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Sample records for 16s mtdna lineage

  1. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I. Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The ‘p’ values are distinctly different from intraspecific ‘p’ distance (0–0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus – B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  2. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  3. mtDNA variation in the Yanomami: evidence for additional New World founding lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Easton, R. D.; Merriwether, D. A.; Crews, D. E.; Ferrell, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Native Americans have been classified into four founding haplogroups with as many as seven founding lineages based on mtDNA RFLPs and DNA sequence data. mtDNA analysis was completed for 83 Yanomami from eight villages in the Surucucu and Catrimani Plateau regions of Roraima in northwestern Brazil. Samples were typed for 15 polymorphic mtDNA sites (14 RFLP sites and 1 deletion site), and a subset was sequenced for both hypervariable regions of the mitochondrial D-loop. Substantial mitochondrial diversity was detected among the Yanomami, five of seven accepted founding haplotypes and three others were observed. Of the 83 samples, 4 (4.8%) were lineage B1, 1 (1.2%) was lineage B2, 31 (37.4%) were lineage C1, 29 (34.9%) were lineage C2, 2 (2.4%) were lineage D1, 6 (7.2%) were lineage D2, 7 (8.4%) were a haplotype we designated "X6," and 3 (3.6%) were a haplotype we designated "X7." Sequence analysis found 43 haplotypes in 50 samples. B2, X6, and X7 are previously unrecognized mitochondrial founding lineage types of Native Americans. The widespread distribution of these haplotypes in the New World and Asia provides support for declaring these lineages to be New World founding types. PMID:8659527

  4. mtDNA variation in the Yanomami: evidence for additional New World founding lineages.

    PubMed

    Easton, R D; Merriwether, D A; Crews, D E; Ferrell, R E

    1996-07-01

    Native Americans have been classified into four founding haplogroups with as many as seven founding lineages based on mtDNA RFLPs and DNA sequence data. mtDNA analysis was completed for 83 Yanomami from eight villages in the Surucucu and Catrimani Plateau regions of Roraima in northwestern Brazil. Samples were typed for 15 polymorphic mtDNA sites (14 RFLP sites and 1 deletion site), and a subset was sequenced for both hypervariable regions of the mitochondrial D-loop. Substantial mitochondrial diversity was detected among the Yanomami, five of seven accepted founding haplotypes and three others were observed. Of the 83 samples, 4 (4.8%) were lineage B1, 1 (1.2%) was lineage B2, 31 (37.4%) were lineage C1, 29 (34.9%) were lineage C2, 2 (2.4%) were lineage D1, 6 (7.2%) were lineage D2, 7 (8.4%) were a haplotype we designated "X6," and 3 (3.6%) were a haplotype we designated "X7." Sequence analysis found 43 haplotypes in 50 samples. B2, X6, and X7 are previously unrecognized mitochondrial founding lineage types of Native Americans. The widespread distribution of these haplotypes in the New World and Asia provides support for declaring these lineages to be New World founding types.

  5. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  6. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Sicilian goats reveals a new mtDNA lineage.

    PubMed

    Sardina, M T; Ballester, M; Marmi, J; Finocchiaro, R; van Kaam, J B C H M; Portolano, B; Folch, J M

    2006-08-01

    The mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequence of 67 goats belonging to the Girgentana, Maltese and Derivata di Siria breeds was partially sequenced in order to present the first phylogenetic characterization of Sicilian goat breeds. These sequences were compared with published sequences of Indian and Pakistani domestic goats and wild goats. Mitochondrial lineage A was observed in most of the Sicilian goats. However, three Girgentana haplotypes were highly divergent from the Capra hircus clade, indicating that a new mtDNA lineage in domestic goats was found.

  8. Two distinct mtDNA lineages among captive African penguins in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murata, Michiko; Murakami, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    The African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is one of the world's most endangered seabirds. In Japan, although the number of African penguins in captivity continues to increase, genetic data have not been collected for either wild or captive populations. To reveal genetic diversity and characterization in captive African penguins, we analyzed the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a sample of 236 African penguins. Analysis of 433 bp of the control region and 1,140 bp of cytochrome b sequences revealed the existence of two mtDNA clades. Control region haplotypes were much more divergent (d=3.39%) between the two clades than within each clade. The divergence of these clades may reflect differences at the subspecies or geographical population level in African penguins. These findings suggest that at least two distinct maternal lineages exist in the wild populations of the African penguin.

  9. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Ancient substructure in early mtDNA lineages of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Rocha, Jorge; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-02-07

    Among the deepest-rooting clades in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny are the haplogroups defined as L0d and L0k, which are found primarily in southern Africa. These lineages are typically present at high frequency in the so-called Khoisan populations of hunter-gatherers and herders who speak non-Bantu languages, and the early divergence of these lineages led to the hypothesis of ancient genetic substructure in Africa. Here we update the phylogeny of the basal haplogroups L0d and L0k with 500 full mtDNA genome sequences from 45 southern African Khoisan and Bantu-speaking populations. We find previously unreported subhaplogroups and greatly extend the amount of variation and time-depth of most of the known subhaplogroups. Our major finding is the definition of two ancient sublineages of L0k (L0k1b and L0k2) that are present almost exclusively in Bantu-speaking populations from Zambia; the presence of such relic haplogroups in Bantu speakers is most probably due to contact with ancestral pre-Bantu populations that harbored different lineages than those found in extant Khoisan. We suggest that although these populations went extinct after the immigration of the Bantu-speaking populations, some traces of their haplogroup composition survived through incorporation into the gene pool of the immigrants. Our findings thus provide evidence for deep genetic substructure in southern Africa prior to the Bantu expansion that is not represented in extant Khoisan populations.

  11. Rampant Nuclear Insertion of mtDNA across Diverse Lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J.; Whiting, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  12. Rampant nuclear insertion of mtDNA across diverse lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J; Whiting, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies.

  13. Diversification of sympatric Sapromyza (Diptera: Lauxaniidae) from Madeira: six morphological species but only four mtDNA lineages.

    PubMed

    Pestano, José; Brown, Richard P; Suárez, Nicolás M; Báez, Marcos

    2003-06-01

    A series of recent studies on speciation of insects within the Canary Islands have indicated considerable within-island diversification, similar to that described in the Hawaiian islands. Little work has yet been carried out on the neighboring Madeiran archipelago, which is also volcanic. This study examines relationships among all known Lauxaniid flies of the genus Sapromyza from Madeira (including six newly described morphological species) based on mitochondrial gene trees constructed from cytochrome c oxidase (subunit I) and 16S rRNA partial sequences. Phylogenies based on maximum likelihood distances, a Bayesian method based on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling from the posterior probability distribution, and maximum parsimony show that eight of the nine Madeiran species comprise a single monophyletic group. This clade is also split into two subclades representing black- and yellow/orange-bodied forms. The latter mtDNA clade corresponds to only two species (Sapromyza imitans and Sapromyza indigena) which are not reciprocally monophyletic. Monophyly is strongly supported within four of the six black-bodied species but not for the species pair (Sapromyza inconspicua, Sapromyza laurisilvae). We discuss the double occurrence (at least) of introgressive hybridization/incomplete lineage sorting within this group and suggest that recent speciation is the most likely explanation. The remaining species on the island, Sapromyza madeirensis, is very divergent from the aforementioned group, occupying a more basal position in the tree than the other Atlantic island and continental Sapromyza that were included in the analysis. At least two speciation events for Madeiran Sapromyza appear to correspond to quite ancient periods relative to the age of the island, while others are more recent. This suggests that a combination of island colonization and within-island sympatric and/or vicariance-mediated speciation may explain the observed diversity.

  14. mtDNA history of the Cayapa Amerinds of Ecuador: detection of additional founding lineages for the Native American populations.

    PubMed Central

    Rickards, O; Martínez-Labarga, C; Lum, J K; De Stefano, G F; Cann, R L

    1999-01-01

    mtDNA variation in the Cayapa, an Ecuadorian Amerindian tribe belonging to the Chibcha-Paezan linguistic branch, was analyzed by use of hypervariable control regions I and II along with two linked regions undergoing insertion/deletion mutations. Three major maternal lineage clusters fit into the A, B, and C founding groups first described by Schurr and colleagues in 1990, whereas a fourth lineage, apparently unique to the Cayapa, has ambiguous affinity to known clusters. The time of divergence from a common maternal ancestor of the four lineage groups is of sufficient age that it indicates an origin in Asia and supports the hypothesis that the degree of variability carried by the Asian ancestral populations into the New World was rather high. Spatial autocorrelation analysis points out (a) statistically significant nonrandom distributions of the founding lineages in the Americas, because of north-south population movements that have occurred since the first Asian migrants spread through Beringia into the Americas, and (b) an unusual pattern associated with the D lineage cluster. The values of haplotype and nucleotide diversity that are displayed by the Cayapa appear to differ from those observed in other Chibchan populations but match those calculated for South American groups belonging to various linguistic stocks. These data, together with the results of phylogenetic analysis performed with the Amerinds of Central and South America, highlight the difficulty in the identification of clear coevolutionary patterns between linguistic and genetic relationships in particular human populations. PMID:10417294

  15. European Y-chromosomal lineages in Polynesians: a contrast to the population structure revealed by mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hurles, M E; Irven, C; Nicholson, J; Taylor, P G; Santos, F R; Loughlin, J; Jobling, M A; Sykes, B C

    1998-01-01

    We have used Y-chromosomal polymorphisms to trace paternal lineages in Polynesians by use of samples previously typed for mtDNA variants. A genealogical approach utilizing hierarchical analysis of eight rare-event biallelic polymorphisms, seven microsatellite loci, and internal structural analysis of the hypervariable minisatellite, MSY1, has been used to define three major paternal-lineage clusters in Polynesians. Two of these clusters, both defined by novel MSY1 modular structures and representing 55% of the Polynesians studied, are also found in coastal Papua New Guinea. Reduced Polynesian diversity, relative to that in Melanesians, is illustrated by the presence of several examples of identical MSY1 codes and microsatellite haplotypes within these lineage clusters in Polynesians. The complete lack of Y chromosomes having the M4 base substitution in Polynesians, despite their prevalence (64%) in Melanesians, may also be a result of the multiple bottleneck events during the colonization of this region of the world. The origin of the M4 mutation has been dated by use of two independent methods based on microsatellite-haplotype and minisatellite-code diversity. Because of the wide confidence limits on the mutation rates of these loci, the M4 mutation cannot be conclusively dated relative to the colonization of Polynesia, 3,000 years ago. The other major lineage cluster found in Polynesians, defined by a base substitution at the 92R7 locus, represents 27% of the Polynesians studied and, most probably, originates in Europe. This is the first Y-chromosomal evidence of major European admixture with indigenous Polynesian populations and contrasts sharply with the picture given by mtDNA evidence. PMID:9837833

  16. A new mtDNA COI gene lineage near An. janconnae of the Albitarsis Complex from Caribbean Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Lina A; Orrego, Lina M; Gómez, Giovan F; López, Andrés; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E; Correa, Margarita M

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the taxonomic status and vector distribution of anophelines is crucial to malaria control efforts. Previous phylogenetic analyses have supported the description of six species of the Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) albitarsis s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae): Anopheles albitarsis, An. deaneorum, An. marajoara, An. oryzalimnetes, An. janconnae and An. albitarsis F. To evaluate the taxonomic status of An. albitarsis s.l. mosquitoes collected in various localities of the Colombian Caribbean region, specimens were analyzed using the complete mtDNA Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) gene, the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and partial nuclear DNA White gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of the COI sequences detected a new lineage near An. janconnae in the Caribbean region of Colombia and determined its position relative to the other members of the complex. However, the ITS2 and White gene sequences lacked resolution to support a new lineage near An. janconnae or the An. janconnae clade. Nothing is known about the possible involvement in malaria transmission in Colombia of this new lineage, but its phylogenetic closeness to Anopheles janconnae, which has been incriminated in local malaria transmission in Brazil, is provocative. PMID:21225199

  17. Causes and Consequences of Rapidly Evolving mtDNA in a Plant Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Paul; Miller, Christopher M.; Bazos, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms of coevolution between nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genomes is a defining challenge in eukaryotic genetics. The angiosperm genus Silene is a natural system to investigate the causes and consequences of mt mutation rate variation because closely related species have highly divergent rates. In Silene species with fast-evolving mtDNA, nuclear genes that encode mitochondrially targeted proteins (N-mt genes) are also fast-evolving. This correlation could indicate positive selection to compensate for mt mutations, but might also result from a recent relaxation of selection. To differentiate between these interpretations, we used phylogenetic and population-genetic methods to test for positive and relaxed selection in three classes of N-mt genes (oxidative phosphorylation genes, ribosomal genes, and “RRR” genes involved in mtDNA recombination, replication, and repair). In all three classes, we found that species with fast-evolving mtDNA had: 1) elevated dN/dS, 2) an excess of nonsynonymous divergence relative to levels of intraspecific polymorphism, which is a signature of positive selection, and 3) no clear signals of relaxed selection. “Control” genes exhibited comparatively few signs of positive selection. These results suggest that high mt mutation rates can create selection on N-mt genes and that relaxed selection is an unlikely cause of recent accelerations in the evolution of N-mt genes. Because mt-RRR genes were found to be under positive selection, it is unlikely that elevated mt mutation rates in Silene were caused by inactivation of these mt-RRR genes. Therefore, the causes of extreme increases in angiosperm mt mutation rates remain uncertain. PMID:28164243

  18. The earliest settlers' antiquity and evolutionary history of Indian populations: evidence from M2 mtDNA lineage

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The "out of Africa" model postulating single "southern route" dispersal posits arrival of "Anatomically Modern Human" to Indian subcontinent around 66–70 thousand years before present (kyBP). However the contributions and legacy of these earliest settlers in contemporary Indian populations, owing to the complex past population dynamics and later migrations has been an issue of controversy. The high frequency of mitochondrial lineage "M2" consistent with its greater age and distribution suggests that it may represent the phylogenetic signature of earliest settlers. Accordingly, we attempted to re-evaluate the impact and contribution of earliest settlers in shaping the genetic diversity and structure of contemporary Indian populations; using our newly sequenced 72 and 4 published complete mitochondrial genomes of this lineage. Results The M2 lineage, harbouring two deep rooting subclades M2a and M2b encompasses approximately one tenth of the mtDNA pool of studied tribes. The phylogeographic spread and diversity indices of M2 and its subclades among the tribes of different geographic regions and linguistic phyla were investigated in detail. Further the reconstructed demographic history of M2 lineage as a surrogate of earliest settlers' component revealed that the demographic events with pronounced regional variations had played pivotal role in shaping the complex net of populations phylogenetic relationship in Indian subcontinent. Conclusion Our results suggest that tribes of southern and eastern region along with Dravidian and Austro-Asiatic speakers of central India are the modern representatives of earliest settlers of subcontinent. The Last Glacial Maximum aridity and post LGM population growth mechanised some sort of homogeneity and redistribution of earliest settlers' component in India. The demic diffusion of agriculture and associated technologies around 3 kyBP, which might have marginalized hunter-gatherer, is coincidental with the decline of

  19. A melting pot of multicontinental mtDNA lineages in admixed Venezuelans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Ignacio-Veiga, Ana; Alvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Pastoriza-Mourelle, Ana; Ruíz, Yarimar; Pineda, Lennie; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of Europeans in Colonial and post-Colonial times coupled with the forced introduction of sub-Saharan Africans have dramatically changed the genetic background of Venezuela. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate, through the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, the extent of admixture and the characterization of the most likely continental ancestral sources of present-day urban Venezuelans. We analyzed two admixed populations that have experienced different demographic histories, namely, Caracas (n = 131) and Pueblo Llano (n = 219). The native American component of admixed Venezuelans accounted for 80% (46% haplogroup [hg] A2, 7% hg B2, 21% hg C1, and 6% hg D1) of all mtDNAs; while the sub-Saharan and European contributions made up ∼10% each, indicating that Trans-Atlantic immigrants have only partially erased the native American nature of Venezuelans. A Bayesian-based model allowed the different contributions of European countries to admixed Venezuelans to be disentangled (Spain: ∼38.4%, Portugal: ∼35.5%, Italy: ∼27.0%), in good agreement with the documented history. Seventeen entire mtDNA genomes were sequenced, which allowed five new native American branches to be discovered. B2j and B2k, are supported by two different haplotypes and control region data, and their coalescence ages are 3.9 k.y. (95% C.I. 0-7.8) and 2.6 k.y. (95% C.I. 0.1-5.2), respectively. The other clades were exclusively observed in Pueblo Llano and they show the fingerprint of strong recent genetic drift coupled with severe historical consanguinity episodes that might explain the high prevalence of certain Mendelian and complex multi-factorial diseases in this region.

  20. Forensic and phylogeographic characterisation of mtDNA lineages from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Martin; Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander W; Zimmermann, Bettina; Rockenbauer, Eszter; Hansen, Anders J; Parson, Walther; Morling, Niels

    2012-07-01

    The African mitochondrial (mt) phylogeny is coarsely resolved but the majority of population data generated so far is limited to the analysis of the first hypervariable segment (HVS-1) of the control region (CR). Therefore, this study aimed on the investigation of the entire CR of 190 unrelated Somali individuals to enrich the severely underrepresented African mtDNA pool. The majority (60.5 %) of the haplotypes were of sub-Saharan origin with L0a1d, L2a1h and L3f being the most frequently observed haplogroups. This is in sharp contrast to previous data reported from the Y-chromosome, where only about 5 % of the observed haplogroups were of sub-Saharan provenance. We compared the genetic distances based on population pairwise F (st) values between 11 published East, Central and North African as well as western Asian populations and the Somali sequences and displayed them in a multi-dimensional scaling plot. Genetic proximity evidenced by clustering roughly reflected the relative geographic location of the populations. The sequences will be included in the EMPOP database ( www.empop.org ) under accession number EMP00397 upon publication (Parson and Dür Forensic Sci Int Genet 1:88-92, 2007).

  1. Is homoplasy or lineage sorting the source of incongruent mtdna and nuclear gene trees in the stiff-tailed ducks (Nomonyx-Oxyura)?

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kevin; Sorenson, Michael

    2005-02-01

    We evaluated the potential effects of homoplasy, ancestral polymorphism, and hybridization as obstacles to resolving phylogenetic relationships within Nomonyx-Oxyura stiff-tailed ducks (Oxyurinae; subtribe Oxyurina). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 94 individuals supported monophyly of mtDNA haplotypes for each of the six species and provided no evidence of extant incomplete lineage sorting or inter-specific hybridization. The ruddy ducks (O. j. jamaicensis,O. j. andina, O. j. ferruginea) are each others' closest relatives, but the lack of shared haplotypes between O. j. jamaicensis and O. j. ferruginea suggests long-standing historical isolation. In contrast, O. j. andina shares haplotypes with O. j. jamaicensis and O. j. ferruginea, which supports Todd's (1979) and Fjeldså's (1986) hypothesis that O. j. andina is an intergrade or hybrid subspecies of O. j. jamaicensis and O. j. ferruginea. Control region data and a much larger data set composed of approximately 8800 base pairs of mitochondrial and nuclear sequence for each species indicate that the two New World species, O. vittata and O. jamaicensis, branch basally within Oxyura. A clade of three Old World species (O. australis, O. maccoa, O. leucocephala) is well supported, but different loci and also different characters within the mtDNA data support three different resolutions of the Old World clade, yielding an essentially unresolved trichotomy. Fundamentally different factors limited the resolution of the mtDNA and nuclear gene trees. Gene trees for most nuclear loci were unresolved due to slow rates of mutation and a lack of informative variation, whereas uncertain resolution of the mtDNA gene tree was due to homoplasy. Within the mtDNA, approximately equal numbers of characters supported each of three possible resolutions. Parametric and nonparametric bootstrap analyses suggest that resolution of the mtDNA tree based on ~4300 bp per taxon is uncertain but that complete mtDNA

  2. Variability in triactinomyxon production from Tubifex tubifex populations from the same mitochondrial DNA lineage infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Zickovich, J.; Winton, J.R.; Kerans, B.L.

    2008-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, infects both salmonid fish and an aquatic oligochaete, Tubifex tubifex. Although M. cerebralis has been detected in river drainages throughout the United States, disease severity among wild fish populations has been highly variable. Tubifex tubifex populations have been genetically characterized using sequences from the 16S mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Our earlier work indicated that large differences in compatibility between the parasite and populations of T. tubifex may play a substantial role in the distribution of whirling disease and resulting mortality in different watersheds. In the present study, we examined 4 laboratory populations of T. tubifex belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage III and 1 population belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage I for triactinomyxon (TAM) production after infection with M. cerebralis myxospores. All 4 16S mtDNA lineage III populations produced TAMs, but statistically significant differences in TAM production were observed. Most individuals in the 16S mtDNA lineage III-infected populations produced TAMs. The 16S mtDNA lineage I population produced few TAMs. Further genetic characterization of the 16S mtDNA lineage III populations with RAPD markers indicated that populations producing similar levels of TAMs had more genetic similarity. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  3. Diversity of mtDNA lineages in Portugal: not a genetic edge of European variation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L; Prata, M J; Amorim, A

    2000-11-01

    The analysis of the hypervariable regions I and II of mitochondrial DNA in Portugal showed that this Iberian population presents a higher level of diversity than some neighbouring populations. The classification of the different sequences into haplogroups revealed the presence of all the most important European haplogroups, including those that expanded through Europe in the Palaeolithic, and those whose expansion has occurred during the Neolithic. Additionally a rather distinct African influence was detected in this Portuguese survey, as signalled by the distributions of haplogroups U6 and L, present at higher frequencies than those usually reported in Iberian populations. The geographical distributions of both haplogroups were quite different, with U6 being restricted to North Portugal whereas L was widespread all over the country. This seems to point to different population movements as the main contributors for the two haplogroup introductions. We hypothesise that the recent Black African slave trade could have been the mediator of most of the L sequence inputs, while the population movement associated with the Muslim rule of Iberia has predominantly introduced U6 lineages.

  4. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. MtDNA Haplogroup A10 Lineages in Bronze Age Samples Suggest That Ancient Autochthonous Human Groups Contributed to the Specificity of the Indigenous West Siberian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, Aleksandr S.; Trapezov, Rostislav O.; Zhuravlev, Anton A.; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Romaschenko, Aida G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The craniometric specificity of the indigenous West Siberian human populations cannot be completely explained by the genetic interactions of the western and eastern Eurasian groups recorded in the archaeology of the area from the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC. Anthropologists have proposed another probable explanation: contribution to the genetic structure of West Siberian indigenous populations by ancient human groups, which separated from western and eastern Eurasian populations before the final formation of their phenotypic and genetic features and evolved independently in the region over a long period of time. This hypothesis remains untested. From the genetic point of view, it could be confirmed by the presence in the gene pool of indigenous populations of autochthonous components that evolved in the region over long time periods. The detection of such components, particularly in the mtDNA gene pool, is crucial for further clarification of early regional genetic history. Results and Conclusion We present the results of analysis of mtDNA samples (n = 10) belonging to the A10 haplogroup, from Bronze Age populations of West Siberian forest-steppe (V—I millennium BC), that were identified in a screening study of a large diachronic sample (n = 96). A10 lineages, which are very rare in modern Eurasian populations, were found in all the Bronze Age groups under study. Data on the A10 lineages’ phylogeny and phylogeography in ancient West Siberian and modern Eurasian populations suggest that A10 haplogroup underwent a long-term evolution in West Siberia or arose there autochthonously; thus, the presence of A10 lineages indicates the possible contribution of early autochthonous human groups to the genetic specificity of modern populations, in addition to contributions of later interactions of western and eastern Eurasian populations. PMID:25950581

  6. West Eurasian mtDNA lineages in India: an insight into the spread of the Dravidian language and the origins of the caste system.

    PubMed

    Palanichamy, Malliya Gounder; Mitra, Bikash; Zhang, Cai-Ling; Debnath, Monojit; Li, Gui-Mei; Wang, Hua-Wei; Agrawal, Suraksha; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-06-01

    There is no indication from the previous mtDNA studies that west Eurasian-specific subclades have evolved within India and played a role in the spread of languages and the origins of the caste system. To address these issues, we have screened 14,198 individuals (4208 from this study) and analyzed 112 mitogenomes (41 new sequences) to trace west Eurasian maternal ancestry. This has led to the identification of two autochthonous subhaplogroups--HV14a1 and U1a1a4, which are likely to have originated in the Dravidian-speaking populations approximately 10.5-17.9 thousand years ago (kya). The carriers of these maternal lineages might have settled in South India during the time of the spread of the Dravidian language. In addition to this, we have identified several subsets of autochthonous U7 lineages, including U7a1, U7a2b, U7a3, U7a6, U7a7, and U7c, which seem to have originated particularly in the higher-ranked caste populations in relatively recent times (2.6-8.0 kya with an average of 5.7 kya). These lineages have provided crucial clues to the differentiation of the caste system that has occurred during the recent past and possibly, this might have been influenced by the Indo-Aryan migration. The remaining west Eurasian lineages observed in the higher-ranked caste groups, like the Brahmins, were found to cluster with populations who possibly arrived from west Asia during more recent times.

  7. Less pollen-mediated gene flow for more signatures of glacial lineages: congruent evidence from balsam fir cpDNA and mtDNA for multiple refugia in eastern and central North America.

    PubMed

    Cinget, Benjamin; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data) and 75 populations (cpDNA data) was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only), but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen), indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed.

  8. Less Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow for More Signatures of Glacial Lineages: Congruent Evidence from Balsam Fir cpDNA and mtDNA for Multiple Refugia in Eastern and Central North America

    PubMed Central

    Cinget, Benjamin; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data) and 75 populations (cpDNA data) was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only), but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen), indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed. PMID:25849816

  9. Molecular systematics of the genus Troglophilus (Rhaphidophoridae, Orthoptera) in Turkey: mitochondrial 16S rDNA evidences

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Russo, Claudio Di; Rampini, Mauro; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study focuses on the evolutionary relationships among Turkish species of the cave cricket genus Troglophilus.Fifteen populations were studied for sequence variation in a fragment (543 base pairs) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 16S rDNA gene (16S) to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history. Genetic data retrieved three main clades and at least three divergent lineages that could not be attributed to any of the taxa known for the area. Molecular time estimates suggest that the diversification of the group took place between the Messinian and the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:23653493

  10. Genetic diversity, paraphyly and incomplete lineage sorting of mtDNA, ITS2 and microsatellite flanking region in closely related Heliopora species (Octocorallia).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Nina; Taquet, Coralie; Nagai, Satoshi; Fortes, Miguel; Fan, Tung-Yung; Harii, Saki; Yoshida, Terutoyo; Sito, Yuta; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Examining genetic diversity and lineage sorting of different genes in closely related species provide useful information for phylogenetic analyses and ultimately for understanding the origins of biodiversity. In this study, we examined inter- and intraspecific genetic variation in internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), partial mitochondrial gene (mtMutS), and nuclear microsatellite flanking region in two closely related octocoral species (Heliopora coerulea, HC-A and HC-B). These species were recently identified in a population genetic study using microsatellite markers. The two species have different reproductive timing, which ecologically promotes lineage sorting. In this study, we examined whether species boundaries could be detected by the commonly used nuclear ITS2 and mtMutS, as well as by possibly neutral microsatellite flanking sequences. Haplotype network analysis of microsatellite flanking region revealed that a possible ancestral haplotype was still shared between the two species, indicating on-going lineage sorting. Haplotype network analysis of ITS2 and microsatellite flanking region revealed shared haplotypes between the two lineages. The two species shared fewer ITS2 sequences than microsatellite flanking region sequences. The almost fixed point mutation at the tip of helix 3 of ITS2 was not associated with the secondary structure or compensatory base changes (CBCs). The phylogenetic tree of ITS2 showed paraphyly and that of the microsatellite flanking region indicated that lineage sorting for the two species may be incomplete. Much higher intra- and inter-individual variation of ITS2 was observed in HC-B than that in HC-A, highlighting the importance of examining ITS2 from multiple individuals to estimate genetic diversity. The mitochondrial mtMutS gene sequences from 39 individuals, including both species collected from Japan and Taiwan, showed no variation because of slow rates of mitochondrial nucleotide substitution. This study suggests caution

  11. Diversity and distribution of white-tailed deer mtdna lineages in chronic wasting disease (cwd) outbreak areas in southern wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.G.; Robinson, S.J.; Samuel, M.D.; Grear, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity among populations in the CWD management zone of southern Wisconsin. A 576-base-pair region of the mitochondrial DNA of 359 white-tailed deer from 12 sample populations was analyzed. Fifty-eight variable sites were detected within the sequence, defining 43 haplotypes. While most sample populations displayed similar levels of haplotype diversity, individual haplotypes were clustered on the landscape. Spatial clusters of different haplotypes were apparent in distinct ecoregions surrounding CWD outbreak areas. The spatial distribution of mtDNA haplotypes suggests that clustering of the deer matrilineal groups and population connectivity are associated with broad-scale geographic landscape features. These landscape characteristics may also influence the contact rates between groups and therefore the potential spread of CWD; this may be especially true of local disease spread between female social groups. Our results suggest that optimal CWD management needs to be tailored to fit gender-specific dispersal behaviors and regional differences in deer population connectivity. This information will help wildlife managers design surveillance and monitoring efforts based on population interactions and potential deer movement among CWD-affected and unaffected areas. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Diversity and distribution of white-tailed deer mtDNA lineages in chronic wasting disease (CWD) outbreak areas in southern Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kip G; Robinson, Stacie J; Samuel, Michael D; Grear, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity among populations in the CWD management zone of southern Wisconsin. A 576-base-pair region of the mitochondrial DNA of 359 white-tailed deer from 12 sample populations was analyzed. Fifty-eight variable sites were detected within the sequence, defining 43 haplotypes. While most sample populations displayed similar levels of haplotype diversity, individual haplotypes were clustered on the landscape. Spatial clusters of different haplotypes were apparent in distinct ecoregions surrounding CWD outbreak areas. The spatial distribution of mtDNA haplotypes suggests that clustering of the deer matrilineal groups and population connectivity are associated with broad-scale geographic landscape features. These landscape characteristics may also influence the contact rates between groups and therefore the potential spread of CWD; this may be especially true of local disease spread between female social groups. Our results suggest that optimal CWD management needs to be tailored to fit gender-specific dispersal behaviors and regional differences in deer population connectivity. This information will help wildlife managers design surveillance and monitoring efforts based on population interactions and potential deer movement among CWD-affected and unaffected areas.

  13. Evidence of at least two evolutionary lineages in Melipona subnitida (Apidae, Meliponini) suggested by mtDNA variability and geometric morphometrics of forewings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Vanessa; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Franco, Fernando Faria; Francoy, Tiago Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Melipona subnitida, a tropical stingless bee, is an endemic species of the Brazilian northeast and exhibits great potential for honey and pollen production in addition to its role as one of the main pollinators of the Caatinga biome. To understand the genetic structure and better assist in the conservation of this species, we characterized the population variability of M. subnitida using geometric morphometrics of the forewing and cytochrome c oxidase I gene fragment sequencing. We collected workers from six localities in the northernmost distribution. Both methodologies indicated that the variability among the sampled populations is related both to the environment in which samples were collected and the geographical distance between the sampling sites, indicating that differentiation among the populations is due to the existence of at least evolutionary lineages. Molecular clock data suggest that this differentiation may have begun in the middle Pleistocene, approximately 396 kya. The conservation of all evolutionary lineages is important since they can present differential resistance to environmental changes, as resistance to drought and diseases.

  14. Association of low race performance with mtDNA haplogroup L3b of Australian thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Davie, Allan; Zhou, Shi; Wen, Li; Meng, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Aladaer, Qimude; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wu-Jun; Yao, Xin-Kui

    2017-01-27

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes the genes for respiratory chain sub-units that determine the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine if there were any haplogroups and variants in mtDNA that could be associated with athletic performance of Thoroughbred horses. The whole mitochondrial genomes of 53 maternally unrelated Australian Thoroughbred horses were sequenced and an association study was performed with the competition histories of 1123 horses within their maternal lineages. A horse mtDNA phylogenetic tree was constructed based on a total of 195 sequences (including 142 from previous reports). The association analysis showed that the sample groups with poor racing performance history were enriched in haplogroup L3b (p = .0003) and its sub-haplogroup L3b1a (p = .0007), while those that had elite performance appeared to be not significantly associated with haplogroups G2 and L3a1a1a (p > .05). Haplogroup L3b and L3b1a bear two and five specific variants of which variant T1458C (site 345 in 16s rRNA) is the only potential functional variant. Furthermore, secondary reconstruction of 16s RNA showed considerable differences between two types of 16s RNA molecules (with and without T1458C), indicating a potential functional effect. The results suggested that haplogroup L3b, could have a negative association with elite performance. The T1458C mutation harboured in haplogroup L3b could have a functional effect that is related to poor athletic performance.

  15. mtDNA analysis of a prehistoric Oneota population: implications for the peopling of the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, A C; Stoneking, M

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA was successfully extracted from 108 individuals from the Norris Farms Oneota, a prehistoric Native American population, to compare the mtDNA diversity from a pre-Columbian population with contemporary Native American and Asian mtDNA lineages and to examine hypotheses about the peopling of the New World. Haplogroup and hypervariable region I sequence data indicate that the lineages from haplogroups A, B, C, and D are the most common among Native Americans but that they were not the only lineages brought into the New World from Asia. The mtDNA evidence does not support the three-wave hypothesis of migration into the New World but rather suggests a single "wave" of people with considerable mtDNA diversity that exhibits a signature of expansion 23,000-37,000 years ago. PMID:9545408

  16. The Effects of Natural Hybridization on the Regulation of Doubly Uniparental Mtdna Inheritance in Blue Mussels (Mytilus Spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, P. D.; Secor, C. L.; Hilbish, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Blue mussels in the Mytilus edulis species complex have a doubly uniparental mode of mtDNA inheritance with separate maternal and paternal mtDNA lineages. Female mussels inherit their mtDNA solely from their mother, while males inherit mtDNA from both parents. In the male gonad the paternal mtDNA is preferentially replicated so that only paternal mtDNA is transmitted from fathers to sons. Hybridization is common among differentiated blue mussel taxa; whenever it involves M. trossulus, doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance is disrupted. We have found high frequencies of males without and females with paternal mtDNA among hybrid mussels produced by interspecific matings between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus. In contrast, hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis does not affect doubly uniparental inheritance, indicating a difference in the divergence of the mechanisms regulating mtDNA inheritance among the three blue mussel taxa. Our data indicate a high frequency of disrupted mtDNA transmission in F(1) hybrids and suggest that two separate mechanisms, one regulating the transmission of paternal mtDNA to males and another inhibiting the establishment of paternal mtDNA in females, act to regulate doubly uniparental inheritance. We propose a model for the regulation of doubly uniparental inheritance that is consistent with these observations. PMID:8878689

  17. Ancient wolf lineages in India.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinesh K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Jhala, Yadrendradev V; Fleischer, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    All previously obtained wolf (Canis lupus) and dog (Canis familiaris) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences fall within an intertwined and shallow clade (the 'wolf-dog' clade). We sequenced mtDNA of recent and historical samples from 45 wolves from throughout lowland peninsular India and 23 wolves from the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau and compared these sequences with all available wolf and dog sequences. All 45 lowland Indian wolves have one of four closely related haplotypes that form a well-supported, divergent sister lineage to the wolf-dog clade. This unique lineage may have been independent for more than 400,000 years. Although seven Himalayan wolves from western and central Kashmir fall within the widespread wolf-dog clade, one from Ladakh in eastern Kashmir, nine from Himachal Pradesh, four from Nepal and two from Tibet form a very different basal clade. This lineage contains five related haplotypes that probably diverged from other canids more than 800,000 years ago, but we find no evidence of current barriers to admixture. Thus, the Indian subcontinent has three divergent, ancient and apparently parapatric mtDNA lineages within the morphologically delineated wolf. No haplotypes of either novel lineage are found within a sample of 37 Indian (or other) dogs. Thus, we find no evidence that these two taxa played a part in the domestication of canids. PMID:15101402

  18. MtDNA haplogroups and elite Korean athlete status.

    PubMed

    Kim, K C; Cho, H I; Kim, W

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation has recently been suggested to have an association with athletic performance or physical endurance. Since mtDNA is haploid and lacks recombination, specific mutations in the mtDNA genome associated with human exercise tolerance or intolerance arise and remain in particular genetic backgrounds referred to as haplogroups. To assess the possible contribution of mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants to differences in elite athletic performance, we performed a population-based study of 152 Korean elite athletes [77 sprint/power athletes (SPA) and 75 endurance/middle-power athletes (EMA)] and 265 non-athletic controls (CON). The overall haplogroup distribution of EMA differed significantly from CON (p<0.01), but that of SPA did not. The EMA have an excess of haplogroups M* (OR 4.38, 95% CI 1.63-11.79, p=0.003) and N9 (OR 2.32, 95% CI 0.92-5.81, p=0.042), but a dearth of haplogroup B (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.75, p=0.003) compared with the CON. Thus, our data imply that specific mtDNA lineages may provide a significant effect on elite Korean endurance status, although functional studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to further substantiate these findings.

  19. Mitochondrial haplogroup C in ancient mitochondrial DNA from Ukraine extends the presence of East Eurasian genetic lineages in Neolithic Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Alexey G; Newton, Jeremy R; Potekhina, Inna D

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies of ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages have revealed the presence of East Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups in the Central European Neolithic. Here we report the finding of East Eurasian lineages in ancient mtDNA from two Neolithic cemeteries of the North Pontic Region (NPR) in Ukraine. In our study, comprehensive haplotyping information was obtained for 7 out of 18 specimens. Although the majority of identified mtDNA haplogroups belonged to the traditional West Eurasian lineages of H and U, three specimens were determined to belong to the lineages of mtDNA haplogroup C. This find extends the presence of East Eurasian lineages in Neolithic Europe from the Carpathian Mountains to the northern shores of the Black Sea and provides the first genetic account of Neolithic mtDNA lineages from the NPR.

  20. Incongruous nuclear and mitochondrial phylogeographic patterns in two sympatric lineages of the wolf spider Pardosa astrigera (Araneae: Lycosidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin; Song, Daxiang; Zhou, Kaiya

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (COI and 16S rRNA-tRNA(Leu(CUN))-ND1) and nuclear DNA (ITS2) variations among and within populations of Pardosa astrigera in China. Two phenotypes of males were recognized. They differed genetically also in the presence (type A) or absence (type B) of common insertions and deletions in ITS2. The concordance between mtDNA based phylogeny and the phenotypic variations of P. astrigera was weak. Haplotypes of type A did not form a monophyletic group. Instead they were found in three clades, in one of them mixed with type B haplotypes, most likely as a result of long-term and ongoing gene flow of mtDNA between the two phenotypic groups (M = 0.69). Pairwise sequence divergences of all data sets indicated that the genetic divergences between the two phenotypes fall within intraspecific range. Our results indicated that the P. astrigera populations in China consist of two sympatric lineages with male phenotypic variations. Patterns of mismatch distribution within lineages suggested long-term demographic stability in the lineage A, and growth in lineage B that expanded rapidly and recolonized from a southern refuge to the northern parts of China during the late-Pleistocene. On the basis of the estimated divergence time between the two lineages (0.18-0.41 Ma), we suggest that the dry-cold climate and the uplift of the Tibetan plateau during the mid-Pleistocene appear to have a determinating impact on the evolutionary history of P. astrigera in China.

  1. Collection of small subunit (16S- and 16S-like) ribosomal RNA structures: 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R

    1994-01-01

    A collection of diverse 16S and 16S-like rRNA secondary structure diagrams are available. This set of rRNAs contains representative structures from all of the major phylogenetic groupings--Archaea, (eu)Bacteria, and the nucleus, mitochondrion, and chloroplast of Eucarya. Within this broad phylogenetic sampling are examples of the major forms of structural diversity currently known for this class of rRNAs. These structure diagrams are available online through our computer-network WWW server and anonymous ftp, as well as from the author in hardcopy format. PMID:7524024

  2. Molecular analyses reveal the occurrence of three new sympatric lineages of velvet worms (Onychophora: Peripatidae) in the eastern Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Williana T R; Santos, Rita C O; Araripe, Juliana; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Rêgo, Péricles S

    2017-03-02

    In the present study, we investigated the possible existence of new lineages of peripatids through comparisons between known Neotropical species and specimens obtained from two locations in Pará, a state in eastern Brazilian Amazonia using a molecular approach based on sequences of the mtDNA genes COI, 16Sr RNA, and 18S RNA. The analyses included also sequences of Asian and African taxa for a more systematic understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within the group. The analysis of the COI, 16S rRNA and 18S RNA sequences permitted the identification of three distinct lineages (A, B and C) based on two different phylogenetic approaches (Bayesian methods and ML). The three lineages presented here are completely distinct from all other peripatid taxa so far defined by molecular data. The presence of specimens of three independent onychophoran lineages occurring in sympatry in the Amazon basin was confirmed in all the analyses, providing consistent support for the phylogenies presented in this study. These findings reinforce the importance of the Amazon region in the diversification of Neotropical peripatids, and indicate that onychophoran diversity is much greater than previously thought, given that the number of taxa found at a single site was equivalent to the total number of allopatric species described for the entire region.

  3. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  5. COI is better than 16S rRNA for DNA barcoding Asiatic salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata: Hynobiidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun; Gu, Hai-Feng; Peng, Rui; Chen, Qin; Zheng, Yu-Chi; Murphy, Robert W; Zeng, Xiao-Mao

    2012-01-01

    The 5' region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is the standard marker for DNA barcoding. However, because COI tends to be highly variable in amphibians, sequencing is often challenging. Consequently, another mtDNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, is often advocated for amphibian barcoding. Herein, we directly compare the usefulness of COI and 16S in discriminating species of hynobiid salamanders using 130 individuals. Species identification and classification of these animals, which are endemic to Asia, are often based on morphology only. Analysis of Kimura 2-parameter genetic distances (K2P) documents the mean intraspecific variation for COI and 16S rRNA genes to be 1.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Whereas COI can always identify species, sometimes 16S cannot. Intra- and interspecific genetic divergences occasionally overlap in both markers, thus reducing the value of a barcoding gap to identify genera. Regardless, COI is the better DNA barcoding marker for hynobiids. In addition to the comparison of two potential markers, high levels of intraspecific divergence in COI (>5%) suggest that both Onychodactylus fischeri and Salamandrella keyserlingii might be composites of cryptic species.

  6. Aminoglycoside antibiotics: A-site specific binding to 16S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2009-06-01

    The A-site of 16S rRNA, which is a part of the 30S ribosomal subunit involved in prokaryotic translation, is a well known aminoglycoside binding site. Full characterization of the conformational changes undergone at the A-site upon aminoglycoside binding is essential for development of future RNA/drug complexes; however, the massiveness of 16S makes this very difficult. Recently, studies have found that a 27 base RNA construct (16S27) that comprises the A-site subdomain of 16S behaves similarly to the whole A-site domain. ESI-MS, ion mobility and molecular dynamics methods were utilized in this study to analyze the A-site of 16S27 before and after the addition of ribostamycin (R), paromomycin (P) and lividomycin (L). The ESI mass spectrum for 16S27 alone illustrated both single-stranded 16S27 and double-stranded (16S27)2 complexes. Upon aminoglycoside addition, the mass spectra showed that only one aminoglycoside binds to 16S27, while either one or two bind to (16S27)2. Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics calculations were utilized in determining the solvent-free structures of the 16S27 and (16S27)2 complexes. These studies found 16S27 in a hairpin conformation while (16S27)2 existed as a cruciform. Only one aminoglycoside binds to the single A-site of the 16S27 hairpin and this attachment compresses the hairpin. Since two A-sites exist for the (16S27)2 cruciform, either one or two aminoglycosides may bind. The aminoglycosides compress the A-sites causing the cruciform with just one aminoglycoside bound to be larger than the cruciform with two bound. Non-specific binding was not observed in any of the aminoglycoside/16S27 complexes.

