb , and U , were performed using two independent devices, SCANDAL and MEDLEY. The data were recorded with low-energy thresholds and for a wide angular range ( 20° 160° ) . The normalization procedure used to extract the cross sections is based on the np elastic scattering reaction that we measured and for which we present experimental results. A good control of the systematic uncertainties affecting the results is achieved. Calculations using the exciton model are reported. Two different theoretical approaches proposed to improve its predictive power regarding the complex particle emission are tested. The capabilities of each approach is illustrated by comparison with the 96 MeV data that we measured, and with other experimental results available in the literature.

  14. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam {sup 7}Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, M. Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Lay, J. A.; Molini, P.; Soramel, F.; Boiano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Di Meo, P.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Silvestri, R.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Acosta, L.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam {sup 7}Be (S{sub α} = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass ({sup 58}Ni) and heavy ({sup 208}Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×10{sup 5} pps {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  15. Enhancement of Diffusion-Controlled Reaction Rates by Surface-Induced Orientational Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Ambarish; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the means by which immobilization of a substrate on a surface can increase the rate of a diffusion-controlled enzymatic reaction. A quasichemical approach is developed and compared with Brownian dynamics simulations. We use these methods to show that restricting only the orientation of the enzyme by long-range interactions with the surface is sufficient for enhancing catalysis. PMID:16299070

  16. Minimal humanity cues induce neural empathic reactions towards non-human entities.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Jeroen; Meconi, Federica; Sessa, Paola; Olechowski, Mateusz

    2016-08-01

    The present study tested whether the attribution of humanness by means of a minimal humanity cue is sufficient for the occurrence of empathic neural reactions towards non-human entities that are painfully stimulated. Vegetables have been used as a control condition to explore empathy towards humans' pain before. In the context of the present study, they were given a minimal humanity cue (i.e., a human name) or not (i.e., an adjective). Human associations with these different types of vegetables were measured and where either represented: pricked by a needle (painful condition) or touched by a Q-tip (touch condition) while recording electroencephalographic activity from a sample of 18 healthy students. Event-related potentials (ERP) indicated that those participants classified as high humanizers, showed an increased neural reaction when vegetables with a name were painfully rather than neutrally stimulated compared to vegetables without a name. These reactions occurred both in an early (P2: 130-180 ms) and a later (P3: 360-540 ms) ERP time-window. Moreover, this differential reaction on the P3 significantly correlated with participants' explicit empathic tendencies. Overall, these findings suggest that empathy can be triggered for non-human entities as long as they are seen as minimally human. PMID:27288560

  17. Genetic factors in the predisposition to drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-02-03

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur with most drugs, although the frequency, severity, and clinical manifestations vary. Case reports have suggested that there may be familial clustering of drug hypersensitivity suggesting a genetic predisposition. As with most other forms of drug response, predisposition to drug hypersensitivity reactions is likely to be multifactorial and multigenic. Given the immune pathogenesis of these reactions, it is perhaps not surprising that the most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex for drugs such as abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. For abacavir, it has been suggested that preprescription genotyping for HLA-B*5701 in whites may reduce the incidence of hypersensitivity. It is likely that as our knowledge of variation in the human genome improves, coupled with improvements in technology, many more significant genetic predisposing factors for drug hypersensitivity are likely to be identified in the next decade. However, as we search for these genetic factors, it is important that we do not forget environmental predisposition, and to bear in mind that a genetic marker for drug hypersensitivity in one population may not necessarily be relevant for another population. Notwithstanding the advances in genetic technologies, the ultimate determinant of success in this area of research will be the identification and careful phenotyping of patients with drug hypersensitivity reactions. As we progress to whole genome scanning, in order to satisfy the requirements for adequate statistical power, the identification of large numbers of carefully phenotyped patients will be feasible only through international collaborations.

  18. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  19. Shear Induced Reaction Localizations and Mechanisms of Energy Dissipation in PBX Subjected to Strong Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor

    2007-06-01

    Paper addresses two emerging topics: how reaction initiation arises when PBX is subjected to shock and how detonation wave becomes oscillating. We apply the 96-channel optical analyzer for simultaneous measurements of radiation from the reaction spots surface and stress field caused by shock or detonation reaction zone in multi-layer optical monitor. This metrology allows meso-scale probing of the 3-D structure of shock- or detonation- reaction-zone as well as revealing mechanisms of its formation at different initiation scenarios. The dominant role of the shear driven plastic deformation in initiation scenario is disclosed in all tested PBX-s (including simulants of PBXN-110, PBAN-128, PBXN-109, 111, 121 and B-2208), in wide range of PBX sample sizes: from 1 mm^3 (single crystal within the binder) up to few cm^3. This research is complementing a separate, longer running, theoretical effort by Dr. Steve Coffey that examines the solid state--quantum physics responsible for initiation of explosive crystals subjected to shock or impact. Finally, this represents a novel research effort to relate plastic deformation, energy dissipation and localization in crystals to shear and shear deformation. The accompanying experimental results strongly support Coffey's theoretical prediction that initiation is due to shear driven plastic deformation and is not due solely to uniform shock pressure. Finally, we will present and discuss the recently revealed phenomenon of the thermal precursor origination caused by the reaction front radiation. The role of this earlier unknown energy localization mechanism, at Shock-to-Detonation transition in PBX, will be shown as a function of HMX particle sizes and the PBX porosity.

  20. Separation of carrier-free hafnium and lutetium radionuclides produced in 16O activated terbium metal target.

    PubMed

    Lahir, S; Banerjee, K; Nayak, D; Ramaswami, A; Das, N R

    2000-06-01

    Charged particle activation with approximately 88 MeV 16O7+ beam on natural terbium metal foil leads to the production of the short lived carrier-free radioisotopes 170,171Ta and their corresponding daughter products 170,171Hf and 170,171Lu in the target matrix. Liquid-liquid extraction with HDEHP diluted in cyclohexane was carried out for the separation of 170,171Hf and 170,171Lu from the bulk terbium in an aqueous HCl medium.