  7. Reduced Mtdna Diversity in the Ngobe Amerinds of Panama

    PubMed Central

    Kolman, C. J.; Bermingham, E.; Cooke, R.; Ward, R. H.; Arias, T. D.; Guionneau-Sinclair, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype diversity was determined for 46 Ngobe Amerinds sampled widely across their geographic range in western Panama. The Ngobe data were compared with mtDNA control region I sequences from two additional Amerind groups located at the northern and southern extremes of Amerind distribution, the Nuu-Chah-Nulth of the Pacific Northwest and the Chilean Mapuche and from one Na-Dene group, the Haida of the Pacific Northwest. The Ngobe exhibit the lowest mtDNA control region sequence diversity yet reported for an Amerind group. Moreover, they carry only two of the four Amerind founding lineages first described by Wallace and coworkers. We posit that the Ngobe passed through a population bottleneck caused by ethnogenesis from a small founding population and/or European conquest and colonization. Dating of the Ngobe population expansion using the HARPENDING et al. approach to the analysis of pairwise genetic differences indicates a Ngobe expansion at roughly 6800 years before present (range: 1850-14,000 years before present), a date more consistent with a bottleneck at Chibcha ethnogenesis than a conquest-based event. PMID:7635293

  8. C16S - a Hidden Markov Model based algorithm for taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gajjalla, Purnachander; Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Mande, Sharmila S

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and concurrent refinements in 16S rDNA isolation techniques have facilitated the rapid extraction and sequencing of 16S rDNA content of microbial communities. The taxonomic affiliation of these 16S rDNA fragments is subsequently obtained using either BLAST-based or word frequency based approaches. However, the classification accuracy of such methods is observed to be limited in typical metagenomic scenarios, wherein a majority of organisms are hitherto unknown. In this study, we present a 16S rDNA classification algorithm, called C16S, that uses genus-specific Hidden Markov Models for taxonomic classification of 16S rDNA sequences. Results obtained using C16S have been compared with the widely used RDP classifier. The performance of C16S algorithm was observed to be consistently higher than the RDP classifier. In some scenarios, this increase in accuracy is as high as 34%. A web-server for the C16S algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/C16S/.

  9. African human mtDNA phylogeography at-a-glance.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Alexandra; Brehem, António

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic system has long proven to be useful for studying the demographic history of our species, since their proposed Southeast/East African origin 200 kya. Despite the weak archaeological and anthropologic records, which render a difficult understanding of early intra- continental migrations, the phylogenetic L0-L1'6 split at about 140-160 kya is thought to represent also an early sub-structuring of small and isolated communities in South and East Africa. Regional variation accumulated over the following millennia, with L2 and L3 lineages arising in Central and East Africa 100-75 kya. Their sub-Saharan dispersal not later than 60 kya, largely overwhelmed the L0'1 distribution, nowadays limited to South African Khoisan and Central African Pygmies. Cyclic expansions and retractions of the equatorial forest between 40 kya and the "Last Glacial Aridity Maximum" were able to reduce the genetic diversity of modern humans. Surviving regional-specific lineages have emerged from the Sahelian refuge areas, repopulating the region and contributing to the overall West African genetic similarity. Particular L1- L3 lineages mirror the substantial population growth made possible by moister and warmer conditions of the Sahara's Wet Phase and the adoption of agriculture and iron smelting techniques. The diffusion of the farming expertise from a Central African source towards South Africa was mediated by the Bantu people 3 kya. The strong impact of their gene flow almost erased the pre-existent maternal pool. Non-L mtDNAs testify for Eurasian lineages that have enriched the African maternal pool at different timeframes: i) Near and Middle Eastern influences in Upper Palaeolithic, probably link to the spread of Afro-Asiatic languages; ii) particular lineages from West Eurasia around or after the glacial period; iii) post-glacial mtDNA signatures from the Franco-Cantabrian refugia, that have crossed the Strait of Gibraltar and iv) Eurasian lineages

  10. Evolutionary neutrality of mtDNA introgression: evidence from complete mitogenome analysis in roe deer.

    PubMed

    Matosiuk, M; Sheremetyeva, I N; Sheremetyev, I S; Saveljev, A P; Borkowska, A

    2014-11-01

    Introgressive hybridization offers a unique platform for studying the molecular basis of natural selection acting on mitogenomes. Most of the mtDNA protein-coding genes are extremely conserved; however, some of the observed variations have potentially adaptive significance. Here, we evaluated whether the evolution of mtDNA in closely related roe deer species affected by widespread mtDNA introgression is neutral or adaptive. We characterized and compared 16 complete mitogenomes of European (Capreolus capreolus) and Siberian (C. pygargus) roe deer, including four of Siberian origin introgressed into European species. The average sequence divergence of species-specific lineages was estimated at 2.8% and varied across gene classes. Only 21 of 315 fixed differences identified in protein-coding genes represented nonsynonymous changes. Only three of them were determined to have arisen in the C. pygargus lineage since the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of both Capreolus species, reflecting a decelerated evolutionary ratio. The almost four-fold higher dN /dS ratio described for the European roe deer lineage is constrained by overall purifying selection, especially pronounced in the ND4 and ND5 genes. We suggest that the highly divergent C. capreolus lineage could have maintained a capability for genomic incorporation of the well-preserved and almost ancestral type of mtDNA present in C. pygargus. Our analyses did not indicate any signs of positive selection for Siberian roe deer mtDNA, suggesting that the present widespread introgression is evolutionarily neutral.

  11. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  12. Isolation of bacteria and 16S rDNAs from Lake Vostok accretion ice.

    PubMed

    Christner, B C; Mosley-Thompson, E; Thompson, L G; Reeve, J N

    2001-09-01

    Lake Vostok, the largest subglacial lake in Antarctica, is separated from the surface by approximately 4 km of glacial ice. It has been isolated from direct surface input for at least 420 000 years, and the possibility of a novel environment and ecosystem therefore exists. Lake Vostok water has not been sampled, but an ice core has been recovered that extends into the ice accreted below glacial ice by freezing of Lake Vostok water. Here, we report the recovery of bacterial isolates belonging to the Brachybacteria, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus and Sphingomonas lineages from a sample of melt water from this accretion ice that originated 3593 m below the surface. We have also amplified small-subunit ribosomal RNA-encoding DNA molecules (16S rDNAs) directly from this melt water that originated from alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, low- and high-G+C Gram-positive bacteria and a member of the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides lineage.

  13. MtDNA analysis of global populations support that major population expansions began before Neolithic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Yan, Shi; Qin, Zhen-Dong; Jin, Li

    2012-10-01

    Agriculture resulted in extensive population growths and human activities. However, whether major human expansions started after Neolithic Time still remained controversial. With the benefit of 1000 Genome Project, we were able to analyze a total of 910 samples from 11 populations in Africa, Europe and Americas. From these random samples, we identified the expansion lineages and reconstructed the historical demographic variations. In all the three continents, we found that most major lineage expansions (11 out of 15 star lineages in Africa, all autochthonous lineages in Europe and America) coalesced before the first appearance of agriculture. Furthermore, major population expansions were estimated after Last Glacial Maximum but before Neolithic Time, also corresponding to the result of major lineage expansions. Considering results in current and previous study, global mtDNA evidence showed that rising temperature after Last Glacial Maximum offered amiable environments and might be the most important factor for prehistorical human expansions.

  14. Mito-nuclear discord in six congeneric lineages of Holarctic ducks (genus Anas).

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeffrey L; Winker, Kevin; Millam, Kendra C; Lavretsky, Philip; Kulikova, Irina; Wilson, Robert E; Zhuravlev, Yuri N; McCracken, Kevin G

    2014-06-01

    Many species have Holarctic distributions that extend across Europe, Asia and North America. Most genetics research on these species has examined only mitochondrial (mt) DNA, which has revealed wide variance in divergence between Old World (OW) and New World (NW) populations, ranging from shallow, unstructured genealogies to deeply divergent lineages. In this study, we sequenced 20 nuclear introns to test for concordant patterns of OW-NW differentiation between mtDNA and nuclear (nu) DNA for six lineages of Holarctic ducks (genus Anas). Genetic differentiation for both marker types varied widely among these lineages (idiosyncratic population histories), but mtDNA and nuDNA divergence within lineages was not significantly correlated. Moreover, compared with the association between mtDNA and nuDNA divergence observed among different species, OW-NW nuDNA differentiation was generally lower than mtDNA divergence, at least for lineages with deeply divergent mtDNA. Furthermore, coalescent estimates indicated significantly higher rates of gene flow for nuDNA than mtDNA for four of the six lineages. Thus, Holarctic ducks show prominent mito-nuclear discord between OW and NW populations, and we reject differences in sorting rates as the sole cause of the within-species discord. Male-mediated intercontinental gene flow is likely a leading contributor to this discord, although selection could also cause increased mtDNA divergence relative to weak nuDNA differentiation. The population genetics of these ducks contribute to growing evidence that mtDNA can be an unreliable indicator of stage of speciation and that more holistic approaches are needed for species delimitation.

  15. Lineage sorting accounting for the disassociation between chloroplast and mitochondrial lineages in oaks of southern France.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T Y

    2000-12-01

    Dumolin-Lapégue et al. (Mol. Biol. Evol. 15: 1321-1331. 1998) suggested that recurrent inversions of a 4-bp sequence of the mtDNA nad4-1/2 locus due to intramolecular recombination were responsible for the disassociation of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of French oaks. Based on their PCR-RFLP (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism) data obtained from three noncoding spacers, a minimum spanning network representing the phylogeny of the cpDNA was reconstructed. The mapping of alleles b and c of the mtDNA nad4-1/2 locus on the cpDNA network revealed a nonrandom distribution, which contradicted the expected patterns when repeated, and ongoing inversions had been occurring. The fact that polymorphisms (a mixed c + d type) were mostly restricted to the interior nodes of the network, which represented ancient haplotypes and geographically coincided with probable glacial refugia in southern Europe, agreed with a migrant-pool model. Evidence of a widespread pattern of polymorphism distribution indicated that mtDNA haplotypes were likely to be more ancient than the cpDNA haplotypes. Lineage sorting, due to relative age of cpDNA vs. mtDNA, plus the specific migratory mode, which recruited colonists from a random sample of resource populations during glacial expansion (thereby extending the lineage sorting period, LSP), may have resulted in the disassociation of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes in oaks.

  16. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  17. A new subclade of mtDNA haplogroup C1 found in Icelanders: evidence of pre-Columbian contact?

    PubMed

    Ebenesersdóttir, Sigríður Sunna; Sigurðsson, Asgeir; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Stefánsson, Kári; Helgason, Agnar

    2011-01-01

    Although most mtDNA lineages observed in contemporary Icelanders can be traced to neighboring populations in the British Isles and Scandinavia, one may have a more distant origin. This lineage belongs to haplogroup C1, one of a handful that was involved in the settlement of the Americas around 14,000 years ago. Contrary to an initial assumption that this lineage was a recent arrival, preliminary genealogical analyses revealed that the C1 lineage was present in the Icelandic mtDNA pool at least 300 years ago. This raised the intriguing possibility that the Icelandic C1 lineage could be traced to Viking voyages to the Americas that commenced in the 10th century. In an attempt to shed further light on the entry date of the C1 lineage into the Icelandic mtDNA pool and its geographical origin, we used the deCODE Genetics genealogical database to identify additional matrilineal ancestors that carry the C1 lineage and then sequenced the complete mtDNA genome of 11 contemporary C1 carriers from four different matrilines. Our results indicate a latest possible arrival date in Iceland of just prior to 1700 and a likely arrival date centuries earlier. Most surprisingly, we demonstrate that the Icelandic C1 lineage does not belong to any of the four known Native American (C1b, C1c, and C1d) or Asian (C1a) subclades of haplogroup C1. Rather, it is presently the only known member of a new subclade, C1e. While a Native American origin seems most likely for C1e, an Asian or European origin cannot be ruled out.

  18. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-01-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation. PMID:26380702

  19. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-09-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation.

  20. Diverse origin of mitochondrial lineages in Iron Age Black Sea Scythians

    PubMed Central

    Juras, Anna; Krzewińska, Maja; Nikitin, Alexey G.; Ehler, Edvard; Chyleński, Maciej; Łukasik, Sylwia; Krenz-Niedbała, Marta; Sinika, Vitaly; Piontek, Janusz; Ivanova, Svetlana; Dabert, Miroslawa; Götherström, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Scythians were nomadic and semi-nomadic people that ruled the Eurasian steppe during much of the first millennium BCE. While having been extensively studied by archaeology, very little is known about their genetic identity. To fill this gap, we analyzed ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from Scythians of the North Pontic Region (NPR) and successfully retrieved 19 whole mtDNA genomes. We have identified three potential mtDNA lineage ancestries of the NPR Scythians tracing back to hunter-gatherer and nomadic populations of east and west Eurasia as well as the Neolithic farming expansion into Europe. One third of all mt lineages in our dataset belonged to subdivisions of mt haplogroup U5. A comparison of NPR Scythian mtDNA linages with other contemporaneous Scythian groups, the Saka and the Pazyryks, reveals a common mtDNA package comprised of haplogroups H/H5, U5a, A, D/D4, and F1/F2. Of these, west Eurasian lineages show a downward cline in the west-east direction while east Eurasian haplogroups display the opposite trajectory. An overall similarity in mtDNA lineages of the NPR Scythians was found with the late Bronze Age Srubnaya population of the Northern Black Sea region which supports the archaeological hypothesis suggesting Srubnaya people as ancestors of the NPR Scythians. PMID:28266657

  1. The Interpretation of Lineage Markers in Forensic DNA Testing

    PubMed Central

    Buckleton, J.S.; Krawczak, M.; Weir, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome are inherited matrilinealy and patrilinealy, respectively, and without recombination. Collectively they are termed ‘lineage markers’. Lineage markers may be used in forensic testing of an item, such as a hair from a crime scene, against a hypothesised source, or in relationship testing. An estimate of the evidential weight of a match is usually provided by a count of the occurrence in some database of the mtDNA or Y-STR haplotype under consideration. When the factual statement of a count in the database is applied to a case, issues of relevance of the database and sampling uncertainty may arise. In this paper, we re-examine the issues of sampling uncertainty, the relevance of the database, and the combination of autosomal and lineage marker evidence. We also review the recent developments by C.H. Brenner. PMID:21397888

  2. Diversity and abundance of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial habitats studied by 16S RNA surveys and real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Selezi, Drazenka; Quaiser, Achim; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Liza; Schleper, Christa

    2003-09-01

    Novel phylogenetic lineages of as yet uncultivated crenarchaeota have been frequently detected in low to moderate-temperature, marine and terrestrial environments. In order to gain a more comprehensive view on the distribution and diversity of Crenarchaeota in moderate habitats, we have studied 18 different terrestrial and freshwater samples by 16S rDNA-based phylogenetic surveys. In seven different soil samples of diverse geographic areas in Europe (forest, grassland, ruderal) and Asia (permafrost, ruderal) as well as in two microbial mats, we have consistently found one particular lineage of crenarchaeota. The diversity of Crenarchaeota in freshwater sediments was considerably higher with respresentative 16S rDNA sequences distributed over four different groups within the moderate crenarchaeota. Systematic analysis of a 16S rDNA universal library from a sandy ecosystem containing 800 clones exclusively revealed the presence of the soil-specific crenarchaeotal cluster. With primers specific for non-thermophilic crenarchaeota we established a rapid method to quantify archaeal 16S rDNA in real time PCR. The relative abundance of crenarchaeotal rDNA was 0.5-3% in the bulk soil sample and only 0.16% in the rhizosphere of the sandy ecosystem. A nearby agricultural setting yielded a relative abundance of 0.17% crenarchaeotal rDNA. In total our data suggest that soil crenarchaeota represent a stable and specific component of the microbiota in terrestrial habitats.

  3. An analysis of correspondence between unique rabies virus variants and divergent big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) mitochondrial DNA lineages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neubaum, M.A.; Shankar, V.; Douglas, M.R.; Douglas, M.E.; O'Shea, T.J.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    The literature supports that unique rabies virus (RABV) variants are often compartmentalized in different species of bats. In Colorado, two divergent mtDNA lineages of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) co-occur. RABV associated with this species also segregates into two clades. We hypothesized that unique RABV variants might be associated with mtDNA lineages of Colorado big brown bats. DNA was extracted from brain tissue of rabid big brown bats, the ND2 gene was amplified to determine mtDNA lineage, and the lineage was compared to a previously derived phylogenetic analysis of the RABV N gene. No correspondence was found between host bat lineage and RABV variant. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Phylogeography of the rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata (Anura: Ranidae), from China based on mtDNA D-loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Zhong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2008-08-01

    The rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata, is an amphibian widely distributed in China. In this study, we sampled the species across its distributional area in China and sequenced the mtDNA D-loop to investigate the genetic diversity and geographical pattern of the frog population. The results revealed 38 haplotypes in the population, with K2P values varying from 0.19% to 4.22%. Both a phylogenetic analysis and a nested clade analysis (NCA) detected two geographically isolated lineages respectively distributed around the Yangtze drainage (Yangtze lineage) and the south of China (southern lineage). NCA inferred a contiguous range expansion within the Yangtze lineage and allopatric fragmentation within the southern lineage, which might be partly due to the limited samples from this lineage. Accordingly, Fu's Fs test also indicated a population expansion after glacial movement. Therefore, we assumed that the species history responding to glacial events shaped the present population pattern of F. multistriata on the Chinese mainland.

  5. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. Methodology/Principal Findings The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3–V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination. PMID:26927306

  6. Transcript Mapping and Genome Annotation of Ascidian mtDNA Using EST Data

    PubMed Central

    Gissi, Carmela; Pesole, Graziano

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcripts of two ascidian species were reconstructed through sequence assembly of publicly available ESTs resembling mitochondrial DNA sequences (mt-ESTs). This strategy allowed us to analyze processing and mapping of the mitochondrial transcripts and to investigate the gene organization of a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). This new strategy would greatly facilitate the sequencing and annotation of mtDNAs. In Ciona intestinalis, the assembled mt-ESTs covered 22 mitochondrial genes (∼12,000 bp) and provided the partial sequence of the mtDNA and the prediction of its gene organization. Such sequences were confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the entire Ciona mtDNA. For Halocynthia roretzi, for which the mtDNA sequence was already available, the inferred mt transcripts allowed better definition of gene boundaries (16S rRNA, ND1, ATP6, and tRNA-Ser genes) and the identification of a new gene (an additional Phe-tRNA). In both species, polycistronic and immature transcripts, creation of stop codons by polyadenylation, tRNA signal processing, and rRNA transcript termination signals were identified, thus suggesting that the main features of mitochondrial transcripts are conserved in Chordata. PMID:12915488

  7. Range-wide mtDNA phylogeography yields insights into the origins of Asian elephants

    PubMed Central

    Vidya, T.N.C.; Sukumar, Raman; Melnick, Don J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent phylogeographic studies of the endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) reveal two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages, an elucidation of which is central to understanding the species's evolution. Previous explanations for the divergent clades include introgression of mtDNA haplotypes between ancestral species, allopatric divergence of the clades between Sri Lanka or the Sunda region and the mainland, historical trade of elephants, and retention of divergent lineages due to large population sizes. However, these studies lacked data from India and Myanmar, which host approximately 70 per cent of all extant Asian elephants. In this paper, we analyse mtDNA sequence data from 534 Asian elephants across the species's range to explain the current distribution of the two divergent clades. Based on phylogenetic reconstructions, estimates of times of origin of clades, probable ancestral areas of origin inferred from dispersal–vicariance analyses and the available fossil record, we believe both clades originated from Elephas hysudricus. This probably occurred allopatrically in different glacial refugia, the α clade in the Myanmar region and the β clade possibly in southern India–Sri Lanka, 1.6–2.1 Myr ago. Results from nested clade and dispersal–vicariance analyses indicate a subsequent isolation and independent diversification of the β clade in both Sri Lanka and the Sunda region, followed by northward expansion of the clade. We also find more recent population expansions in both clades based on mismatch distributions. We therefore suggest a contraction–expansion scenario during severe climatic oscillations of the Quaternary, with range expansions from different refugia during warmer interglacials leading to the varying geographical overlaps of the two mtDNA clades. We also demonstrate that trade in Asian elephants has not substantially altered the species's mtDNA population genetic structure. PMID:19019786

  8. Range-wide mtDNA phylogeography yields insights into the origins of Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Vidya, T N C; Sukumar, Raman; Melnick, Don J

    2009-03-07

    Recent phylogeographic studies of the endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) reveal two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages, an elucidation of which is central to understanding the species's evolution. Previous explanations for the divergent clades include introgression of mtDNA haplotypes between ancestral species, allopatric divergence of the clades between Sri Lanka or the Sunda region and the mainland, historical trade of elephants, and retention of divergent lineages due to large population sizes. However, these studies lacked data from India and Myanmar, which host approximately 70 per cent of all extant Asian elephants. In this paper, we analyse mtDNA sequence data from 534 Asian elephants across the species's range to explain the current distribution of the two divergent clades. Based on phylogenetic reconstructions, estimates of times of origin of clades, probable ancestral areas of origin inferred from dispersal-vicariance analyses and the available fossil record, we believe both clades originated from Elephas hysudricus. This probably occurred allopatrically in different glacial refugia, the alpha clade in the Myanmar region and the beta clade possibly in southern India-Sri Lanka, 1.6-2.1Myr ago. Results from nested clade and dispersal-vicariance analyses indicate a subsequent isolation and independent diversification of the beta clade in both Sri Lanka and the Sunda region, followed by northward expansion of the clade. We also find more recent population expansions in both clades based on mismatch distributions. We therefore suggest a contraction-expansion scenario during severe climatic oscillations of the Quaternary, with range expansions from different refugia during warmer interglacials leading to the varying geographical overlaps of the two mtDNA clades. We also demonstrate that trade in Asian elephants has not substantially altered the species's mtDNA population genetic structure.

  9. Second generation sequencing allows for mtDNA mixture deconvolution and high resolution detection of heteroplasmy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mitchell M.; McQuillan, Megan R.; O’Hanlon, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To use parallel array pyrosequencing to deconvolute mixtures of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and provide high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy. Methods The hypervariable segment 1 (HV1) of the mtDNA control region was analyzed from 30 individuals using the 454 GS Junior instrument. Mock mixtures were used to evaluate the system’s ability to deconvolute mixtures and to reliably detect heteroplasmy, including heteroplasmic differences between 5 family members of the same maternal lineage. Amplicon sequencing was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated with primers that included multiplex identifiers (MID) and adaptors for pyrosequencing. Data analysis was performed using NextGENe® software. The analysis of an autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) locus (D18S51) and a Y-STR locus (DYS389 I/II) was performed simultaneously with a portion of HV1 to illustrate that multiplexing can encompass different markers of forensic interest. Results Mixtures, including heteroplasmic variants, can be detected routinely down to a component ratio of 1:250 (20 minor variant copies with a coverage rate of 5000 sequences) and can be readily detected down to 1:1000 (0.1%) with expanded coverage. Amplicon sequences from D18S51, DYS389 I/II, and the second half of HV1 were successfully partitioned and analyzed. Conclusions The ability to routinely deconvolute mtDNA mixtures down to a level of 1:250 allows for high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy, and for differentiation of individuals from the same maternal lineage. The pyrosequencing approach results in poor resolution of homopolymeric sequences, and PCR/sequencing artifacts require a filtering mechanism similar to that for STR stutter and spectral bleed through. In addition, chimeric sequences from jumping PCR must be addressed to make the method operational. PMID:21674826

  10. Origin and History of Mitochondrial DNA Lineages in Domestic Horses

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Michael; Pruvost, Melanie; Benecke, Norbert; Hofreiter, Michael; Morales, Arturo; Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Domestic horses represent a genetic paradox: although they have the greatest number of maternal lineages (mtDNA) of all domestic species, their paternal lineages are extremely homogeneous on the Y-chromosome. In order to address their huge mtDNA variation and the origin and history of maternal lineages in domestic horses, we analyzed 1961 partial d-loop sequences from 207 ancient remains and 1754 modern horses. The sample set ranged from Alaska and North East Siberia to the Iberian Peninsula and from the Late Pleistocene to modern times. We found a panmictic Late Pleistocene horse population ranging from Alaska to the Pyrenees. Later, during the Early Holocene and the Copper Age, more or less separated sub-populations are indicated for the Eurasian steppe region and Iberia. Our data suggest multiple domestications and introgressions of females especially during the Iron Age. Although all Eurasian regions contributed to the genetic pedigree of modern breeds, most haplotypes had their roots in Eastern Europe and Siberia. We found 87 ancient haplotypes (Pleistocene to Mediaeval Times); 56 of these haplotypes were also observed in domestic horses, although thus far only 39 haplotypes have been confirmed to survive in modern breeds. Thus, at least seventeen haplotypes of early domestic horses have become extinct during the last 5,500 years. It is concluded that the large diversity of mtDNA lineages is not a product of animal breeding but, in fact, represents ancestral variability. PMID:21187961

  11. Fine Dissection of Human Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup HV Lineages Reveals Paleolithic Signatures from European Glacial Refugia

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Sevini, Federica; Vianello, Dario; Tamm, Erika; Metspalu, Ene; van Oven, Mannis; Hübner, Alexander; Sazzini, Marco; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata

    2015-01-01

    Genetic signatures from the Paleolithic inhabitants of Eurasia can be traced from the early divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages still present in contemporary human populations. Previous studies already suggested a pre-Neolithic diffusion of mitochondrial haplogroup HV*(xH,V) lineages, a relatively rare class of mtDNA types that includes parallel branches mainly distributed across Europe and West Asia with a certain degree of structure. Up till now, variation within haplogroup HV was addressed mainly by analyzing sequence data from the mtDNA control region, except for specific sub-branches, such as HV4 or the widely distributed haplogroups H and V. In this study, we present a revised HV topology based on full mtDNA genome data, and we include a comprehensive dataset consisting of 316 complete mtDNA sequences including 60 new samples from the Italian peninsula, a previously underrepresented geographic area. We highlight points of instability in the particular topology of this haplogroup, reconstructed with BEAST-generated trees and networks. We also confirm a major lineage expansion that probably followed the Late Glacial Maximum and preceded Neolithic population movements. We finally observe that Italy harbors a reservoir of mtDNA diversity, with deep-rooting HV lineages often related to sequences present in the Caucasus and the Middle East. The resulting hypothesis of a glacial refugium in Southern Italy has implications for the understanding of late Paleolithic population movements and is discussed within the archaeological cultural shifts occurred over the entire continent. PMID:26640946

  12. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  13. Disuniting uniformity: a pied cladistic canvas of mtDNA haplogroup H in Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Roostalu, Urmas; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Tambets, Kristiina; Reidla, Maere; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Parik, Jüri; Pennarun, Erwan; Laos, Sirle; Lunkina, Arina; Golubenko, Maria; Barac, Lovorka; Pericic, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg P; Gusar, Vladislava; Khusnutdinova, Elsa K; Stepanov, Vadim; Puzyrev, Valery; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena V; Grechanina, Elena; Richard, Christelle; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventré, André; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel N; Claustres, Mireille; Gölge, Mukaddes; Mikerezi, Ilia; Usanga, Esien; Villems, Richard

    2004-11-01

    It has been often stated that the overall pattern of human maternal lineages in Europe is largely uniform. Yet this uniformity may also result from an insufficient depth and width of the phylogenetic analysis, in particular of the predominant western Eurasian haplogroup (Hg) H that comprises nearly a half of the European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) pool. Making use of the coding sequence information from 267 mtDNA Hg H sequences, we have analyzed 830 mtDNA genomes, from 11 European, Near and Middle Eastern, Central Asian, and Altaian populations. In addition to the seven previously specified subhaplogroups, we define fifteen novel subclades of Hg H present in the extant human populations of western Eurasia. The refinement of the phylogenetic resolution has allowed us to resolve a large number of homoplasies in phylogenetic trees of Hg H based on the first hypervariable segment (HVS-I) of mtDNA. As many as 50 out of 125 polymorphic positions in HVS-I were found to be mutated in more than one subcluster of Hg H. The phylogeographic analysis revealed that sub-Hgs H1*, H1b, H1f, H2a, H3, H6a, H6b, and H8 demonstrate distinct phylogeographic patterns. The monophyletic subhaplogroups of Hg H provide means for further progress in the understanding of the (pre)historic movements of women in Eurasia and for the understanding of the present-day genetic diversity of western Eurasians in general.

  14. Revealing the prehistoric settlement of Australia by Y chromosome and mtDNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hudjashov, Georgi; Kivisild, Toomas; Underhill, Peter A.; Endicott, Phillip; Sanchez, Juan J.; Lin, Alice A.; Shen, Peidong; Oefner, Peter; Renfrew, Colin; Villems, Richard; Forster, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Published and new samples of Aboriginal Australians and Melanesians were analyzed for mtDNA (n = 172) and Y variation (n = 522), and the resulting profiles were compared with the branches known so far within the global mtDNA and the Y chromosome tree. (i) All Australian lineages are confirmed to fall within the mitochondrial founder branches M and N and the Y chromosomal founders C and F, which are associated with the exodus of modern humans from Africa ≈50–70,000 years ago. The analysis reveals no evidence for any archaic maternal or paternal lineages in Australians, despite some suggestively robust features in the Australian fossil record, thus weakening the argument for continuity with any earlier Homo erectus populations in Southeast Asia. (ii) The tree of complete mtDNA sequences shows that Aboriginal Australians are most closely related to the autochthonous populations of New Guinea/Melanesia, indicating that prehistoric Australia and New Guinea were occupied initially by one and the same Palaeolithic colonization event ≈50,000 years ago, in agreement with current archaeological evidence. (iii) The deep mtDNA and Y chromosomal branching patterns between Australia and most other populations around the Indian Ocean point to a considerable isolation after the initial arrival. (iv) We detect only minor secondary gene flow into Australia, and this could have taken place before the land bridge between Australia and New Guinea was submerged ≈8,000 years ago, thus calling into question that certain significant developments in later Australian prehistory (the emergence of a backed-blade lithic industry, and the linguistic dichotomy) were externally motivated. PMID:17496137

  15. [Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA gene of endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. CB/S1 isolated from soil].

    PubMed

    Xuan, Ying-hua; Cui, Chun-quan; Zheng, Shan-zi

    2011-04-30

    The endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. CB/SI was identified by orcein-carmine staining and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The endosymbiont bacteria were rod-shaped and darkly stained, and irregularly localized within the cytoplasm. The length of the 16S rDNA was 1534 bp and its DNA sequence was closely related to those of Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus and Acanthamoeba sp. KA/E21 with 98% homology. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the endosymbiont of CB/SI, the endosymbiont of KA/E21, Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus, the endosymbiont of Ixodes scapularis, and the endosymbiont of Encarsia pergandiella constitute a monophyletic lineage in phylogenetic tree.

  16. The Elusive Nature of Adaptive Mitochondrial DNA Evolution of an Arctic Lineage Prone to Frequent Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Ferreira, José; Vilela, Joana; Fonseca, Miguel M.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Boursot, Pierre; Alves, Paulo C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a fundamental role in cellular metabolism, being responsible for most of the energy production of the cell in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for key components of this process, but its direct role in adaptation remains far from understood. Hares (Lepus spp.) are privileged models to study the impact of natural selection on mitogenomic evolution because 1) species are adapted to contrasting environments, including arctic, with different metabolic pressures, and 2) mtDNA introgression from arctic into temperate species is widespread. Here, we analyzed the sequences of 11 complete mitogenomes (ten newly obtained) of hares of temperate and arctic origins (including two of arctic origin introgressed into temperate species). The analysis of patterns of codon substitutions along the reconstructed phylogeny showed evidence for positive selection in several codons in genes of the OXPHOS complexes, most notably affecting the arctic lineage. However, using theoretical models, no predictable effect of these differences was found on the structure and physicochemical properties of the encoded proteins, suggesting that the focus of selection may lie on complex interactions with nuclear encoded peptides. Also, a cloverleaf structure was detected in the control region only from the arctic mtDNA lineage, which may influence mtDNA replication and transcription. These results suggest that adaptation impacted the evolution of hare mtDNA and may have influenced the occurrence and consequences of the many reported cases of massive mtDNA introgression. However, the origin of adaptation remains elusive. PMID:24696399

  17. Multiplexed SNP typing of ancient DNA clarifies the origin of Andaman mtDNA haplogroups amongst South Asian tribal populations.

    PubMed

    Endicott, Phillip; Metspalu, Mait; Stringer, Chris; Macaulay, Vincent; Cooper, Alan; Sanchez, Juan J

    2006-12-20

    The issue of errors in genetic data sets is of growing concern, particularly in population genetics where whole genome mtDNA sequence data is coming under increased scrutiny. Multiplexed PCR reactions, combined with SNP typing, are currently under-exploited in this context, but have the potential to genotype whole populations rapidly and accurately, significantly reducing the amount of errors appearing in published data sets. To show the sensitivity of this technique for screening mtDNA genomic sequence data, 20 historic samples of the enigmatic Andaman Islanders and 12 modern samples from three Indian tribal populations (Chenchu, Lambadi and Lodha) were genotyped for 20 coding region sites after provisional haplogroup assignment with control region sequences. The genotype data from the historic samples significantly revise the topologies for the Andaman M31 and M32 mtDNA lineages by rectifying conflicts in published data sets. The new Indian data extend the distribution of the M31a lineage to South Asia, challenging previous interpretations of mtDNA phylogeography. This genetic connection between the ancestors of the Andamanese and South Asian tribal groups approximately 30 kya has important implications for the debate concerning migration routes and settlement patterns of humans leaving Africa during the late Pleistocene, and indicates the need for more detailed genotyping strategies. The methodology serves as a low-cost, high-throughput model for the production and authentication of data from modern or ancient DNA, and demonstrates the value of museum collections as important records of human genetic diversity.

  18. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  19. The GHEP–EMPOP collaboration on mtDNA population data—A new resource for forensic casework

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, L.; Zimmermann, B.; Goios, A.; Rodriguez-Monge, A.; Paneto, G.G.; Alves, C.; Alonso, A.; Fridman, C.; Cardoso, S.; Lima, G.; Anjos, M.J.; Whittle, M.R.; Montesino, M.; Cicarelli, R.M.B.; Rocha, A.M.; Albarrán, C.; de Pancorbo, M.M.; Pinheiro, M.F.; Carvalho, M.; Sumita, D.R.; Parson, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) population data for forensic purposes are still scarce for some populations, which may limit the evaluation of forensic evidence especially when the rarity of a haplotype needs to be determined in a database search. In order to improve the collection of mtDNA lineages from the Iberian and South American subcontinents, we here report the results of a collaborative study involving nine laboratories from the Spanish and Portuguese Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GHEP-ISFG) and EMPOP. The individual laboratories contributed population data that were generated throughout the past 10 years, but in the majority of cases have not been made available to the scientific community. A total of 1019 haplotypes from Iberia (Basque Country, 2 general Spanish populations, 2 North and 1 Central Portugal populations), and Latin America (3 populations from São Paulo) were collected, reviewed and harmonized according to defined EMPOP criteria. The majority of data ambiguities that were found during the reviewing process (41 in total) were transcription errors confirming that the documentation process is still the most error-prone stage in reporting mtDNA population data, especially when performed manually. This GHEP–EMPOP collaboration has significantly improved the quality of the individual mtDNA datasets and adds mtDNA population data as valuable resource to the EMPOP database (www.empop.org). PMID:21075696

  20. Maternal admixture and population structure in Mexican-Mestizos based on mtDNA haplogroups.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Salazar-Flores, Joel; Haro-Guerrero, Javier; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Velarde-Félix, Jésus S; Muñoz-Valle, José F; López-Casamichana, Mavil; Carrillo-Tapia, Eduardo; Canseco-Avila, Luis M; Bravi, Claudio M; López-Armenta, Mauro; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2013-08-01

    The maternal ancestry (mtDNA) has important applications in different research fields, such as evolution, epidemiology, identification, and human population history. This is particularly interesting in Mestizos, which constitute the main population in Mexico (∼93%) resulting from post-Columbian admixture between Spaniards, Amerindians, and African slaves, principally. Consequently, we conducted minisequencing analysis (SNaPshot) of 11 mitochondrial single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 742 Mestizos of 10 populations from different regions in Mexico. The predominant maternal ancestry was Native American (92.9%), including Haplogroups A, B, C, and D (47, 23.7, 15.9, and 6.2%, respectively). Conversely, European and African ancestries were less frequent (5.3 and 1.9%, respectively). The main characteristics of the maternal lineages observed in Mexican-Mestizos comprised the following: 1) contrasting geographic gradient of Haplogroups A and C; 2) increase of European lineages toward the Northwest; 3) low or absent, but homogeneous, African ancestry throughout the Mexican territory; 4) maternal lineages in Mestizos roughly represent the genetic makeup of the surrounding Amerindian groups, particularly toward the Southeast, but not in the North and West; 5) continuity over time of the geographic distribution of Amerindian lineages in Mayas; and 6) low but significant maternal population structure (FST  = 2.8%; P = 0.0000). The average ancestry obtained from uniparental systems (mtDNA and Y-chromosome) in Mexican-Mestizos was correlated with previous ancestry estimates based on autosomal systems (genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats). Finally, the comparison of paternal and maternal lineages provided additional information concerning the gender bias admixture, mating patterns, and population structure in Mestizos throughout the Mexican territory.

  1. Phylogeographic analysis reveals a deep lineage split within North Atlantic Littorina saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Doellman, Meredith M; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Grahame, John W; Vollmer, Steve V

    2011-11-07

    Phylogeographic studies provide critical insight into the evolutionary histories of model organisms; yet, to date, range-wide data are lacking for the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis, a classic example of marine sympatric speciation. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to demonstrate that L. saxatilis is not monophyletic for this marker, but is composed of two distinct mtDNA lineages (I and II) that are shared with sister species Littorina arcana and Littorina compressa. Bayesian coalescent dating and phylogeographic patterns indicate that both L. saxatilis lineages originated in the eastern North Atlantic, around the British Isles, at approximately 0.64 Ma. Both lineages are now distributed broadly across the eastern, central and western North Atlantic, and show strong phylogeographic structure among regions. The Iberian Peninsula is genetically distinct, suggesting prolonged isolation from northeastern North Atlantic populations. Western North Atlantic populations of L. saxatilis lineages I and II predate the last glacial maximum and have been isolated from eastern North Atlantic populations since that time. This identification of two distinct, broadly distributed mtDNA lineages further complicates observed patterns of repeated incipient ecological speciation in L. saxatilis, because the sympatric origins of distinct ecotype pairs on eastern North Atlantic shores may be confounded by admixture of divergent lineages.

  2. Phylogeographic analysis reveals a deep lineage split within North Atlantic Littorina saxatilis

    PubMed Central

    Doellman, Meredith M.; Trussell, Geoffrey C.; Grahame, John W.; Vollmer, Steve V.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies provide critical insight into the evolutionary histories of model organisms; yet, to date, range-wide data are lacking for the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis, a classic example of marine sympatric speciation. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to demonstrate that L. saxatilis is not monophyletic for this marker, but is composed of two distinct mtDNA lineages (I and II) that are shared with sister species Littorina arcana and Littorina compressa. Bayesian coalescent dating and phylogeographic patterns indicate that both L. saxatilis lineages originated in the eastern North Atlantic, around the British Isles, at approximately 0.64 Ma. Both lineages are now distributed broadly across the eastern, central and western North Atlantic, and show strong phylogeographic structure among regions. The Iberian Peninsula is genetically distinct, suggesting prolonged isolation from northeastern North Atlantic populations. Western North Atlantic populations of L. saxatilis lineages I and II predate the last glacial maximum and have been isolated from eastern North Atlantic populations since that time. This identification of two distinct, broadly distributed mtDNA lineages further complicates observed patterns of repeated incipient ecological speciation in L. saxatilis, because the sympatric origins of distinct ecotype pairs on eastern North Atlantic shores may be confounded by admixture of divergent lineages. PMID:21429920

  3. An ancient clonal lineage in the fish genus Poeciliopsis (Atheriniformes: Poeciliidae).

    PubMed Central

    Quattro, J M; Avise, J C; Vrijenhoek, R C

    1992-01-01

    Genetic diversity in mtDNA was assessed within the unisexual (all female) hybridogenetic fish Poeciliopsis monacha-occidentalis and the two sexual species from which it arose. Results confirm that P. monacha was the maternal ancestor and that paternal leakage of P. occidentalis mtDNA has not occurred. Of particular interest is the high level of de novo mutational divergence within one hybridogenetic lineage that on the basis of independent zoogeographic considerations, protein electrophoretic data, and tissue grafting analysis is of monophyletic (single hybridization) origin. Using a conventional mtDNA clock calibration, we estimate that this unisexual clade might be >100,000 generations old. Contrary to conventional belief, this result shows that some unisexual vertebrate lineages can achieve a substantial evolutionary age. Images PMID:11607248

  4. Insertion of a self-splicing intron into the mtDNA of atriploblastic animal

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Y.; Halanych, K.; Boore, J.L.

    2006-04-14

    Nephtys longosetosa is a carnivorous polychaete worm that lives in the intertidal and subtidal zones with worldwide distribution (pleijel&rouse2001). Its mitochondrial genome has the characteristics typical of most metazoans: 37 genes; circular molecule; almost no intergenic sequence; and no significant gene rearrangements when compared to other annelid mtDNAs (booremoritz19981995). Ubiquitous features as small intergenic regions and lack of introns suggested that metazoan mtDNAs are under strong selective pressures to reduce their genome size allowing for faster replication requirements (booremoritz19981995Lynch2005). Yet, in 1996 two type I introns were found in the mtDNA of the basal metazoan Metridium senile (FigureX). Breaking a long-standing rule (absence of introns in metazoan mtDNA), this finding was later supported by the further presence of group I introns in other cnidarians. Interestingly, only the class Anthozoa within cnidarians seems to harbor such introns. Although several hundreds of triploblastic metazoan mtDNAs have been sequenced, this study is the first evidence of mitochondrial introns in triploblastic metazoans. The cox1 gene of N. longosetosa has an intron of almost 2 kbs in length. This finding represents as well the first instance of a group II intron (anthozoans harbor group I introns) in all metazoan lineages. Opposite trends are observed within plants, fungi and protist mtDNAs, where introns (both group I and II) and other non-coding sequences are widespread. Plant, fungal and protist mtDNA structure and organization differ enormously from that of metazoan mtDNA. Both, plant and fungal mtDNA are dynamic molecules that undergo high rates of recombination, contain long intergenic spacer regions and harbor both group I and group II introns. However, as metazoans they have a conserved gene content. Protists, on the other hand have a striking variation of gene content and introns that account for the genome size variation. In contrast to

  5. Phylogenetic position of Phthiraptera (Insecta: Paraneoptera) and elevated rate of evolution in mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Johnson, Kevin P

    2003-10-01

    Phthiraptera (chewing and sucking lice) and Psocoptera (booklice and barklice) are closely related to each other and compose the monophyletic taxon Psocodea. However, there are two hypotheses regarding their phylogenetic relationship: (1) monophyletic Psocoptera is the sister group of Phthiraptera or (2) Psocoptera is paraphyletic, and Liposcelididae of Psocoptera is the sister group of Phthiraptera. Each hypothesis is supported morphologically and/or embryologically, and this problem has not yet been resolved. In the present study, the phylogenetic position of Phthiraptera was examined using mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA sequences, with three methods of phylogenetic analysis. Results of all analyses strongly supported the close relationship between Phthiraptera and Liposcelididae. Results of the present analyses also provided some insight into the elevated rate of evolution in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Phthiraptera. An elevated substitution rate of mtDNA appears to originate in the common ancestor of Phthiraptera and Liposcelididae, and directly corresponds to an increased G+C content. Therefore, the elevated substitution rate of mtDNA in Phthiraptera and Liposcelididae appears to be directional. A high diversity of 12S rDNA secondary structure was also observed in wide range of Phthiraptera and Liposcelididae, but these structures seem to have evolved independently in different clades.

  6. Lineage sorting in apes.

    PubMed

    Mailund, Thomas; Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-01-01

    Recombination allows different parts of the genome to have different genealogical histories. When a species splits in two, allelic lineages sort into the two descendant species, and this lineage sorting varies along the genome. If speciation events are close in time, the lineage sorting process may be incomplete at the second speciation event and lead to gene genealogies that do not match the species phylogeny. We review different recent approaches to model lineage sorting along the genome and show how it is possible to learn about population sizes, natural selection, and recombination rates in ancestral species from application of these models to genome alignments of great ape species.

  7. Rapid deployment of the five founding Amerind mtDNA haplogroups via coastal and riverine colonization.

    PubMed

    Fix, Alan G

    2005-10-01

    Numerous studies of variation in mtDNA in Amerindian populations established that four haplogroups are present throughout both North and South America. These four haplogroups (A, B, C, and D) and perhaps a fifth (X) in North America are postulated to be present in the initial founding migration to the Americas. Furthermore, studies of ancient mtDNA in North America suggested long-term regional continuity of the frequencies of these founding haplogroups. Present-day tribal groups possess high frequencies of private mtDNA haplotypes (variants within the major haplogroups), consistent with early establishment of local isolation of regional populations. Clearly these patterns have implications for the mode of colonization of the hemisphere. Recently, the earlier consensus among archaeologists for an initial colonization by Clovis hunters arriving through an ice-free corridor and expanding in a "blitzkrieg " wave was shown to be inconsistent with extensive genetic variability in Native Americans; a coastal migration route avoids this problem. The present paper demonstrates through a computer simulation model how colonization along coasts and rivers could have rapidly spread the founding lineages widely through North America.

  8. Lineage divergence in Odorrana graminea complex (Anura: Ranidae: Odorrana).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rongchuan; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Jianping

    2015-05-26

    The confusing and unstable taxonomy of Odorrana livida (Rana livida) since its first record has made it a focal frog complex for systematics. In China, four species, Odorrana nebulosa, O. graminea, O. sinica, O. leporipes, were described to closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota based on their morphological similarities, accompanied by much taxonomic confusion because of ambiguities in the wide distribution and morphological variations. Currently O. graminea is being used as the name of a provisional monotypic species group to include all the populations in China that closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota. Here, we conducted a range-wide molecular phylogeographic analysis of the large green odorous frog (Odorrana graminea) complex across the majority of its range in China, based on 2780 bp DNA sequences of three mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, ND2) in 107 samples from 20 sites. Our data recognized three distinct phylogeographic lineages of the Odorrana graminea (lato sensu) complex in China, and they together with a Thailand lineage formed a monophyletic group. Among the four lineages within O. graminea complex, the average genetic distances based on the concatenated sequences of 12S, 16S and ND2 were 7.5-8.8% and those based on 16S rRNA alone were 4.2-5.5%. Furthermore, canonical discriminant functions in morphometric analyses showed significant separations of all the paired lineage comparisons in China. The aforementioned genetic divergence and mismatched phenotypes among the lineages within the Odorrana graminea complex, in addition to their non-overlapping geographic distributions, imply extensive lineage diversification. However, precise taxonomic status of these lineages needs more studies based on adequate type information and more thorough species delimitation based on analysis of differentiation in bioacoustic and nuclear genetic characters especially regarding gene flow and admixture in geographical contact zones.

  9. The mitochondrial DNA makeup of Romanians: A forensic mtDNA control region database and phylogenetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Turchi, Chiara; Stanciu, Florin; Paselli, Giorgia; Buscemi, Loredana; Parson, Walther; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of Romanian population from a mitochondrial perspective and to establish an appropriate mtDNA forensic database, we generated a high-quality mtDNA control region dataset from 407 Romanian subjects belonging to four major historical regions: Moldavia, Transylvania, Wallachia and Dobruja. The entire control region (CR) was analyzed by Sanger-type sequencing assays and the resulting 306 different haplotypes were classified into haplogroups according to the most updated mtDNA phylogeny. The Romanian gene pool is mainly composed of West Eurasian lineages H (31.7%), U (12.8%), J (10.8%), R (10.1%), T (9.1%), N (8.1%), HV (5.4%),K (3.7%), HV0 (4.2%), with exceptions of East Asian haplogroup M (3.4%) and African haplogroup L (0.7%). The pattern of mtDNA variation observed in this study indicates that the mitochondrial DNA pool is geographically homogeneous across Romania and that the haplogroup composition reveals signals of admixture of populations of different origin. The PCA scatterplot supported this scenario, with Romania located in southeastern Europe area, close to Bulgaria and Hungary, and as a borderland with respect to east Mediterranean and other eastern European countries. High haplotype diversity (0.993) and nucleotide diversity indices (0.00838±0.00426), together with low random match probability (0.0087) suggest the usefulness of this control region dataset as a forensic database in routine forensic mtDNA analysis and in the investigation of maternal genetic lineages in the Romanian population.

  10. Perched at the mito-nuclear crossroads: divergent mitochondrial lineages correlate with environment in the face of ongoing nuclear gene flow in an Australian bird.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Alexandra; Amos, J Nevil; Joseph, Leo; Loynes, Kate; Austin, Jeremy J; Keogh, J Scott; Stone, Graham N; Nicholls, James A; Sunnucks, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Relationships among multilocus genetic variation, geography, and environment can reveal how evolutionary processes affect genomes. We examined the evolution of an Australian bird, the eastern yellow robin Eopsaltria australis, using mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) genetic markers, and bioclimatic variables. In southeastern Australia, two divergent mtDNA lineages occur east and west of the Great Dividing Range, perpendicular to latitudinal nDNA structure. We evaluated alternative scenarios to explain this striking discordance in landscape genetic patterning. Stochastic mtDNA lineage sorting can be rejected because the mtDNA lineages are essentially distinct geographically for > 1500 km. Vicariance is unlikely: the Great Dividing Range is neither a current barrier nor was it at the Last Glacial Maximum according to species distribution modeling; nuclear gene flow inferred from coalescent analysis affirms this. Female philopatry contradicts known female-biased dispersal. Contrasting mtDNA and nDNA demographies indicate their evolutionary histories are decoupled. Distance-based redundancy analysis, in which environmental temperatures explain mtDNA variance above that explained by geographic position and isolation-by-distance, favors a nonneutral explanation for mitochondrial phylogeographic patterning. Thus, observed mito-nuclear discordance accords with environmental selection on a female-linked trait, such as mtDNA, mtDNA-nDNA interactions or genes on W-chromosome, driving mitochondrial divergence in the presence of nuclear gene flow.

  11. Hybridization and massive mtDNA unidirectional introgression between the closely related Neotropical toads Rhinella marina and R. schneideri inferred from mtDNA and nuclear markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The classical perspective that interspecific hybridization in animals is rare has been changing due to a growing list of empirical examples showing the occurrence of gene flow between closely related species. Using sequence data from cyt b mitochondrial gene and three intron nuclear genes (RPL9, c-myc, and RPL3) we investigated patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence between two closely related toad species R. marina and R. schneideri. By comparing levels of differentiation at nuclear and mtDNA levels we were able to describe patterns of introgression and infer the history of hybridization between these species. Results All nuclear loci are essentially concordant in revealing two well differentiated groups of haplotypes, corresponding to the morphologically-defined species R. marina and R. schneideri. Mitochondrial DNA analysis also revealed two well-differentiated groups of haplotypes but, in stark contrast with the nuclear genealogies, all R. schneideri sequences are clustered with sequences of R. marina from the right Amazon bank (RAB), while R. marina sequences from the left Amazon bank (LAB) are monophyletic. An Isolation-with-Migration (IM) analysis using nuclear data showed that R. marina and R. schneideri diverged at ≈ 1.69 Myr (early Pleistocene), while R. marina populations from LAB and RAB diverged at ≈ 0.33 Myr (middle Pleistocene). This time of divergence is not consistent with the split between LAB and RAB populations obtained with mtDNA data (≈ 1.59 Myr), which is notably similar to the estimate obtained with nuclear genes between R. marina and R. schneideri. Coalescent simulations of mtDNA phylogeny under the speciation history inferred from nuclear genes rejected the hypothesis of incomplete lineage sorting to explain the conflicting signal between mtDNA and nuclear-based phylogenies. Conclusions The cytonuclear discordance seems to reflect the occurrence of interspecific hybridization between these two closely related

  12. The genetic relationship between the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps): analysis of nuclear DNA and mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Lahermo, P; Sajantila, A; Sistonen, P; Lukka, M; Aula, P; Peltonen, L; Savontaus, M L

    1996-06-01

    The genetic relationships between two Finno-Ugric-speaking populations, the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps), were studied by using PCR for six nuclear-DNA marker loci, mitochondrial restriction-site polymorphism, and sequence variation of a 360-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region. The allele frequencies of each of the nuclear-DNA marker loci and the frequencies of mtDNA restriction haplotypes were significantly different between the populations. The Saami showed exceptionally low variation in their mtDNA restriction sites. The 9-bp deletion common in East Asian populations was not observed, nor did the haplotype data fit into the haplogroup categorization of Torroni et al. The average number of nucleotide substitutions from the mtDNA haplotype data indicated that the Finnish Saami may be closer to the Finns than to the other reference populations, whereas nuclear DNA suggested that the Finns are more closely related to the European reference populations than to the Finnish Saami. The similarity of the Finns to the other Europeans was even more pronounced according to the sequence data. We were unable to distinguish between the Finns and either the Swiss or Sardinian reference populations, whereas the Finnish Saami clearly stood apart. The Finnish Saami are distinct from other Circumarctic populations, although two of the lineages found among the Saami showed closer relationship to the Circumarctic than to the European lineages. The sequence data indicated an exceptionally high divergence for the Saami mtDNA control lineages. The distribution of the pairwise nucleotide differences in the Saami suggested that this population has not experienced an expansion similar to what was indicated for the Finns and the reference populations.

  13. The genetic relationship between the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps): analysis of nuclear DNA and mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lahermo, P.; Sajantila, A.; Sistonen, P.; Lukka, M.; Aula, P.; Peltonen, L.; Savontaus, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    The genetic relationships between two Finno-Ugric-speaking populations, the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps), were studied by using PCR for six nuclear-DNA marker loci, mitochondrial restriction-site polymorphism, and sequence variation of a 360-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region. The allele frequencies of each of the nuclear-DNA marker loci and the frequencies of mtDNA restriction haplotypes were significantly different between the populations. The Saami showed exceptionally low variation in their mtDNA restriction sites. The 9-bp deletion common in East Asian populations was not observed, nor did the haplotype data fit into the haplogroup categorization of Torroni et al. The average number of nucleotide substitutions from the mtDNA haplotype data indicated that the Finnish Saami may be closer to the Finns than to the other reference populations, whereas nuclear DNA suggested that the Finns are more closely related to the European reference populations than to the Finnish Saami. The similarity of the Finns to the other Europeans was even more pronounced according to the sequence data. We were unable to distinguish between the Finns and either the Swiss or Sardinian reference populations, whereas the Finnish Saami clearly stood apart. The Finnish Saami are distinct from other Circumarctic populations, although two of the lineages found among the Saami showed closer relationship to the Circumarctic than to the European lineages. The sequence data indicated an exceptionally high divergence for the Saami mtDNA control lineages. The distribution of the pairwise nucleotide differences in the Saami suggested that this population has not experienced an expansion similar to what was indicated for the Finns and the reference populations. Images Figure 1 PMID:8651309

  14. Seventeen New Complete mtDNA Sequences Reveal Extensive Mitochondrial Genome Evolution within the Demospongiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2008-01-01

    parallel in several lineages and suggest general trends in demosponge mtDNA evolution. PMID:18628961

  15. Linear mtDNA fragments and unusual mtDNA rearrangements associated with pathological deficiency of MGME1 exonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Thomas J.; Zsurka, Gábor; Peeva, Viktoriya; Schöler, Susanne; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Reyes, Aurelio; Kornblum, Cornelia; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-01-01

    MGME1, also known as Ddk1 or C20orf72, is a mitochondrial exonuclease found to be involved in the processing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during replication. Here, we present detailed insights on the role of MGME1 in mtDNA maintenance. Upon loss of MGME1, elongated 7S DNA species accumulate owing to incomplete processing of 5′ ends. Moreover, an 11-kb linear mtDNA fragment spanning the entire major arc of the mitochondrial genome is generated. In contrast to control cells, where linear mtDNA molecules are detectable only after nuclease S1 treatment, the 11-kb fragment persists in MGME1-deficient cells. In parallel, we observed characteristic mtDNA duplications in the absence of MGME1. The fact that the breakpoints of these mtDNA rearrangements do not correspond to either classical deletions or the ends of the linear 11-kb fragment points to a role of MGME1 in processing mtDNA ends, possibly enabling their repair by homologous recombination. In agreement with its functional involvement in mtDNA maintenance, we show that MGME1 interacts with the mitochondrial replicase PolgA, suggesting that it is a constituent of the mitochondrial replisome, to which it provides an additional exonuclease activity. Thus, our results support the viewpoint that MGME1-mediated mtDNA processing is essential for faithful mitochondrial genome replication and might be required for intramolecular recombination of mtDNA. PMID:24986917

  16. MtDNA analysis reveals enriched pathogenic mutations in Tibetan highlanders

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Longli; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Menghan; Yan, Shi; Li, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Kang; Chen, Feng; Ma, Lifeng; Qin, Zhendong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan highlanders, including Tibetans, Monpas, Lhobas, Dengs and Sherpas, are considered highly adaptive to severe hypoxic environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might be important in hypoxia adaptation given its role in coding core subunits of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we employed 549 complete highlander mtDNA sequences (including 432 random samples) to obtain a comprehensive view of highlander mtDNA profile. In the phylogeny of a total of 36,914 sequences, we identified 21 major haplogroups representing founding events of highlanders, most of which were coalesced in 10 kya. Through founder analysis, we proposed a three-phase model of colonizing the plateau, i.e., pre-LGM Time (30 kya, 4.68%), post-LGM Paleolithic Time (16.8 kya, 29.31%) and Neolithic Time (after 8 kya, 66.01% in total). We observed that pathogenic mutations occurred far more frequently in 22 highlander-specific lineages (five lineages carrying two pathogenic mutations and six carrying one) than in the 6,857 haplogroups of all the 36,914 sequences (P = 4.87 × 10−8). Furthermore, the number of possible pathogenic mutations carried by highlanders (in average 3.18 ± 1.27) were significantly higher than that in controls (2.82 ± 1.40) (P = 1.89 × 10−4). Considering that function-altering and pathogenic mutations are enriched in highlanders, we therefore hypothesize that they may have played a role in hypoxia adaptation. PMID:27498855

  17. mtDNA haplogroup X: An ancient link between Europe/Western Asia and North America?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Hosseini, S H; Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; Allen, J C; Schurr, T G; Scozzari, R; Cruciani, F; Wallace, D C

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of comprehensive RFLP analysis, it has been inferred that approximately 97% of Native American mtDNAs belong to one of four major founding mtDNA lineages, designated haplogroups "A"-"D." It has been proposed that a fifth mtDNA haplogroup (haplogroup X) represents a minor founding lineage in Native Americans. Unlike haplogroups A-D, haplogroup X is also found at low frequencies in modern European populations. To investigate the origins, diversity, and continental relationships of this haplogroup, we performed mtDNA high-resolution RFLP and complete control region (CR) sequence analysis on 22 putative Native American haplogroup X and 14 putative European haplogroup X mtDNAs. The results identified a consensus haplogroup X motif that characterizes our European and Native American samples. Among Native Americans, haplogroup X appears to be essentially restricted to northern Amerindian groups, including the Ojibwa, the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, the Sioux, and the Yakima, although we also observed this haplogroup in the Na-Dene-speaking Navajo. Median network analysis indicated that European and Native American haplogroup X mtDNAs, although distinct, nevertheless are distantly related to each other. Time estimates for the arrival of X in North America are 12,000-36,000 years ago, depending on the number of assumed founders, thus supporting the conclusion that the peoples harboring haplogroup X were among the original founders of Native American populations. To date, haplogroup X has not been unambiguously identified in Asia, raising the possibility that some Native American founders were of Caucasian ancestry. PMID:9837837

  18. Keeping mtDNA in Shape between Generations

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing. PMID:25299061

  19. A trans-Amazonian screening of mtDNA reveals deep intraspecific divergence in forest birds and suggests a vast underestimation of species diversity.

    PubMed

    Milá, Borja; Tavares, Erika S; Muñoz Saldaña, Alberto; Karubian, Jordan; Smith, Thomas B; Baker, Allan J

    2012-01-01

    The Amazonian avifauna remains severely understudied relative to that of the temperate zone, and its species richness is thought to be underestimated by current taxonomy. Recent molecular systematic studies using mtDNA sequence reveal that traditionally accepted species-level taxa often conceal genetically divergent subspecific lineages found to represent new species upon close taxonomic scrutiny, suggesting that intraspecific mtDNA variation could be useful in species discovery. Surveys of mtDNA variation in Holarctic species have revealed patterns of variation that are largely congruent with species boundaries. However, little information exists on intraspecific divergence in most Amazonian species. Here we screen intraspecific mtDNA genetic variation in 41 Amazonian forest understory species belonging to 36 genera and 17 families in 6 orders, using 758 individual samples from Ecuador and French Guiana. For 13 of these species, we also analyzed trans-Andean populations from the Ecuadorian Chocó. A consistent pattern of deep intraspecific divergence among trans-Amazonian haplogroups was found for 33 of the 41 taxa, and genetic differentiation and genetic diversity among them was highly variable, suggesting a complex range of evolutionary histories. Mean sequence divergence within families was the same as that found in North American birds (13%), yet mean intraspecific divergence in Neotropical species was an order of magnitude larger (2.13% vs. 0.23%), with mean distance between intraspecific lineages reaching 3.56%. We found no clear relationship between genetic distances and differentiation in plumage color. Our results identify numerous genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages which may result in new species-level designations upon closer taxonomic scrutiny and thorough sampling, although lineages in the tropical region could be older than those in the temperate zone without necessarily representing separate species. In-depth phylogeographic surveys

  20. A Trans-Amazonian Screening of mtDNA Reveals Deep Intraspecific Divergence in Forest Birds and Suggests a Vast Underestimation of Species Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Milá, Borja; Tavares, Erika S.; Muñoz Saldaña, Alberto; Karubian, Jordan; Smith, Thomas B.; Baker, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The Amazonian avifauna remains severely understudied relative to that of the temperate zone, and its species richness is thought to be underestimated by current taxonomy. Recent molecular systematic studies using mtDNA sequence reveal that traditionally accepted species-level taxa often conceal genetically divergent subspecific lineages found to represent new species upon close taxonomic scrutiny, suggesting that intraspecific mtDNA variation could be useful in species discovery. Surveys of mtDNA variation in Holarctic species have revealed patterns of variation that are largely congruent with species boundaries. However, little information exists on intraspecific divergence in most Amazonian species. Here we screen intraspecific mtDNA genetic variation in 41 Amazonian forest understory species belonging to 36 genera and 17 families in 6 orders, using 758 individual samples from Ecuador and French Guiana. For 13 of these species, we also analyzed trans-Andean populations from the Ecuadorian Chocó. A consistent pattern of deep intraspecific divergence among trans-Amazonian haplogroups was found for 33 of the 41 taxa, and genetic differentiation and genetic diversity among them was highly variable, suggesting a complex range of evolutionary histories. Mean sequence divergence within families was the same as that found in North American birds (13%), yet mean intraspecific divergence in Neotropical species was an order of magnitude larger (2.13% vs. 0.23%), with mean distance between intraspecific lineages reaching 3.56%. We found no clear relationship between genetic distances and differentiation in plumage color. Our results identify numerous genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages which may result in new species-level designations upon closer taxonomic scrutiny and thorough sampling, although lineages in the tropical region could be older than those in the temperate zone without necessarily representing separate species. In-depth phylogeographic surveys

  1. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  2. mtDNA haplogroup and single nucleotide polymorphisms structure human microbiome communities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although our microbial community and genomes (the human microbiome) outnumber our genome by several orders of magnitude, to what extent the human host genetic complement informs the microbiota composition is not clear. The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) Consortium established a unique population-scale framework with which to characterize the relationship of microbial community structure with their human hosts. A wide variety of taxa and metabolic pathways have been shown to be differentially distributed by virtue of race/ethnicity in the HMP. Given that mtDNA haplogroups are the maternally derived ancestral genomic markers and mitochondria’s role as the generator for cellular ATP, characterizing the relationship between human mtDNA genomic variants and microbiome profiles becomes of potential marked biologic and clinical interest. Results We leveraged sequencing data from the HMP to investigate the association between microbiome community structures with its own host mtDNA variants. 15 haplogroups and 631 mtDNA nucleotide polymorphisms (mean sequencing depth of 280X on the mitochondria genome) from 89 individuals participating in the HMP were accurately identified. 16S rRNA (V3-V5 region) sequencing generated microbiome taxonomy profiles and whole genome shotgun sequencing generated metabolic profiles from various body sites were treated as traits to conduct association analysis between haplogroups and host clinical metadata through linear regression. The mtSNPs of individuals with European haplogroups were associated with microbiome profiles using PLINK quantitative trait associations with permutation and adjusted for multiple comparisons. We observe that among 139 stool and 59 vaginal posterior fornix samples, several haplogroups show significant association with specific microbiota (q-value < 0.05) as well as their aggregate community structure (Chi-square with Monte Carlo, p < 0.005), which confirmed and expanded previous research on the

  3. Phylogenetic lineages in Entomophthoromycota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomophthoromycota Humber is one of five major phylogenetic lineages among the former phylum Zygomycota. These early terrestrial fungi share evolutionarily ancestral characters such as coenocytic mycelium and gametangiogamy as a sexual process resulting in zygospore formation. Previous molecular st...

  4. Myocardial Lineage Development

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sylvia M.; Yelon, Deborah; Conlon, Frank L.; Kirby, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    The myocardium of the heart is composed of multiple highly specialized myocardial lineages, including those of the ventricular and atrial myocardium, and the specialized conduction system. Specification and maturation of each of these lineages during heart development is a highly ordered, ongoing process involving multiple signaling pathways and their intersection with transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we attempt to summarize and compare much of what we know about specification and maturation of myocardial lineages from studies in several different vertebrate model systems. To date, most research has focused on early specification, and while there is still more to learn, less is known about factors that promote subsequent maturation of myocardial lineages required to build the functioning adult heart. PMID:21148449

  5. Flow Cytometry-assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs fromComplex 16S ribosomal RNA Gene Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.L.; Schramm, A.; Bernhard, A.E.; van den Engh, G.J.; Stahl, D.A.

    2004-07-21

    A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screeningand recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. Thisapproach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting-assisted cloning,was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within theBacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNAgenes. Retrieval and sequence analysis of phylogenetically informativegenes has become a standard cultivation-independent technique toinvestigate microbial diversity in nature (7, 18). Genes encoding the 16SrRNA, because of the relative ease of their selective amplification, havebeen most frequently employed for general diversity surveys (16).Environmental studies have also focused on specific subpopulationsaffiliated with a phylogenetic group or identified by genes encodingspecific metabolic functions (e.g., ammonia oxidation, sulfaterespiration, and nitrate reduction) (8,15,20). However, specificpopulations may be of low abundance (1,23), or the genes encodingspecific metabolic functions may be insufficiently conserved to providepriming sites for general PCR amplification. Three general approacheshave been used to obtain 16S rRNA sequence information from low-abundancepopulations: screening hundreds to thousands of clones in a general 16SrRNA gene library (21), flow cytometric sorting of a subpopulation ofenvironmentally derived cells labeled by fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) (27), or selective PCR amplification using primersspecific for the subpopulation (2,23). While the first approach is simplytime-consuming and tedious, the second has been restricted to fairlylarge and strongly fluorescent cells from aquatic samples (5, 27). Thethird approach often generates fragments of only a few hundred bases dueto the limited number of specific priming sites. Partial sequenceinformation often degrades analysis, obscuring or distorting thephylogenetic placement of the new sequences (11, 20). A more robustcharacterization of environ

  6. Contraception for the under 16s: better safe than sorry.

    PubMed

    Cook, A

    1981-09-16

    acceptible if the couple was engaged, and 5.4% were totally against it, 9) 62% felt abortion was the right of every woman and 31.1% felt it was acceptible if the physical or mental well being of the mother was at risk, 10) 40.9% agreed with the British Medical Association policy on teenage contraception which advises doctors to encourage under 16's to tell their parents, but if they refuse, the doctor can still prescribe the pill, 11) 22.7% wanted contraception unconditionally available, 18.2% felt it should be dependent on parental knowledge, and 17% said it should not be available, 12) there was a trend for opinions to become less liberal as age increased, and 13) young girls appear to be less conscientious in using contraception than older women.

  7. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L.; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D.; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537–542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the “Out of Africa” model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains. PMID:27274055

  8. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited.

    PubMed

    Heupink, Tim H; Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M

    2016-06-21

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537-542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the "Out of Africa" model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains.

  9. Carriers of Mitochondrial DNA Macrohaplogroup N Lineages Reached Australia around 50,000 Years Ago following a Northern Asian Route

    PubMed Central

    Larruga, Jose M.; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; González, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The modern human colonization of Eurasia and Australia is mostly explained by a single-out-of-Africa exit following a southern coastal route throughout Arabia and India. However, dispersal across the Levant would better explain the introgression with Neanderthals, and more than one exit would fit better with the different ancient genomic components discovered in indigenous Australians and in ancient Europeans. The existence of an additional Northern route used by modern humans to reach Australia was previously deduced from the phylogeography of mtDNA macrohaplogroup N. Here, we present new mtDNA data and new multidisciplinary information that add more support to this northern route. Methods MtDNA hypervariable segments and haplogroup diagnostic coding positions were analyzed in 2,278 Saudi Arabs, from which 1,725 are new samples. Besides, we used 623 published mtDNA genomes belonging to macrohaplogroup N, but not R, to build updated phylogenetic trees to calculate their coalescence ages, and more than 70,000 partial mtDNA sequences were screened to establish their respective geographic ranges. Results The Saudi mtDNA profile confirms the absence of autochthonous mtDNA lineages in Arabia with coalescence ages deep enough to support population continuity in the region since the out-of-Africa episode. In contrast to Australia, where N(xR) haplogroups are found in high frequency and with deep coalescence ages, there are not autochthonous N(xR) lineages in India nor N(xR) branches with coalescence ages as deep as those found in Australia. These patterns are at odds with the supposition that Australian colonizers harboring N(xR) lineages used a route involving India as a stage. The most ancient N(xR) lineages in Eurasia are found in China, and inconsistently with the coastal route, N(xR) haplogroups with the southernmost geographical range have all more recent radiations than the Australians. Conclusions Apart from a single migration event via a southern route

  10. Phylogeography of pipistrelle-like bats within the Canary Islands, based on mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pestano, J; Brown, R P; Suárez, N M; Fajardo, S

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of three Canary Island Vespertilionid bat species, Pipistrellus kuhlii, Pipistrellus maderensis, and Hypsugo savii was studied by comparison of approximately 1 kbp of mtDNA (from cytochrome b and 16S rRNA genes) between islands. mtDNA reveals that both P. kuhlii and P. maderensis exist in sympatry on Tenerife (and possibly other islands). Their morphological similarity explains why their co-occurrence had not been detected previously. Levels of sequence divergence are quite low within P. maderensis. Haplotypes were either identical or separated by /=12 mutational steps) indicating colonization of the latter from the former sometime during the last approximately 1.2 Ma, with low subsequent gene flow. Unlike P. maderensis the El Hierro population alone appears to represent an ESU. The H. savii haplotypes detected in Gran Canaria and Tenerife are identical or separated by 1 mutational step.

  11. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Merriwether, D. A.; Hall, W. W.; Vahlne, A.; Ferrell, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    mtDNA RFLP variation was analyzed in 42 Mongolians from Ulan Bator. All four founding lineage types (A [4.76%], B [2.38%], C [11.9%], and D [19.04%]) identified by Torroni and colleagues were detected. Seven of the nine founding lineage types proposed by Bailliet and colleagues and Merriwether and Ferrell were detected (A2 [4.76%], B [2.38%], C1 [11.9%], D1 [7.14%], D2 [11.9%], X6 [16.7%], and X7 [9.5%]). Sixty-four percent of these 42 individuals had "Amerindian founding lineage" haplotypes. A survey of 24 restriction sites yielded 16 polymorphic sites and 21 different haplotypes. The presence of all four of the founding lineages identified by the Torroni group (and seven of Merriwether and Ferrell's nine founding lineages), combined with Mongolia's location with respect to the Bering Strait, indicates that Mongolia is a potential location for the origin of the founders of the New World. Since lineage B, which is widely distributed in the New World, is absent in Siberia, we conclude that Mongolia or a geographic location common to both contemporary Mongolians and American aboriginals is the more likely origin of the founders of the New World. PMID:8659526

  12. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  13. Spotlight on the relevance of mtDNA in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, A; Vicente-Blanco, R J; Gonzalez-Vioque, E; Provencio, M; Fernández-Moreno, M Á; Garesse, R

    2017-04-01

    The potential role of the mitochondrial genome has recently attracted interest because of its high mutation frequency in tumors. Different aspects of mtDNA make it relevant for cancer's biology, such as it encodes a limited but essential number of genes for OXPHOS biogenesis, it is particularly susceptible to mutations, and its copy number can vary. Moreover, most ROS in mitochondria are produced by the electron transport chain. These characteristics place the mtDNA in the center of multiple signaling pathways, known as mitochondrial retrograde signaling, which modifies numerous key processes in cancer. Cybrid studies support that mtDNA mutations are relevant and exert their effect through a modification of OXPHOS function and ROS production. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical relevance of mtDNA mutations. New studies should focus more on OXPHOS dysfunction associated with a specific mutational signature rather than the presence of mutations in the mtDNA.

  14. Developing equine mtDNA profiling for forensic application.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Susan M R; Schneider, Sandra; Pflugradt, René; Barrett, Elizabeth; Forster, Anna Catharina; Brinkmann, Bernd; Jansen, Thomas; Forster, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Horse mtDNA profiling can be useful in forensic work investigating degraded samples, hair shafts or highly dilute samples. Degraded DNA often does not allow sequencing of fragments longer than 200 nucleotides. In this study we therefore search for the most discriminatory sections within the hypervariable horse mtDNA control region. Among a random sample of 39 horses, 32 different sequences were identified in a stretch of 921 nucleotides. The sequences were assigned to the published mtDNA types A-G, and to a newly labelled minor type H. The random match probability within the analysed samples is 3.61%, and the average pairwise sequence difference is 15 nucleotides. In a "sliding window" analysis of 200-nucleotide sections of the mtDNA control region, we find that the known repetitive central motif divides the mtDNA control region into a highly diverse segment and a markedly less discriminatory segment.

  15. Recovering mitochondrial DNA lineages of extinct Amerindian nations in extant homopatric Brazilian populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brazilian Amerindians have experienced a drastic population decrease in the past 500 years. Indeed, many native groups from eastern Brazil have vanished. However, their mitochondrial mtDNA haplotypes, still persist in Brazilians, at least 50 million of whom carry Amerindian mitochondrial lineages. Our objective was to test whether, by analyzing extant rural populations from regions anciently occupied by specific Amerindian groups, we could identify potentially authentic mitochondrial lineages, a strategy we have named 'homopatric targeting'. Results We studied 173 individuals from Queixadinha, a small village located in a territory previously occupied by the now extinct Botocudo Amerindian nation. Pedigree analysis revealed 74 unrelated matrilineages, which were screened for Amerindian mtDNA lineages by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A cosmopolitan control group was composed of 100 individuals from surrounding cities. All Amerindian lineages identified had their hypervariable segment HVSI sequenced, yielding 13 Amerindian haplotypes in Queixadinha, nine of which were not present in available databanks or in the literature. Among these haplotypes, there was a significant excess of haplogroup C (70%) and absence of haplogroup A lineages, which were the most common in the control group. The novelty of the haplotypes and the excess of the C haplogroup suggested that we might indeed have identified Botocudo lineages. To validate our strategy, we studied teeth extracted from 14 ancient skulls of Botocudo Amerindians from the collection of the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro. We recovered mtDNA sequences from all the teeth, identifying only six different haplotypes (a low haplotypic diversity of 0.8352 ± 0.0617), one of which was present among the lineages observed in the extant individuals studied. Conclusions These findings validate the technique of homopatric targeting as a useful new strategy to study the peopling and colonization of the New

  16. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA4977.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Navidi, W; Tavaré, S; Dang, M H; Chomyn, A; Attardi, G; Cortopassi, G; Arnheim, N

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA4977 is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation fate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA4977 in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10(-8) per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations.

  17. A mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with maternally inherited Parkinson`s disease (PD) and deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Shoffner, J.M.; Brown, M.; Huoponen, K.

    1994-09-01

    A pedigree was characterized in which PD and deafness is expressed along the maternal lineage. The proband is 74 years old and has PD. Her mother and 3 of 7 siblings have PD and a maternal lineage cousin may have early signs of PD. The proband`s mother, a sibling, and all four of her daughters have premature deafness. Since manifestations of PD begin after 50 years of age, the 30-40 year old daughters have not reached an age where extrapyramidal symptoms are likely to appear. Although all 4 daughters have premature deafness, one daughter experienced a rapid reduction of her hearing after receiving a short course during childhood of the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Muscle biopsies from the proband who has PD and 3 daughters with deafness revealed normal histology. Oxidative phosphorylation biochemistry showed Complex I and IV defects in the proband and 2 daughters and a Complex I defect in the other daughter. The proband`s mtDNA was sequenced. Of the nucleotide variants observed, the only significant nucleotide change was a homoplasmic A-to-G point mutation in the 12S rRNA gene at position 1555 of the mtDNA. This site is homologous to the E. coli aminoglycoside binding site and has been found in a large Arab-Israeli pedigree with spontaneously occurring deafness and three Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced deafness. Hence, this family shows a direct link between PD, deafness, Complex I and IV defects, and a mutation in a gene that functions in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Furthermore, the interaction between aminoglycosides and the mtDNA in a manner that augments the pathogenic effects of this mutation provides an excellent example of how environmental toxins and mtDNA mutations can interact to give a spectrum of clinical presentations.

  18. Deciphering the biodiversity of Listeria monocytogenes lineage III strains by polyphasic approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanxin; Chen, Jianshun; Fang, Chun; Xia, Ye; Cheng, Changyong; Jiang, Lingli; Fang, Weihuan

    2011-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen of humans and animals. The majority of human listeriosis cases are caused by strains of lineages I and II, while lineage III strains are rare and seldom implicated in human listeriosis. We revealed by 16S rRNA sequencing the special evolutionary status of L. monocytogenes lineage III, which falls between lineages I and II strains of L. monocytogenes and the non-pathogenic species L. innocua and L. marthii in the dendrogram. Thirteen lineage III strains were then characterized by polyphasic approaches. Biochemical reactions demonstrated 8 biotypes, internalin profiling identified 10 internal-in types clustered in 4 groups, and multilocus sequence typing differentiated 12 sequence types. These typing schemes show that lineage III strains represent the most diverse population of L. monocytogenes, and comprise at least four subpopulations IIIA-1, IIIA-2, HIB, and IIIC. The in vitro and in vivo virulence assessments showed that two lineage IIIA-2 strains had reduced pathogenicity, while the other lineage III strains had comparable virulence to lineages I and II. The HIB strains are phylogenetically distinct from other sub-populations, providing additional evidence that this sublineage represents a novel lineage. The two biochemical reactions L-rhamnose and L-lactate alkalinization, and 10 internalins were identified as potential markers for lineage III subpopulations. This study provides new insights into the biodiversity and population structure of lineage III strains, which are important for understanding the evolution of the L. mono-cytogenes-L. innocua clade.

  19. Lack of founding Amerindian mitochondrial DNA lineages in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Lalueza, C; Pérez-Pérez, A; Prats, E; Cornudella, L; Turbón, D

    1997-01-01

    Ancient DNA from bones and teeth of 60 individuals from four extinct human populations from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia (Selknam, Yamana, Kaweskar and Aonikenk) has been extracted and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. High-resolution analysis of endonuclease restriction site variation in the mtDNA and sequencing of its hypervariable non-coding control region, revealed complete absence of two of the four primary mitochondrial haplotype groups present in contemporary Amerinds, namely A and B. In contrast, haplogroups C and D were found in all but one sample with frequencies of approximately 38% and 60%. These results, together with the decreasing incidence of group A in more southerly latitudes in the American continent and the absence of cluster B above 55 degrees North in America and Asia, argue that the first settlers entering America 21000-14000 years ago already lacked both mtDNA lineages.

  20. Early Holocenic and Historic mtDNA African Signatures in the Iberian Peninsula: The Andalusian Region as a Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Candela L; Soares, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean M; Novelletto, Andrea; Rodríguez, Juan N; Rito, Teresa; Oliveira, Marisa; Melhaoui, Mohammed; Baali, Abdellatif; Pereira, Luisa; Calderón, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Determining the timing, identity and direction of migrations in the Mediterranean Basin, the role of "migratory routes" in and among regions of Africa, Europe and Asia, and the effects of sex-specific behaviors of population movements have important implications for our understanding of the present human genetic diversity. A crucial component of the Mediterranean world is its westernmost region. Clear features of transcontinental ancient contacts between North African and Iberian populations surrounding the maritime region of Gibraltar Strait have been identified from archeological data. The attempt to discern origin and dates of migration between close geographically related regions has been a challenge in the field of uniparental-based population genetics. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies have been focused on surveying the H1, H3 and V lineages when trying to ascertain north-south migrations, and U6 and L in the opposite direction, assuming that those lineages are good proxies for the ancestry of each side of the Mediterranean. To this end, in the present work we have screened entire mtDNA sequences belonging to U6, M1 and L haplogroups in Andalusians--from Huelva and Granada provinces--and Moroccan Berbers. We present here pioneer data and interpretations on the role of NW Africa and the Iberian Peninsula regarding the time of origin, number of founders and expansion directions of these specific markers. The estimated entrance of the North African U6 lineages into Iberia at 10 ky correlates well with other L African clades, indicating that U6 and some L lineages moved together from Africa to Iberia in the Early Holocene. Still, founder analysis highlights that the high sharing of lineages between North Africa and Iberia results from a complex process continued through time, impairing simplistic interpretations. In particular, our work supports the existence of an ancient, frequently denied, bridge connecting the Maghreb and Andalusia.

  1. Early Holocenic and Historic mtDNA African Signatures in the Iberian Peninsula: The Andalusian Region as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Candela L.; Soares, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean M.; Novelletto, Andrea; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Rito, Teresa; Oliveira, Marisa; Melhaoui, Mohammed; Baali, Abdellatif; Pereira, Luisa; Calderón, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Determining the timing, identity and direction of migrations in the Mediterranean Basin, the role of “migratory routes” in and among regions of Africa, Europe and Asia, and the effects of sex-specific behaviors of population movements have important implications for our understanding of the present human genetic diversity. A crucial component of the Mediterranean world is its westernmost region. Clear features of transcontinental ancient contacts between North African and Iberian populations surrounding the maritime region of Gibraltar Strait have been identified from archeological data. The attempt to discern origin and dates of migration between close geographically related regions has been a challenge in the field of uniparental-based population genetics. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies have been focused on surveying the H1, H3 and V lineages when trying to ascertain north-south migrations, and U6 and L in the opposite direction, assuming that those lineages are good proxies for the ancestry of each side of the Mediterranean. To this end, in the present work we have screened entire mtDNA sequences belonging to U6, M1 and L haplogroups in Andalusians—from Huelva and Granada provinces—and Moroccan Berbers. We present here pioneer data and interpretations on the role of NW Africa and the Iberian Peninsula regarding the time of origin, number of founders and expansion directions of these specific markers. The estimated entrance of the North African U6 lineages into Iberia at 10 ky correlates well with other L African clades, indicating that U6 and some L lineages moved together from Africa to Iberia in the Early Holocene. Still, founder analysis highlights that the high sharing of lineages between North Africa and Iberia results from a complex process continued through time, impairing simplistic interpretations. In particular, our work supports the existence of an ancient, frequently denied, bridge connecting the Maghreb and Andalusia. PMID:26509580

  2. Evidence from mitochondrial DNA that African honey bees spread as continuous maternal lineages.

    PubMed

    Hall, H G; Muralidharan, K

    1989-05-18

    African honey bees have populated much of South and Central America and will soon enter the United States. The mechanism by which they have spread is controversial. Africanization may be largely the result of paternal gene flow into extant European populations or, alternatively, of maternal migration of feral swarms that have maintained an African genetic integrity. We have been using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms to follow the population dynamics between European and African bees. In earlier reports, we suggested that if African honey bees had distinctive mitochondrial (mt) DNA, then it could potentially distinguish the relative contributions of swarming and mating to the Africanization process. Because mtDNA is maternally inherited, it would not be transmitted by mating drones and only transported by queens accompanying swarms. Furthermore, the presence of African mtDNA would reflect unbroken maternal lineages from the original bees introduced from Africa. The value of mtDNA for population studies in general has been reviewed recently. Here we report that 19 feral swarms, randomly caught in Mexico, all carried African mtDNA. Thus, the migrating force of the African honey bee in the American tropics consists of continuous African maternal lineages spreading as swarms. The mating of African drones to European queens seems to contribute little to African bee migration.

  3. The use of 16S and 16S-23S rDNA to easily detect and differentiate common Gram-negative orchard epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Jeng, R S; Svircev, A M; Myers, A L; Beliaeva, L; Hunter, D M; Hubbes, M

    2001-02-01

    The identification of Gram-negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria commonly isolated from an orchard phylloplane may result in a time consuming and tedious process for the plant pathologist. The paper provides a simple "one-step" protocol that uses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify intergenic spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes and a portion of 16S gene in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. Amplified 16S rDNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) following EcoRI digestion produced band patterns that readily distinguished between the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora (causal agent of fire blight in pear and apple) and the orchard epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans (formerly E. herbicola). The amplified DNA patterns of 16S-23S spacer regions may be used to differentiate E. amylovora at the intraspecies level. Isolates of E. amylovora obtained from raspberries exhibited two major fragments while those obtained from apples showed three distinct amplified DNA bands. In addition, the size of the 16S-23S spacer region differs between Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The RFLP pattern generated by HaeIII digestion may be used to provide a rapid and accurate identification of these two common orchard epiphytes.

  4. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  5. HVSI polymorphism indicates multiple origins of mtDNA in the Hazarewal population of Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akbar, N; Ahmad, H; Nadeem, M S; Hemphill, B E; Muhammad, K; Ahmad, W; Ilyas, M

    2016-06-24

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important tool used to explore ethnogenetics and the evolutionary history of human populations. In this study, hypervariable segment I (HVSI) from mtDNA was analyzed to establish the genetic lineage of the Hazarewal populations residing in the Mansehra and Abbottabad districts of Northern Pakistan. HVSI was extracted from genetic specimens obtained from 225 unrelated male and female individuals belonging to seven distinct Pakistani ethnic groups (31 Abbassis, 44 Awans, 38 Gujars, 16 Jadoons, 23 Karlals, 33 Syeds, and 40 Tanolis). Eighty-three haplogroups, 39 of which were unique, were identified; haplogroup H was predominantly represented (in 40% of the people), followed by haplogroups M (21.78%), R (16.89%), N (15.56%), L (3.11%), and HV (2.67%). The results revealed a sex-biased genetic contribution from putative West Eurasian, South Asian, and Sub-Saharan populations to the genetic lineage of Hazarewal ancestry, with the effect of Eurasians being predominant. The HVSI nucleotide sequences exhibited some characteristic deletion mutations between 16,022 and 16,193 bp, which is characteristic of specific ethnic groups. HVSI sequence homology showed that Hazarewal populations fall into three major clusters: Syeds and Awans sorted out into cluster I; Tanolis, Gujars, and Karlals segregated in cluster II; and Abbassis and Jadoons in cluster III. Here, we have reported the firsthand genetic information and evolutionary sketch of the selected populations residing alongside the historical Silk Route, which provides a baseline for collating the origin, route of migration, and phylogenetics of the population.

  6. The Expansion of mtDNA Haplogroup L3 within and out of Africa.

    PubMed

    Soares, Pedro; Alshamali, Farida; Pereira, Joana B; Fernandes, Verónica; Silva, Nuno M; Afonso, Carla; Costa, Marta D; Musilová, Eliska; Macaulay, Vincent; Richards, Martin B; Cerny, Viktor; Pereira, Luísa

    2012-03-01

    Although fossil remains show that anatomically modern humans dispersed out of Africa into the Near East ∼100 to 130 ka, genetic evidence from extant populations has suggested that non-Africans descend primarily from a single successful later migration. Within the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) tree, haplogroup L3 encompasses not only many sub-Saharan Africans but also all ancient non-African lineages, and its age therefore provides an upper bound for the dispersal out of Africa. An analysis of 369 complete African L3 sequences places this maximum at ∼70 ka, virtually ruling out a successful exit before 74 ka, the date of the Toba volcanic supereruption in Sumatra. The similarity of the age of L3 to its two non-African daughter haplogroups, M and N, suggests that the same process was likely responsible for both the L3 expansion in Eastern Africa and the dispersal of a small group of modern humans out of Africa to settle the rest of the world. The timing of the expansion of L3 suggests a link to improved climatic conditions after ∼70 ka in Eastern and Central Africa rather than to symbolically mediated behavior, which evidently arose considerably earlier. The L3 mtDNA pool within Africa suggests a migration from Eastern Africa to Central Africa ∼60 to 35 ka and major migrations in the immediate postglacial again linked to climate. The largest population size increase seen in the L3 data is 3-4 ka in Central Africa, corresponding to Bantu expansions, leading diverse L3 lineages to spread into Eastern and Southern Africa in the last 3-2 ka.

  7. Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs of Acinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oerther, Daniel B.; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schramm, Andreas; Amann, Rudolf; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Cangelosi and Brabant used oligonucleotide probes targeting the precursor 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli to demonstrate that the levels of precursor rRNA were more sensitive to changes in growth phase than the levels of total rRNA (G. A. Cangelosi and W. H. Brabant, J. Bacteriol. 179:4457–4463, 1997). In order to measure changes in the levels of precursor rRNA in activated sludge systems, we designed oligonucleotide probes targeting the 3′ region of the precursor 16S rRNA of Acinetobacter spp. We used these probes to monitor changes in the level of precursor 16S rRNA during batch growth of Acinetobacter spp. in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, filtered wastewater, and in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. Consistent with the previous reports for E. coli, results obtained with membrane hybridizations and fluorescence in situ hybridizations with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus grown in LB medium showed a more substantial and faster increase in precursor 16S rRNA levels compared to the increase in total 16S rRNA levels during exponential growth. Diluting an overnight culture of A. calcoaceticus grown in LB medium with filtered wastewater resulted in a pattern of precursor 16S rRNA levels that appeared to follow diauxic growth. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes targeting total 16S rRNA and precursor 16S rRNA showed that individual cells of A. calcoaceticus expressed highly variable levels of precursor 16S rRNA when adapting from LB medium to filtered sewage. Precursor 16S rRNA levels of Acinetobacter spp. transiently increased when activated sludge was mixed with influent wastewater in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. These results suggest that Acinetobacter spp. experience a change in growth activity within wastewater treatment systems. PMID:10788395

  8. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  9. Revealing the hidden complexities of mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel James; Wolff, Jonci Nikolai; Pierson, Melanie; Gemmell, Neil John

    2008-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a pivotal tool in molecular ecology, evolutionary and population genetics. The power of mtDNA analyses derives from a relatively high mutation rate and the apparent simplicity of mitochondrial inheritance (maternal, without recombination), which has simplified modelling population history compared to the analysis of nuclear DNA. However, in biology things are seldom simple, and advances in DNA sequencing and polymorphism detection technology have documented a growing list of exceptions to the central tenets of mitochondrial inheritance, with paternal leakage, heteroplasmy and recombination now all documented in multiple systems. The presence of paternal leakage, recombination and heteroplasmy can have substantial impact on analyses based on mtDNA, affecting phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, estimates of the coalescent and the myriad of other parameters that are dependent on such estimates. Here, we review our understanding of mtDNA inheritance, discuss how recent findings mean that established ideas may need to be re-evaluated, and we assess the implications of these new-found complications for molecular ecologists who have relied for decades on the assumption of a simpler mode of inheritance. We show how it is possible to account for recombination and heteroplasmy in evolutionary and population analyses, but that accurate estimates of the frequencies of biparental inheritance and recombination are needed. We also suggest how nonclonal inheritance of mtDNA could be exploited, to increase the ways in which mtDNA can be used in analyses.

  10. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  11. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts.

  12. Direct somatic lineage conversion

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  13. Free from mitochondrial DNA: Nuclear genes and the inference of species trees among closely related darter lineages (Teleostei: Percidae: Etheostomatinae).

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Keck, Benjamin P

    2013-03-01

    Investigations into the phylogenetics of closely related animal species are dominated by the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data. However, the near-ubiquitous use of mtDNA to infer phylogeny among closely related animal lineages is tempered by an increasing number of studies that document high rates of transfer of mtDNA genomes among closely related species through hybridization, leading to substantial discordance between phylogenies inferred from mtDNA and nuclear gene sequences. In addition, the recent development of methods that simultaneously infer a species phylogeny and estimate divergence times, while accounting for incongruence among individual gene trees, has ushered in a new era in the investigation of phylogeny among closely related species. In this study we assess if DNA sequence data sampled from a modest number of nuclear genes can resolve relationships of a species-rich clade of North American freshwater teleost fishes, the darters. We articulate and expand on a recently introduced method to infer a time-calibrated multi-species coalescent phylogeny using the computer program (*)BEAST. Our analyses result in well-resolved and strongly supported time-calibrated darter species tree. Contrary to the expectation that mtDNA will provide greater phylogenetic resolution than nuclear gene data; the darter species tree inferred exclusively from nuclear genes exhibits a higher frequency of strongly supported nodes than the mtDNA time-calibrated gene tree.

  14. Unexpected population genetic structure of European roe deer in Poland: an invasion of the mtDNA genome from Siberian roe deer.

    PubMed

    Matosiuk, Maciej; Borkowska, Anetta; Świsłocka, Magdalena; Mirski, Paweł; Borowski, Zbigniew; Krysiuk, Kamil; Danilkin, Aleksey A; Zvychaynaya, Elena Y; Saveljev, Alexander P; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2014-05-01

    Introgressive hybridization is a widespread evolutionary phenomenon which may lead to increased allelic variation at selective neutral loci and to transfer of fitness-related traits to introgressed lineages. We inferred the population genetic structure of the European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Poland from mitochondrial (CR and cyt b) and sex-linked markers (ZFX, SRY, DBY4 and DBY8). Analyses of CR mtDNA sequences from 452 individuals indicated widespread introgression of Siberian roe deer (C. pygargus) mtDNA in the European roe deer genome, 2000 km from the current distribution range of C. pygargus. Introgressed individuals constituted 16.6% of the deer studied. Nearly 75% of them possessed haplotypes belonging to the group which arose 23 kyr ago and have not been detected within the natural range of Siberian roe deer, indicating that majority of present introgression has ancient origin. Unlike the mtDNA results, sex-specific markers did not show signs of introgression. Species distribution modelling analyses suggested that C. pygargus could have extended its range as far west as Central Europe after last glacial maximum. The main hybridization event was probably associated with range expansion of the most abundant European roe deer lineage from western refugia and took place in Central Europe after the Younger Dryas (10.8-10.0 ka BP). Initially, introgressed mtDNA variants could have spread out on the wave of expansion through the mechanism of gene surfing, reaching high frequencies in European roe deer populations and leading to observed asymmetrical gene flow. Human-mediated introductions of C. pygargus had minimal effect on the extent of mtDNA introgression.

  15. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  16. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  17. Incorporating 16S gene copy number information improves estimates of microbial diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Green, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA ("16S") gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly - from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data.

  18. Evolutionary Analyses of Entire Genomes Do Not Support the Association of mtDNA Mutations with Ras/MAPK Pathway Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, María; Balboa, Emilia; Heredia, Claudia; Castro-Feijóo, Lidia; Rica, Itxaso; Barreiro, Jesús; Eirís, Jesús; Cabanas, Paloma; Martínez-Soto, Isabel; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Pombo, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Barros, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Background There are several known autosomal genes responsible for Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes, including Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders (such as LEOPARD, neurofibromatosis type 1), although mutations of these genes do not explain all cases. Due to the important role played by the mitochondrion in the energetic metabolism of cardiac muscle, it was recently proposed that variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome could be a risk factor in the Noonan phenotype and in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which is a common clinical feature in Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes. In order to test these hypotheses, we sequenced entire mtDNA genomes in the largest series of patients suffering from Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes analyzed to date (n = 45), most of them classified as NS patients (n = 42). Methods/Principal Findings The results indicate that the observed mtDNA lineages were mostly of European ancestry, reproducing in a nutshell the expected haplogroup (hg) patterns of a typical Iberian dataset (including hgs H, T, J, and U). Three new branches of the mtDNA phylogeny (H1j1, U5b1e, and L2a5) are described for the first time, but none of these are likely to be related to NS or Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes when observed under an evolutionary perspective. Patterns of variation in tRNA and protein genes, as well as redundant, private and heteroplasmic variants, in the mtDNA genomes of patients were as expected when compared with the patterns inferred from a worldwide mtDNA phylogeny based on more than 8700 entire genomes. Moreover, most of the mtDNA variants found in patients had already been reported in healthy individuals and constitute common polymorphisms in human population groups. Conclusions/Significance As a whole, the observed mtDNA genome variation in the NS patients was difficult to reconcile with previous findings that indicated a pathogenic role of mtDNA variants in NS. PMID:21526175

  19. Phylogeny of Japanese stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) inferred from 16S mtrRNA gene sequences, with reference to the evolution of sexual dimorphism of mandibles.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Tadatsugu; Araya, Kunio

    2005-12-01

    As a first step in reconstructing the phylogeny of world stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), phylogenetic relationships among the major members of Japanese stag beetles were explored by analyzing a sequence of 1030 nucleotides from the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. A total of 20 species and three additional subspecies representing 13 genera were examined to provide basic information on the phylogeny of world Lucanidae. The resultant phylogenetic tree indicates that the family Lucanidae is monophyletic, and contains two major lineages: one consists of the genera Platycerus, Aesalus, Ceruchus, and Nicagus, and the other includes Dorcus, Rhaetulus, Prosopocoilus, Aegus, Neolucanus, Prismognathus, Lucanus, Figulus, and Nigidius. Generic members of the latter lineage are further divided into the following four sublineages: i) Figulus and Nigidius; ii) Prismognathus and Lucanus; iii) Aegus and Neolucanus; and iv) Dorcus, Rhaetulus, and Prosopocoilus. These molecular phylogenetic relationships are used as a basis for a preliminary exploration of the evolution of sexual dimorphism in the shape of the mandible. The results of this investigation suggest that strong sexual dimorphism with well-developed mandibles in males evolved independently at least twice, once in the genus Aegus and once in the ancestor of the Lucanus-Prismognathus and Dorcus-Rhaetulus-Prosopocoilus clades. Alternatively, it is possible that sexual dimorphism of mandibles has undergone secondary loss in the genera Figulus and Nigidius.

  20. MtDNA control region variation affirms diversity and deep sub-structure in populations from southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Khoe-San groups with high proportions of Bantu-speaking admixture but also unique distributions of other mtDNA lineages. Conclusions On the whole, the research reported here presented new insights into the multifaceted demographic history that shaped the existing genetic landscape of the Khoe-San and Coloured populations of southern Africa. PMID:23445172

  1. High prevalence of non-synonymous substitutions in mtDNA of cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kazumasa; Inomata, Nobuyuki; Mizoiri, Shinji; Aibara, Mitsuto; Terai, Yohey; Okada, Norihiro; Tachida, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    When a population size is reduced, genetic drift may fix slightly deleterious mutations, and an increase in nonsynonymous substitution is expected. It has been suggested that past aridity has seriously affected and decreased the populations of cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria, while geographical studies have shown that the water levels in Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi have remained fairly constant. The comparably stable environments in the latter two lakes might have kept the populations of cichlid fishes large enough to remove slightly deleterious mutations. The difference in the stability of cichlid fish population sizes between Lake Victoria and the Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi is expected to have caused differences in the nonsynonymous/synonymous ratio, ω (=dN/dS), of the evolutionary rate. Here, we estimated ω and compared it between the cichlids of the three lakes for 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes using maximum likelihood methods. We found that the lineages of the cichlids in Lake Victoria had a significantly higher ω for several mitochondrial loci. Moreover, positive selection was indicated for several codons in the mtDNA of the Lake Victoria cichlid lineage. Our results indicate that both adaptive and slightly deleterious molecular evolution has taken place in the Lake Victoria cichlids' mtDNA genes, whose nonsynonymous sites are generally conserved.

  2. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  3. Towards a taxonomic coherence between average nucleotide identity and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity for species demarcation of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mincheol; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Park, Sang-Cheol; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    Among available genome relatedness indices, average nucleotide identity (ANI) is one of the most robust measurements of genomic relatedness between strains, and has great potential in the taxonomy of bacteria and archaea as a substitute for the labour-intensive DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) technique. An ANI threshold range (95-96%) for species demarcation had previously been suggested based on comparative investigation between DDH and ANI values, albeit with rather limited datasets. Furthermore, its generality was not tested on all lineages of prokaryotes. Here, we investigated the overall distribution of ANI values generated by pairwise comparison of 6787 genomes of prokaryotes belonging to 22 phyla to see whether the suggested range can be applied to all species. There was an apparent distinction in the overall ANI distribution between intra- and interspecies relationships at around 95-96% ANI. We went on to determine which level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity corresponds to the currently accepted ANI threshold for species demarcation using over one million comparisons. A twofold cross-validation statistical test revealed that 98.65% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity can be used as the threshold for differentiating two species, which is consistent with previous suggestions (98.2-99.0%) derived from comparative studies between DDH and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Our findings should be useful in accelerating the use of genomic sequence data in the taxonomy of bacteria and archaea.

  4. Use of 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequences to Infer Relationships among Archaebacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-16

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Archaebacteria; Eubacteria ; Eukaryotes; 16S Ribosomal RNA; 08 I Phylogeny; rRNA; RNA Sequencing; Molecular Clock; Urkingdoms; r...16S rRNA data were used to infer the relat onships among the archaebacteria, and of the archaebacteria to the eubacteria and eukaryotes. ur programs for...been published (1, 2, 16, 18). The analyses render untenable the suggestions of Lake and colleagues (Lake et al., 1985) that the eubacteria derive from

  5. PhytoREF: a reference database of the plastidial 16S rRNA gene of photosynthetic eukaryotes with curated taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Decelle, Johan; Romac, Sarah; Stern, Rowena F; Bendif, El Mahdi; Zingone, Adriana; Audic, Stéphane; Guiry, Michael D; Guillou, Laure; Tessier, Désiré; Le Gall, Florence; Gourvil, Priscillia; Dos Santos, Adriana L; Probert, Ian; Vaulot, Daniel; de Vargas, Colomban; Christen, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes have a critical role as the main producers in most ecosystems of the biosphere. The ongoing environmental metabarcoding revolution opens the perspective for holistic ecosystems biological studies of these organisms, in particular the unicellular microalgae that often lack distinctive morphological characters and have complex life cycles. To interpret environmental sequences, metabarcoding necessarily relies on taxonomically curated databases containing reference sequences of the targeted gene (or barcode) from identified organisms. To date, no such reference framework exists for photosynthetic eukaryotes. In this study, we built the PhytoREF database that contains 6490 plastidial 16S rDNA reference sequences that originate from a large diversity of eukaryotes representing all known major photosynthetic lineages. We compiled 3333 amplicon sequences available from public databases and 879 sequences extracted from plastidial genomes, and generated 411 novel sequences from cultured marine microalgal strains belonging to different eukaryotic lineages. A total of 1867 environmental Sanger 16S rDNA sequences were also included in the database. Stringent quality filtering and a phylogeny-based taxonomic classification were applied for each 16S rDNA sequence. The database mainly focuses on marine microalgae, but sequences from land plants (representing half of the PhytoREF sequences) and freshwater taxa were also included to broaden the applicability of PhytoREF to different aquatic and terrestrial habitats. PhytoREF, accessible via a web interface (http://phytoref.fr), is a new resource in molecular ecology to foster the discovery, assessment and monitoring of the diversity of photosynthetic eukaryotes using high-throughput sequencing.

  6. Tracing the Tumor Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Nicholas E.; Hicks, James

    2010-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which tumors progress is critical to our understanding and treatment of cancer. We do not routinely sample patients at multiple time points during the progression of their disease, and thus our research is limited to inferring progression a posteriori from the examination of a single tumor sample. Despite this limitation, inferring progression is possible because the tumor genome contains a natural history of the mutations that occur during the formation of the tumor mass. There are two approaches to reconstructing a lineage of progression: (1) inter-tumor comparisons, and (2) intra-tumor comparisons. The inter-tumor approach consists of taking single samples from large collections of tumors and comparing the complexity of the genomes to identify early and late mutations. The intra-tumor approach involves taking multiple samples from individual heterogeneous tumors to compare divergent clones and reconstruct a phylogenetic lineage. Here we discuss how these approaches can be used to interpret the current models for tumor progression. We also compare data from primary and metastatic copy number profiles to shed light on the final steps of breast cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how recent technical advances in single cell genomics will herald a new era in understanding the fundamental basis of tumor heterogeneity and progression. PMID:20537601

  7. Comparative analysis of bacteria associated with different mosses by 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yang; Li, Yan Hong

    2017-01-01

    To understand the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses, a phylogenetic study of bacterial communities in three mosses was carried out based on 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. The mosses used were Hygroamblystegium noterophilum, Entodon compressus and Grimmia montana, representing hygrophyte, shady plant and xerophyte, respectively. In total, the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), richness and diversity were different regardless of the moss species and the library level. All the examined 1183 clones were assigned to 248 OTUs, 56 genera were assigned in rDNA libraries and 23 genera were determined at the rRNA level. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were considered as the most dominant phyla in all the libraries, whereas abundant Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria were detected in the rDNA library of Entodon compressus and approximately 24.7% clones were assigned to Candidate division TM7 in Grimmia montana at rRNA level. The heatmap showed the bacterial profiles derived from rRNA and rDNA were partly overlapping. However, the principle component analysis of all the profiles derived from rDNA showed sharper differences between the different mosses than that of rRNA-based profiles. This suggests that the metabolically active bacterial compositions in different mosses were more phylogenetically similar and the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses were mainly detected at the rDNA level. Obtained results clearly demonstrate that combination of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing is preferred approach to have a good understanding on the constitution of the microbial communities in mosses.

  8. Phylogenetic ecology of the freshwater Actinobacteria acI lineage.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ryan J; Jones, Stuart E; Helmus, Matthew R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2007-11-01

    The acI lineage of freshwater Actinobacteria is a cosmopolitan and often numerically dominant member of lake bacterial communities. We conducted a survey of acI 16S rRNA genes and 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions from 18 Wisconsin lakes and used standard nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic statistical approaches to investigate the factors that determine acI community composition at the local scale (within lakes) and at the regional scale (across lakes). Phylogenetic reconstruction of 434 acI 16S rRNA genes revealed a well-defined and highly resolved phylogeny. Eleven previously unrecognized monophyletic clades, each with > or =97.9% within-clade 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, were identified. Clade community similarity positively correlated with lake environmental similarity but not with geographic distance, implying that the lakes represent a single biotic region containing environmental filters for communities that have similar compositions. Phylogenetically disparate clades within the acI lineage were most abundant at the regional scale, and local communities were comprised of more closely related clades. Lake pH was a strong predictor of the community composition, but only when lakes with a pH below 6 were included in the data set. In the remaining lakes (pH above 6) biogeographic patterns in the landscape were instead a predictor of the observed acI community structure. The nonrandom distribution of the newly defined acI clades suggests potential ecophysiological differences between the clades, with acI clades AI, BII, and BIII preferring acidic lakes and acI clades AII, AVI, and BI preferring more alkaline lakes.

  9. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  10. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of grey mullets (Teleostei: Mugilidae) in Greece: evidence from sequence analysis of mtDNA segments.

    PubMed

    Papasotiropoulos, Vasilis; Klossa-Kilia, Elena; Alahiotis, Stamatis N; Kilias, George

    2007-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis has been used to explore genetic differentiation and phylogenetic relationships among five species of the Mugilidae family, Mugil cephalus, Chelon labrosus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, and Liza saliens. DNA was isolated from samples originating from the Messolongi Lagoon in Greece. Three mtDNA segments (12s rRNA, 16s rRNA, and CO I) were PCR amplified and sequenced. Sequencing analysis revealed that the greatest genetic differentiation was observed between M. cephalus and all the other species studied, while C. labrosus and L. aurata were the closest taxa. Dendrograms obtained by the neighbor-joining method and Bayesian inference analysis exhibited the same topology. According to this topology, M. cephalus is the most distinct species and the remaining taxa are clustered together, with C. labrosus and L. aurata forming a single group. The latter result brings into question the monophyletic origin of the genus Liza.

  12. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  13. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    PubMed

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species.

  14. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  15. MtDNA diversity of Ghana: a forensic and phylogeographic view

    PubMed Central

    Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander; Zimmermann, Bettina; Bodner, Martin; Thye, Thorsten; Tschentscher, Frank; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Göbel, Tanja M.K.; Schneider, Peter M.; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    West Africa is characterized by a migration history spanning more than 150,000 years. Climate changes but also political circumstances were responsible for several early but also recent population movements that shaped the West African mitochondrial landscape. The aim of the study was to establish a Ghanaian mtDNA dataset for forensic purposes and to investigate the diversity of the Ghanaian population sample with respect to surrounding populations. We sequenced full mitochondrial control regions of 193 Akan people from Ghana and excluded two apparently close maternally related individuals due to preceding kinship testing. The remaining dataset comprising 191 sequences was applied as etalon for quasi-median network analysis and was subsequently combined with 99 additional control region sequences from surrounding West African countries. All sequences were incorporated into the EMPOP database enriching the severely underrepresented African mtDNA pool. For phylogeographic considerations, the Ghanaian haplotypes were compared to those of 19 neighboring populations comprising a total number of 6198 HVS1 haplotypes. We found extensive genetic admixture between the Ghanaian lineages and those from adjacent populations diminishing with geographical distance. The extent of genetic admixture reflects the long but also recent history of migration waves within West Africa mainly caused by changing environmental conditions. Also, evidence for potential socio-economical influences such as trade routes is provided by the occurrence of U6b and U6d sequences found in Dubai but also in Tunisia leading to the African West Coast via Mauritania and Senegal but also via Niger, Nigeria to Cameroon. PMID:21723214

  16. mtDNA diversity in Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai azarai) of the Argentinean Chaco.

    PubMed

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Baiduc, Caitlin A; Gagneux, Pascal; Evans, Sian; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-10-01

    Owl monkeys (Aotus spp.) inhabit much of South America yet represent an enigmatic evolutionary branch among primates. While morphological, cytogenetic, and immunological evidence suggest that owl monkey populations have undergone isolation and diversification since their emergence in the New World, problems with adjacent species ranges, and sample provenance have complicated efforts to characterize genetic variation within the genus. As a result, the phylogeographic history of owl monkey species and subspecies remains unclear, and the extent of genetic diversity at the population level is unknown. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) variation in a population of wild Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai azarai) living in the Gran Chaco region of Argentina. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome from one individual (16,585 base pairs (bp)) and analyzed 1,099 bp of the hypervariable control region (CR) and 696 bp of the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene in 117 others. In addition, we sequenced the mitochondrial genome (16,472 bp) of one Nancy Ma's owl monkey (A. nancymaae). Based on the whole mtDNA and COII data, we observed an ancient phylogeographic discontinuity among Aotus species living north, south, and west of the Amazon River that began more than eight million years ago. Our population analyses identified three major CR lineages and detected a high level of haplotypic diversity within A. a. azarai. These data point to a recent expansion of Azara's owl monkeys into the Argentinean Chaco. Overall, we provide a detailed view of owl monkey mtDNA variation at genus, species, and population levels.

  17. Individual performance in relation to cytonuclear discordance in a northern contact zone between long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) lineages.

    PubMed

    Lee-Yaw, Julie A; Jacobs, Chris G C; Irwin, Darren E

    2014-09-01

    Cytonuclear discordance in contact zones between related lineages is common, with mitochondrial clines often being displaced from clines in nuclear allele frequency. Proposed explanations for such a pattern include adaptive introgression of mtDNA or a neutral wake of mtDNA being left behind following hybrid zone movement. However, studies investigating these hypotheses are rare. Our previous survey of genetic variation in the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) highlighted a potential case of cytonuclear discordance between two lineages in western Canada. Here, we use additional markers and samples to clarify the extent of this discordance. We simultaneously assess the feeding performance of individuals in a common environment to test for an association between mitotype and individual performance. The genetic results confirm a general pattern of cytonuclear discordance in the focal region. However, we also observed more limited introgression of a diagnostic nuclear marker. Intriguingly, although there were differences in individual performance associated with the transition between mitotypes, these differences were not fully explained by mitotype. Instead, the lowest performance was observed in individuals demonstrating the greatest mismatch between mtDNA and all nuclear markers, suggesting the potential for cytonuclear incompatibilities to be acting. These results highlight the complexity of understanding the causes and consequences of mtDNA introgression and cytonuclear discordance in contact zones.

  18. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development.

  19. Routine Molecular Identification of Enterococci by Gene-Specific PCR and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lorino, Giulia; Gherardi, Giovanni; Battistoni, Fabrizio; De Cesaris, Marina; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2001-01-01

    For 279 clinically isolated specimens identified by commercial kits as enterococci, genotypic identification was performed by two multiplex PCRs, one with ddlE. faecalis and ddlE. faecium primers and another with vanC-1 and vanC-2/3 primers, and by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. For 253 strains, phenotypic and genotypic results were the same. Multiplex PCR allowed for the identification of 13 discordant results. Six strains were not enterococci and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. For 5 discordant and 10 concordant enterococcal strains, 16S rDNA sequencing was needed. Because many supplementary tests are frequently necessary for phenotypic identification, the molecular approach is a good alternative. PMID:11158155

  20. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  1. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  2. How few whales were there after whaling? Inference from contemporary mtDNA diversity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J A; Patenaude, N J; Carroll, E L; Baker, C Scott

    2008-01-01

    Reconstructing the history of exploited populations of whales requires fitting a trajectory through at least three points in time: (i) prior to exploitation, when abundance is assumed to be at the maximum allowed by environmental carrying capacity; (ii) the point of minimum abundance or 'bottleneck', usually near the time of protection or the abandonment of the hunt; and (iii) near the present, when protected populations are assumed to have undergone some recovery. As historical abundance is usually unknown, this trajectory must be extrapolated according to a population dynamic model using catch records, an assumed rate of increase and an estimate of current abundance, all of which have received considerable attention by the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Relatively little attention has been given to estimating minimum abundance (N(min)), although it is clear that genetic and demographic forces at this point are critical to the potential for recovery or extinction of a local population. We present a general analytical framework to improve estimates of N(min) using the number of mtDNA haplotypes (maternal lineages) surviving in a contemporary population of whales or other exploited species. We demonstrate the informative potential of this parameter as an a posteriori constraint on Bayesian logistic population dynamic models based on the IWC Comprehensive Assessment of the intensively exploited southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) and published surveys of mtDNA diversity for this species. Estimated historical trajectories from all demographic scenarios suggested a substantial loss of mtDNA haplotype richness as a result of 19th century commercial whaling and 20th century illegal whaling by the Soviet Union. However, the relatively high rates of population increase used by the IWC assessment predicted a bottleneck that was implausibly narrow (median, 67 mature females), given our corrected estimates of N(min). Further, high levels of remnant sequence

  3. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  4. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  5. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  6. Effect of gemini (alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide)) (16-s-16, s=4, 5, 6) surfactants on the interaction of ninhydrin with chromium-glycylphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dileep; Rub, Malik Abdul; Akram, Mohd; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-11-11

    The effect of gemini (alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide)) (16-s-16, s=4, 5, 6) surfactants on the interaction of ninhydrin with chromium(III) complex of glycylphenylalanine ([Cr(III)-Gly-Phe]2+) has been investigated using UV-visible spectrophotometer at different temperatures. The order of reaction with respect to [Cr(III)-Gly-Phe]2+ is unity while it is fractional with respect to ninhydrin. Whereas, the values of rate constant (kψ) increase and leveling-off regions, like conventional single chain cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, were observed with geminis, later produces a third region of increasing kψ at higher gemini surfactant concentrations. This unusual third-region effect of the gemini micelles is assigned to changes in their micellar morphologies. The results obtained in micellar media were treated in terms of pseudo-phase model. The values of thermodynamic parameters (Ea, ΔH# and ΔS#) and binding constants (KA and KNin) have been evaluated.

  7. Determination of population origin: a comparison of autosomal SNPs, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroups using a Malagasy population as example.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, Micaela; Wiegand, Aline; Harder, Melanie; Blöhm, Rowena; Rakotomavo, Noel; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms have been used for population studies for a long time. However, there is another possibility to define the origin of a population: autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose allele frequencies differ considerably in different populations. In an attempt to compare the usefulness of these approaches we studied a population from Madagascar using all the three mentioned approaches. Former investigations of Malagasy maternal (mtDNA) and paternal (Y chromosome) lineages have led to the assumption that the Malagasy are an admixed population with an African and Asian-Indonesian heritage. Our additional study demonstrated that more than two-third of the Malagasy investigated showed clearly a West African genotype regarding only the autosomal SNPs despite the fact that 64% had an Asian mtDNA and more than 70% demonstrated an Asian-Indonesian heritage in either mtDNA or Y-chromosomal haplogroup or both. Nonetheless, the admixture of the Malagasy could be confirmed. A clear African or Asian-Indonesian heritage according to all the three DNA approaches investigated was only found in 14% and 1% of male samples, respectively. Not even the European or Northern African influences, detected in 9% of males (Y-chromosomal analysis) and 11% of samples (autosomal SNPs) were consistent. No Malagasy in our samples showed a European or Northern African origin in both categories. So, the analysis of autosomal SNPs could confirm the admixed character of the Malagasy population, even if it pointed to a greater African influence as detectable by Y-chromosomal or mtDNA analysis.

  8. Random Genetic Drift Determines the Level of Mutant mtDNA in Human Primary Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. T.; Samuels, D. C.; Michael, E. M.; Turnbull, D. M.; Chinnery, P. F.

    2001-01-01

    We measured the proportion of mutant mtDNA (mutation load) in 82 primary oocytes from a woman who harbored the A3243G mtDNA mutation. The frequency distribution of mutation load indicates that random drift is the principal mechanism that determines the level of mutant mtDNA within individual oocytes. PMID:11133360

  9. The divergence of two independent lineages of an endemic Chinese gecko, Gekko swinhonis, launched by the Qinling orogenic belt.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Wang, Qiuxian; Chang, Qing; Ji, Xiang; Zhou, Kaiya

    2010-06-01

    The genetic structure and demographic history of an endemic Chinese gecko, Gekko swinhonis, were investigated by analysing the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 10 microsatellite loci for samples collected from 27 localities. Mitochondrial DNA data provided a detailed distribution of two highly divergent evolutionary lineages, between which the average pairwise distance achieved was 0.14. The geographic division of the two lineages coincided with a plate boundary consisting of the Qinling and Taihang Mts, suggesting a historical vicariant pattern. The orogeny of the Qinling Mts, a dispersal and major climatic barrier of the region, may have launched the independent lineage divergence. Both lineages have experienced recent expansion, and the current sympatric localities comprised the region of contact between the lineages. Individual-based phylogenetic analyses of nucDNA and Bayesian-clustering approaches revealed a deep genetic structure analogous to mtDNA. Incongruence between nucDNA and mtDNA at the individual level at localities outside of the contact region can be explained by the different inheritance patterns and male-biased dispersal in this species. High genetic divergence, long-term isolation and ecological adaptation, as well as the morphological differences, suggest the presence of a cryptic species.

  10. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni', a novel taxon associated with X-disease of stone fruits, Prunus spp.: multilocus characterization based on 16S rRNA, secY, and ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Yan; Dally, Ellen L; Lee, Ing-Ming; Jomantiene, Rasa; Douglas, Sharon M

    2013-02-01

    X-disease is one of the most serious diseases known in peach (Prunus persica). Based on RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, peach X-disease phytoplasma strains from eastern and western United States and eastern Canada were classified in 16S rRNA gene RFLP group 16SrIII, subgroup A. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the X-disease phytoplasma strains formed a distinct subclade within the phytoplasma clade, supporting the hypothesis that they represented a lineage distinct from those of previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Nucleotide sequence alignments revealed that all studied X-disease phytoplasma strains shared less than 97.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Based on unique properties of the DNA, we propose recognition of X-disease phytoplasma strain PX11CT1(R) as representative of a novel taxon, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni'. Results from nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of secY and ribosomal protein (rp) gene sequences provided additional molecular markers of the 'Ca. Phytoplasma pruni' lineage. We propose that the term 'Ca. Phytoplasma pruni' be applied to phytoplasma strains whose 16S rRNA gene sequences contain the oligonucleotide sequences of unique regions that are designated in the formally published description of the taxon. Such strains include X-disease phytoplasma and--within the tolerance of a single base difference in one unique sequence--peach rosette, peach red suture, and little peach phytoplasmas. Although not employed for taxon delineation in this work, we further propose that secY, rp, and other genetic loci from the reference strain of a taxon, and where possible oligonucleotide sequences of unique regions of those genes that distinguish taxa within a given 16Sr group, be incorporated in emended descriptions and as part of future descriptions of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' taxa.

  11. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  12. Ovine pedomics: the first study of the ovine foot 16S rRNA-based microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first study of the bacterial microbiome of ovine interdigital skin based on 16S rRNA by pyrosequencing and conventional cloning with Sanger-sequencing. Ovine foot rot is an infectious, contagious disease of sheep that causes severe lameness and economic loss from decreased flock produc...

  13. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  14. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  15. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  16. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  17. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  18. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  19. Problem-Based Test: Functional Analysis of Mutant 16S rRNAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: ribosome, ribosomal subunits, antibiotics, point mutation, 16S, 5S, and 23S rRNA, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, mRNA, tRNA, palindrome, hairpin, restriction endonuclease, fMet-tRNA, peptidyl transferase, initiation, elongation, termination of translation, expression plasmid, transformation,…

  20. Genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships in grey mullets (Teleostei: Mugilidae) based on PCR-RFLP analysis of mtDNA segments.

    PubMed

    Papasotiropoulos, V; Klossa-Kilia, E; Kilias, G; Alahiotis, S

    2002-04-01

    The genetic differentiation and phylogenetic relationships among five species of the Mugilidae family (Mugil cephalus, Chelon labrosus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, and Liza saliens) were investigated at the mtDNA level, on samples taken from Messolongi lagoon-Greece. RFLP analysis of three PCR-amplified mtDNA gene segments (12s rRNA, 16s rRNA, and CO I) was used. Ten, eight, and nine restriction enzymes were found to have at least one recognition site at 12s rRNA, 16s rRNA, and CO I genes, respectively. Several fragment patterns were revealed to be species-specific, and thus they could be useful in species taxonomy as diagnostic markers, as well as for further evolutionary studies. Seven different haplotypes were detected. The greatest amount of genetic differentiation was observed at the interspecific level, while little variation was revealed at the intraspecific level. The highest values of nucleotide sequence divergence were observed between M. cephalus and all the other species, while the lowest was found between C. labrosus and L. saliens. Dendrograms obtained by the three different methods (UPGMA, Neighbor-Joining, and Dollo parsimony), were found to exhibit in all cases the same topology. According to this, the most distinct species is M. cephalus, while the other species are clustered in two separate groups, thefirst one containing L. aurata and L. ramada, the other L. saliens and C. labrosus. This last clustering makes the monophyletic origin of the genus Liza questionable.

  1. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA evidence for a single species hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3-1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species.

  2. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA Evidence for a Single Species Hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3–1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species. PMID:25506929

  3. The expanded mtDNA phylogeny of the Franco-Cantabrian region upholds the pre-neolithic genetic substrate of Basques.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sergio; Valverde, Laura; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Algorta, Jaime; Catarino, Susana; Arteta, David; Herrera, Rene J; Zarrabeitia, María Teresa; Peña, José A; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2013-01-01

    The European genetic landscape has been shaped by several human migrations occurred since Paleolithic times. The accumulation of archaeological records and the concordance of different lines of genetic evidence during the last two decades have triggered an interesting debate concerning the role of ancient settlers from the Franco-Cantabrian region in the postglacial resettlement of Europe. Among the Franco-Cantabrian populations, Basques are regarded as one of the oldest and more intriguing human groups of Europe. Recent data on complete mitochondrial DNA genomes focused on macrohaplogroup R0 revealed that Basques harbor some autochthonous lineages, suggesting a genetic continuity since pre-Neolithic times. However, excluding haplogroup H, the most representative lineage of macrohaplogroup R0, the majority of maternal lineages of this area remains virtually unexplored, so that further refinement of the mtDNA phylogeny based on analyses at the highest level of resolution is crucial for a better understanding of the European prehistory. We thus explored the maternal ancestry of 548 autochthonous individuals from various Franco-Cantabrian populations and sequenced 76 mitogenomes of the most representative lineages. Interestingly, we identified three mtDNA haplogroups, U5b1f, J1c5c1 and V22, that proved to be representative of Franco-Cantabria, notably of the Basque population. The seclusion and diversity of these female genetic lineages support a local origin in the Franco-Cantabrian area during the Mesolithic of southwestern Europe, ~10,000 years before present (YBP), with signals of expansions at ~3,500 YBP. These findings provide robust evidence of a partial genetic continuity between contemporary autochthonous populations from the Franco-Cantabrian region, specifically the Basques, and Paleolithic/Mesolithic hunter-gatherer groups. Furthermore, our results raise the current proportion (≈ 15%) of the Franco-Cantabrian maternal gene pool with a putative pre

  4. Analysis of BRCA1 and mtDNA haplotypes and mtDNA polymorphism in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Povedano, Cristina; Salgado, Josefa; Gil, Carmen; Robles, Maitane; Patiño-García, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects have been postulated to play an important role in the modulation and/or progression of cancer. In the past decade, a wide spectrum of mtDNA variations have been suggested as potentially sensitive and specific biomarkers for several human cancer types. In this context, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) described as protective or risk variants have been published, in particular in breast cancer, though not without controversy. Moreover, many mtDNA haplogroups have been associated with different phenotypes and diseases. We genotyped 18 SNPs, 15 of them defining European mtDNA haplogroups, including SNPs described as protective or risk variants, 7 SNPs that determine BRCA1 haplotypes and a BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism. We included in this study 90 Caucasian unrelated women with breast cancer with familial criteria and 96 controls. Our aim was to clarify the importance of any of these SNPs, mitochondrial haplogroups and BRCA1 haplotypes in the modulation of breast cancer. We detected no significant differences in the distribution of BRCA1 haplotypes between patients and controls. Haplogroup U and the 12308G variant of mtDNA were overrepresented within the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.036, respectively) compared to breast cancer. Finally, we identified a significant association between the BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism and BRCA1 haplotypes. Specifically, (TTC)6/6 and (TTC)6/7 genotypes with the seven polymorphic site cassette of "H2-like" haplotypes, and the (TTC)7/7 genotype associated with the "H1-like" haplotypes (p < 0.001).

  5. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  6. Phytoplasma infecting cherry and lilac represent two distinct lineages having close evolutionary affinities with clover phyllody phytoplasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoplasmas infecting cherry and lilac in Lithuania were found to represent two lineages related to clover phyllody phytoplasma (CPh), a subgroup 16SrI-C strain exhibiting rRNA interoperon sequence heterogeneity. 16S rDNAs amplified from the cherry bunchy leaf (ChBL) and lilac little leaf (LcLL) p...

  7. [Phylogenetic analysis of ancient mitochondrial DNA lineages of human remains found in Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, S A; Stepanov, A D; Adoian, M; Parik, J; Argunov, V A; Ozawa, T; Khusnutdinova, E K; Villems, R

    2008-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of ancient human remains are mostly based on mitochondrial DNA due to its better preservation in human skeletons in comparison with nuclear DNA. We investigated mtDNA extracted from human skeletons found in graves in Yakutia to determine their haplotypes and to compare them with lineages of modern populations. Ancient DNA was extracted from fragments of three skeletons of Yakut graves at At-Dabaan, Ojuluun and Jaraama sites (dating XVIII century) and two skeletons of Neolithic graves at Kerdugen site found in central Yakutia (Churapchinsky, Kangalassky and Megino-Kangalassky districts of Yakutia). Five different haplotypes belonging to specific Asian haplogroups were identified. Lineages of mtDNA of Yakut graves belong to haplo-groups C4a, D5a2 and B5b. Our results indicate the continuity of mitochondrial lineages in the Yakut gene pool during the last 300 years. Haplotypes of two humans from Kerdugen site graves belong to haplogroups A4 and G2a/D. We compared these haplotypes with that of 40,000 Eurasian individuals, 900 of them from Yakutia. No exact matches were found in Paleoasian populations of Chukchi, Eskimos, Koryaks and Itelmen. Phylogenetically close haplotypes (+/- 1 mutation) were found in populations of Yakuts and Evenks, as well as in some populations of China, Southern and Western Siberia.

  8. Microbial diversity of cold-seep sediments in Sagami Bay, Japan, as determined by 16S rRNA gene and lipid analyses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiasong; Shizuka, Arakawa; Kato, Chiaki; Schouten, Stefan

    2006-09-01

    Microbial communities in Calyptogena sediment and microbial mats of Sagami Bay, Japan, were characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and lipid biomarker analysis. Characterization of 16S rRNA gene isolated from these samples suggested a predominance of bacterial phylotypes related to Gammaproteobacteria (57-64%) and Deltaproteobacteria (27-29%). The Epsilonproteobacteria commonly found in cold seeps and hydrothermal vents were only detected in the microbial mat sample. Significantly different archaeal phylotypes were found in Calyptogena sediment and microbial mats; the former contained only Crenarchaeota clones (100% of the total archaeal clones) and the latter exclusively Euryarchaeota clones, including the anaerobic oxidation of methane archaeal groups ANME-2a and ANME-2c. Many of these lineages are as yet uncultured and undescribed groups of bacteria and archaea. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis suggested the presence of sulphate-reducing and sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Results of intact glyceryl dialkyl glyceryl tetraether lipid analysis indicated the presence of nonthermophilic marine planktonic archaea. These results suggest that the microbial community in the Sagami Bay seep site is distinct from previously characterized cold-seep environments.

  9. Microbial Diversity of Cold-Seep Sediments in Sagami Bay, Japan as Determined by 16S rDNA and Lipid Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Arakawa, S.; Kato, C.; Schouten, S.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial communities in Calyptogena sediment and microbial mats of Sagami Bay, Japan were characterized by using 16S rDNA sequencing and lipid biomarker analysis. Characterization of 16S rDNA isolated from these samples suggested a predominance of bacterial phylotypes related to γ- (57-64%) and δ-subclasses (27-29%) of the Proteobacteria. The ɛ-subclass of the Proteobacteria commonly found in cold seeps and hydrothermal vents were only detected in the microbial mat sample. There are significantly different archaeal phylotypes between Calyptogena sediment and microbial mat; the former contains only Crenarchaeota clones (100% of the total archaeal clones) and the latter exclusively Euryarchaeota clones including the ANME-2a and ANME-2c archaeal groups. Many of these lineages are as yet uncultured and undescribed groups of bacteria and archaea. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis suggests the presence of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Results of intact glyceryl dialkyl glyceryl tetraether (GDGT) lipid analysis indicate the presence of nonthermophilic marine planktonic archaea. These results suggest that the microbial community in the Sagami Bay seep site is distinct from previously characterized cold seep environments.

  10. Prevalence of lysogeny among soil bacteria and presence of 16S rRNA and trzN genes in viral-community DNA.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dhritiman; Roy, Krishnakali; Williamson, Kurt E; White, David C; Wommack, K Eric; Sublette, Kerry L; Radosevich, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are very abundant in the biosphere, and viral infection is believed to affect the activity and genetic diversity of bacterial communities in aquatic environments. Lysogenic conversion, for example, can improve host fitness and lead to phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about lysogeny and transduction in the soil environment. In this study we employed atrazine-impregnated Bio-Sep beads (a cell immobilization matrix) to sample active microbiota from soils with prior pesticide exposure history. Once recovered from soil, the bead communities were induced with mitomycin C (MC), and viral and bacterial abundances were determined to evaluate the incidence of inducible prophage in soil bacteria. The inducible fraction calculated within bead communities was high (ca. 85%) relative to other studies in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Moreover, the bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA and trzN, a chlorohydrolase gene responsible for dehalogenation of atrazine, were detected by PCR in the viral DNA fraction purified from MC-induced bead communities. A diverse collection of actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences occurred within the viral DNA fraction of induced, water-equilibrated beads. Similar results were observed in induced atrazine-equilibrated beads, where 77% of the cloned sequences were derived from actinobacterial lineages. Heterogeneous 16S rRNA gene sequences consisting of fragments from two different taxa were detected in the clone libraries. The results suggest that lysogeny is a prevalent reproductive strategy among soil bacteriophages and that the potential for horizontal gene transfer via transduction is significant in soil microbial communities.

  11. Phylogeographical lineages of Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) in North America: divergence, origins and affinities with Eurasian Thymallus.

    PubMed

    Stamford, M D; Taylor, E B

    2004-06-01

    The number and location of Arctic glacial refugia utilized by taxa during the Pleistocene are continuing uncertainties in Holarctic phylogeography. Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) are widely distributed in freshwaters from the eastern side of Hudson Bay (Canada) west to central Asia. We studied mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite DNA variation in North American T. arcticus to test for genetic signatures of survival in, and postglacial dispersal from, multiple glacial refugia, and to assess their evolutionary affinities with Eurasian Thymallus. In samples from 32 localities, we resolved 12 mtDNA haplotypes belonging to three assemblages that differed from each other in sequence by between 0.75 and 2.13%: a 'South Beringia' lineage found from western Alaska to northern British Columbia, Canada; a 'North Beringia' lineage found on the north slope of Alaska, the lower Mackenzie River, and to eastern Saskatchewan; and a 'Nahanni' lineage confined to the Nahanni River area of the upper Mackenzie River drainage. Sequence analysis of a portion of the control region indicated monophyly of all North American T. arcticus and their probable origin from eastern Siberian T. arcticus at least 3 Mya. Arctic grayling sampled from 25 localities displayed low allelic diversity and expected heterozygosity (H(E)) across five microsatellite loci (means of 2.1 alleles and 0.27 H(E), respectively) and there were declines in these measures of genetic diversity with distance eastward from the lower Yukon River Valley. Assemblages defined by mtDNA divergences were less apparent at microsatellite loci, but again the Nahanni lineage was the most distinctive. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that between 24% (microsatellite DNA) and 81% (mtDNA) of the variance was attributable to differences among South Beringia, North Beringia and Nahanni lineages. Our data suggest that extant North American Arctic grayling are more diverse phylogeographically than previously suspected

  12. Mitochondrial disease in childhood: mtDNA encoded.

    PubMed

    Saneto, Russell P; Sedensky, Margret M

    2013-04-01

    Since the first description of a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-associated disease in the late 1980s, there have been more than 275 mutations within the mtDNA genome described causing human disease. The phenotypic expression of these disorders is vast, as disturbances of the unique physiology of mitochondria can create a wide range of clinical heterogeneity. Features of heteroplasmy, threshold effect, genetic bottleneck, mtDNA depletion, mitotic segregation, and maternal inheritance have been identified and described as a result of novel biochemical and genetic controls of mitochondrial function. We hope that as we unfold this fascinating part of clinical medicine, the reader will see how alterations in the tapestry of mitochondrial biochemistry and genetics can give rise to human illness.

  13. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  14. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  15. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  16. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  17. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  18. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  19. How conserved are the conserved 16S-rRNA regions?

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz Suarez, Luis Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene has been used as master key for studying prokaryotic diversity in almost every environment. Despite the claim of several researchers to have the best universal primers, the reality is that no primer has been demonstrated to be truly universal. This suggests that conserved regions of the gene may not be as conserved as expected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the conservation degree of the so-called conserved regions flanking the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Data contained in SILVA database (release 123) were used for the study. Primers reported as matches of each conserved region were assembled to form contigs; sequences sizing 12 nucleotides (12-mers) were extracted from these contigs and searched into the entire set of SILVA sequences. Frequency analysis shown that extreme regions, 1 and 10, registered the lowest frequencies. 12-mer frequencies revealed segments of contigs that were not as conserved as expected (≤90%). Fragments corresponding to the primer contigs 3, 4, 5b and 6a were recovered from all sequences in SILVA database. Nucleotide frequency analysis in each consensus demonstrated that only a small fraction of these so-called conserved regions is truly conserved in non-redundant sequences. It could be concluded that conserved regions of the 16S rRNA gene exhibit considerable variation that has to be considered when using this gene as biomarker. PMID:28265511

  20. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S; Perkins, David L

    2016-01-22

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translational studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1 × 10(6) reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that whole genome shotgun sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection.

  1. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  2. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  3. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S.; Perkins, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translation studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using shotgun whole genome sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1×106 reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that shotgun whole genome sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection. PMID:26718401

  4. Simultaneous discrimination between 15 fish pathogens by using 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Warsen, Adelaide E; Krug, Melissa J; LaFrentz, Stacey; Stanek, Danielle R; Loge, Frank J; Call, Douglas R

    2004-07-01

    We developed a DNA microarray suitable for simultaneous detection and discrimination between multiple bacterial species based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphisms using glass slides. Microarray probes (22- to 31-mer oligonucleotides) were spotted onto Teflon-masked, epoxy-silane-derivatized glass slides using a robotic arrayer. PCR products (ca. 199 bp) were generated using biotinylated, universal primer sequences, and these products were hybridized overnight (55 degrees C) to the microarray. Targets that annealed to microarray probes were detected using a combination of Tyramide Signal Amplification and Alexa Fluor 546. This methodology permitted 100% specificity for detection of 18 microbes, 15 of which were fish pathogens. With universal 16S rDNA PCR (limited to 28 cycles), detection sensitivity for purified control DNA was equivalent to <150 genomes (675 fg), and this sensitivity was not adversely impacted either by the presence of competing bacterial DNA (1.1 x 10(6) genomes; 5 ng) or by the addition of up to 500 ng of fish DNA. Consequently, coupling 16S rDNA PCR with a microarray detector appears suitable for diagnostic detection and surveillance for commercially important fish pathogens.

  5. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  6. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  7. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  8. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, H.; Tuero, A. D.; Bacardí, D.; Palenzuela, D. O.; Aguilera, A.; Silva, J. A.; Estrada, R.; Gell, O.; Suárez, J.; Ancizar, J.; Brown, E.; Colarte, A. B.; Castro, J.; Novoa, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies. PMID:27382362

  9. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  10. Interpreting 16S metagenomic data without clustering to achieve sub-OTU resolution

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonov, Mikhail; Leach, Robert W; Wingreen, Ned S

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach to analyzing 16S tag sequence data, which relies on clustering reads by sequence similarity into Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), underexploits the accuracy of modern sequencing technology. We present a clustering-free approach to multi-sample Illumina data sets that can identify independent bacterial subpopulations regardless of the similarity of their 16S tag sequences. Using published data from a longitudinal time-series study of human tongue microbiota, we are able to resolve within standard 97% similarity OTUs up to 20 distinct subpopulations, all ecologically distinct but with 16S tags differing by as little as one nucleotide (99.2% similarity). A comparative analysis of oral communities of two cohabiting individuals reveals that most such subpopulations are shared between the two communities at 100% sequence identity, and that dynamical similarity between subpopulations in one host is strongly predictive of dynamical similarity between the same subpopulations in the other host. Our method can also be applied to samples collected in cross-sectional studies and can be used with the 454 sequencing platform. We discuss how the sub-OTU resolution of our approach can provide new insight into factors shaping community assembly. PMID:25012900

  11. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization.

  12. Profiling the Succession of Bacterial Communities throughout the Life Stages of a Higher Termite Nasutitermes arborum (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Michel; Roy, Virginie; Mora, Philippe; Frechault, Sophie; Lefebvre, Thomas; Hervé, Vincent; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Previous surveys of the gut microbiota of termites have been limited to the worker caste. Termite gut microbiota has been well documented over the last decades and consists mainly of lineages specific to the gut microbiome which are maintained across generations. Despite this intimate relationship, little is known of how symbionts are transmitted to each generation of the host, especially in higher termites where proctodeal feeding has never been reported. The bacterial succession across life stages of the wood-feeding higher termite Nasutitermes arborum was characterized by 16S rRNA gene deep sequencing. The microbial community in the eggs, mainly affiliated to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, was markedly different from the communities in the following developmental stages. In the first instar and last instar larvae and worker caste termites, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were less abundant than Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Fibrobacteres and the candidate phylum TG3 from the last instar larvae. Most of the representatives of these phyla (except Firmicutes) were identified as termite-gut specific lineages, although their relative abundances differed. The most salient difference between last instar larvae and worker caste termites was the very high proportion of Spirochaetes, most of which were affiliated to the Treponema Ic, Ia and If subclusters, in workers. The results suggest that termite symbionts are not transmitted from mother to offspring but become established by a gradual process allowing the offspring to have access to the bulk of the microbiota prior to the emergence of workers, and, therefore, presumably through social exchanges with nursing workers.

  13. Subdivisions of haplogroups U and C encompass mitochondrial DNA lineages of Eneolithic-Early Bronze Age Kurgan populations of western North Pontic steppe.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Alexey G; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kiosak, Dmytro; Badgerow, Jessica; Pashnick, Jeff

    2017-02-02

    Prehistoric Europe experienced a marked cultural and economic shift around 4000 years ago, when the established Neolithic agriculture-based economy was replaced by herding-pastoralist industry. In recent years new data about the genetic structure of human communities living during this transition period began to emerge. At the same time, the genetic identities of the Eneolithic and Early Bronze Age (EBA) inhabitants from a prehistoric cultural crossroad in western North Pontic steppe region remain understudied. This report presents results of the investigation of maternal genetic lineages of individuals buried in kurgans constructed during the Eneolithic-EBA transition in the western part of the North Pontic Region (NPR). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages from the interments belonging to the Eneolithic as well as the EBA cultures such as Yamna (Pit Grave), Catacomb and Babino (Mnogovalikovaya or KMK) were examined. In the 12 successfully haplotyped specimens, 75% of mtDNA lineages consisted of west Eurasian haplogroup U and its U4 and U5 sublineages. Furthermore, we identified a subgroup of east Eurasian haplogroup C in two representatives of the Yamna culture in one of the studied kurgans. Our results indicate the persistence of Mesolithic hunter-gatherer mtDNA lineages in western NPR through the EBA, as well as suggesting a mtDNA lineage continuum connecting the western NPR inhabitants of the Early Metal Ages to the North Pontic Neolithic population groups.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 2 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.12.

  14. mtDNA from fossils reveals a radiation of Hawaiian geese recently derived from the Canada goose (Brantacanadensis).

    PubMed

    Paxinos, Ellen E; James, Helen F; Olson, Storrs L; Sorenson, Michael D; Jackson, Jennifer; Fleischer, Robert C

    2002-02-05

    Phylogenetic analysis of 1.35 kb of mtDNA sequence from fossils revealed a previously unknown radiation of Hawaiian geese, of which only one representative remains alive (the endangered Hawaiian goose or nene, Branta sandvicensis). This radiation is nested phylogenetically within a living species, the Canada goose (Branta canadensis) and is related most closely to the large-bodied lineage within that species. The barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis) is also nested within the Canada goose species and is related most closely to the small-bodied lineage of Canada geese. The peripheral isolation of the barnacle goose in the Palearctic apparently allowed the evolution of its distinctive plumage pattern, whereas the two Nearctic lineages of Canada geese share a primitive plumage pattern. The Hawaiian lineage of Canada geese diverged more dramatically, splitting into at least three species that differ in body size, body proportions, and flight ability. One fossil species, limited to the island of Hawaii, was related closely to the nene but was over four times larger, flightless, heavy-bodied and had a much more robust cranium. Application of a rate calibration to levels of DNA divergence suggests that this species evolved on the island of Hawaii in less than 500,000 years. This date is consistent with the potassium/argon-based age of the island of Hawaii of 430,000-500,000 years. The giant Hawaii goose resembles the moa-nalos, a group of massive, extinct, flightless ducks that lived on older Hawaiian Islands and thus is an example of convergent evolution of similar morphologies in island ecosystems.

  15. mtDNA from fossils reveals a radiation of Hawaiian geese recently derived from the Canada goose (Branta canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Paxinos, Ellen E.; James, Helen F.; Olson, Storrs L.; Sorenson, Michael D.; Jackson, Jennifer; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 1.35 kb of mtDNA sequence from fossils revealed a previously unknown radiation of Hawaiian geese, of which only one representative remains alive (the endangered Hawaiian goose or nene, Branta sandvicensis). This radiation is nested phylogenetically within a living species, the Canada goose (Branta canadensis) and is related most closely to the large-bodied lineage within that species. The barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis) is also nested within the Canada goose species and is related most closely to the small-bodied lineage of Canada geese. The peripheral isolation of the barnacle goose in the Palearctic apparently allowed the evolution of its distinctive plumage pattern, whereas the two Nearctic lineages of Canada geese share a primitive plumage pattern. The Hawaiian lineage of Canada geese diverged more dramatically, splitting into at least three species that differ in body size, body proportions, and flight ability. One fossil species, limited to the island of Hawaii, was related closely to the nene but was over four times larger, flightless, heavy-bodied and had a much more robust cranium. Application of a rate calibration to levels of DNA divergence suggests that this species evolved on the island of Hawaii in less than 500,000 years. This date is consistent with the potassium/argon-based age of the island of Hawaii of 430,000–500,000 years. The giant Hawaii goose resembles the moa-nalos, a group of massive, extinct, flightless ducks that lived on older Hawaiian Islands and thus is an example of convergent evolution of similar morphologies in island ecosystems. PMID:11818543

  16. Three divergent lineages within an Australian marsupial (Petrogale penicillata) suggest multiple major refugia for mesic taxa in southeast Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hazlitt, Stephanie L; Goldizen, Anne W; Nicholls, James A; Eldridge, Mark D B

    2014-01-01

    Mesic southeastern Australia represents the continent's ancestral biome and is highly biodiverse, yet its phylogeographic history remains poorly understood. Here, we examine mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and microsatellite diversity in the brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata;n = 279 from 31 sites), to assess historic evolutionary and biogeographic processes in southeastern Australia. Our results (mtDNA, microsatellites) confirmed three geographically discrete and genetically divergent lineages within brush-tailed rock-wallabies, whose divergence appears to date to the mid-Pleistocene. These three lineages had been hypothesized previously but data were limited. While the Northern and Central lineages were separated by a known biogeographic barrier (Hunter Valley), the boundary between the Central and Southern lineages was not. We propose that during particularly cool glacial cycles, the high peaks of the Great Dividing Range and the narrow adjacent coastal plain resulted in a more significant north–south barrier for mesic taxa in southeastern Australia than has been previously appreciated. Similarly, located phylogeographic breaks in codistributed species highlight the importance of these regions in shaping the distribution of biodiversity in southeastern Australia and suggest the existence of three major refuge areas during the Pleistocene. Substructuring within the northern lineage also suggests the occurrence of multiple local refugia during some glacial cycles. Within the three major lineages, most brush-tailed rock-wallaby populations were locally highly structured, indicating limited dispersal by both sexes. The three identified lineages represent evolutionarily significant units and should be managed to maximize the retention of genetic diversity within this threatened species. PMID:24772286

  17. Similar patterns of clonally expanded somatic mtDNA mutations in the colon of heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and ageing humans

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Holly L.; Stewart, James B.; Stamp, Craig; Zupanic, Anze; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Greaves, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in focal respiratory chain deficiency in individual cells are proposed to contribute to the ageing of human tissues that depend on adult stem cells for self-renewal; however, the consequences of these mutations remain unclear. A good animal model is required to investigate this further; but it is unknown whether mechanisms for clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, and the mutational spectra, are similar between species. Here we show that mice, heterozygous for a mutation disrupting the proof-reading activity of mtDNA polymerase (PolgA+/mut) resulting in an increased mtDNA mutation rate, accumulate clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations in their colonic crypts with age. This results in focal respiratory chain deficiency, and by 81 weeks of age these animals exhibit a similar level and pattern of respiratory chain deficiency to 70-year-old human subjects. Furthermore, like in humans, the mtDNA mutation spectrum appears random and there is an absence of selective constraints. Computer simulations show that a random genetic drift model of mtDNA clonal expansion can accurately model the data from the colonic crypts of wild-type, PolgA+/mut animals, and humans, providing evidence for a similar mechanism for clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations between these mice and humans. PMID:24915468

  18. Application of a west Eurasian-specific filter for quasi-median network analysis: Sharpening the blade for mtDNA error detection

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Bettina; Röck, Alexander; Huber, Gabriela; Krämer, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M.; Parson, Walther

    2011-01-01

    The application of quasi-median networks provides an effective tool to check the quality of mtDNA data. Filtering of highly recurrent mutations prior to network analysis is required to simplify the data set and reduce the complexity of the network. The phylogenetic background determines those mutations that need to be filtered. While the traditional EMPOPspeedy filter was based on the worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, haplogroup-specific filters can more effectively highlight potential errors in data of the respective (sub)-continental region. In this study we demonstrate the performance of a new, west Eurasian filter EMPOPspeedyWE for the fine-tuned examination of data sets belonging to macrohaplogroup N that constitutes the main portion of mtDNA lineages in Europe. The effects on the resulting network of different database sizes, high-quality and flawed data, as well as the examination of a phylogenetically distant data set, are presented by examples. The analyses are based on a west Eurasian etalon data set that was carefully compiled from more than 3500 control region sequences for network purposes. Both, etalon data and the new filter file, are provided through the EMPOP database (www.empop.org). PMID:21067984

  19. Helena, the hidden beauty: Resolving the most common West Eurasian mtDNA control region haplotype by massively parallel sequencing an Italian population sample.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Iuvaro, Alessandra; Strobl, Christina; Nagl, Simone; Huber, Gabriela; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Parson, Walther

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA is a powerful tool in forensic genetics when nuclear markers fail to give results or maternal relatedness is investigated. The mtDNA control region (CR) contains highly condensed variation and is therefore routinely typed. Some samples exhibit an identical haplotype in this restricted range. Thus, they convey only weak evidence in forensic queries and limited phylogenetic information. However, a CR match does not imply that also the mtDNA coding regions are identical or samples belong to the same phylogenetic lineage. This is especially the case for the most frequent West Eurasian CR haplotype 263G 315.1C 16519C, which is observed in various clades within haplogroup H and occurs at a frequency of 3-4% in many European populations. In this study, we investigated the power of massively parallel complete mtGenome sequencing in 29 Italian samples displaying the most common West Eurasian CR haplotype - and found an unexpected high diversity. Twenty-eight different haplotypes falling into 19 described sub-clades of haplogroup H were revealed in the samples with identical CR sequences. This study demonstrates the benefit of complete mtGenome sequencing for forensic applications to enforce maximum discrimination, more comprehensive heteroplasmy detection, as well as highest phylogenetic resolution.

  20. A Molecular Assessment of Phylogenetic Relationships and LineageDiversification Within the Family Salamandridae (Amphibia, Caudata)

    SciTech Connect

    Weisrock, David W.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Macey, J. Robert; Litvinchuk, Spartak N.; Polymeni, Rosa; Ugurtas, Ismail H.; Zhao, Ermi; Larson, Allan

    2005-08-08

    Phylogenetic relationships among species of the salamanderfamily Salamandridae are investigated using nearly 3000 nucleotide basesof newly reported mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the mtDNA genicregion spanning the genes tRNALeu-COI. This study uses nearlycomprehensive species-level sampling to provide the first completephylogeny for the Salamandridae. Deep phylogenetic relationships amongthe three most divergent lineages in the family Salamandrina terdigitata,a clade comprising the "True" salamanders, and a clade comprising allnewts except S. terdigitata are difficult to resolve. However, mostrelationships within the latter two lineages are resolved with robustlevels of branch support. The genera Euproctus and Triturus arestatistically shown to be nonmonophyletic, instead each contains adiverse set of lineages positioned within the large newt clade. The genusParamesotriton is also resolve as a nonmonophyletic group, with the newlydescribed species P. laoensis constituting a divergent lineage placed ina sister position to clade containing all Pachytriton species and allremaining Paramesotriton species. Sequence divergences between P.laoensis and other Paramesotriton species are as great as those comparingP. laoensis and species of the genera Cynops and Pachytriton. Analyses oflineage diversification across the Salamandridae indicate that, despiteits exceptional diversity, lineage accumulation appears to have beenconstant across time, indicating that it does not represent a truespecies radiation.

  1. Genetic origin, admixture, and asymmetry in maternal and paternal human lineages in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Before the arrival of Europeans to Cuba, the island was inhabited by two Native American groups, the Tainos and the Ciboneys. Most of the present archaeological, linguistic and ancient DNA evidence indicates a South American origin for these populations. In colonial times, Cuban Native American people were replaced by European settlers and slaves from Africa. It is still unknown however, to what extent their genetic pool intermingled with and was 'diluted' by the arrival of newcomers. In order to investigate the demographic processes that gave rise to the current Cuban population, we analyzed the hypervariable region I (HVS-I) and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coding region in 245 individuals, and 40 Y-chromosome SNPs in 132 male individuals. Results The Native American contribution to present-day Cubans accounted for 33% of the maternal lineages, whereas Africa and Eurasia contributed 45% and 22% of the lineages, respectively. This Native American substrate in Cuba cannot be traced back to a single origin within the American continent, as previously suggested by ancient DNA analyses. Strikingly, no Native American lineages were found for the Y-chromosome, for which the Eurasian and African contributions were around 80% and 20%, respectively. Conclusion While the ancestral Native American substrate is still appreciable in the maternal lineages, the extensive process of population admixture in Cuba has left no trace of the paternal Native American lineages, mirroring the strong sexual bias in the admixture processes taking place during colonial times. PMID:18644108

  2. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Moraxella catarrhalis Serosensitive and Seroresistant Lineages Demonstrate Their Independent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Joshua P.; de Vries, Stefan P.W.; Ahmed, Azad; Powell, Evan; Schultz, Matthew P.; Hermans, Peter W.M.; Hill, Darryl J.; Zhou, Zhemin; Constantinidou, Crystala I.; Hu, Fen Z.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial species Moraxella catarrhalis has been hypothesized as being composed of two distinct lineages (referred to as the seroresistant [SR] and serosensitive [SS]) with separate evolutionary histories based on several molecular typing methods, whereas 16S ribotyping has suggested an additional split within the SS lineage. Previously, we characterized whole-genome sequences of 12 SR-lineage isolates, which revealed a relatively small supragenome when compared with other opportunistic nasopharyngeal pathogens, suggestive of a relatively short evolutionary history. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing on 18 strains from both ribotypes of the SS lineage, an additional SR strain, as well as four previously identified highly divergent strains based on multilocus sequence typing analyses. All 35 strains were subjected to a battery of comparative genomic analyses which clearly show that there are three lineages—the SR, SS, and the divergent. The SR and SS lineages are closely related, but distinct from each other based on three different methods of comparison: Allelic differences observed among core genes; possession of lineage-specific sets of core and distributed genes; and by an alignment of concatenated core sequences irrespective of gene annotation. All these methods show that the SS lineage has much longer interstrain branches than the SR lineage indicating that this lineage has likely been evolving either longer or faster than the SR lineage. There is evidence of extensive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) within both of these lineages, and to a lesser degree between them. In particular, we identified very high rates of HGT between these two lineages for ß-lactamase genes. The four divergent strains are sui generis, being much more distantly related to both the SR and SS groups than these other two groups are to each other. Based on average nucleotide identities, gene content, GC content, and genome size, this group could be considered as a separate

  3. Lineage specificity of the evolutionary dynamics of the mtDNA D-loop region in rodents.

    PubMed

    Larizza, Alessandra; Pesole, Graziano; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports an intraorder study on the D-loop-containing region of the mitochondrial DNA in rodents. A complete multialignment of this region is not feasible with the exception of some conserved regions. The comparative analysis of 25 complete rodent sequences from 23 species plus one lagomorph has revealed that only the central domain (CD), a conserved region of about 80 bp in the extended termination-associated sequences (ETAS) domain, adjacent to the CD, the ETAS1, and conserved sequence block (CSB) 1 blocks are present in all rodent species, whereas the presence of CSB2 and CSB3 is erratic within the order. We have also found a conserved region of 90 bp located between tRNAPro and ETAS1 present in fat dormouse, squirrel, guinea pig, and rabbit. Repeated sequences are present in both the ETAS and the CSB domain, but the repeats differ in length, copy number, and base composition in different species. The potential use of the D-loop for evolutionary studies has been investigated; the presence/absence of conserved blocks and/or repeated sequences cannot be used as a reliable phylogenetic marker, since in some cases they may be shared by distantly related organisms but not by close ones, while in other ones a relationship between tree topology and presence/absence of such motifs is observed. Better results can be obtained by the use of the CD, which, however, due to its reduced size, when used for tracing a phylogenetic tree, shows some nodes with low statistical support.

  4. The effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ayse Gul

    2013-03-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits that the accumulation of macromolecular damage induced by toxic reactive oxygen species plays a central role in the aging process. Therefore consumption of dietary antioxidants appears to be of great importance. Wheat germ have strong antioxidant properties. Aim of this study is investigate the effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in Drosophila. Current results suggested that dietary wheat germ enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes in Drosophila. There was no statistically difference in mtDNA damage and mtDNA copy number results of "Wheat Germ" and "Refined White Flour" feed groups. mtDNA damage slightly increased with aging in both groups but these changes were no statistically different.

  5. Evolution of Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata (Anura: Discoglossidae) in the Carpathian Basin: a history of repeated mt-DNA introgression across species.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Judit; Alcobendas, Marina; Martínez-Solano, Iñigo; García-París, Mario

    2006-03-01

    The structure and geographic location of hybrid zones change through time. Current patterns result from present and historical population-environment interactions that act on each of the hybridizing taxa. This is particularly evident for species involved in complex hybrid zones, such as that formed by the toad species Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata (Anura: Discoglossidae), which interact along extensive areas in Central Europe. We used data on external morphology and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxidase I (cox1) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotid dehydrogenase subunit 4 (nad4) mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) genes to analyze the current patterns of genetic structure shown by both species of Bombina along their contact zone in Hungary. Phylogenetic, phylogeographic, and historical demography analyses were applied to 1.5kb mt-DNA obtained from 119 individuals representing 24 populations from Hungary and additional specimens from Slovakia, Albania, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. We use these data to infer the evolutionary history of the isolated populations of B. variegata in Hungary and to discriminate between competing biogeographic scenarios accounting for the historical interactions between species in this region. Results from the inferred phylogenetic branching pattern and sequence divergence among species and populations support the following: (i) recent population expansion has occurred in Hungarian populations of B. bombina, which are genetically very homogeneous; (ii) the Hungarian populations of B. variegata correspond to two distinct mitochondrial lineages (Carpathian and Alpine, respectively); average maximum-likelihood-corrected sequence divergence between these lineages is 8.96% for cox1 and 10.85% for nad4; (iii) mt-DNA divergence among the three isolated western populations of B. variegata from Transdanubia is low, with four closely related haplotypes, which suggests that the isolation between these populations is the result of a recent process

  6. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, David; Wallen, Rick L; Dobson, Lauren K; Derr, James N

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  7. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    PubMed Central

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  8. Universal bacterial identification by mass spectrometry of 16S ribosomal RNA cleavage products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, George W.; McNichols, Roger J.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2007-03-01

    The public availability of over 180,000 bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has facilitated microbial identification and classification using nucleic acid hybridization and other molecular approaches. Species-specific PCR, microarrays, and in situ hybridization are based on the presence of unique subsequences in the target sequence and therefore require prior knowledge of what organisms are likely to be present in a sample. Mass spectrometry is not limited by a pre-synthesized inventory of probe/primer sequences. It has already been demonstrated that organism identification can be recovered from mass spectra using various methods including base-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. The feasibility of broad bacterial identification by comparing such mass spectral patterns to predictive databases derived from virtually all previously sequenced strains has yet to be demonstrated, however. Herein, we present universal bacterial identification by base-specific cleavage, mass spectrometry, and an efficient coincidence function for rapid spectral scoring against a large database of predicted "mass catalogs". Using this approach in conjunction with universal PCR of the 16S rDNA gene, four bacterial isolates and an uncultured clone were successfully identified against a database of predicted cleavage products derived 6rom over 47,000 16S rRNA sequences representing all major bacterial taxaE At present, the conventional DNA isolation and PCR steps require approximately 2 h, while subsequent transcription, enzymatic cleavage, mass spectrometric analysis, and database comparison require less than 45 min. All steps are amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  9. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  10. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  11. Abiotrophia defectiva bleb-associated endophthalmitis confirmed with 16s ribosomal RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hugo Lee, Ming-Han; Lawlor, Mitchell; Lee, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    One recognized complication of trabeculectomy with visually devastating potential is blebitis. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with a culture and polymerase chain reaction-positive Abiotrophia defectiva bleb-associated endophthalmitis. Abiotrophia defectiva is a rare but possible cause of endophthalmitis secondary to blebitis and should be considered in culture-negative cases. Prompt identification, hence directed eradication, of the causative organism in such visually threatening cases may be facilitated by requesting polymerase chain reaction and 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing.

  12. Mitochondrial 16S rDNA analysis of Tunisian androctonus species (Scorpions, Buthidae): phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ben Othmen, A; Said, K; Ben Alp, Z; Chatti, N; Ready, P D

    2006-01-01

    Tunisian Androctonus species, for long time discussed, were recognized on the basis of mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Although the analysed nucleotide sequence is rather short (about 300 bp), the obtained phlogenetic trees revealed that A. amoreuxi and A. aeneas form two well-supported sister clades against A. australis haplotypes. Each specimen of the very rare species A. aeneas showed a specific haplotype, but together formed a well-defined clade. Some A. amoreuxi specimens highlighted unidirectional mitochondrial introgression from neighbouring A. australis population. Within A. australis, previously described, subspecies subdivision (A. a .hector and A. a. garzonii) was not supported.

  13. Single-cell analysis of intercellular heteroplasmy of mtDNA in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Sharpe, H.; Brown, N.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have investigated the distribution of mutant mtDNA molecules in single cells from a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a maternally inherited disease that is characterized by a sudden-onset bilateral loss of central vision, which typically occurs in early adulthood. More than 50% of all LHON patients carry an mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 11778. This nucleotide change converts a highly conserved arginine residue to histidine at codon 340 in the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene of mtDNA. In the present study, the authors used PCR amplification of mtDNA from lymphocytes to investigate mtDNA heteroplasmy at the single-cell level in a LHON patient. They found that most cells were either homoplasmic normal or homoplasmic mutant at nucleotide position 11778. Some (16%) cells contained both mutant and normal mtDNA.

  14. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  15. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  16. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

    PubMed

    González-Sobrino, Blanca Z; Pintado-Cortina, Ana P; Sebastián-Medina, Leticia; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Contreras, Alejandra V; Aguilar, Yasnaya E; Chávez-Benavides, Juan; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Aurelio; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Medrano-González, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Y-chromosome variation distinguished urban and indigenous populations through the Amerindian haplogroup Q frequency. The MtDNA and the Y-chromosome together primarily distinguished urban and indigenous populations, with different geographic arrays for both. Gene flow across geographical distance and between the urban and indigenous realms appears to have altered the pre-Hispanic phylogeography in central and southern Mexico, mainly by displacement of women, while maintaining the indigenous isolation in the north, southeast, and Zapotec regions. Most Amerindian mtDNA diversity currently occurs in urban populations and appears to be reduced among indigenous people.

  17. [Studies on mtDNA of Ustilago maydis. II. Restriction mapping].

    PubMed

    Feng, G H; Cheng, W; Lu, S Y

    1991-01-01

    A restriction map was constructed for mtDNA of Ustilago maydis. The fragment order for each restriction enzyme was determined by DNA hybridization and fragment overlapping. The restriction sites were located by analysing the secondary digestions of the cloned mtDNA fragments. It was also found that the mtDNA of U. maydis was a circle molecule (60.7 kb), without recognizable repeat sequence.

  18. An unusual case of Streptococcus anginosus group pyomyositis diagnosed using direct 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walkty, Andrew; Embil, John M; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group (Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus anginosus) are capable of causing serious pyogenic infections, with a tendency for abscess formation. The present article reports a case of S anginosus group pyomyositis in a 47-year-old man. The pathogen was recovered from one of two blood cultures obtained from the patient, but speciation was initially not performed because the organism was considered to be a contaminant (viridans streptococci group). The diagnosis was ultimately confirmed using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing of purulent fluid obtained from a muscle abscess aspirate. The present case serves to emphasize that finding even a single positive blood culture of an organism belonging to the S anginosus group should prompt careful evaluation of the patient for a pyogenic focus of infection. It also highlights the potential utility of 16S ribosomal DNA amplification and sequencing in direct pathogen detection from aspirated fluid in cases of pyomyositis in which antimicrobial therapy was initiated before specimen collection.

  19. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  20. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  1. Phylogenetic relationships between Bacillus species and related genera inferred from 16s rDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wei Wang, Mi Sun

    2009-01-01

    Neighbor-joining, maximum-parsimony, minimum-evolution, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian trees constructed based on 16S rDNA sequences of 181 type strains of Bacillus species and related taxa manifested nine phylogenetic groups. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Bacillus was not a monophyletic group. B. subtilis was in Group 1. Group 4, 6 and 8 respectively consisted of thermophiles, halophilic or halotolerant bacilli and alkaliphilic bacilli. Group 2, 4 and 8 consisting of Bacillus species and related genera demonstrated that the current taxonomic system did not agree well with the 16S rDNA evolutionary trees. The position of Caryophanaceae and Planococcaceae in Group 2 suggested that they might be transferred into Bacillaceae, and the heterogeneity of Group 2 implied that some Bacillus species in it might belong to several new genera. Group 9 was mainly comprised of the genera (excluding Bacillus) of Bacillaceae, so some Bacillus species in Group 9: B. salarius, B. qingdaonensis and B. thermcloacae might not belong to Bacillus. Four Bacillus species, B. schlegelii, B. tusciae, B. edaphicus and B. mucilaginosus were clearly placed outside the nine groups. PMID:24031394

  2. Identification of Clinical Isolates of Actinomyces Species by Amplified 16S Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Val; Talbot, P. R.; Stubbs, S. L.; Duerden, B. I.

    2001-01-01

    Amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction analysis (ARDRA), using enzymes HaeIII and HpaII, was applied to 176 fresh and 299 stored clinical isolates of putative Actinomyces spp. referred to the Anaerobe Reference Unit of the Public Health Laboratory Service for confirmation of identity. Results were compared with ARDRA results obtained previously for reference strains and with conventional phenotypic reactions. Identities of some strains were confirmed by analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences. Of the 475 isolates, 331 (70%) were clearly assigned to recognized Actinomyces species, including 94 isolates assigned to six recently described species. A further 52 isolates in 12 ARDRA profiles were designated as apparently resembling recognized species, and 44 isolates, in 18 novel profiles, were confirmed as members of genera other than Actinomyces. The identities of 48 isolates in nine profiles remain uncertain, and they may represent novel species of Actinomyces. For the majority of species, phenotypic results, published reactions for the species, and ARDRA profiles concurred. However, of 113 stored isolates originally identified as A. meyeri or resembling A. meyeri by phenotypic tests, only 21 were confirmed as A. meyeri by ARDRA; 63 were reassigned as A. turicensis, 7 as other recognized species, and 22 as unidentified actinomycetes. Analyses of incidence and clinical associations of Actinomyces spp. add to the currently sparse knowledge of some recently described species. PMID:11574572

  3. Rapid identification of marine bioluminescent bacteria by amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Wada, Minoru; Yao, Katomi; Kamiya, Akiko; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Uchiyama, Nami; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2006-03-01

    To rapidly identify natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, we developed amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) methods. ARDRA, which is based on the restriction patterns of 16S rRNA gene digested with five enzymes (EcoRI, DdeI, HhaI, HinfI, RsaI), clearly distinguished the 14 species of marine bioluminescent bacteria currently known, which belong to the genera Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella. When we applied ARDRA to 129 natural isolates from two cruises in Sagami Bay, Japan, 127 were grouped into six ARDRA types with distinctive restriction patterns; these isolates represented the bioluminescent species, P. angustum, P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, S. woodyi, V. fischeri, and V. harveyi. The other two isolates showing unexpected ARDRA patterns turned out to have 16S rRNA gene sequences similar to P. leiognathi and P. phosphoreum. Nevertheless, ARDRA provides a simple and fairly robust means for rapid identification of the natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, and is therefore useful in studying their diversity.

  4. Mitochondrial swinger replication: DNA replication systematically exchanging nucleotides and short 16S ribosomal DNA swinger inserts.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (swinger RNAs) resolves genomic 'parenthood' of some orphan mitochondrial transcripts. Twenty-three different systematic nucleotide exchanges (bijective transformations) exist. Similarities between transcription and replication suggest occurrence of swinger DNA. GenBank searches for swinger DNA matching the 23 swinger versions of human and mouse mitogenomes detect only vertebrate mitochondrial swinger DNA for swinger type AT+CG (from five different studies, 149 sequences) matching three human and mouse mitochondrial genes: 12S and 16S ribosomal RNAs, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I. Exchange A<->T+C<->G conserves self-hybridization properties, putatively explaining swinger biases for rDNA, against protein coding genes. Twenty percent of the regular human mitochondrial 16S rDNA consists of short swinger repeats (from 13 exchanges). Swinger repeats could originate from recombinations between regular and swinger DNA: duplicated mitochondrial genes of the parthenogenetic gecko Heteronotia binoei include fewer short A<->T+C<->G swinger repeats than non-duplicated mitochondrial genomes of that species. Presumably, rare recombinations between female and male mitochondrial genes (and in parthenogenetic situations between duplicated genes), favors reverse-mutations of swinger repeat insertions, probably because most inserts affect negatively ribosomal function. Results show that swinger DNA exists, and indicate that swinger polymerization contributes to the genesis of genetic material and polymorphism.

  5. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  6. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization. PMID:25477935

  7. 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions in four Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Zhemin; Wen, Shaoping; Rozalski, Antoni; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-01

    Proteus is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium. In this study, 813 Proteus 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were determined from 46 Proteus strains, including 388 ITS from 22 P. mirabilis strains, 211 ITS from 12 P. vulgaris strains, 169 ITS from 10 P. penneri strains, and 45 ITS from 2 P. myxofaciens strains. The Proteus strains carry mainly two types of ITS, ITS(Glu) (containing tRNA(Glu (UUC)) gene) and ITS(Ile+Ala) (containing tRNA(Ile (GAU)) and tRNA(Ala (UGC)) gene), and are in the forms of 28 variants with 25 genomic origins. The ITS sequences are a mosaic-like structure consisting of three conservative regions and two variable regions. The nucleotide identity of ITS subtypes in strains of the same species ranges from 96.2% to 100%. The divergence of Proteus ITS divergence was most likely due to intraspecies recombinations or horizontal transfers of sequence blocks. The phylogenetic relationship deduced from the second variable region of ITS sequences of the three facultative human pathogenic species P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. penneri is similar with that based on 16S rDNA sequences, but has higher resolution to differentiate closely related P. vulgaris and P. penneri. This study is the first comprehensive study of ITS in four Proteus species and laid solid foundation for the development of high-throughput technology for quick and accurate identification of the important foodborne and nosocomial pathogens.

  8. Characterization of the Gut Microbiome Using 16S or Shotgun Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Jovel, Juan; Patterson, Jordan; Wang, Weiwei; Hotte, Naomi; O'Keefe, Sandra; Mitchel, Troy; Perry, Troy; Kao, Dina; Mason, Andrew L.; Madsen, Karen L.; Wong, Gane K.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled investigations of the gut microbiome with unprecedented resolution and throughput. This has stimulated the development of sophisticated bioinformatics tools to analyze the massive amounts of data generated. Researchers therefore need a clear understanding of the key concepts required for the design, execution and interpretation of NGS experiments on microbiomes. We conducted a literature review and used our own data to determine which approaches work best. The two main approaches for analyzing the microbiome, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons and shotgun metagenomics, are illustrated with analyses of libraries designed to highlight their strengths and weaknesses. Several methods for taxonomic classification of bacterial sequences are discussed. We present simulations to assess the number of sequences that are required to perform reliable appraisals of bacterial community structure. To the extent that fluctuations in the diversity of gut bacterial populations correlate with health and disease, we emphasize various techniques for the analysis of bacterial communities within samples (α-diversity) and between samples (β-diversity). Finally, we demonstrate techniques to infer the metabolic capabilities of a bacteria community from these 16S and shotgun data. PMID:27148170

  9. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  10. Changes in 16s RNA Gene Microbial Community Profiling by Concentration of Prokaryotic DNA.

    PubMed

    Glassing, Angela; Dowd, Scot E; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Jorden, Jeffrey R; Chiodini, Rodrick J

    2015-12-01

    Microbial metagenomics are hindered in clinical tissue samples as a result of the large relative amount of human DNA in relation to microbial DNA acting as competitive inhibitors of downstream applications. We evaluated the LOOXSTER® Enrichment Kit to separate eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA in submucosal intestinal tissue samples having a low microbial biomass and to determine the effects of enrichment on 16s rRNA microbiota sequencing. The enrichment kit reduced the amount of human DNA in the samples 40-70% resulting in a 3.5-fold increase in the number of 16s bacterial gene sequences detected on the Illumina MiSeq platform. This increase was accompanied by the detection of 41 additional bacterial genera and 94 tentative species. The additional bacterial taxa detected accounted for as much as 25% of the total bacterial population that significantly altered the relative prevalence and composition of the intestinal microbiota. The ability to reduce the competitive inhibition created by human DNA and the concentration of bacterial DNA may allow metagenomics to be performed on complex tissues containing a low bacterial biomass.

  11. No recombination of mtDNA after heteroplasmy for 50 generations in the mouse maternal germline

    PubMed Central

    Hagström, Erik; Freyer, Christoph; Battersby, Brendan J.; Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are commonly used as markers to track human evolution because of the high sequence divergence and exclusive maternal inheritance. It is assumed that the inheritance is clonal, i.e. that mtDNA is transmitted between generations without germline recombination. In contrast to this assumption, a number of studies have reported the presence of recombinant mtDNA molecules in cell lines and animal tissues, including humans. If germline recombination of mtDNA is frequent, it would strongly impact phylogenetic and population studies by altering estimates of coalescent time and branch lengths in phylogenetic trees. Unfortunately, this whole area is controversial and the experimental approaches have been widely criticized as they often depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of mtDNA and/or involve studies of transformed cell lines. In this study, we used an in vivo mouse model that has had germline heteroplasmy for a defined set of mtDNA mutations for more than 50 generations. To assess recombination, we adapted and validated a method based on cloning of single mtDNA molecules in the λ phage, without prior PCR amplification, followed by subsequent mutation analysis. We screened 2922 mtDNA molecules and found no germline recombination after transmission of mtDNA under genetically and evolutionary relevant conditions in mammals. PMID:24163253

  12. Infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in two lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cicuttin, Gabriel L; Tarragona, Evelina L; De Salvo, M Nazarena; Mangold, Atilio J; Nava, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Natural infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in ticks belonging to the tropical and temperate lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato from Argentina was evaluated. Samples were tested for Ehrlichia canis infection by PCR assays using 16S rRNA, dsb and p28 gene, while detection of A. platys was performed with 16S rRNA and groESL gene. The assignment of the ticks to each lineage was corroborated with 16S rDNA sequences. All ticks infected with E. canis and A. platys belonged to the tropical lineage. These results constitute the first record of E. canis infection in R. sanguineus s.l ticks from Argentina. No ticks from the temperate lineage were found to be infected with E. canis, coinciding with previous studies performed in Argentina and Uruguay where E. canis infection was not detected in R. sanguineus s.l from the temperate lineage. Because the presence of the tropical lineage of R. sanguineus s.l has been documented in tropical areas of northern Argentina between 22° and 24° of south latitude, the findings of this work indicate that transmission of E. canis and A. platys to dogs by R. sanguineus s.l probably occurs along this region.

  13. Combined Use of 16S Ribosomal DNA and 16S rRNA To Study the Bacterial Community of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Balbina; Moore, Edward R. B.; Llobet-Brossa, Enrique; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Amann, Rudolf; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial diversity assessed from clone libraries prepared from rRNA (two libraries) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (one library) from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-polluted soil has been analyzed. A good correspondence of the community composition found in the two types of library was observed. Nearly 29% of the cloned sequences in the rDNA library were identical to sequences in the rRNA libraries. More than 60% of the total cloned sequence types analyzed were grouped in phylogenetic groups (a clone group with sequence similarity higher than 97% [98% for Burkholderia and Pseudomonas-type clones]) represented in both types of libraries. Some of those phylogenetic groups, mostly represented by a single (or pair) of cloned sequence type(s), were observed in only one of the types of library. An important difference between the libraries was the lack of clones representative of the Actinobacteria in the rDNA library. The PCB-polluted soil exhibited a high bacterial diversity which included representatives of two novel lineages. The apparent abundance of bacteria affiliated to the beta-subclass of the Proteobacteria, and to the genus Burkholderia in particular, was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The possible influence on apparent diversity of low template concentrations was assessed by dilution of the RNA template prior to amplification by reverse transcription-PCR. Although differences in the composition of the two rRNA libraries obtained from high and low RNA concentrations were observed, the main components of the bacterial community were represented in both libraries, and therefore their detection was not compromised by the lower concentrations of template used in this study. PMID:11282645

  14. Importance of mitochondrial haplotypes and maternal lineage in sprint performance among individuals of West African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Deason, M; Scott, R; Irwin, L; Macaulay, V; Fuku, N; Tanaka, M; Irving, R; Charlton, V; Morrison, E; Austin, K; Pitsiladis, Y P

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited solely along the matriline, giving insight into both ancestry and prehistory. Individuals of sub-Saharan ancestry are overrepresented in sprint athletics, suggesting a genetic advantage. The purpose of this study was to compare the mtDNA haplogroup data of elite groups of Jamaican and African-American sprinters against respective controls to assess any differences in maternal lineage. The first hypervariable region of mtDNA was haplogrouped in elite Jamaican athletes (N=107) and Jamaican controls (N=293), and elite African-American athletes (N=119) and African-American controls (N=1148). Exact tests of total population differentiation were performed on total haplogroup frequencies. The frequency of non-sub-Saharan haplogroups in Jamaican athletes and Jamaican controls was similar (1.87% and 1.71%, respectively) and lower than that of African-American athletes and African-American controls (21.01% and 8.19%, respectively). There was no significant difference in total haplogroup frequencies between Jamaican athletes and Jamaican controls (P=0.551 ± 0.005); however, there was a highly significant difference between African-American athletes and African-American controls (P<0.001). The finding of statistically similar mtDNA haplogroup distributions in Jamaican athletes and Jamaican controls suggests that elite Jamaican sprinters are derived from the same source population and there is neither population stratification nor isolation for sprint performance. The significant difference between African-American sprinters and African-American controls suggests that the maternal admixture may play a role in sprint performance.

  15. Brown and polar bear Y chromosomes reveal extensive male-biased gene flow within brother lineages.

    PubMed

    Bidon, Tobias; Janke, Axel; Fain, Steven R; Eiken, Hans Geir; Hagen, Snorre B; Saarma, Urmas; Hallström, Björn M; Lecomte, Nicolas; Hailer, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Brown and polar bears have become prominent examples in phylogeography, but previous phylogeographic studies relied largely on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or were geographically restricted. The male-specific Y chromosome, a natural counterpart to mtDNA, has remained underexplored. Although this paternally inherited chromosome is indispensable for comprehensive analyses of phylogeographic patterns, technical difficulties and low variability have hampered its application in most mammals. We developed 13 novel Y-chromosomal sequence and microsatellite markers from the polar bear genome and screened these in a broad geographic sample of 130 brown and polar bears. We also analyzed a 390-kb-long Y-chromosomal scaffold using sequencing data from published male ursine genomes. Y chromosome evidence support the emerging understanding that brown and polar bears started to diverge no later than the Middle Pleistocene. Contrary to mtDNA patterns, we found 1) brown and polar bears to be reciprocally monophyletic sister (or rather brother) lineages, without signals of introgression, 2) male-biased gene flow across continents and on phylogeographic time scales, and 3) male dispersal that links the Alaskan ABC islands population to mainland brown bears. Due to female philopatry, mtDNA provides a highly structured estimate of population differentiation, while male-biased gene flow is a homogenizing force for nuclear genetic variation. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing both maternally and paternally inherited loci for a comprehensive view of phylogeographic history, and that mtDNA-based phylogeographic studies of many mammals should be reevaluated. Recent advances in sequencing technology render the analysis of Y-chromosomal variation feasible, even in nonmodel organisms.

  16. Genetic characterization of uniparental lineages in populations from Southwest Iberia with past malaria endemicity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vânia; Gomes, Verónica; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; João Prata, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Malaria endemicity in Southwest Iberia afforded conditions for an increase of sickle cell disease (SCD), which in the region follows a clinal pattern toward the south, where foci of high prevalence were found. SCD distribution is associated with specific geographical areas, and therefore, its introduction into Iberia may be related to the migration of different populations. We have analyzed the variation of uniparental markers in Portuguese populations with high frequency of SCD--Coruche, Pias, and Alcacer do Sal--to evaluate if their present-day pattern of neutral diversity could provide evidence about people inhabiting the area over different time periods. Two hundred and eighty-five individuals were sampled in Coruche, Pias, and Alcacer do Sal. All were analyzed for the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); males were additionally examined for Y-chromosome markers. Results were then compared with data from other Portuguese and non-Portuguese populations. In Coruche, the genetic profile was similar to the profile usually found in Portugal. In Alcacer do Sal, the frequency of sub-Saharan mtDNA L lineages was the highest ever reported (22%) in Europe. In Pias, mtDNA diversity revealed higher frequencies of Mediterranean haplogroups I, J, and T than usually found in surrounding populations. The presence of Sub-Saharan maternal lineages in Alcacer do Sal is likely associated with the influx of African slaves between the 15th and 19th centuries, whereas in Pias, the Mediterranean influence might be traced to ancient contacts with Greeks, Phoenicians, and Carthaginians, who established important trading networks in southern Iberia.

  17. Review of 16S and ITS Direct Sequencing Results for Clinical Specimens Submitted to a Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Michael; Azana, Robert; Hoang, Linda M. N.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of 16S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region amplification and sequencing of rDNA from clinical specimens, for the respective detection and identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Direct rDNA amplification of 16S and ITS targets from clinical samples was performed over a 4-year period and reviewed. All specimens were from sterile sites and submitted to a reference laboratory for evaluation. Results of 16S and ITS were compared to histopathology, Gram and/or calcofluor stain microscopy results. A total of 277 16S tests were performed, with 64 (23%) positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Identification of an organism was more likely in microscopy positive 16S samples 14/21 (67%), compared to 35/175 (20%) of microscopy negative samples. A total of 110 ITS tests were performed, with 14 (13%) positive. The yield of microscopy positive ITS samples, 9/44 (21%), was higher than microscopy negative samples 3/50 (6%). Given these findings, 16S and ITS are valuable options for culture negative specimens from sterile sites, particularly in the setting of positive microscopy findings. Where microscopy results are negative, the limited sensitivity of 16S and ITS in detecting and identifying an infectious agent needs to be considered. PMID:27366168

  18. Different organisms associated with heartwater as shown by analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Allsopp, M; Visser, E S; du Plessis, J L; Vogel, S W; Allsopp, B A

    1997-08-01

    Cowdria ruminantium is a rickettsial parasite which causes heartwater, a economically important disease of domestic and wild ruminants in tropical and subtropical Africa and parts of the Caribbean. Because existing diagnostic methods are unreliable, we investigated the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene from heartwater-infected material to characterise the organisms present and to develop specific oligonucleotide probes for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based diagnosis. DNA was obtained from ticks and ruminants from heartwater-free and heartwater-endemic areas from Cowdria in tissue culture. PCR was carried out using primers designed to amplify only rickettsial srRNA genes, the target region being the highly variable V1 loop. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced; 51% were C. ruminantium sequences corresponding to four genotypes, two of which were identical to previously reported C. ruminantium sequences while the other two were new. The four different Cowdria genotypes can be correlated with different phenotypes. Tissue-culture samples yielded only Cowdria genotype sequences, but an extraordinary heterogeneity of 16S sequences was obtained from field samples. In addition to Cowdria genotypes we found sequences from previously unknown Ehrlichia spp., sequences showing homology to other Rickettsiales and a variety of Pseudomonadaceae. One Ehrlichia sequence was phylogenetically closely related to Ehrlichia platys (Group II Ehrlichia) and one to Ehrlichia canis (Group III Ehrlichia). This latter sequence was from an isolate (Germishuys) made from a naturally infected sheep which, from brain smear examination and pathology, appeared to be suffering from heartwater; nevertheless no Cowdria genotype sequences were found in this isolate. In addition no Cowdria sequences were obtained from uninfected ticks. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for two C. ruminantium genotypes and for two previously uncharacterised heartwater-associated Ehrlichia spp

  19. Morphing of the phylogeographic lineages of the Balkan alpine newts (Ichthyosaura alpestris, Caudata, Salamandridae): in situ morphological diversification.

    PubMed

    Vukov, Tanja D; Sotiropoulos, Konstantinos; Kalezić, Miloš L; Džukić, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Numerous alpine newt (Ichthyosaura alpestris) populations from the Balkans, representing all the previously established phylogeographic lineages, were studied for variations in various morphological characteristics (body size and shape, skull qualitative traits and number of trunk vertebrae). Here, we present a decoupling of morphological and mtDNA phylogeographic substructuring in the alpine newt on the Balkan Peninsula. In sharp contrast to other European newts (Triturus spp., Lissotriton spp.), the vast majority of morphological variation in the alpine newt is concentrated at the population level indicating an in situ morphological diversification. We found that the rate of morphological change is similar to the rate of mtDNA change. We hypothesize that the alpine newts are characterized by non-adaptive morphological evolution.

  20. Underestimation of Species Richness in Neotropical Frogs Revealed by mtDNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Antoine; Gilles, André; Vences, Miguel; Marty, Christian; Blanc, Michel; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Amphibians are rapidly vanishing. At the same time, it is most likely that the number of amphibian species is highly underestimated. Recent DNA barcoding work has attempted to define a threshold between intra- and inter-specific genetic distances to help identify candidate species. In groups with high extinction rates and poorly known species boundaries, like amphibians, such tools may provide a way to rapidly evaluate species richness. Methodology Here we analyse published and new 16S rDNA sequences from 60 frog species of Amazonia-Guianas to obtain a minimum estimate of the number of undescribed species in this region. We combined isolation by distance, phylogenetic analyses, and comparison of molecular distances to evaluate threshold values for the identification of candidate species among these frogs. Principal Findings In most cases, geographically distant populations belong to genetically highly distinct lineages that could be considered as candidate new species. This was not universal among the taxa studied and thus widespread species of Neotropical frogs really do exist, contrary to previous assumptions. Moreover, the many instances of paraphyly and the wide overlap between distributions of inter- and intra-specific distances reinforce the hypothesis that many cryptic species remain to be described. In our data set, pairwise genetic distances below 0.02 are strongly correlated with geographical distances. This correlation remains statistically significant until genetic distance is 0.05, with no such relation thereafter. This suggests that for higher distances allopatric and sympatric cryptic species prevail. Based on our analyses, we propose a more inclusive pairwise genetic distance of 0.03 between taxa to target lineages that could correspond to candidate species. Conclusions Using this approach, we identify 129 candidate species, two-fold greater than the 60 species included in the current study. This leads to estimates of around 170 to 460

  1. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the dragonfly genera Libellula, Ladona, and Plathemis (Odonata: Libellulidae) based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S rRNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Artiss, T; Schultz, T R; Polhemus, D A; Simon, C

    2001-03-01

    Molecular phylogenetic relationships among members of the odonate genus Libellula (Odonata: Anisoptera: Libellulidae) were examined using 735 bp of mitochondrial COI and 416 bp of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Considerable debate exists over several relationships within Libellula, as well over the status of two putative genera often placed as subgenera within Libellula: Ladona and Plathemis. Parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses of the separate and combined data sets indicate that Plathemis is basal and monophyletic and that Ladona is the sister clade to the remainder of Libellula sensu stricto (s.s.) (all species within the genus Libellula, excluding Plathemis and Ladona). Moreover, two European taxa, Libellula fulva and L. depressa, were found to occupy a sister group relationship within the Ladona clade. Relationships within Libellula s.s. are less well resolved. However, monophyletic lineages within the genus are largely consistent with morphologically based subgeneric classifications. Although tree topologies from each analysis differed in some details, the differences were in no case statistically significant. The analysis of the combined COI and 16S data yielded trees with overall stronger support than analyses of either gene alone. Several analyses failed to support the monophyly of Libellula sensu lato due to the inclusion of one or more outgroup species. However, statistical comparisons of topologies produced by unconstrained analyses and analyses in which the monophyly of Libellula was constrained indicate that any differences are nonsignificant. Based on morphological data, we therefore reject the paraphyly of Libellula and accept the outgroup status of Orthemis ferruginea and Pachydiplax longipennis.

  2. Metabolic rescue in pluripotent cells from patients with mtDNA disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Wu, Jun; Morey, Robert; Mora-Castilla, Sergio; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Poulton, Joanna; Wang, Xinjian; Ahmed, Riffat; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Yeonmi; Hayama, Tomonari; Li, Ying; Van Dyken, Crystal; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Koski, Amy; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Amato, Paula; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Terzic, Andre; Laurent, Louise C; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-08-13

    Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A>G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T>G and 13513G>A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T>G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease.

  3. AFLP markers resolve intra-specific relationships and infer genetic structure among lineages of the canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor.

    PubMed

    Klymus, Katy E; Carl Gerhardt, H

    2012-11-01

    The canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor, is a wide-ranging hylid found from southwestern US into southern Mexico. Recent studies have shown this species to have a complex evolutionary history, with several phylogeographically distinct lineages, a probable cryptic species, and multiple episodes of mitochondrial introgression with the sister group, the H. eximia complex. We aimed to use genome wide AFLP markers to better resolve relationships within this group. As in other studies, our inferred phylogeny not only provides evidence for repeated mitochondrial introgression between H. arenicolor lineages and H. eximia/H. wrightorum, but it also affords more resolution within the main H. arenicolor clade than was previously achieved with sequence data. However, as with a previous study, the placement of a lineage of H. arenicolor whose distribution is centered in the Balsas Basin of Mexico remains poorly resolved, perhaps due to past hybridization with the H. eximia complex. Furthermore, the AFLP data set shows no differentiation among lineages from the Grand Canyon and Colorado Plateau despite their large mitochondrial sequence divergence. Finally, our results infer a well-supported sister relationship between this combined Colorado Plateau/Grand Canyon lineage and the Sonoran Desert lineage, a relationship that strongly contradicts conclusions drawn from the mtDNA evidence. Our study provides a basis for further behavioral and ecological speciation studies of this system and highlights the importance of multi-taxon (species) sampling in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies.

  4. Genealogical analysis of maternal and paternal lineages in the Quebec population.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marc; Vézina, Hélène

    2010-04-01

    The Quebec population is one of the rare populations of its size for which genealogical information is available for an uninterrupted period of almost four centuries. This allows for in-depth studies on the formation and evolution of a young founder population. Using data from two major population registers, in this study we focus on the maternal and paternal lineages (i.e., strictly female or male genealogical lines) that can be traced back within the Quebec genealogies. Through the analysis of these lineages it is possible to characterize the founders who transmitted to the contemporary population their mitochondrial (for females) and Y-chromosome (for males) DNA. The basic material consists of 2,221 ascending genealogies of subjects who married in the Quebec population between 1945 and 1965. On average, more than nine generations of ancestors were identified among the lineages. Analyses of maternal and paternal lineages show that the number of paternal founders is higher and their origins and genetic contributions are more variable than that of maternal founders, leading to a larger effective population size and greater diversity of Y chromosomes than of mtDNA. This is explained for the most part by differential migratory patterns among male and female founders of the Quebec population. Comparisons of sex-specific genetic contributions with total genetic contribution showed a strong correlation between the two values, with some discrepancies related to sex ratio differences among the founders' first descendants.

  5. Origin and evolution of the dependent lineages in the genetic caste determination system of Pogonomyrmex ants.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Anu; Pamilo, Pekka; Johnson, Robert A; Page, Robert E; Gadau, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Hybridizing harvester ants of the Pogonomyrmex barbatus/rugosus complex have an exceptional genetic caste determination (GCD) mechanism. We combined computer simulations, population genomics, and linkage mapping using >1000 nuclear AFLP markers and a partial mtDNA sequence to explore the genetic architecture and origin of the dependent lineages. Our samples included two pairs of hybridizing lineages, and the mitochondrial and nuclear data showed contradicting affinities between them. Clustering of individual genotypes based on nuclear markers indicated some exceptions to the general GCD system, that is, interlineage hybrid genes as well as some pure-line workers. A genetic linkage map of P. rugosus showed one of the highest recombination rates ever measured in insects (14.0 cM/Mb), supporting the view that social insects are characterized by high recombination rates. The population data had 165 markers in which sibling pairs showed a significant genetic difference depending on the caste. The differences were scattered in the genome; 13 linkage groups had loci with F(ST)>0.9 between the hybridizing lineages J1 and J2.The mapping results and the population data indicate that the dependent lineages have been initially formed through hybridization at different points in time but the role of introgression has been insignificant in their later evolution.

  6. Mitochondrial haplogroup C4c: a rare lineage entering America through the ice-free corridor?

    PubMed

    Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Perego, Ugo A; Olivieri, Anna; Angerhofer, Norman; Gandini, Francesca; Carossa, Valeria; Lancioni, Hovirag; Semino, Ornella; Woodward, Scott R; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recent analyses of mitochondrial genomes from Native Americans have brought the overall number of recognized maternal founding lineages from just four to a current count of 15. However, because of their relative low frequency, almost nothing is known for some of these lineages. This leaves a considerable void in understanding the events that led to the colonization of the Americas following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In this study, we identified and completely sequenced 14 mitochondrial DNAs belonging to one extremely rare Native American lineage known as haplogroup C4c. Its age and geographical distribution raise the possibility that C4c marked the Paleo-Indian group(s) that entered North America from Beringia through the ice-free corridor between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets. The similarities in ages andgeographical distributions for C4c and the previously analyzed X2a lineage provide support to the scenario of a dual origin for Paleo-Indians. Taking into account that C4c is deeply rooted in the Asian portion of the mtDNA phylogeny and is indubitably of Asian origin, the finding that C4c and X2a are characterized by parallel genetic histories definitively dismisses the controversial hypothesis of an Atlantic glacial entry route into North America.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  8. Structure of E. coli 16S RNA elucidated by psoralen crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Hearst, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    E. coli 16S RNA in solution was photoreacted with hydroxymethyltrimethylpsoralen and long wave ultraviolet light. Positions of crosslinks were determined to high resolution by partially digesting the RNA with T/sub 1/ RNase, separating the crosslinked fragments by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, reversing the crosslink, and sequencing the separated fragments. This method yielded the locations of crosslinks to +/-15 nucleotides. Even finer placement has been made on the basis of our knowledge of psoralen reactivity. Thirteen unique crosslinks were mapped. Seven crosslinks confirmed regions of secondary structure which had been predicted in published phylogenetic models, three crosslinks discriminated between phylogenetic models, and three proved the existence of new structures. The new structures were all long-range interactions which appear to be in dynamic equilibrium with local secondary structure. Because this technique yields direct information about the secondary structure of large RNAs, it should prove invaluable in studying the structure of other RNAs of all sizes.

  9. [PCR rDNA 16S used for the etiological diagnosis of blood culture negative endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Baty, G; Lanotte, P; Hocqueloux, L; Prazuck, T; Bret, L; Romano, M; Mereghetti, L

    2010-06-01

    We report the case of a 55 year-old man presenting with a double aortic and mitral endocarditis for which resected valve culture was repeatedly negative. Specific PCR made on valves because of highly positive blood tests for Bartonella henselae remained negative. A molecular approach was made with 16S rDNA PCR, followed by sequencing. Bartonella quintana was identified as the etiology of endocarditis. B. quintana, "fastidious" bacteria, even if hard to identify in a laboratory, is often reported as a blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) agent. Molecular biology methods have strongly improved the diagnosis of BCNE. We propose a review of the literature focusing on the interest of broad-spectrum PCR on valve for the etiological diagnosis of BCNE.

  10. An unusual case of seronegative, 16S PCR positive Brucella infection

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Lucy; Rawat, David; Naik, Sandhia; Millar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Brucella is a zoonotic infection commonly diagnosed by isolation of the organism from blood culture or positive serological testing. It is an uncommon cause of a pyrexia of unknown origin in the United Kingdom. Case presentation: We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl with no history of travel who presented with pyrexia, weight loss, arthralgia, multiple splenic abscesses and a subsequent pleural effusion, the latter of which isolated a Brucella species on 16S rRNA PCR. The patient responded well to initiation of treatment for brucellosis and on repeat imaging, after 3 months, the splenic abscesses had resolved. Conclusion: This unique case demonstrates uncommon complications of brucellosis and the challenges of diagnosing the organism, the latter of which can be alleviated by the utilization of molecularbased technologies. This patient had a negative serology result for brucellosis, which highlights the need to interpret serology results with caution in non-endemic regions for brucellosis. PMID:28348782

  11. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  12. Maternal Lineage of Warmblood Mares Contributes to Variation of Gestation Length and Bias of Foal Sex Ratio.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, J; Stock, K F; Wulf, M; Aurich, C

    2015-01-01

    Maternal lineage influences performance traits in horses. This is probably caused by differences in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transferred to the offspring via the oocyte. In the present study, we investigated if reproductive traits with high variability-gestation length and fetal sex ratio-are influenced by maternal lineage. Data from 142 Warmblood mares from the Brandenburg State Stud at Neustadt (Dosse), Germany, were available for the study. Mares were grouped according to their maternal lineage. Influences on the reproduction parameters gestation length and sex ratio of offspring were analyzed by simple and multiple analyses of variance. A total of 786 cases were included. From the 142 mares, 119 were assigned to six maternal lineages with n≥10 mares per lineage, and 23 mares belonged to smaller maternal lineages. The mean number of live foals produced per mare was 4.6±3.6 (±SD). Live foal rate was 83.5%. Mean gestation length was 338.5±8.9 days (±SD) with a range of 313 to 370 days. Gestation length was affected by maternal lineage (p<0.001). Gestation length was also significantly influenced by the individual mare, age of the mare, year of breeding, month of breeding and sex of the foal (p<0.05). Of the 640 foals born alive at term, 48% were male and 52% female. Mare age group and maternal lineage significantly influenced the sex ratio of the foals (p<0.05). It is concluded that maternal lineage influences reproductive parameters with high variation such as gestation length and foal sex ratio in horses. In young primiparous and aged mares, the percentage of female offspring is higher than the expected 1:1 ratio.

  13. Maternal Lineage of Warmblood Mares Contributes to Variation of Gestation Length and Bias of Foal Sex Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, J.; Stock, K. F.; Wulf, M.; Aurich, C.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal lineage influences performance traits in horses. This is probably caused by differences in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transferred to the offspring via the oocyte. In the present study, we investigated if reproductive traits with high variability—gestation length and fetal sex ratio—are influenced by maternal lineage. Data from 142 Warmblood mares from the Brandenburg State Stud at Neustadt (Dosse), Germany, were available for the study. Mares were grouped according to their maternal lineage. Influences on the reproduction parameters gestation length and sex ratio of offspring were analyzed by simple and multiple analyses of variance. A total of 786 cases were included. From the 142 mares, 119 were assigned to six maternal lineages with n≥10 mares per lineage, and 23 mares belonged to smaller maternal lineages. The mean number of live foals produced per mare was 4.6±3.6 (±SD). Live foal rate was 83.5%. Mean gestation length was 338.5±8.9 days (±SD) with a range of 313 to 370 days. Gestation length was affected by maternal lineage (p<0.001). Gestation length was also significantly influenced by the individual mare, age of the mare, year of breeding, month of breeding and sex of the foal (p<0.05). Of the 640 foals born alive at term, 48% were male and 52% female. Mare age group and maternal lineage significantly influenced the sex ratio of the foals (p<0.05). It is concluded that maternal lineage influences reproductive parameters with high variation such as gestation length and foal sex ratio in horses. In young primiparous and aged mares, the percentage of female offspring is higher than the expected 1:1 ratio. PMID:26436555

  14. Fully stereocontrolled total syntheses of the prostacyclin analogues 16S-iloprost and 16S-3-oxa-iloprost by a common route, using alkenylcopper-azoalkene conjugate addition, asymmetric olefination, and allylic alkylation.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Guido J; Kim, Mikhail; Gais, Hans-Joachim; Vermeeren, Cornelia

    2005-12-21

    In this article we describe fully stereocontrolled total syntheses of 16S-iloprost (16S-2), the most active component of the drugs Ilomedin and Ventavis, and of 16S-3-oxa-iloprost (16S-3), a close analogue of 16S-2 having the potential for a high oral activity, by a new and common route. The key steps of this route are (1) the establishment of the complete C13-C20 omega side chain of the target molecules through a stereoselective conjugate addition of the alkenylcopper derivative 9 to the bicyclic C6-C12 azoalkene 10 with formation of hydrazone 8, (2) the diastereoselective olefination of ketone 7 with the chiral phosphoryl acetate 39, and (3) the regio- and stereoselective alkylation of the allylic acetate 43 with cuprate 42. These measures allowed the 5E,15S,16S-stereoselective synthesis of 16S-2 and 16S-3, a goal which had previously not been achieved. Azoalkene 10 was obtained from the achiral bicyclic C6-C12 ketone 11 as previously described by using as key step an enantioselective deprotonation. The configuration at C16 of omega-side chain building block 9 has been installed with high stereoselectivity by the oxazolidinone method and that at C15 by a diastereoselective oxazaborolidine-catalyzed reduction of the C13-C20 ketone 23 with catecholborane. Surprisingly, a high diastereoselectivity in the reduction of 23 was only obtained by using 2 equiv of oxazaborolidine 24. Application of substoichiometric amounts of 24 resulted in irreproducible diastereoselectivities ranging from very high to nil.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai.

  16. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  17. Hosts, distribution and genetic divergence (16S rDNA) of Amblyomma dubitatum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Labruna, Marcelo B; Mastropaolo, Mariano; González, Enrique M; Mangold, Atilio J; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2010-08-01

    We supply information about hosts and distribution of Amblyomma dubitatum. In addition, we carry out an analysis of genetic divergence among specimens of A. dubitatum from different localities and with respect to other Neotropical Amblyomma species, using sequences of 16S rDNA gene. Although specimens of A. dubitatum were collected on several mammal species as cattle horse, Tapirus terrestris, Mazama gouazoubira, Tayassu pecari, Sus scrofa, Cerdocyon thous, Myocastor coypus, Allouata caraya, Glossophaga soricina and man, most records of immature and adult stages of A. dubitatum were made on Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, making this rodent the principal host for all parasitic stages of this ticks. Cricetidae rodents (Lundomys molitor, Scapteromys tumidus), opossums (Didelphis albiventris) and vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus) also were recorded as hosts for immature stages. All findings of A. dubitatum correspond to localities of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, and they were concentrated in the Biogeographical provinces of Pampa, Chaco, Cerrado, Brazilian Atlantic Forest, Parana Forest and Araucaria angustifolia Forest. The distribution of A. dubitatum is narrower than that of its principal host, therefore environmental variables rather than hosts determine the distributional ranges of this tick. The intraspecific genetic divergence among 16S rDNA sequences of A. dubitatum ticks collected in different localities from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay was in all cases lower than 0.8%, whereas the differences with the remaining Amblyomma species included in the analysis were always bigger than 6.8%. Thus, the taxonomic status of A. dubitatum along its distribution appears to be certain at the specific level.

  18. African origin for Madagascan dogs revealed by mtDNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Arman; Oskarsson, Mattias C. R.; van Asch, Barbara; Rabakonandriania, Elisabeth; Savolainen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar was one of the last major land masses to be inhabited by humans. It was initially colonized by Austronesian speaking Indonesians 1500–2000 years ago, but subsequent migration from Africa has resulted in approximately equal genetic contributions from Indonesia and Africa, and the material culture has mainly African influences. The dog, along with the pig and the chicken, was part of the Austronesian Neolithic culture, and was furthermore the only domestic animal to accompany humans to every continent in ancient times. To illuminate Madagascan cultural origins and track the initial worldwide dispersal of dogs, we here investigated the ancestry of Madagascan dogs. We analysed mtDNA control region sequences in dogs from Madagascar (n=145) and compared it with that from potential ancestral populations in Island Southeast Asia (n=219) and sub-Saharan Africa (n=493). We found that 90% of the Madagascan dogs carried a haplotype that was also present in sub-Saharan Africa and that the remaining lineages could all be attributed to a likely origin in Africa. By contrast, only 26% of Madagascan dogs shared haplotypes with Indonesian dogs, and one haplotype typical for Austronesian dogs, carried by more than 40% of Indonesian and Polynesian dogs, was absent among the Madagascan dogs. Thus, in contrast to the human population, Madagascan dogs seem to trace their origin entirely from Africa. These results suggest that dogs were not brought to Madagascar by the initial Austronesian speaking colonizers on their transoceanic voyage, but were introduced at a later stage, together with human migration and cultural influence from Africa. PMID:26064658

  19. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Laura D; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A; Driscoll, Carlos A; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Tumenta, Pricelia N; Jirmo, Tuqa H; de Snoo, Geert R; de Iongh, Hans H; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted.

  20. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Laura D.; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A.; Tumenta, Pricelia N.; Jirmo, Tuqa H.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  1. Genetic Diversity of the Biofilm Covering Montacuta ferruginosa (Mollusca, Bivalvia) as Evaluated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis and Cloning of PCR-Amplified Gene Fragments Coding for 16S rRNA†

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, David C.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Zwart, Gabriel; De Ridder, Chantal

    1998-01-01

    The shell of the bivalve Montacuta ferruginosa, a symbiont living in the burrow of an echinoid, is covered with a rust-colored biofilm. This biofilm includes different morphotypes of bacteria that are encrusted with a mineral rich in ferric ion and phosphate. The aim of this research was to determine the genetic diversity and phylogenetic affiliation of the biofilm bacteria. Also, the possible roles of the microorganisms in the processes of mineral deposition within the biofilm, as well as their impact on the biology of the bivalve, were assessed by phenotypic inference. The genetic diversity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of short (193-bp) 16S ribosomal DNA PCR products obtained with primers specific for the domain Bacteria. This analysis revealed a diverse consortium; 11 to 25 sequence types were detected depending on the method of DNA extraction used. Individual biofilms analyzed by using the same DNA extraction protocol did not produce identical DGGE profiles. However, different biofilms shared common bands, suggesting that similar bacteria can be found in different biofilms. The phylogenetic affiliations of the sequence types were determined by cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. Close relatives of the genera Pseudoalteromonas, Colwellia, and Oceanospirillum (members of the γ-Proteobacteria lineage), as well as Flexibacter maritimus (a member of the Cytophaga-Flavobacter-Bacteroides lineage), were found in the biofilms. We inferred from the results that some of the biofilm bacteria could play a role in the mineral formation processes. PMID:9726898

  2. Within-population genetic effects of mtDNA on metabolic rate in Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    Kurbalija Novičić, Z; Immonen, E; Jelić, M; AnÐelković, M; Stamenković-Radak, M; Arnqvist, G

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of research supports the view that within-species sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is functional, in the sense that it has important phenotypic effects. However, most of this empirical foundation is based on comparisons across populations, and few studies have addressed the functional significance of mtDNA polymorphism within populations. Here, using mitonuclear introgression lines, we assess differences in whole-organism metabolic rate of adult Drosophila subobscura fruit flies carrying either of three different sympatric mtDNA haplotypes. We document sizeable, up to 20%, differences in metabolic rate across these mtDNA haplotypes. Further, these mtDNA effects are to some extent sex specific. We found no significant nuclear or mitonuclear genetic effects on metabolic rate, consistent with a low degree of linkage disequilibrium between mitochondrial and nuclear genes within populations. The fact that mtDNA haplotype variation within a natural population affects metabolic rate, which is a key physiological trait with important effects on life-history traits, adds weight to the emergent view that mtDNA haplotype variation is under natural selection and it revitalizes the question as to what processes act to maintain functional mtDNA polymorphism within populations.

  3. Ethidium bromide as a marker of mtDNA replication in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Anna Maria; Fusi, Paola; Pastori, Valentina; Amicarelli, Giulia; Pozzi, Chiara; Adlerstein, Daniel; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in tumor cells was found to play an important role in maintaining the malignant phenotype. Using laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSCFM) in a recent work, we reported a variable fluorescence intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in mitochondria nucleoids of living carcinoma cells. Since when EB is bound to nucleic acids its fluorescence is intensified; a higher EB fluorescence intensity could reflect a higher DNA accessibility to EB, suggesting a higher mtDNA replication activity. To prove this hypothesis, in the present work we studied, by LSCFM, the EB fluorescence in mitochondria nucleoids of living neuroblastoma cells, a model system in which differentiation affects the level of mtDNA replication. A drastic decrease of fluorescence was observed after differentiation. To correlate EB fluorescence intensity to the mtDNA replication state, we evaluated the mtDNA nascent strands content by ligation-mediated real-time PCR, and we found a halved amount of replicating mtDNA molecules in differentiating cells. A similar result was obtained by BrdU incorporation. These results indicate that the low EB fluorescence of nucleoids in differentiated cells is correlated to a low content of replicating mtDNA, suggesting that EB may be used as a marker of mtDNA replication in living cells.

  4. Oxidants and not alkylating agents induce rapid mtDNA loss and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Furda, Amy M.; Marrangoni, Adele M.; Lokshin, Anna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for proper mitochondrial function and encodes 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 polypeptides that make up subunits of complex I, III, IV, in the electron transport chain and complex V, the ATP synthase. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in processes such as premature aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer, it has not been shown whether persistent mtDNA damage causes a loss of oxidative phosphorylation. We addressed this question by treating mouse embryonic fibroblasts with either hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and measuring several endpoints, including mtDNA damage and repair rates using QPCR, levels of mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins using antibody analysis, and a pharmacologic profile of mitochondria using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. We show that a 60 min treatment with H2O2 causes persistent mtDNA lesions, mtDNA loss, decreased levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, a loss of ATP-linked oxidative phosphorylation and a loss of total reserve capacity. Conversely, a 60 min treatment with 2 mM MMS causes persistent mtDNA lesions but no mtDNA loss, no decrease in levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, and no mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that persistent mtDNA damage is not sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22766155

  5. Lake Tanganyika—A 'Melting Pot' of Ancient and Young Cichlid Lineages (Teleostei: Cichlidae)?

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Juliane D.; Cotterill, Fenton P. D.; Schliewen, Ulrich K.

    2015-01-01

    A long history of research focused on the East Africa cichlid radiations (EAR) revealed discrepancies between mtDNA and nuclear phylogenies, suggesting that interspecific hybridisation may have been significant during the radiation of these fishes. The approximately 250 cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika have their roots in a monophyletic African cichlid assemblage, but controversies remain about the precise phylogenetic origin and placement of different lineages and consequently about L. Tanganyika colonization scenarios. 3312 AFLP loci and the mitochondrial ND2 gene were genotyped for 91 species representing almost all major lacustrine and riverine haplotilapiine east African cichlid lineages with a focus on L. Tanganyika endemics. Explicitly testing for the possibility of ancient hybridisation events, a comprehensive phylogenetic network hypothesis is proposed for the origin and diversification of L. Tanganyika cichlids. Inference of discordant phylogenetic signal strongly suggests that the genomes of two endemic L. Tanganyika tribes, Eretmodini and Tropheini, are composed of an ancient mixture of riverine and lacustrine lineages. For the first time a strong monophyly signal of all non-haplochromine mouthbrooding species endemic to L. Tanganyika (“ancient mouthbrooders”) was detected. Further, in the genomes of early diverging L. Tanganyika endemics Trematocarini, Bathybatini, Hemibatini and Boulengerochromis genetic components of other lineages belonging to the East African Radiation appear to be present. In combination with recent palaeo-geological results showing that tectonic activity in the L. Tanganyika region resulted in highly dynamic and heterogeneous landscape evolution over the Neogene and Pleistocene, the novel phylogenetic data render a single lacustrine basin as the geographical cradle of the endemic L. Tanganyika cichlid lineages unlikely. Instead a scenario of a pre-rift origin of several independent L. Tanganyika precursor lineages which

  6. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships linking Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) species based on 12S and 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Suman; Bhattacharya, Manojit; Deuti, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Genus Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) is endemic to southwestern and southern China and throughout southern Asia. Duttaphrynus phylogeny was also under debate for many years. 12S and 16S rDNAs help us to elucidate Duttaphrynus phylogeny.

  8. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  9. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses.

  10. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Profiling the Succession of Bacterial Communities throughout the Life Stages of a Higher Termite Nasutitermes arborum (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Michel; Roy, Virginie; Mora, Philippe; Frechault, Sophie; Lefebvre, Thomas; Hervé, Vincent; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Previous surveys of the gut microbiota of termites have been limited to the worker caste. Termite gut microbiota has been well documented over the last decades and consists mainly of lineages specific to the gut microbiome which are maintained across generations. Despite this intimate relationship, little is known of how symbionts are transmitted to each generation of the host, especially in higher termites where proctodeal feeding has never been reported. The bacterial succession across life stages of the wood-feeding higher termite Nasutitermes arborum was characterized by 16S rRNA gene deep sequencing. The microbial community in the eggs, mainly affiliated to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, was markedly different from the communities in the following developmental stages. In the first instar and last instar larvae and worker caste termites, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were less abundant than Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Fibrobacteres and the candidate phylum TG3 from the last instar larvae. Most of the representatives of these phyla (except Firmicutes) were identified as termite-gut specific lineages, although their relative abundances differed. The most salient difference between last instar larvae and worker caste termites was the very high proportion of Spirochaetes, most of which were affiliated to the Treponema Ic, Ia and If subclusters, in workers. The results suggest that termite symbionts are not transmitted from mother to offspring but become established by a gradual process allowing the offspring to have access to the bulk of the microbiota prior to the emergence of workers, and, therefore, presumably through social exchanges with nursing workers. PMID:26444989

  12. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  13. A molecular phylogeny of four endangered Madagascar tortoises based on MtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Caccone, A; Amato, G; Gratry, O C; Behler, J; Powell, J R

    1999-06-01

    Four of the five tortoise species in Madagascar, Pyxis arachnoides, P. planicauda, Geochelone radiata, and G. yniphora, are endemic and on the verge of extinction. Their phylogenetic relationships remain controversial and unresolved. Here we address the phylogeny of this group using DNA sequences for the 12S and 16S rDNA and cyt b genes in mitochondrial DNA. As outgroups we used two species of Geochelone, pardalis (mainland Africa) and nigra (Galápagos), as well as a more distant North American tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus. We conclude that the two Pyxis species are sister taxa and are imbedded in the genus Geochelone, rendering this latter genus paraphyletic. There is moderate support for the sister status of the two Madagascar Geochelone and for the monophyletic origin of all four endemics, suggesting a single colonization of the island. The separation of Madagascar from other land masses (90-165 mya) predates the origin of the endemic tortoises (estimated to be 14-22 mya). This suggests founding by rafting, a process known to have occurred with other tortoises. The derived morphological divergence of the Pyxis species in a relatively short period of time (13-20 my) stands in contrast to the notoriously slow rate of morphological evolution in most lineages of Chelonia.

  14. Dynamics of Cytoplasmic Incompatibility and Mtdna Variation in Natural Drosophila Simulans Populations

    PubMed Central

    Turelli, M.; Hoffmann, A. A.; McKechnie, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Drosophila simulans a cytoplasmically transmitted microorganism causes reduced egg hatch when infected males mate with uninfected females. The infection is rapidly spreading northward in California. Data on a specific mtDNA restriction site length polymorphism show that changes in the frequency of mtDNA variants are associated with this spread. All infected flies possess the same mtDNA allele, whereas the uninfected flies are polymorphic. Given that both paternal inheritance of the infection and imperfect maternal transmission have been demonstrated, one might expect instead that both infected and uninfected flies would possess both mtDNA variants. Our data suggest that imperfect female transmission of the infection (and/or the loss of the infection among progeny) is more common in nature than paternal transmission. A simple model of intrapopulation dynamics, with empirically supported parameter values, adequately describes the joint frequencies of the mtDNA variants and incompatibility types. PMID:1468627

  15. No consistent evidence for association between mtDNA variants and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, G.; Sims, R.; Harold, D.; Chapman, J.; Hollingworth, P.; Gerrish, A.; Russo, G.; Hamshere, M.; Moskvina, V.; Jones, N.; Thomas, C.; Stretton, A.; Holmans, P.A.; O'Donovan, M.C.; Owen, M.J.; Williams, J.; Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Chapman, Jade; Russo, Giancarlo; Hamshere, Marian; Pahwa, Jaspreet Singh; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Johnston, Janet; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Heun, Reiner; Kölsch, Heike; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although several studies have described an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and genetic variation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), each has implicated different mtDNA variants, so the role of mtDNA in the etiology of AD remains uncertain. Methods: We tested 138 mtDNA variants for association with AD in a powerful sample of 4,133 AD case patients and 1,602 matched controls from 3 Caucasian populations. Of the total population, 3,250 case patients and 1,221 elderly controls met the quality control criteria and were included in the analysis. Results: In the largest study to date, we failed to replicate the published findings. Meta-analysis of the available data showed no evidence of an association with AD. Conclusion: The current evidence linking common mtDNA variations with AD is not compelling. PMID:22442439

  16. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  17. Geographic patterns of mtDNA diversity in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simoni, L; Calafell, F; Pettener, D; Bertranpetit, J; Barbujani, G

    2000-01-01

    Genetic diversity in Europe has been interpreted as a reflection of phenomena occurring during the Paleolithic ( approximately 45,000 years before the present [BP]), Mesolithic ( approximately 18,000 years BP), and Neolithic ( approximately 10,000 years BP) periods. A crucial role of the Neolithic demographic transition is supported by the analysis of most nuclear loci, but the interpretation of mtDNA evidence is controversial. More than 2,600 sequences of the first hypervariable mitochondrial control region were analyzed for geographic patterns in samples from Europe, the Near East, and the Caucasus. Two autocorrelation statistics were used, one based on allele-frequency differences between samples and the other based on both sequence and frequency differences between alleles. In the global analysis, limited geographic patterning was observed, which could largely be attributed to a marked difference between the Saami and all other populations. The distribution of the zones of highest mitochondrial variation (genetic boundaries) confirmed that the Saami are sharply differentiated from an otherwise rather homogeneous set of European samples. However, an area of significant clinal variation was identified around the Mediterranean Sea (and not in the north), even though the differences between northern and southern populations were insignificant. Both a Paleolithic expansion and the Neolithic demic diffusion of farmers could have determined a longitudinal cline of mtDNA diversity. However, additional phenomena must be considered in both models, to account both for the north-south differences and for the greater geographic scope of clinical patterns at nuclear loci. Conversely, two predicted consequences of models of Mesolithic reexpansion from glacial refugia were not observed in the present study.

  18. Geographic Patterns of mtDNA Diversity in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Lucia; Calafell, Francesc; Pettener, Davide; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido

    2000-01-01

    Summary Genetic diversity in Europe has been interpreted as a reflection of phenomena occurring during the Paleolithic (∼45,000 years before the present [BP]), Mesolithic (∼18,000 years BP), and Neolithic (∼10,000 years BP) periods. A crucial role of the Neolithic demographic transition is supported by the analysis of most nuclear loci, but the interpretation of mtDNA evidence is controversial. More than 2,600 sequences of the first hypervariable mitochondrial control region were analyzed for geographic patterns in samples from Europe, the Near East, and the Caucasus. Two autocorrelation statistics were used, one based on allele-frequency differences between samples and the other based on both sequence and frequency differences between alleles. In the global analysis, limited geographic patterning was observed, which could largely be attributed to a marked difference between the Saami and all other populations. The distribution of the zones of highest mitochondrial variation (genetic boundaries) confirmed that the Saami are sharply differentiated from an otherwise rather homogeneous set of European samples. However, an area of significant clinal variation was identified around the Mediterranean Sea (and not in the north), even though the differences between northern and southern populations were insignificant. Both a Paleolithic expansion and the Neolithic demic diffusion of farmers could have determined a longitudinal cline of mtDNA diversity. However, additional phenomena must be considered in both models, to account both for the north-south differences and for the greater geographic scope of clinal patterns at nuclear loci. Conversely, two predicted consequences of models of Mesolithic reexpansion from glacial refugia were not observed in the present study. PMID:10631156

  19. Adding resolution to ordinal level relationships of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) with large fragments of mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Waeschenbach, Andrea; Webster, B L; Littlewood, D T J

    2012-06-01

    The construction of a stable phylogeny for the Cestoda, indicating the interrelationships of recognised orders and other major lineages, has proceeded iteratively since the group first received attention from phylogenetic systematists. Molecular analyses using nuclear ribosomal RNA gene fragments from the small (ssrDNA) and large (lsrDNA) subunits have been used to test competing evolutionary scenarios based on morphological data but could not arbitrate between some key conflicting hypotheses. To the ribosomal data, we have added a contiguous fragment of mitochondrial (mt) genome data (mtDNA) of partial nad1-trnN-trnP-trnI-trnK-nad3-trnS-trnW-cox1-trnT-rrnL-trnC-partial rrnS, spanning 4034-4447 bp, where new data for this region were generated for 18 species. Bayesian analysis of mtDNA and rDNA as nucleotides, and where appropriate as amino acids, demonstrated that these two classes of genes provide complementary signal across the phylogeny. In all analyses, except when using mt amino acids only, the Gyrocotylidea is sister group to all other Cestoda (Nephroposticophora), and Amphilinidea forms the sister group to the Eucestoda. However, an earliest-diverging position of Amphilinidea is strongly supported in the mt amino acid analysis. Amphilinidea exhibit a unique tRNA arrangement (nad1-trnI-trnL2-trnP-trnK-trnV-trnA-trnN-nad3), whereas Gyrocotylidea shares that of the derived lineages, providing additional evidence of the uniqueness of amphilinid genes and genomes. The addition of mtDNA to the rDNA genes supported the Caryophyllidea as the sister group to (Spathebothriidea+remaining Eucestoda), a hypothesis consistently supported by morphology. This relationship suggests a history of step-wise evolutionary transitions from simple monozoic, unsegmented tapeworms to the more familiar polyzoic, externally segmented (strobilate) forms. All our data partitions recovered Haplobothriidea as the sister group to Diphyllobothriidae. The sister-group relationship between

  20. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing for Epidemiological Surveys of Bacteria in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Bard, Emilie; Bernard, Maria; Brouat, Carine; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Dehne-Garcia, Alexandre; Loiseau, Anne; Tatard, Caroline; Tamisier, Lucie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vignes, Helene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission posed by urban rodents in West Africa. In addition to listing pathogenic bacteria in wild populations, as in other high-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies, our approach can estimate essential parameters for studies of zoonotic risk, such as prevalence and patterns of coinfection within individual hosts. However, the estimation of these parameters requires cleaning of the raw data to mitigate the biases generated by HTS methods. We present here an extensive review of these biases and of their consequences, and we propose a comprehensive trimming strategy for managing these biases. We demonstrated the application of this strategy using 711 commensal rodents, including 208 Mus musculus domesticus, 189 Rattus rattus, 93 Mastomys natalensis, and 221 Mastomys erythroleucus, collected from 24 villages in Senegal. Seven major genera of pathogenic bacteria were detected in their spleens: Borrelia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia. Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia have never before been detected in West African rodents. Bacterial prevalence ranged from 0% to 90% of individuals per site, depending on the bacterial taxon, rodent species, and site considered, and 26% of rodents displayed coinfection. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing strategy presented here has the advantage over other molecular surveillance tools of dealing with a large spectrum of bacterial

  1. X-chromosome lineages and the settlement of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Stephane; Yotova, Vania; Wang, Sijia; Bourtoumieu, Sylvie; Moreau, Claudia; Michalski, Roman; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Labuda, Damian

    2009-11-01

    Most genetic studies on the origins of Native Americans have examined data from mtDNA and Y-chromosome DNA. To complement these studies and to broaden our understanding of the origin of Native American populations, we present an analysis of 1,873 X-chromosomes representing Native American (n = 438) and other continental populations (n = 1,435). We genotyped 36 polymorphic sites, forming an informative haplotype within an 8-kb DNA segment spanning exon 44 of the dystrophin gene. The data reveal continuity from a common Eurasian ancestry between Europeans, Siberians, and Native Americans. However, the loss of two haplotypes frequent in Eurasia (18.8 and 7%) and the rise in frequency of a third haplotype rare elsewhere, indicate a major population bottleneck in the peopling of the Americas. Although genetic drift appears to have played a greater role in the genetic differentiation of Native Americans than in the latitudinally distributed Eurasians, we also observe a signal of a differentiated ancestry of southern and northern populations that cannot be simply explained by the serial southward dilution of genetic diversity. It is possible that the distribution of X-chromosome lineages reflects the genetic structure of the population of Beringia, itself issued from founder effects and a source of subsequent southern colonization(s).

  2. The phylogeography of Brazilian Y-chromosome lineages.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Silva, D R; Santos, F R; Rocha, J; Pena, S D

    2001-01-01

    We examined DNA polymorphisms in the nonrecombining portion of the Y-chromosome to investigate the contribution of distinct patrilineages to the present-day white Brazilian population. Twelve unique-event polymorphisms were typed in 200 unrelated males from four geographical regions of Brazil and in 93 Portuguese males. In our Brazilian sample, the vast majority of Y-chromosomes proved to be of European origin. Indeed, there were no significant differences when the haplogroup frequencies in Brazil and Portugal were compared by means of an exact test of population differentiation. Y-chromosome typing was quite sensitive in the detection of regional immigration events. Distinct footprints of Italian immigration to southern Brazil, migration of Moroccan Jews to the Amazon region, and possible relics of the 17th-century Dutch invasion of northeast Brazil could be seen in the data. In sharp contrast with our mtDNA data in white Brazilians, which showed that > or =60% of the matrilineages were Amerindian or African, only 2.5% of the Y-chromosome lineages were from sub-Saharan Africa, and none were Amerindian. Together, these results configure a picture of strong directional mating between European males and Amerindian and African females, which agrees with the known history of the peopling of Brazil since 1500.

  3. Multigene Phylogeography of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae): Distinct Genetic Lineages in Northern and Southern Hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Song, Sze-Looi; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera caudata is a pest of pumpkin flower. Specimens of B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (mainland Asia) and southern hemisphere (Indonesia) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of the nuclear 28S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) genes, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16S rRNA genes. The COI, COII, 16S rDNA and concatenated COI+COII+16S and COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences revealed that B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (Peninsular Malaysia, East Malaysia, Thailand) was distinctly different from the southern hemisphere (Indonesia: Java, Bali and Lombok), without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades (northern and southern hemispheres), indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for the concatenated COI+COII+16S nucleotide sequences between the taxa from the northern and southern hemispheres (‘p’ = 4.46-4.94%) was several folds higher than the ‘p’ distance for the taxa in the northern hemisphere (‘p’ = 0.00-0.77%) and the southern hemisphere (‘p’ = 0.00%). This distinct difference was also reflected by concatenated COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences with an uncorrected 'p' distance of 2.34-2.69% between the taxa of northern and southern hemispheres. In accordance with the type locality the Indonesian taxa belong to the nominal species. Thus the taxa from the northern hemisphere, if they were to constitute a cryptic species of the B. caudata species complex based on molecular data, need to be formally described as a new species. The Thailand and Malaysian B. caudata populations in the northern hemisphere showed distinct genetic structure and phylogeographic pattern. PMID:26090853

  4. Multigene Phylogeography of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae): Distinct Genetic Lineages in Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Song, Sze-Looi; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera caudata is a pest of pumpkin flower. Specimens of B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (mainland Asia) and southern hemisphere (Indonesia) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of the nuclear 28S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) genes, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16S rRNA genes. The COI, COII, 16S rDNA and concatenated COI+COII+16S and COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences revealed that B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (Peninsular Malaysia, East Malaysia, Thailand) was distinctly different from the southern hemisphere (Indonesia: Java, Bali and Lombok), without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades (northern and southern hemispheres), indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for the concatenated COI+COII+16S nucleotide sequences between the taxa from the northern and southern hemispheres ('p' = 4.46-4.94%) was several folds higher than the 'p' distance for the taxa in the northern hemisphere ('p' = 0.00-0.77%) and the southern hemisphere ('p' = 0.00%). This distinct difference was also reflected by concatenated COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences with an uncorrected 'p' distance of 2.34-2.69% between the taxa of northern and southern hemispheres. In accordance with the type locality the Indonesian taxa belong to the nominal species. Thus the taxa from the northern hemisphere, if they were to constitute a cryptic species of the B. caudata species complex based on molecular data, need to be formally described as a new species. The Thailand and Malaysian B. caudata populations in the northern hemisphere showed distinct genetic structure and phylogeographic pattern.

  5. Taxonomic relationships among Turkish water frogs as revealed by phylogenetic analyses using mtDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Ufuk; Matsui, Masafumi; Kutrup, Bilal; Eto, Koshiro

    2011-12-01

    We assessed taxonomic relationships among Turkish water frogs through estimation of phylogenetic relationships among 62 adult specimens from 44 distinct populations inhabiting seven main geographical regions of Turkey using 2897 bp sequences of the mitochondrial Cytb, 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes with equally-weighted parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian methods of inference. Monophyletic clade (Clade A) of the northwesternmost (Thrace) samples is identified as Pelophylax ridibundus. The other clade (Clade B) consisted of two monophyletic subclades. One of these contains specimens from southernmost populations that are regarded as an unnamed species. The other subclade consists of two lineages, of which one corresponds to P. caralitanus and another to P. bedriagae. Taxonomic relationships of these two species are discussed and recognition of P. caralitanus as a subspecies of P. bedriagae is proposed.

  6. The Expanded mtDNA Phylogeny of the Franco-Cantabrian Region Upholds the Pre-Neolithic Genetic Substrate of Basques

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Sergio; Valverde, Laura; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A.; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Algorta, Jaime; Catarino, Susana; Arteta, David; Herrera, Rene J.; Zarrabeitia, María Teresa; Peña, José A.; de Pancorbo, Marian M.

    2013-01-01

    The European genetic landscape has been shaped by several human migrations occurred since Paleolithic times. The accumulation of archaeological records and the concordance of different lines of genetic evidence during the last two decades have triggered an interesting debate concerning the role of ancient settlers from the Franco-Cantabrian region in the postglacial resettlement of Europe. Among the Franco-Cantabrian populations, Basques are regarded as one of the oldest and more intriguing human groups of Europe. Recent data on complete mitochondrial DNA genomes focused on macrohaplogroup R0 revealed that Basques harbor some autochthonous lineages, suggesting a genetic continuity since pre-Neolithic times. However, excluding haplogroup H, the most representative lineage of macrohaplogroup R0, the majority of maternal lineages of this area remains virtually unexplored, so that further refinement of the mtDNA phylogeny based on analyses at the highest level of resolution is crucial for a better understanding of the European prehistory. We thus explored the maternal ancestry of 548 autochthonous individuals from various Franco-Cantabrian populations and sequenced 76 mitogenomes of the most representative lineages. Interestingly, we identified three mtDNA haplogroups, U5b1f, J1c5c1 and V22, that proved to be representative of Franco-Cantabria, notably of the Basque population. The seclusion and diversity of these female genetic lineages support a local origin in the Franco-Cantabrian area during the Mesolithic of southwestern Europe, ∼10,000 years before present (YBP), with signals of expansions at ∼3,500 YBP. These findings provide robust evidence of a partial genetic continuity between contemporary autochthonous populations from the Franco-Cantabrian region, specifically the Basques, and Paleolithic/Mesolithic hunter-gatherer groups. Furthermore, our results raise the current proportion (≈15%) of the Franco-Cantabrian maternal gene pool with a putative pre

  7. The structure of bacterial communities in the western Arctic Ocean as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kirchman, David L; Cottrell, Matthew T; Lovejoy, Connie

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial communities in the surface layer of the oceans consist of a few abundant phylotypes and many rare ones, most with unknown ecological functions and unclear roles in biogeochemical processes. To test hypotheses about relationships between abundant and rare phylotypes, we examined bacterial communities in the western Arctic Ocean using pyrosequence data of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Samples were collected from various locations in the Chukchi Sea, the Beaufort Sea and Franklin Bay in summer and winter. We found that bacterial communities differed between summer and winter at a few locations, but overall there was no significant difference between the two seasons in spite of large differences in biogeochemical properties. The sequence data suggested that abundant phylotypes remained abundant while rare phylotypes remained rare between the two seasons and among the Arctic regions examined here, arguing against the 'seed bank' hypothesis. Phylotype richness was calculated for various bacterial groups defined by sequence similarity or by phylogeny (phyla and proteobacterial classes). Abundant bacterial groups had higher within-group diversity than rare groups, suggesting that the ecological success of a bacterial lineage depends on diversity rather than on the dominance of a few phylotypes. In these Arctic waters, in spite of dramatic variation in several biogeochemical properties, bacterial community structure was remarkably stable over time and among regions, and any variation was due to the abundant phylotypes rather than rare ones.

  8. Identification and Phylogenetic analysis of thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field samples by 16S rDNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Leu, J Y; McGovern-Traa, C P; Porter, A J; Harris, W J; Hamilton, W A

    1998-06-01

    Thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been recognized as an important source of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in hydrocarbon reservoirs and in production systems. Four thermophilic SRB enrichment cultures from three different oil field samples (sandstone core, drilling mud, and production water) were investigated using 16S rDNA sequence comparative analysis. In total, 15 different clones were identified. We found spore-forming, low G+C content, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum-related sequences present in all oil field samples, and additionally a clone originating from sandstone core which was assigned to the mesophilic Desulfomicrobium group. Furthermore, three clones related to Gram-positive, non-sulfate-reducing Thermoanaerobacter species and four clones close to Clostridium thermocopriae were found in enrichment cultures from sandstone core and from production water, respectively. In addition, the deeply rooted lineage of two of the clones suggested previously undescribed, Gram-positive, low G+C content, thermophilic, obligately anaerobic bacteria present in production water. Such thermophilic, non-sulfate-reducing microorganisms may play an important ecological role alongside SRB in oil field environments.

  9. Homoduplex and Heteroduplex Polymorphisms of the Amplified Ribosomal 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacers Describe Genetic Relationships in the “Bacillus cereus Group”

    PubMed Central

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Borin, Sara

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus weihenstephanensis are closely related in phenotype and genotype, and their genetic relationship is still open to debate. The present work uses amplified 16S-23S internal transcribed spacers (ITS) to discriminate between the strains and species and to describe the genetic relationships within the “B. cereus group,” advantage being taken of homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. One hundred forty-one strains belonging to the six species were investigated, and 73 ITS-HHP pattern types were distinguished by MDE, a polyacrylamide matrix specifically designed to resolve heteroduplex and single-strand conformation polymorphisms. The discriminating bands were confirmed as ITS by Southern hybridization, and the homoduplex or heteroduplex nature was identified by single-stranded DNA mung bean nuclease digestion. Several of the ITS-HHP types corresponded to specific phenotypes such as B. anthracis or serotypes of B. thuringiensis. Unweighted pair group method arithmetic average cluster analysis revealed two main groups. One included B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. The second included B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis appeared as a lineage of B. cereus. PMID:11097928

  10. Reconstruction of ancestral 16S rRNA reveals mutation bias in the evolution of optimal growth temperature in the Thermotogae phylum.

    PubMed

    Green, Anna G; Swithers, Kristen S; Gogarten, Jan F; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optimal growth temperature is a complex trait involving many cellular components, and its physiology is not yet fully understood. Evolution of continuous characters, such as optimal growth temperature, is often modeled as a one-dimensional random walk, but such a model may be an oversimplification given the complex processes underlying the evolution of continuous characters. Recent articles have used ancestral sequence reconstruction to infer the optimal growth temperature of ancient organisms from the guanine and cytosine content of the stem regions of ribosomal RNA, allowing inferences about the evolution of optimal growth temperature. Here, we investigate the optimal growth temperature of the bacterial phylum Thermotogae. Ancestral sequence reconstruction using a nonhomogeneous model was used to reconstruct the stem guanine and cytosine content of 16S rRNA sequences. We compare this sequence reconstruction method with other ancestral character reconstruction methods, and show that sequence reconstruction generates smaller confidence intervals and different ancestral values than other reconstruction methods. Unbiased random walk simulation indicates that the lower temperature members of the Thermotogales have been under directional selection; however, when a simulation is performed that takes possible mutations into account, it is the high temperature lineages that are, in fact, under directional selection. We find that the evolution of Thermotogales optimal growth temperatures is best fit by a biased random walk model. These findings suggest that it may be easier to evolve from a high optimal growth temperature to a lower one than vice versa.

  11. Phylogenetic lineages in the Botryosphaeriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J.; Rheeder, John; Marasas, Walter F.O.; Philips, Alan J.L.; Alves, Artur; Burgess, Treena; Barber, Paul; Groenewald, Johannes Z.

    2006-01-01

    Botryosphaeria is a species-rich genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, commonly associated with dieback and cankers of woody plants. As many as 18 anamorph genera have been associated with Botryosphaeria, most of which have been reduced to synonymy under Diplodia (conidia mostly ovoid, pigmented, thick-walled), or Fusicoccum (conidia mostly fusoid, hyaline, thin-walled). However, there are numerous conidial anamorphs having morphological characteristics intermediate between Diplodia and Fusicoccum, and there are several records of species outside the Botryosphaeriaceae that have anamorphs apparently typical of Botryosphaeria s.str. Recent studies have also linked Botryosphaeria to species with pigmented, septate ascospores, and Dothiorella anamorphs, or Fusicoccum anamorphs with Dichomera synanamorphs. The aim of this study was to employ DNA sequence data of the 28S rDNA to resolve apparent lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae. From these data, 12 clades are recognised. Two of these lineages clustered outside the Botryosphaeriaceae, namely Diplodia-like anamorphs occurring on maize, which are best accommodated in Stenocarpella (Diaporthales), as well as an unresolved clade including species of Camarosporium/Microdiplodia. We recognise 10 lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae, including an unresolved clade (Diplodia/Lasiodiplodia/Tiarosporella), Botryosphaeria s.str. (Fusicoccum anamorphs), Macrophomina, Neoscytalidium gen. nov., Dothidotthia (Dothiorella anamorphs), Neofusicoccum gen. nov. (Botryosphaeria-like teleomorphs, Dichomera-like synanamorphs), Pseudofusicoccum gen. nov., Saccharata (Fusicoccum- and Diplodia-like synanamorphs), “Botryosphaeria” quercuum (Diplodia-like anamorph), and Guignardia (Phyllosticta anamorphs). Separate teleomorph and anamorph names are not provided for newly introduced genera, even where both morphs are known. The taxonomy of some clades and isolates (e.g. B. mamane) remains unresolved due to the absence of ex

  12. Nucleotide sequencing and analysis of 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) of Taylorella equigenitalis, as an important pathogen for contagious equine metritis (CEM).

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Nagano, Y; Tazumi, A; Murayama, O; Millar, B C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M

    2006-05-01

    The primer set for 16S rDNA amplified an amplicon of about 1500 bp in length for three strains of Taylorella equigenitalis (NCTC11184(T), Kentucky188 and EQ59). Sequence differences of the 16S rDNA among the six sequences, including three reference sequences, occurred at only a few nucleotide positions and thus, an extremely high sequence similarity of the 16S rDNA was first demonstrated among the six sequences. In addition, the primer set for 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) amplified two amplicons about 1300 bp and 1200 bp in length for the three strains. The ISRs were estimated to be about 920 bp in length for large ISR-A and about 830 bp for small ISR-B. Sequence alignment of the ISR-A and ISR-B demonstrated about 10 base differences between NCTC11184(T) and EQ59 and between Kentucky188 and EQ59. However, only minor sequence differences were demonstrated between the ISR-A and ISR-B from NCTC11184(T) and Kentucky188, respectively. A typical order of the intercistronic tRNAs with the 29 nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ile)-tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-3' was demonstrated in the all ISRs. The ISRs may be useful for the discrimination amongst isolates of T. equigenitalis if sequencing is employed.

  13. Algae-bacteria association inferred by 16S rDNA similarity in established microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Dagmar; Nohynek, Liisa; Rischer, Heiko

    2014-06-01

    Forty cultivable, visually distinct bacterial cultures were isolated from four Baltic microalgal cultures Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus obliquus, Isochrysis sp., and Nitzschia microcephala, which have been maintained for several years in the laboratory. Bacterial isolates were characterized with respect to morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. A total of 17 unique bacterial strains, almost all belonging to one of three families, Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Erythrobacteraceae, were subsequently isolated. The majority of isolated bacteria belong to Rhodobacteraceae. Literature review revealed that close relatives of the bacteria isolated in this study are not only often found in marine environments associated with algae, but also in lakes, sediments, and soil. Some of them had been shown to interact with organisms in their surroundings. A Basic Local Alignment Search Tool study indicated that especially bacteria isolated from the Isochrysis sp. culture were highly similar to microalgae-associated bacteria. Two of those isolates, I1 and I6, belong to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, members of which are known to occur in close communities with microalgae. An UniFrac analysis revealed that the bacterial community of Isochrysis sp. significantly differs from the other three communities.

  14. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships among cirrate octopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) resolved using mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piertney, Stuart B; Hudelot, Cendrine; Hochberg, F G; Collins, Martin A

    2003-05-01

    PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE CIRRATE OCTOPODS (MOLLUSCA: Cephalopoda) were investigated using partial sequences of the 16S rRNA mitochondrial gene. The derived phylogeny supports the traditional separation of cirrate families based on web form. Genera with a single web (Opisthoteuthis, Grimpoteuthis, Luteuthis, and Cirroctopus) are clearly distinct from those with an intermediate or secondary web (Cirroteuthis, Cirrothauma, and Stauroteuthis). The cirrates with a single web are separated into three groups. The first group is represented by Opisthoteuthis species, the second by Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis, and the third by members of the genus Cirroctopus. There is no support for the isolation of Luteuthis in a separate family (Luteuthidae). There is, however, evidence of two groupings within the genus Opisthoteuthis. The data suggest the following revisions in the systematic classification of the cirrates: (1) Cirrothauma, Cirroteuthis, and Stauroteuthis be united in the Cirroteuthidae; (2) Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis be placed in the Grimpoteuthidae; (3) Opisthoteuthis in the Opisthoteuthidae, and; (4) Cirroctopus be considered sufficiently distinct from both Opisthoteuthidae and Grimpoteuthidae to warrant placement in a new family.

  16. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; ...

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as wellmore » as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.« less

  17. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  18. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, T.; Reeves, R. H.; Gilichinsky, D. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite).

  19. Investigation of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) hindgut microbiome via 16S pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Barker, Christopher J; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2013-12-27

    As a dietary source, the foliage of Eucalyptus spp. is low in available protein and carbohydrate while containing polyphenolic compounds that interfere with enzymatic digestion. To overcome this, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) has evolved a range of anatomical and physiological adaptations to assist with digestion and absorption of nutrients from this food source. Microbial fermentation of partially digested eucalyptus leaves is thought to be critical in this process, however, little is known about the composition and diversity of microorganisms that are associated with digestive health in this native species. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of caecum, colon and faecal pellet samples from two wild, free ranging, Queensland koalas. Our results reveal a highly complex and diverse ecosystem with considerable intra-individual variation. Although samples were dominated by sequences from the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla there was considerable variation at the genus level. This study is the first non-culture based microbiota analysis, using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing, and provides preliminary data to expand our understanding of the koala hindgut.

  20. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  1. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; Kirton, Edward S.; He, Shaomei; Woyke, Tanja; Lee, Janey; Chen, Feng; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as well as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.

  2. 16S rRNA Gene Mutations Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Tetracycline in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Amram, E.; Mikula, I.; Schnee, C.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.; Rosales, R. S.; Harrus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis isolates with decreased susceptibilities to tetracyclines are increasingly reported worldwide. The acquired molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon were investigated in 70 clinical isolates of M. bovis. Sequence analysis of the two 16S rRNA-encoding genes (rrs3 and rrs4 alleles) containing the primary binding pocket for tetracycline (Tet-1 site) was performed on isolates with tetracycline hydrochloride MICs of 0.125 to 16 μg/ml. Mutations at positions A965T, A967T/C (Escherichia coli numbering) of helix 31, U1199C of helix 34, and G1058A/C were identified. Decreased susceptibilities to tetracycline (MICs, ≥2 μg/ml) were associated with mutations present at two (A965 and A967) or three positions (A965, A967, and G1058) of the two rrs alleles. No tet(M), tet(O), or tet(L) determinants were found in the genome of any of the 70 M. bovis isolates. The data presented correlate (P < 0.0001) the mutations identified in the Tet-1 site of clinical isolates of M. bovis with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline. PMID:25403668

  3. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  4. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  5. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  6. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  7. Extensive paternal mtDNA leakage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria D S; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Strict maternal inheritance is considered a hallmark of animal mtDNA. Although recent reports suggest that paternal leakage occurs in a broad range of species, it is still considered an exceptionally rare event. To evaluate the impact of paternal leakage on the evolution of mtDNA, it is essential to reliably estimate the frequency of paternal leakage in natural populations. Using allele-specific real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we show that heteroplasmy is common in natural populations with at least 14% of the individuals carrying multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. However, the average frequency of the minor mtDNA haplotype is low (0.8%), which suggests that this pervasive heteroplasmy has not been noticed before due to a lack of power in sequencing surveys. Based on the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in the offspring of heteroplasmic mothers, we found no evidence for strong selection against one of the haplotypes. We estimated that the rate of paternal leakage is 6% and that at least 100 generations are required for complete sorting of mtDNA haplotypes. Despite the high proportion of heteroplasmic individuals in natural populations, we found no evidence for recombination between mtDNA molecules, suggesting that either recombination is rare or recombinant haplotypes are counter-selected. Our results indicate that evolutionary studies using mtDNA as a marker might be biased by paternal leakage in this species. PMID:23452233

  8. mtDNA Mutations and Their Role in Aging, Diseases and Forensic Sciences.

    PubMed

    Zapico, Sara C; Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2013-10-03

    Mitochondria are independent organelles with their own DNA. As a primary function, mitochondria produce the energy for the cell through Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the Electron Transport Chain (ETC). One of the toxic products of this process is Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which can induce oxidative damage in macromolecules like lipids, proteins and DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is less protected and has fewer reparation mechanisms than nuclear DNA (nDNA), and as such is more exposed to oxidative, mutation-inducing damage. This review analyzes the causes and consequences of mtDNA mutations and their relationship with the aging process. Neurodegenerative diseases, related with the aging, are consequences of mtDNA mutations resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial function. Also described are "mitochondrial diseases", pathologies produced by mtDNA mutations and whose symptoms are related with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, mtDNA haplogroups are defined in this review; these groups are important for determination of geographical origin of an individual. Additionally, different haplogroups exhibit variably longevity and risk of certain diseases. mtDNA mutations in aging and haplogroups are of special interest to forensic science research. Therefore this review will help to clarify the key role of mtDNA mutations in these processes and support further research in this area.

  9. mtDNA Mutations and Their Role in Aging, Diseases and Forensic Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Zapico, Sara C.; Ubelaker, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are independent organelles with their own DNA. As a primary function, mitochondria produce the energy for the cell through Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the Electron Transport Chain (ETC). One of the toxic products of this process is Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which can induce oxidative damage in macromolecules like lipids, proteins and DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is less protected and has fewer reparation mechanisms than nuclear DNA (nDNA), and as such is more exposed to oxidative, mutation-inducing damage. This review analyzes the causes and consequences of mtDNA mutations and their relationship with the aging process. Neurodegenerative diseases, related with the aging, are consequences of mtDNA mutations resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial function. Also described are “mitochondrial diseases”, pathologies produced by mtDNA mutations and whose symptoms are related with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, mtDNA haplogroups are defined in this review; these groups are important for determination of geographical origin of an individual. Additionally, different haplogroups exhibit variably longevity and risk of certain diseases. mtDNA mutations in aging and haplogroups are of special interest to forensic science research. Therefore this review will help to clarify the key role of mtDNA mutations in these processes and support further research in this area. PMID:24307969

  10. 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis of a Large Collection of Environmental and Clinical Unidentifiable Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, Michel; Bollet, Claude; Carlioz, Antoine; Martelin, Rolland; Gayral, Jean-Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Some bacteria are difficult to identify with phenotypic identification schemes commonly used outside reference laboratories. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based identification of bacteria potentially offers a useful alternative when phenotypic characterization methods fail. However, as yet, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequence analysis in the identification of conventionally unidentifiable isolates has not been evaluated with a large collection of isolates. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S rDNA sequencing as a means to identify a collection of 177 such isolates obtained from environmental, veterinary, and clinical sources. For 159 isolates (89.8%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥97%, and for 139 isolates (78.5%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥99%. These similarity score values were used to defined identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. For isolates identified to the species level, conventional identification failed to produce accurate results because of inappropriate biochemical profile determination in 76 isolates (58.7%), Gram staining in 16 isolates (11.6%), oxidase and catalase activity determination in 5 isolates (3.6%) and growth requirement determination in 2 isolates (1.5%). Eighteen isolates (10.2%) remained unidentifiable by 16S rDNA sequence analysis but were probably prototype isolates of new species. These isolates originated mainly from environmental sources (P = 0.07). The 16S rDNA approach failed to identify Enterobacter and Pantoea isolates to the species level (P = 0.04; odds ratio = 0.32 [95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 1.14]). Elsewhere, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing was compromised by the presence of 16S rDNA sequences with >1% undetermined positions in the databases. Unlike phenotypic identification, which can be modified by the variability of expression of characters, 16S rDNA sequencing provides

  11. mtDNA Variation among Greenland Eskimos: The Edge of theBeringian Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Saillard, Juliette; Forster, Peter; Lynnerup, Niels; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Nørby, Søren

    2000-01-01

    The Eskimo-Aleut language phylum is distributed from coastal Siberia across Alaska and Canada to Greenland and is well distinguished from the neighboring Na Dene languages. Genetically, however, the distinction between Na Dene and Eskimo-Aleut speakers is less clear. In order to improve the genetic characterization of Eskimos in general and Greenlanders in particular, we have sequenced hypervariable segment I (HVS-I) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and typed relevant RFLP sites in the mtDNA of 82 Eskimos from Greenland. A comparison of our data with published sequences demonstrates major mtDNA types shared between Na Dene and Eskimo, indicating a common Beringian history within the Holocene. We further confirm the presence of an Eskimo-specific mtDNA subgroup characterized by nucleotide position 16265G within mtDNA group A2. This subgroup is found in all Eskimo groups analyzed so far and is estimated to have originated <3,000 years ago. A founder analysis of all Eskimo and Chukchi A2 types indicates that the Siberian and Greenland ancestral mtDNA pools separated around the time when the Neo-Eskimo culture emerged. The Greenland mtDNA types are a subset of the Alaskan mtDNA variation: they lack the groups D2 and D3 found in Siberia and Alaska and are exclusively A2 but at the same time lack the A2 root type. The data are in agreement with the view that the present Greenland Eskimos essentially descend from Alaskan Neo-Eskimos. European mtDNA types are absent in our Eskimo sample. PMID:10924403

  12. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  13. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  14. The Enigmatic Origin of Bovine mtDNA Haplogroup R: Sporadic Interbreeding or an Independent Event of Bos primigenius Domestication in Italy?

    PubMed Central

    Bonfiglio, Silvia; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Negrini, Riccardo; Colli, Licia; Liotta, Luigi; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Torroni, Antonio; Ferretti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Background When domestic taurine cattle diffused from the Fertile Crescent, local wild aurochsen (Bos primigenius) were still numerous. Moreover, aurochsen and introduced cattle often coexisted for millennia, thus providing potential conditions not only for spontaneous interbreeding, but also for pastoralists to create secondary domestication centers involving local aurochs populations. Recent mitochondrial genomes analyses revealed that not all modern taurine mtDNAs belong to the shallow macro-haplogroup T of Near Eastern origin, as demonstrated by the detection of three branches (P, Q and R) radiating prior to the T node in the bovine phylogeny. These uncommon haplogroups represent excellent tools to evaluate if sporadic interbreeding or even additional events of cattle domestication occurred. Methodology The survey of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control-region variation of 1,747 bovine samples (1,128 new and 619 from previous studies) belonging to 37 European breeds allowed the identification of 16 novel non-T mtDNAs, which after complete genome sequencing were confirmed as members of haplogroups Q and R. These mtDNAs were then integrated in a phylogenetic tree encompassing all available P, Q and R complete mtDNA sequences. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses of 28 mitochondrial genomes belonging to haplogroups P (N = 2), Q (N = 16) and R (N = 10) together with an extensive survey of all previously published mtDNA datasets revealed major similarities between haplogroups Q and T. Therefore, Q most likely represents an additional minor lineage domesticated in the Near East together with the founders of the T subhaplogroups. Whereas, haplogroup R is found, at least for the moment, only in Italy and nowhere else, either in modern or ancient samples, thus supporting an origin from European aurochsen. Haplogroup R could have been acquired through sporadic interbreeding of wild and domestic animals, but our data do not rule out the possibility of a local

  15. Analysis of the unexplored features of rrs (16S rDNA) of the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny based on rrs (16S rDNA) sequencing is being vigorously pursued. In fact, it has been stated that novel biological findings are driven by comparison and integration of massive data sets. In spite of a large reservoir of rrs sequencing data of 1,237,963 entries, this analysis invariably needs supplementation with other genes. The need is to divide the genetic variability within a taxa or genus at their rrs phylogenetic boundaries and to discover those fundamental features, which will enable the bacteria to naturally fall within them. Within the large bacterial community, Clostridium represents a large genus of around 110 species of significant biotechnological and medical importance. Certain Clostridium strains produce some of the deadliest toxins, which cause heavy economic losses. We have targeted this genus because of its high genetic diversity, which does not allow accurate typing with the available molecular methods. Results Seven hundred sixty five rrs sequences (> 1200 nucleotides, nts) belonging to 110 Clostridium species were analyzed. On the basis of 404 rrs sequences belonging to 15 Clostridium species, we have developed species specific: (i) phylogenetic framework, (ii) signatures (30 nts) and (iii) in silico restriction enzyme (14 Type II REs) digestion patterns. These tools allowed: (i) species level identification of 95 Clostridium sp. which are presently classified up to genus level, (ii) identification of 84 novel Clostridium spp. and (iii) potential reduction in the number of Clostridium species represented by small populations. Conclusions This integrated approach is quite sensitive and can be easily extended as a molecular tool for diagnostic and taxonomic identification of any microbe of importance to food industries and health services. Since rapid and correct identification allows quicker diagnosis and consequently treatment as well, it is likely to lead to reduction in economic losses and mortality

  16. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Feces of Pet Birds Using 16S Marker Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Castillo-Carranza, Stephany A; Guard, Blake; Gomez-Vazquez, Jose P; Dowd, Scot E; Brigthsmith, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    Birds and other animals live and evolve in close contact with millions of microorganisms (microbiota). While the avian microbiota has been well characterized in domestic poultry, the microbiota of other bird species has been less investigated. The aim of this study was to describe the fecal bacterial communities of pet birds. Pooled fecal samples from 22 flocks representing over 150 individual birds of three different species (Melopsittacus undulatus or budgerigars, Nymphicus hollandicus or cockatiels, and Serinus canaria or domestic canaries) were used for analysis using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the MiSeq platform (Illumina). Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum (median 88.4 %; range 12.9-98.4 %) followed by other low-abundant phyla such as Proteobacteria (median 2.3 %; 0.1-85.3 %) and Actinobacteria (median 1.7 %; 0-18.3 %). Lactobacillaceae (mostly Lactobacillus spp.) was the most abundant family (median 78.1 %; 1.4-97.5 %), especially in budgerigars and canaries, and it deserves attention because of the ascribed beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria. Importantly, feces from birds contain intestinal, urinary, and reproductive-associated microbiota thus posing a serious problem to study one anatomical region at a time. Other groups of interest include the family Clostridiaceae that showed very low abundance (overall median <0.1 %) with the exception of two samples from cockatiels (14 and 45.9 %) and one sample from budgerigars (19.9 %). Analysis of UniFrac metrics showed that overall, the microbial communities from the 22 flocks tended to cluster together for each bird species, meaning each species shed distinctive bacterial communities in feces. This descriptive analysis provides insight into the fecal microbiota of pet birds.

  17. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  18. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  19. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M.; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities. PMID:27708630

  20. Identification of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens and Beneficial Species by Quantitative 16S Clonal Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Purnima S.; Griffen, Ann L.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2005-01-01

    Most studies of the bacterial etiology of periodontitis have used either culture-based or targeted DNA approaches, and so it is likely that pathogens remain undiscovered. The purpose of this study was to use culture-independent, quantitative analysis of biofilms associated with chronic periodontitis and periodontal health to identify pathogens and beneficial species. Samples from subjects with periodontitis and controls were analyzed using ribosomal 16S cloning and sequencing. Several genera, many of them uncultivated, were associated with periodontitis, the most numerous of which were gram positive, including Peptostreptococcus and Filifactor. The genera Megasphaera and Desulfobulbus were elevated in periodontitis, and the levels of several species or phylotypes of Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Deferribacteres, Dialister, Catonella, Tannerella, Streptococcus, Atopobium, Eubacterium, and Treponema were elevated in disease. Streptococcus and Veillonella spp. were found in high numbers in all samples and accounted for a significantly greater fraction of the microbial community in healthy subjects than in those with periodontitis. The microbial profile of periodontal health also included the less-abundant genera Campylobacter, Abiotrophia, Gemella, Capnocytophaga, and Neisseria. These newly identified candidates outnumbered Porphyromonas gingivalis and other species previously implicated as periodontopathogens, and it is not clear if newly identified and more numerous species may play a more important role in pathogenesis. Finally, more differences were found in the bacterial profile between subjects with periodontitis and healthy subjects than between deep and shallow sites within the same subject. This suggests that chronic periodontitis is the result of a global perturbation of the oral bacterial ecology rather than a disease-site specific microbial shift. PMID:16081935

  1. Sources for sedimentary bacteriohopanepolyols as revealed by 16S rDNA stratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Marco J L; Talbot, Helen M; Abbas, Ben A; Ward, Christopher; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2008-07-01

    Bacteriohopanoids are widespread lipid biomarkers in the sedimentary record. Many aerobic and anaerobic bacteria are potential sources of these lipids which sometimes complicates the use of these biomarkers as proxies for ecological and environmental changes. Therefore, we applied preserved 16S ribosomal RNA genes to identify likely Holocene biological sources of bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) in the sulfidic sediments of the permanently stratified postglacial Ace Lake, Antarctica. A suite of intact BHPs were identified, which revealed a variety of structural forms whose composition differed through the sediment core reflecting changes in bacterial populations induced by large changes in lake salinity. Stable isotopic compositions of the hopanols formed from periodic acid-cleaved BHPs, showed that some were substantially depleted in (13)C, indicative of their methanotrophic origin. Using sensitive molecular tools, we found that Type I and II methanotrophic bacteria (respectively Methylomonas and Methylocystis) were unique to the oldest lacustrine sediments (> 9400 years BP), but quantification of fossil DNA revealed that the Type I methanotrophs, including methanotrophs related to methanotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea cold-seep mussels, were the main precursors of the 35-amino BHPs (i.e. aminopentol, -tetrol and -triols). After isolation of the lake approximately 3000 years ago, one Type I methanotroph of the 'methanotrophic gill symbionts cluster' remained the most obvious source of aminotetrol and -triol. We, furthermore, identified a Synechococcus phylotype related to pelagic freshwater strains in the oldest lacustrine sediments as a putative source of 2-methylbacteriohopanetetrol (2-Me BHT). This combined application of advanced geochemical and paleogenomical tools further refined our knowledge about Holocene biogeochemical processes in Ace Lake.

  2. Vikodak - A Modular Framework for Inferring Functional Potential of Microbial Communities from 16S Metagenomic Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Sunil; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The overall metabolic/functional potential of any given environmental niche is a function of the sum total of genes/proteins/enzymes that are encoded and expressed by various interacting microbes residing in that niche. Consequently, prior (collated) information pertaining to genes, enzymes encoded by the resident microbes can aid in indirectly (re)constructing/ inferring the metabolic/ functional potential of a given microbial community (given its taxonomic abundance profile). In this study, we present Vikodak—a multi-modular package that is based on the above assumption and automates inferring and/ or comparing the functional characteristics of an environment using taxonomic abundance generated from one or more environmental sample datasets. With the underlying assumptions of co-metabolism and independent contributions of different microbes in a community, a concerted effort has been made to accommodate microbial co-existence patterns in various modules incorporated in Vikodak. Results Validation experiments on over 1400 metagenomic samples have confirmed the utility of Vikodak in (a) deciphering enzyme abundance profiles of any KEGG metabolic pathway, (b) functional resolution of distinct metagenomic environments, (c) inferring patterns of functional interaction between resident microbes, and (d) automating statistical comparison of functional features of studied microbiomes. Novel features incorporated in Vikodak also facilitate automatic removal of false positives and spurious functional predictions. Conclusions With novel provisions for comprehensive functional analysis, inclusion of microbial co-existence pattern based algorithms, automated inter-environment comparisons; in-depth analysis of individual metabolic pathways and greater flexibilities at the user end, Vikodak is expected to be an important value addition to the family of existing tools for 16S based function prediction. Availability and Implementation A web implementation of Vikodak

  3. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  4. DECIPHER, a search-based approach to chimera identification for 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Noguera, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    DECIPHER is a new method for finding 16S rRNA chimeric sequences by the use of a search-based approach. The method is based upon detecting short fragments that are uncommon in the phylogenetic group where a query sequence is classified but frequently found in another phylogenetic group. The algorithm was calibrated for full sequences (fs_DECIPHER) and short sequences (ss_DECIPHER) and benchmarked against WigeoN (Pintail), ChimeraSlayer, and Uchime using artificially generated chimeras. Overall, ss_DECIPHER and Uchime provided the highest chimera detection for sequences 100 to 600 nucleotides long (79% and 81%, respectively), but Uchime's performance deteriorated for longer sequences, while ss_DECIPHER maintained a high detection rate (89%). Both methods had low false-positive rates (1.3% and 1.6%). The more conservative fs_DECIPHER, benchmarked only for sequences longer than 600 nucleotides, had an overall detection rate lower than that of ss_DECIPHER (75%) but higher than those of the other programs. In addition, fs_DECIPHER had the lowest false-positive rate among all the benchmarked programs (<0.20%). DECIPHER was outperformed only by ChimeraSlayer and Uchime when chimeras were formed from closely related parents (less than 10% divergence). Given the differences in the programs, it was possible to detect over 89% of all chimeras with just the combination of ss_DECIPHER and Uchime. Using fs_DECIPHER, we detected between 1% and 2% additional chimeras in the RDP, SILVA, and Greengenes databases from which chimeras had already been removed with Pintail or Bellerophon. DECIPHER was implemented in the R programming language and is directly accessible through a webpage or by downloading the program as an R package (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  5. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  6. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates.

  7. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  8. Early population differentiation in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia: ancient mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome STR characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Bour, Jaume; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Alvarez, Sara; Fernández, Eva; López-Parra, Ana María; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Turbón, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    Ancient mtDNA was successfully recovered from 24 skeletal samples of a total of 60 ancient individuals from Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego, dated to 100-400 years BP, for which consistent amplifications and two-strand sequences were obtained. Y-chromosome STRs (DYS434, DYS437, DYS439, DYS393, DYS391, DYS390, DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, and DYS388) and the biallelic system DYS199 were also amplified, Y-STR alleles could be characterized in nine cases, with an average of 4.1 loci per sample correctly typed. In two samples of the same ethnic group (Aonikenk), an identical and complete eight-loci haplotype was recovered. The DYS199 biallelic system was used as a control of contamination by modern DNA and, along with DYS19, as a marker of American origin. The analysis of both mtDNA and Y-STRs revealed DNA from Amerindian ancestry. The observed polymorphisms are consistent with the hypothesis that the ancient Fuegians are close to populations from south-central Chile and Argentina, but their high nucleotide diversity and the frequency of single lineages strongly support early genetic differentiation of the Fuegians through combined processes of population bottleneck, isolation, and/or migration, followed by strong genetic drift. This suggests an early genetic diversification of the Fuegians right after their arrival at the southernmost extreme of South America.

  9. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the “central pseudoknot” and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A–916U and betaproteobacterial 19C–916G) and the non-native 19A–916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C–916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A–916U or 19C–916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts. PMID:28293553

  10. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the "central pseudoknot" and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A-916U and betaproteobacterial 19C-916G) and the non-native 19A-916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C-916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A-916U or 19C-916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts.

  11. Distinct symbiont lineages in three thyasirid species (Bivalvia: Thyasiridae) from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Clara F.; Duperron, Sébastien

    2011-04-01

    Thyasiridae are one of the less studied groups of chemosymbiotic bivalves. Here, we investigated symbioses in three different thyasirid species collected at three cold seeps from the Atlantic and Mediterranean. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences demonstrated that each thyasirid species harbours a single phylotype of symbiont that belongs to a distinct lineage of putative sulphur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. This result is confirmed by other marker genes (encoding 23S rRNA and APS reductase) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. This work highlights the diversity of bacteria involved in symbiosis with thyasirids and underlines the relevance of this group as a target for future symbiosis studies.

  12. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA from lyophilized cell cultures facilitates studies in molecular systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the major portion of a Bacillus cycloheptanicus strain SCH(T) 16S rRNA gene is reported. This sequence suggests that B. cycloheptanicus is genetically quite distinct from traditional Bacillus strains (e.g., B. subtilis) and may be properly regarded as belonging to a different genus. The sequence was determined from DNA that was produced by direct amplification of ribosomal DNA from a lyophilized cell pellet with straightforward polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. By obviating the need to revive cell cultures from the lyophile pellet, this approach facilitates rapid 16S rDNA sequencing and thereby advances studies in molecular systematics.

  13. Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed.

  14. The Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology, and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed. PMID:26284340

  15. A new way to build cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuwei

    2017-01-01

    A combination of single-cell techniques and computational analysis enables the simultaneous discovery of cell states, lineage relationships and the genes that control developmental decisions. PMID:28332977

  16. Peeking through the trapdoor: Historical biogeography of the Aegean endemic spider Cyrtocarenum Ausserer, 1871 with an estimation of mtDNA substitution rates for Mygalomorphae.

    PubMed

    Kornilios, P; Thanou, E; Kapli, P; Parmakelis, A; Chatzaki, M

    2016-05-01

    The Aegean region, located in the Eastern Mediterranean, is an area of rich biodiversity and endemism. Its position, geographical configuration and complex geological history have shaped the diversification history of many animal taxa. Mygalomorph spiders have drawn the attention of researchers, as excellent model systems for phylogeographical investigations. However, phylogeographic studies of spiders in the Aegean region are scarce. In this study, we focused on the phylogeography of the endemic ctenizid trap-door spider Cyrtocarenum Ausserer, 1871. The genus includes two morphologically described species: C. grajum (C.L. Koch, 1836) and C. cunicularium (Olivier, 1811). We sampled 60 specimens from the distributions of both species and analyzed four mitochondrial and two nuclear markers. Cyrtocarenum served as an example to demonstrate the importance of natural history traits in the inference of phylogeographic scenarios. The mtDNA substitution rates inferred for the genus are profoundly higher compared to araneomorph spiders and other arthropods, which seems tightly associated with their biology. We evaluate published mtDNA substitution rates followed in the literature for mygalomorph spiders and discuss potential pitfalls. Following gene tree (maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference) and species tree approaches ((*)BEAST), we reconstructed a time-calibrated phylogeny of the genus. These results, combined with a biogeographical ancestral-area analysis, helped build a biogeographic scenario that describes how the major palaeogeographic and palaeoclimatic events of the Aegean may have affected the distribution of Cyrtocarenum lineages. The diversification of the genus seems to have begun in the Middle Miocene in the present west Aegean area, while major phylogenetic events occurred at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary for C. cunicularium, probably related to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Our results also demonstrate the clear molecular distinction of the two

  17. A New Miocene-Divergent Lineage of Old World Racer Snake from India

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Raju; Maheta, Jaydeep

    2016-01-01

    A distinctive early Miocene-divergent lineage of Old world racer snakes is described as a new genus and species based on three specimens collected from the western Indian state of Gujarat. Wallaceophis gen. et. gujaratenesis sp. nov. is a members of a clade of old world racers. The monotypic genus represents a distinct lineage among old world racers is recovered as a sister taxa to Lytorhynchus based on ~3047bp of combined nuclear (cmos) and mitochondrial molecular data (cytb, ND4, 12s, 16s). The snake is distinct morphologically in having a unique dorsal scale reduction formula not reported from any known colubrid snake genus. Uncorrected pairwise sequence divergence for nuclear gene cmos between Wallaceophis gen. et. gujaratenesis sp. nov. other members of the clade containing old world racers and whip snake is 21–36%. PMID:26934509

  18. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Emilio J.

    2013-01-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest. PMID:24130438

  19. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Emilio J

    2013-09-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest.

  20. Searching for doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA in the apple snail Pomacea diffusa.

    PubMed

    Parakatselaki, Maria Eleni; Saavedra, Carlos; Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D

    2016-11-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an exceptional mode of mtDNA transmission, restricted so far to the class of bivalves. We searched for DUI outside bivalves using the apple snail Pomacea diffusa. It was an appropriate candidate to search for DUI for three reasons; it belongs to gastropods, which is the closest sister group to bivalves, it is gonochoristic and it has a strong sex bias in the progeny of different female individuals. These phenomena (gonochorism and sex-biased progeny) are also found in species with DUI. We searched for heteroplasmy in males and for high sequence divergence among mtDNA sequences obtained from male and female gonads. All sequences examined were identical. These data suggest that the mtDNA in P. diffusa is maternally transmitted and DUI remains an exclusive characteristic of bivalves.

  1. In situ lineage tracking of human prostatic epithelial stem cell fate reveals a common clonal origin for basal and luminal cells.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, John K; Williamson, Stuart C; Greaves, Laura C; Wilson, Laura; Rigas, Anastasia C; Sandher, Raveen; Pickard, Robert S; Robson, Craig N; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W; Heer, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    Stem cells accumulate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in an observable respiratory chain defect in their progeny, allowing the mapping of stem cell fate. There is considerable uncertainty in prostate epithelial biology where both basal and luminal stem cells have been described, and in this study the clonal relationships within the human prostate epithelial cell layers were explored by tracing stem cell fate. Fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed histologically-benign prostate samples from 35 patients were studied using sequential cytochrome c oxidase (COX)/succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme histochemistry and COX subunit I immunofluorescence to identify areas of respiratory chain deficiency; mtDNA mutations were identified by whole mitochondrial genome sequencing of laser-captured areas. We demonstrated that cells with respiratory chain defects due to somatic mtDNA point mutations were present in prostate epithelia and clonally expand in acini. Lineage tracing revealed distinct patterning of stem cell fate with mtDNA mutations spreading throughout the whole acinus or, more commonly, present as mosaic acinar defects. This suggests that individual acini are typically generated from multiple stem cells, and the presence of whole COX-deficient acini suggests that a single stem cell can also generate an entire branching acinar subunit of the gland. Significantly, a common clonal origin for basal, luminal and neuroendocrine cells is demonstrated, helping to resolve a key area of debate in human prostate stem cell biology.

  2. MtDNA phylogeny and biogeography of Copelatinae, a highly diverse group of tropical diving beetles (Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Balke, Michael; Ribera, Ignacio; Vogler, Alfried P

    2004-09-01

    Copelatinae is a diverse lineage of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) frequently encountered in wet tropical and subtropical forests, but phylogenetic relationships are very poorly understood. We performed a phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of this worldwide distributed group based on 50 species including a representative sample of major taxonomic groups and biogeographical regions. DNA sequences were obtained for the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome b, and 16S rRNA, for a total of 1575 aligned nucleotide positions. We found Copelatinae to be monophyletic, placed in a derived position and not sister to all remaining dytiscids, as had been suggested by earlier authors. The largest genus, Copelatus with some 460 known species was paraphyletic with respect to the smaller genera Lacconectus and Aglymbus. Among the major lineages of Copelatus, the subgenus Papuadytes was consistently recovered as sister to all other species (including Lacconectus and Aglymbus) with the possible exception of two western Palearctic taxa. We propose that the subgenus Papuadytes is removed from Copelatus and assigned generic status. Likewise, the two western Palearctic Copelatus are removed from this genus, and assigned the available genus name Liopterus. Our best phylogenetic hypothesis retrieved Afrotropical and New Guinean plus Australian species of Copelatus as monophyletic. Asian species were paraphyletic with respect to a species from Sulawesi which grouped with the species from New Guinea. Asian species were also paraphyletic with respect to Oriental Lacconectus, which was grouped with a clade of Neotropical species. Neotropical Copelatus form at least two separate lineages. The biogeographical evolution of Papuadytes is consistent with the relative age of the landmasses in the Austral region. Basal species are Australian, and successively derived ones are from New Caledonia and New Guinea. One species apparently dispersed from New Caledonia to China. Assuming a

  3. Strong and stable geographic differentiation of swamp buffalo maternal and paternal lineages indicates domestication in the China/Indochina border region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Yongfang; Yindee, Marnoch; Li, Kuan-Yi; Kuo, Hsiao-Yun; Ju, Yu-Ten; Ye, Shaohui; Faruque, Md Omar; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yachun; Cuong, Vu Chi; Pham, Lan Doan; Bouahom, Bounthong; Yang, Bingzhuang; Liang, Xianwei; Cai, Zhihua; Vankan, Dianne; Manatchaiworakul, Wallaya; Kowlim, Nonglid; Duangchantrasiri, Somphot; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Colenbrander, Ben; Zhang, Yuan; Beerli, Peter; Lenstra, Johannes A; Barker, J Stuart F

    2016-04-01

    The swamp type of the Asian water buffalo is assumed to have been domesticated by about 4000 years BP, following the introduction of rice cultivation. Previous localizations of the domestication site were based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation within China, accounting only for the maternal lineage. We carried out a comprehensive sampling of China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Nepal and Bangladesh and sequenced the mtDNA Cytochrome b gene and control region and the Y-chromosomal ZFY, SRY and DBY sequences. Swamp buffalo has a higher diversity of both maternal and paternal lineages than river buffalo, with also a remarkable contrast between a weak phylogeographic structure of river buffalo and a strong geographic differentiation of swamp buffalo. The highest diversity of the swamp buffalo maternal lineages was found in south China and north Indochina on both banks of the Mekong River, while the highest diversity in paternal lineages was in the China/Indochina border region. We propose that domestication in this region was later followed by introgressive capture of wild cows west of the Mekong. Migration to the north followed the Yangtze valley as well as a more eastern route, but also involved translocations of both cows and bulls over large distances with a minor influence of river buffaloes in recent decades. Bayesian analyses of various migration models also supported domestication in the China/Indochina border region. Coalescence analysis yielded consistent estimates for the expansion of the major swamp buffalo haplogroups with a credibility interval of 900 to 3900 years BP. The spatial differentiation of mtDNA and Y-chromosomal haplotype distributions indicates a lack of gene flow between established populations that is unprecedented in livestock.

  4. Phylogeography of the heavily poached African common pangolin (Pholidota, Manis tricuspis) reveals six cryptic lineages as traceable signatures of Pleistocene diversification.

    PubMed

    Gaubert, Philippe; Njiokou, Flobert; Ngua, Gabriel; Afiademanyo, Komlan; Dufour, Sylvain; Malekani, Jean; Bi, Sery Gonedelé; Tougard, Christelle; Olayemi, Ayodeji; Danquah, Emmanuel; Djagoun, Chabi A M S; Kaleme, Prince; Mololo, Casimir Nebesse; Stanley, William; Luo, Shu-Jin; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on faunal diversification in African rainforests remains scarce. We used phylogeography to assess (i) the role of Pleistocene climatic oscillations in the diversification of the African common pangolin (Manis tricuspis) and (ii) the utility of our multilocus approach for taxonomic delineation and trade tracing of this heavily poached species. We sequenced 101 individuals for two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), two nuclear DNA and one Y-borne gene fragments (totalizing 2602 bp). We used a time-calibrated, Bayesian inference phylogenetic framework and conducted character-based, genetic and phylogenetic delineation of species hypotheses within African common pangolins. We identified six geographic lineages partitioned into western Africa, Ghana, the Dahomey Gap, western central Africa, Gabon and central Africa, all diverging during the Middle to Late Pleistocene. MtDNA (cytochrome b + control region) was the sole locus to provide diagnostic characters for each of the six lineages. Tree-based Bayesian delimitation methods using single- and multilocus approaches gave high support for 'species' level recognition of the six African common pangolin lineages. Although the diversification of African common pangolins occurred during Pleistocene cyclical glaciations, causative correlation with traditional rainforest refugia and riverine barriers in Africa was not straightforward. We conclude on the existence of six cryptic lineages within African common pangolins, which might be of major relevance for future conservation strategies. The high discriminative power of the mtDNA markers used in this study should allow an efficient molecular tracing of the regional origin of African common pangolin seizures.

  5. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Exemplar of an mtDNA Disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas C; Lott, Marie T

    2017-02-24

    The report in 1988 that Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) was the product of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations provided the first demonstration of the clinical relevance of inherited mtDNA variation. From LHON studies, the medical importance was demonstrated for the mtDNA showing its coding for the most important energy genes, its maternal inheritance, its high mutation rate, its presence in hundreds to thousands of copies per cell, its quantitatively segregation of biallelic genotypes during both mitosis and meiosis, its preferential effect on the most energetic tissues including the eye and brain, its wide range of functional polymorphisms that predispose to common diseases, and its accumulation of mutations within somatic tissues providing the aging clock. These features of mtDNA genetics, in combination with the genetics of the 1-2000 nuclear DNA (nDNA) coded mitochondrial genes, is not only explaining the genetics of LHON but also providing a model for understanding the complexity of many common diseases. With the maturation of LHON biology and genetics, novel animal models for complex disease have been developed and new therapeutic targets and strategies envisioned, both pharmacological and genetic. Multiple somatic gene therapy approaches are being developed for LHON which are applicable to other mtDNA diseases. Moreover, the unique cytoplasmic genetics of the mtDNA has permitted the first successful human germline gene therapy via spindle nDNA transfer from mtDNA mutant oocytes to enucleated normal mtDNA oocytes. Such LHON lessons are actively being applied to common ophthalmological diseases like glaucoma and neurological diseases like Parkinsonism.

  6. How Good Are Indirect Tests at Detecting Recombination in Human mtDNA?

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel James; Bryant, David; Gemmell, Neil John

    2013-01-01

    Empirical proof of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination in somatic tissues was obtained in 2004; however, a lack of irrefutable evidence exists for recombination in human mtDNA at the population level. Our inability to demonstrate convincingly a signal of recombination in population data sets of human mtDNA sequence may be due, in part, to the ineffectiveness of current indirect tests. Previously, we tested some well-established indirect tests of recombination (linkage disequilibrium vs. distance using D′ and r2, Homoplasy Test, Pairwise Homoplasy Index, Neighborhood Similarity Score, and Max χ2) on sequence data derived from the only empirically confirmed case of human mtDNA recombination thus far and demonstrated that some methods were unable to detect recombination. Here, we assess the performance of these six well-established tests and explore what characteristics specific to human mtDNA sequence may affect their efficacy by simulating sequence under various parameters with levels of recombination (ρ) that vary around an empirically derived estimate for human mtDNA (population parameter ρ = 5.492). No test performed infallibly under any of our scenarios, and error rates varied across tests, whereas detection rates increased substantially with ρ values > 5.492. Under a model of evolution that incorporates parameters specific to human mtDNA, including rate heterogeneity, population expansion, and ρ = 5.492, successful detection rates are limited to a range of 7−70% across tests with an acceptable level of false-positive results: the neighborhood similarity score incompatibility test performed best overall under these parameters. Population growth seems to have the greatest impact on recombination detection probabilities across all models tested, likely due to its impact on sequence diversity. The implications of our findings on our current understanding of mtDNA recombination in humans are discussed. PMID:23665874

  7. MtDNA depleted PC3 cells exhibit Warburg effect and cancer stem cell features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yali; Lu, Jie; Axcrona, Karol; Eide, Lars; Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Peng, Qian; Wang, Junbai; Zhang, Hongquan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Reducing mtDNA content was considered as a critical step in the metabolism restructuring for cell stemness restoration and further neoplastic development. However, the connections between mtDNA depletion and metabolism reprograming-based cancer cell stemness in prostate cancers are still lack of studies. Here, we demonstrated that human CRPC cell line PC3 tolerated high concentration of the mtDNA replication inhibitor ethidium bromide (EtBr) and the mtDNA depletion triggered a universal metabolic remodeling process. Failure in completing that process caused lethal consequences. The mtDNA depleted (MtDP) PC3 cells could be steadily maintained in the special medium in slow cycling status. The MtDP PC3 cells contained immature mitochondria and exhibited Warburg effect. Furthermore, the MtDP PC3 cells were resistant to therapeutic treatments and contained greater cancer stem cell-like subpopulations: CD44+, ABCG2+, side-population and ALDHbright. In conclusion, these results highlight the association of mtDNA content, mitochondrial function and cancer cell stemness features. PMID:27248169

  8. Impaired dynamics and function of mitochondria caused by mtDNA toxicity leads to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Kleppa, Liv; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Haugen, Øyvind P; Sjaastad, Ivar; Klungland, Arne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in heart failure of diverse etiologies. Generalized mitochondrial disease also leads to cardiomyopathy with various clinical manifestations. Impaired mitochondrial homeostasis may over time, such as in the aging heart, lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), close to the electron transport chain and unprotected by histones, may be a primary pathogenetic site, but this is not known. Here, we test the hypothesis that cumulative damage of cardiomyocyte mtDNA leads to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Transgenic mice with Tet-on inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a mutant uracil-DNA glycosylase 1 (mutUNG1) were generated. The mutUNG1 is known to remove thymine in addition to uracil from the mitochondrial genome, generating apyrimidinic sites, which obstruct mtDNA function. Following induction of mutUNG1 in cardiac myocytes by administering doxycycline, the mice developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure and premature death after ∼2 mo. The heart showed reduced mtDNA replication, severely diminished mtDNA transcription, and suppressed mitochondrial respiration with increased Pgc-1α, mitochondrial mass, and antioxidative defense enzymes, and finally failing mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics and deteriorating myocardial contractility as the mechanism of heart failure. The approach provides a model with induced cardiac-restricted mtDNA damage for investigation of mtDNA-based heart disease.

  9. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism affects accumulation of mtDNA damage in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Altilia, Serena; Santoro, Aurelia; Malagoli, Davide; Lanzarini, Catia; Álvarez, Josué Adolfo Ballesteros; Galazzo, Gianluca; Porter, Donald Carl; Crocco, Paolina; Rose, Giuseppina; Passarino, Giuseppe; Roninson, Igor Boris; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvioli, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Human TP53 gene is characterised by a polymorphism at codon 72 leading to an Arginine-to-Proline (R/P) substitution. The two resulting p53 isoforms have a different subcellular localisation after stress (more nuclear or more mitochondrial for the P or R isoform, respectively). p53P72 variant is more efficient than p53R72 in inducing the expression of genes involved in nuclear DNA repair. Since p53 is involved also in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, we wondered whether these p53 isoforms are associated with different accumulation of mtDNA damage. We observed that cells bearing p53R72 accumulate lower amount of mtDNA damage upon rotenone stress with respect to cells bearing p53P72, and that p53R72 co-localises with polymerase gamma more than p53P72. We also analysed the in vivo accumulation of heteroplasmy in a 300 bp fragment of mtDNA D-loop of 425 aged subjects. We observed that subjects with heteroplasmy higher than 5% are significantly less than expected in the p53R72/R72 group. On the whole, these data suggest that the polymorphism of TP53 at codon 72 affects the accumulation of mtDNA mutations, likely through the different ability of the two p53 isoforms to bind to polymerase gamma, and may contribute to in vivo accumulation of mtDNA mutations. PMID:22289634

  10. The occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in multiple cetacean species.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Nicole L; Viricel, Amélia; Wilcox, Lynsey; Katherine Moore, M; Rosel, Patricia E

    2011-04-01

    In population genetics and phylogenetic studies, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is commonly used for examining differences both between and within groups of individuals. For these studies, correct interpretation of every nucleotide position is crucial but can be complicated by the presence of ambiguous bases resulting from heteroplasmy. Particularly for non-model taxa, the presence of heteroplasmy in mtDNA is rarely reported, therefore, it is unclear how commonly it occurs and how it can affect phylogenetic relationships among taxa and the overall understanding of evolutionary processes. We examined the occurrence of both site and length heteroplasmy within the mtDNA of ten marine mammal species, for most of which mtDNA heteroplasmy has never been reported. After sequencing a portion of the mtDNA control region for 5,062 individuals, we found heteroplasmy in at least 2% of individuals from seven species, including Stenella frontalis where 58.9% were heteroplasmic. We verified the presence of true heteroplasmy, ruling out artifacts from amplification and sequencing methods and the presence of nuclear copies of mitochondrial genes. We found no evidence that mtDNA heteroplasmy influenced phylogenetic relationships, however, its occurrence does have the potential to increase the genetic diversity for all species in which it is found. This study stresses the importance of both detecting and reporting the occurrence of heteroplasmy in wild populations in order to enhance the knowledge of both the introduction and the persistence of mutant mitochondrial haplotypes in the evolutionary process.

  11. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kukat, Alexandra; Edgar, Daniel; Bratic, Ivana; Maiti, Priyanka; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  12. The a2 Mating-Type Locus Genes lga2 and rga2 Direct Uniparental Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Inheritance and Constrain mtDNA Recombination During Sexual Development of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W.

    2009-01-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance. PMID:19104076

  13. The a2 mating-type locus genes lga2 and rga2 direct uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and constrain mtDNA recombination during sexual development of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W

    2009-03-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF ACTIVE BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN A MODEL DRINKING WATER BIOFILM SYSTEM USING 16S RRNA-BASED CLONE LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent phylogenetic studies have used DNA as the target molecule for the development of environmental 16S rDNA clone libraries. As DNA may persist in the environment, DNA-based libraries cannot be used to identify metabolically active bacteria in water systems. In this study, a...

  15. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  16. Molecular Diagnosis of Kingella kingae Pericarditis by Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. PMID:17634294

  17. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  18. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence.

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  20. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    PubMed

    Ong, Swee Hoe; Kukkillaya, Vinutha Uppoor; Wilm, Andreas; Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  1. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  2. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  4. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA-BASED ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate between ruminant and human fecal pollution. These assays are rapid and relatively inexpensive but have been used in a limited number of studies. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy o...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  7. Minimization of chloroplast contamination in 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of insect herbivore bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Hanshew, Alissa S.; Mason, Charles J.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast sequence contamination in 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S) analyses can be particularly problematic when sampling microbial communities in plants and folivorous arthropods. We previously encountered high levels of plastid contamination in herbivorous insect samples when we used the predominant 454 pyrosequencing 16S methodologies described in the literature. 799F, a primer previously found to exclude chloroplast sequences, was modified to enhance its efficacy, and we describe, in detail, our methodology throughout amplicon pyrosequencing. Thirteen versions of 799F were assessed for the exclusion of chloroplast sequences from our samples. We found that a shift in the mismatch between 799F and chloroplast 16S resulted in significant reduction of chloroplast reads. Our results also indicate that amplifying sequences from environmental samples in a two-step PCR process, with the addition of the multiplex identifiers and 454 adapters in a second round of PCR, further improved primer specificity. Primers that included 3′ phosphorothioate bonds, which were designed to block primer degradation, did not amplify consistently across samples. The different forward primers do not appear to bias the bacterial communities detected. We provide a methodological framework for reducing chloroplast reads in high-throughput sequencing data sets that can be applied to a number of environmental samples and sequencing techniques. PMID:23968645

  8. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  9. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  10. A Web-Hosted R Workflow to Simplify and Automate the Analysis of 16S NGS Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) produces large data sets that include tens-of-thousands of sequence reads per sample. For analysis of bacterial diversity, 16S NGS sequences are typically analyzed in a workflow that containing best-of-breed bioinformatics packages that may levera...

  11. MULTIPLE ENZYME RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION DISTINCTION OF PSEUDOMONAS (SENSU STRICTO) 16S RRNA GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas specific 16S rDNA PCR amplification and multiple enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (MERFLP) analysis using a single digestion mixture of Alu I, Hinf I, Rsa I, and Tru 9I distinguished 150 published sequences and reference strains of authentic Pseudomonas...

  12. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  13. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  14. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  15. Between the Balkans and the Baltic: Phylogeography of a Common Vole Mitochondrial DNA Lineage Limited to Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Stojak, Joanna; McDevitt, Allan D.; Herman, Jeremy S.; Kryštufek, Boris; Uhlíková, Jitka; Purger, Jenő J.; Lavrenchenko, Leonid A.; Searle, Jeremy B.; Wójcik, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The common vole (Microtus arvalis) has been a model species of small mammal for studying end-glacial colonization history. In the present study we expanded the sampling from central and eastern Europe, analyzing contemporary genetic structure to identify the role of a potential ‘northern glacial refugium’, i.e. a refugium at a higher latitude than the traditional Mediterranean refugia. Altogether we analyzed 786 cytochrome b (cytb) sequences (representing mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA) from the whole of Europe, adding 177 new sequences from central and eastern Europe, and we conducted analyses on eight microsatellite loci for 499 individuals (representing nuclear DNA) from central and eastern Europe, adding data on 311 new specimens. Our new data fill gaps in the vicinity of the Carpathian Mountains, the potential northern refugium, such that there is now dense sampling from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea. Here we present evidence that the Eastern mtDNA lineage of the common vole was present in the vicinity of this Carpathian refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger Dryas. The Eastern lineage expanded from this refugium to the Baltic and shows low cytb nucleotide diversity in those most northerly parts of the distribution. Analyses of microsatellites revealed a similar pattern but also showed little differentiation between all of the populations sampled in central and eastern Europe. PMID:27992546

  16. Between the Balkans and the Baltic: Phylogeography of a Common Vole Mitochondrial DNA Lineage Limited to Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Stojak, Joanna; McDevitt, Allan D; Herman, Jeremy S; Kryštufek, Boris; Uhlíková, Jitka; Purger, Jenő J; Lavrenchenko, Leonid A; Searle, Jeremy B; Wójcik, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    The common vole (Microtus arvalis) has been a model species of small mammal for studying end-glacial colonization history. In the present study we expanded the sampling from central and eastern Europe, analyzing contemporary genetic structure to identify the role of a potential 'northern glacial refugium', i.e. a refugium at a higher latitude than the traditional Mediterranean refugia. Altogether we analyzed 786 cytochrome b (cytb) sequences (representing mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA) from the whole of Europe, adding 177 new sequences from central and eastern Europe, and we conducted analyses on eight microsatellite loci for 499 individuals (representing nuclear DNA) from central and eastern Europe, adding data on 311 new specimens. Our new data fill gaps in the vicinity of the Carpathian Mountains, the potential northern refugium, such that there is now dense sampling from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea. Here we present evidence that the Eastern mtDNA lineage of the common vole was present in the vicinity of this Carpathian refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger Dryas. The Eastern lineage expanded from this refugium to the Baltic and shows low cytb nucleotide diversity in those most northerly parts of the distribution. Analyses of microsatellites revealed a similar pattern but also showed little differentiation between all of the populations sampled in central and eastern Europe.

  17. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  18. High Pressure-Induced mtDNA Alterations in Retinal Ganglion Cells and Subsequent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Gao, Feng-Juan; Sun, Zhong-Mou; Xu, Ping; Chen, Jun-Yi; Sun, Xing-Huai; Wu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study indicated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mutations are crucial to the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a glaucomatous rat model. In this study, we examined whether high pressure could directly cause mtDNA alterations and whether the latter could lead to mitochondrial dysfunction and RGC death. Methods: Primary cultured rat RGCs were exposed to 30 mm Hg of hydrostatic pressure (HP) for 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h. mtDNA alterations and mtDNA repair/replication enzymes OGG1, MYH and polymerase gamma (POLG) expressions were also analyzed. The RGCs were then infected with a lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector targeting POLG (POLG-shRNA), and mtDNA alterations as well as mitochondrial function, including complex I/III activities and ATP production were subsequently studied at appropriate times. Finally, RGC apoptosis and the mitochondrial-apoptosis pathway-related protein cleaved caspase-3 were detected using a Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and western blotting, respectively. Results: mtDNA damage was observed as early as 48 h after the exposure of RGCs to HP. At 120 h after HP, mtDNA damage and mutations significantly increased, reaching >40% and 4.8 ± 0.3-fold, respectively, compared with the control values. Twelve hours after HP, the expressions of OGG1, MYH and POLG mRNA in the RGCs were obviously increased 5.02 ± 0.6-fold (p < 0.01), 4.3 ± 0.2-fold (p < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.09-fold (p < 0.05). Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of the three enzymes decreased at 72 and 120 h after HP (p < 0.05). After interference with POLG-shRNA, the mtDNA damage and mutations were significantly increased (p < 0.01), while complex I/III activities gradually decreased (p < 0.05). Corresponding decreases in membrane potential and ATP production appeared at 5 and 6 days after POLG-shRNA transfection respectively (p < 0.05). Increases in the

  19. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  20. A molecular assessment of phylogenetic relationships and lineage accumulation rates within the family Salamandridae (Amphibia, Caudata).

    PubMed

    Weisrock, David W; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Macey, J Robert; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Polymeni, Rosa; Ugurtas, Ismail H; Zhao, Ermi; Jowkar, Houman; Larson, Allan

    2006-11-01

    We examine phylogenetic relationships among salamanders of the family Salamandridae using approximately 2700 bases of new mtDNA sequence data (the tRNALeu, ND1, tRNAIle, tRNAGln, tRNAMet, ND2, tRNATrp, tRNAAla, tRNAAsn, tRNACys, tRNATyr, and COI genes and the origin for light-strand replication) collected from 96 individuals representing 61 of the 66 recognized salamandrid species and outgroups. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis are performed on the new data alone and combined with previously reported sequences from other parts of the mitochondrial genome. The basal phylogenetic split is a polytomy of lineages ancestral to (1) the Italian newt Salamandrina terdigitata, (2) a strongly supported clade comprising the "true" salamanders (genera Chioglossa, Mertensiella, Lyciasalamandra, and Salamandra), and (3) a strongly supported clade comprising all newts except S. terdigitata. Strongly supported clades within the true salamanders include monophyly of each genus and grouping Chioglossa and Mertensiella as the sister taxon to a clade comprising Lyciasalamandra and Salamandra. Among newts, genera Echinotriton, Pleurodeles, and Tylototriton form a strongly supported clade whose sister taxon comprises the genera Calotriton, Cynops, Euproctus, Neurergus, Notophthalmus, Pachytriton, Paramesotriton, Taricha, and Triturus. Our results strongly support monophyly of all polytypic newt genera except Paramesotriton and Triturus, which appear paraphyletic, and Calotriton, for which only one of the two species is sampled. Other well-supported clades within newts include (1) Asian genera Cynops, Pachytriton, and Paramesotriton, (2) North American genera Notophthalmus and Taricha, (3) the Triturus vulgaris species group, and (4) the Triturus cristatus species group; some additional groupings appear strong in Bayesian but not parsimony analyses. Rates of lineage accumulation through time are evaluated using this nearly comprehensive sampling of

  1. POLRMT regulates the switch between replication primer formation and gene expression of mammalian mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Inge; Miranda, Maria; Posse, Viktor; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Siira, Stefan J.; Bonekamp, Nina A.; Neumann, Ulla; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital in providing cellular energy via their oxidative phosphorylation system, which requires the coordinated expression of genes encoded by both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). Transcription of the circular mammalian mtDNA depends on a single mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT). Although the transcription initiation process is well understood, it is debated whether POLRMT also serves as the primase for the initiation of mtDNA replication. In the nucleus, the RNA polymerases needed for gene expression have no such role. Conditional knockout of Polrmt in the heart results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction causing dilated cardiomyopathy in young mice. We further studied the molecular consequences of different expression levels of POLRMT and found that POLRMT is essential for primer synthesis to initiate mtDNA replication in vivo. Furthermore, transcription initiation for primer formation has priority over gene expression. Surprisingly, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) exists in an mtDNA-free pool in the Polrmt knockout mice. TFAM levels remain unchanged despite strong mtDNA depletion, and TFAM is thus protected from degradation of the AAA+ Lon protease in the absence of POLRMT. Last, we report that mitochondrial transcription elongation factor may compensate for a partial depletion of POLRMT in heterozygous Polrmt knockout mice, indicating a direct regulatory role of this factor in transcription. In conclusion, we present in vivo evidence that POLRMT has a key regulatory role in the replication of mammalian mtDNA and is part of a transcriptional mechanism that provides a switch between primer formation for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:27532055

  2. Genetic variation and phylogeography of central Asian and other house mice, including a major new mitochondrial lineage in Yemen.

    PubMed Central

    Prager, E M; Orrego, C; Sage, R D

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and flanking tRNAs were sequenced from 76 mice collected at 60 localities extending from Egypt through Turkey, Yemen, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nepal to eastern Asia. Segments of the Y chromosome and of a processed p53 pseudogene (Psip53) were amplified from many of these mice and from others collected elsewhere in Eurasia and North Africa. The 251 mtDNA types, including 54 new ones reported here, now identified from commensal house mice (Mus musculus group) by sequencing this segment can be organized into four major lineages-domesticus, musculus, castaneus, and a new lineage found in Yemen. Evolutionary tree analysis suggested the domesticus mtDNAs as the sister group to the other three commensal mtDNA lineages and the Yemeni mtDNAs as the next oldest lineage. Using this tree and the phylogeographic approach, we derived a new model for the origin and radiation of commensal house mice whose main features are an origin in west-central Asia (within the present-day range of M. domesticus) and the sequential spreading of mice first to the southern Arabian Peninsula, thence eastward and northward into south-central Asia, and later from south-central Asia to north-central Asia (and thence into most of northern Eurasia) and to southeastern Asia. Y chromosomes with and without an 18-bp deletion in the Zfy-2 gene were detected among mice from Iran and Afghanistan, while only undeleted Ys were found in Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, and Nepal. Polymorphism for the presence of a Psip53 was observed in Georgia, Iran, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Sequencing of a 128-bp Psip53 segment from 79 commensal mice revealed 12 variable sites and implicated >/=14 alleles. The allele that appeared to be phylogenetically ancestral was widespread, and the greatest diversity was observed in Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nepal. Two mice provided evidence for a second Psip53 locus in some commensal populations. PMID:9755213

  3. Diversification of two lineages of symbiotic Photobacterium.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis'. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI), genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of 'P. mandapamensis' svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than 'P. mandapamensis'. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis' found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages.

  4. Diversification of Two Lineages of Symbiotic Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and ‘P. mandapamensis’. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI), genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of ‘P. mandapamensis’ svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than ‘P. mandapamensis’. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and ‘P. mandapamensis’ found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages. PMID:24349398

  5. Coreceptor gene imprinting governs thymocyte lineage fate

    PubMed Central

    Adoro, Stanley; McCaughtry, Thomas; Erman, Batu; Alag, Amala; Van Laethem, François; Park, Jung-Hyun; Tai, Xuguang; Kimura, Motoko; Wang, Lie; Grinberg, Alex; Kubo, Masato; Bosselut, Remy; Love, Paul; Singer, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Immature thymocytes are bipotential cells that are signalled during positive selection to become either helper- or cytotoxic-lineage T cells. By tracking expression of lineage determining transcription factors during positive selection, we now report that the Cd8 coreceptor gene locus co-opts any coreceptor protein encoded within it to induce thymocytes to express the cytotoxic-lineage factor Runx3 and to adopt the cytotoxic-lineage fate, findings we refer to as ‘coreceptor gene imprinting'. Specifically, encoding CD4 proteins in the endogenous Cd8 gene locus caused major histocompatibility complex class II-specific thymocytes to express Runx3 during positive selection and to differentiate into CD4+ cytotoxic-lineage T cells. Our findings further indicate that coreceptor gene imprinting derives from the dynamic regulation of specific cis Cd8 gene enhancer elements by positive selection signals in the thymus. Thus, for coreceptor-dependent thymocytes, lineage fate is determined by Cd4 and Cd8 coreceptor gene loci and not by the specificity of T-cell antigen receptor/coreceptor signalling. This study identifies coreceptor gene imprinting as a critical determinant of lineage fate determination in the thymus. PMID:22036949

  6. Isolation and 16S DNA characterization of soil microorganisms from tropical soils capable of utilizing the herbicides hexazinone and tebuthiuron.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Fadwa I Y; Helling, Charles S

    2003-11-01

    Six non-fermentative bacteria were isolated from Colombian (South America) and Hawaiian (USA) soils after enrichment with minimal medium supplemented with two herbicides, hexazinone (Hex) and tebuthiuron (Teb). Microscopic examination and physiological tests were followed by partial 16S DNA sequence analysis, using the first 527 bp of the 16S rRNA gene for bacterial identification. The isolated microorganisms (and in brackets, the herbicide that each degraded) were identified as: from Colombia. Methylobacterium organophilum [Teb], Paenibacillus pabuli [Teb], and Micrmbacterium foliorum [Hex]; and from Hawaii, Methylobacterium radiotolerans [Teb], Paenibacillus illinoisensis [Hex], and Rhodococcus equi [Hex]. The findings further explain how these herbicides, which have potential for illicit coca (Erythroxylum sp.) control, dissipate following their application to tropical soils.

  7. Phylogeography of Diadophis punctatus: extensive lineage diversity and repeated patterns of historical demography in a trans-continental snake.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Frank M; Feldman, Chris R; Siddall, Mark E; Burbrink, Frank T

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene had profound effects on the distributions of species across North America. Although the role of historical climate change on speciation remains controversial, the impact on genetic variation within species has been well documented. We examined mtDNA sequences from the cytochrome b gene (1117 bp) and a portion of the NADH-4 gene (659 bp) for 286 individuals of Diadophis punctatus to infer phylogeographic patterns and population structure and to examine historical demographic patterns in both glaciated and unglaciated regions of North America. We inferred 14 lineages that replace each other geographically across the United States. Several of these lineages appear to be confined to specific habitats (floodplains, grasslands, montane environments) and traverse previously identified genetic barriers for terrestrial vertebrates including the Mississippi and Apalachicola Rivers, the Appalachian Mountains, and the western continental divide. We also observed overlapping ranges between some haplotype groups and several instances of secondary contact associated with ecological transition zones in eastern South Carolina, southern Oklahoma and central California. Within the US, diversification began during the late Miocene and continued into the mid-Pleistocene, suggesting these lineages pre-dated the last glacial maximum. Coalescent and non-coalescent demographic analyses indicate that independent lineages currently occupying previously glaciated or unsuitable areas in eastern, central and western US underwent post-glacial population expansion likely from southern refugia during the late Pleistocene/early Holocene. Conversely, southern lineages display patterns consistent with long-term population stability. Such long-term persistence of genetic structure may be due to the competitive effects between lineages or ecosystem stability in more southern latitudes.

  8. Differentiation in stag beetles, Neolucanus swinhoei complex (Coleoptera: Lucanidae): four major lineages caused by periodical Pleistocene glaciations and separation by a mountain range.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Lung; Wan, Xia; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2014-09-01

    Taxonomic debates on Neolucanus swinhoei complex consisting of N. swinhoei, N. doro doro, N. doro horaguchii, and N. euganiae, distributed exclusively in Taiwan, have been ongoing for several decades because of their overlapping morphological characters. To clarify their taxonomic status and phylogeographical history, we analyzed nine morphological characteristics and four molecular amplicons. Phylogenetic inferences based on COI+16S rDNA+wingless showed one eastern and three western lineages, with the latter consisting of one low-hill and two montane lineages. Intermingled DNA sequences from different populations within each lineage, many low FST values, and a high variance component between lineages indicate the possibility of gene flow among populations. However, positive relationships were observed between the genetic divergences of 16S rDNA and its FST values with geographic distance. A divergence estimation based on COI+16S revealed that these beetles might have originated from Asian mainland and differentiated into western and eastern lineages ca. 1Mya, with the differentiation of the western lineages occurring approximately 0.50-0.75Mya. Isolation by mountain ranges and limited flying capability of these beetles as well as populations retreat to and expansion from refugia in response to glaciation cycles have resulted in the current distribution of N. swinhoei complex. Although most morphological characters are variable and undistinguishable, multi-dimensional scaling analysis based on measurable characteristics could recognize hill N. swinhoei as a cluster distinct from the others. However, based on the realities of genetic admixture, shared phylogeographical history and overlapping characteristics, all of these stag beetles should be regarded as Neolucanus swinhoei Bates, 1866.

  9. Post-glacial recolonization of the Great Lakes region by the common gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis) inferred from mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Placyk, John S; Burghardt, Gordon M; Small, Randall L; King, Richard B; Casper, Gary S; Robinson, Jace W

    2007-05-01

    Pleistocene events played an important role in the differentiation of North American vertebrate populations. Michigan, in particular, and the Great Lakes region, in general, were greatly influenced by the last glaciation. While several hypotheses regarding the recolonization of this region have been advanced, none have been strongly supported. We generated 148 complete ND2 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from common gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis) populations throughout the Great Lakes region to evaluate phylogeographic patterns and population structure and to determine whether the distribution of haplotypic variants is related to the post-Pleistocene retreat of the Wisconsinan glacier. The common gartersnake was utilized, as it is believed to have been one of the primary vertebrate invaders of the Great Lakes region following the most recent period of glacial retreat and because it has been a model species for a variety of evolutionary, ecological, behavioral, and physiological studies. Several genetically distinct evolutionary lineages were supported by both genealogical and molecular population genetic analyses, although to different degrees. The geographic distribution of the majority of these lineages is interpreted as reflecting post-glacial recolonization dynamics during the late Pleistocene. These findings generally support previous hypotheses of range expansion in this region.

  10. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  11. RmtC and RmtF 16S rRNA Methyltransferase in NDM-1-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohibur; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Pathak, Ashutosh; Pati, Binod Kumar; Singh, Avinash; Ovejero, Cristina M; Ahmad, Saheem; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA methyltransferases in 38 blaNDM-1-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and found RmtC in 3 isolates, 1 of which also harbored RmtF. The isolates were clonally unrelated; rmtC and rmtF genes were located on a chromosome with the blaNDM-1 gene. Strategies are needed to limit the spread of such isolates.

  12. Use of 16S rRNA Sequencing for Identification of Actinobacillus ureae Isolated from a Cerebrospinal Fluid Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A. C.; Shankland, I. M.; Elisha, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus ureae, previously Pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of DNA sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:11825992

  13. Usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Pathipati, Padmaja; Menon, Thangam; Kumar, Naveen; Francis, Thara; Sekar, Prem; Cherian, Kotturathu Mammen

    2012-08-01

    We report a rare case of infective endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae in an 8-year-old boy, 2 years after a right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with a bovine Contegra valved conduit. The patient recovered well after an RV-PA conduit enblock explantation and replacement with an aortic homograft with antibiotic treatment. All bacteriological cultures of excised tissue and blood were negative. The aetiological agent was identified as C. diphtheriae subsp. gravis by 16s rDNA sequencing.

  14. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  15. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; ...

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n =more » 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.« less

  16. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  17. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  18. Short-read assembly of full-length 16S amplicons reveals bacterial diversity in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher S; Handley, Kim M; Wrighton, Kelly C; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology, a fundamental question relates to how community diversity and composition change in response to perturbation. Most studies have had limited ability to deeply sample community structure (e.g. Sanger-sequenced 16S rRNA libraries), or have had limited taxonomic resolution (e.g. studies based on 16S rRNA hypervariable region sequencing). Here, we combine the higher taxonomic resolution of near-full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the economics and sensitivity of short-read sequencing to assay the abundance and identity of organisms that represent as little as 0.01% of sediment bacterial communities. We used a new version of EMIRGE optimized for large data size to reconstruct near-full-length 16S rRNA genes from amplicons sheared and sequenced with Illumina technology. The approach allowed us to differentiate the community composition among samples acquired before perturbation, after acetate amendment shifted the predominant metabolism to iron reduction, and once sulfate reduction began. Results were highly reproducible across technical replicates, and identified specific taxa that responded to the perturbation. All samples contain very high alpha diversity and abundant organisms from phyla without cultivated representatives. Surprisingly, at the time points measured, there was no strong loss of evenness, despite the selective pressure of acetate amendment and change in the terminal electron accepting process. However, community membership was altered significantly. The method allows for sensitive, accurate profiling of the "long tail" of low abundance organisms that exist in many microbial communities, and can resolve population dynamics in response to environmental change.

  19. Mic60/Mitofilin determines MICOS assembly essential for mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA nucleoid organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Ruan, Y; Zhang, K; Jian, F; Hu, C; Miao, L; Gong, L; Sun, L; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Chen, H; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    The MICOS complex (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system) is essential for mitochondrial inner membrane organization and mitochondrial membrane contacts, however, the molecular regulation of MICOS assembly and the physiological functions of MICOS in mammals remain obscure. Here, we report that Mic60/Mitofilin has a critical role in the MICOS assembly, which determines the mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. The downregulation of Mic60/Mitofilin or Mic19/CHCHD3 results in instability of other MICOS components, disassembly of MICOS complex and disorganized mitochondrial cristae. We show that there exists direct interaction between Mic60/Mitofilin and Mic19/CHCHD3, which is crucial for their stabilization in mammals. Importantly, we identified that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1L regulates Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis. Impaired MICOS assembly causes the formation of 'giant mitochondria' because of dysregulated mitochondrial fusion and fission. Also, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized and clustered in these giant mitochondria in which mtDNA transcription is attenuated because of remarkable downregulation of some key mtDNA nucleoid-associated proteins. Together, these findings demonstrate that Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis regulated by Yme1L is central to the MICOS assembly, which is required for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and organization of mtDNA nucleoids. PMID:26250910

  20. Inspecting close maternal relatedness: Towards better mtDNA population samples in forensic databases

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Martin; Irwin, Jodi A.; Coble, Michael D.; Parson, Walther

    2011-01-01

    Reliable data are crucial for all research fields applying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a genetic marker. Quality control measures have been introduced to ensure the highest standards in sequence data generation, validation and a posteriori inspection. A phylogenetic alignment strategy has been widely accepted as a prerequisite for data comparability and database searches, for forensic applications, for reconstructions of human migrations and for correct interpretation of mtDNA mutations in medical genetics. There is continuing effort to enhance the number of worldwide population samples in order to contribute to a better understanding of human mtDNA variation. This has often lead to the analysis of convenience samples collected for other purposes, which might not meet the quality requirement of random sampling for mtDNA data sets. Here, we introduce an additional quality control means that deals with one aspect of this limitation: by combining autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) marker with mtDNA information, it helps to avoid the bias introduced by related individuals included in the same (small) sample. By STR analysis of individuals sharing their mitochondrial haplotype, pedigree construction and subsequent software-assisted calculation of likelihood ratios based on the allele frequencies found in the population, closely maternally related individuals can be identified and excluded. We also discuss scenarios that allow related individuals in the same set. An ideal population sample would be representative for its population: this new approach represents another contribution towards this goal. PMID:21067986

  1. Heteroplasmy of mouse mtDNA is genetically unstable and results in altered behavior and cognition.

    PubMed

    Sharpley, Mark S; Marciniak, Christine; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; McManus, Meagan; Crimi, Marco; Waymire, Katrina; Lin, Chun Shi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Friend, Nicole; Koike, Maya; Chalkia, Dimitra; MacGregor, Grant; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Wallace, Douglas C

    2012-10-12

    Maternal inheritance of mtDNA is the rule in most animals, but the reasons for this pattern remain unclear. To investigate the consequence of overriding uniparental inheritance, we generated mice containing an admixture (heteroplasmy) of NZB and 129S6 mtDNAs in the presence of a congenic C57BL/6J nuclear background. Analysis of the segregation of the two mtDNAs across subsequent maternal generations revealed that proportion of NZB mtDNA was preferentially reduced. Ultimately, this segregation process produced NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice and their NZB or 129 mtDNA homoplasmic counterparts. Phenotypic comparison of these three mtDNA lines demonstrated that the NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice, but neither homoplasmic counterpart, had reduced activity, food intake, respiratory exchange ratio; accentuated stress response; and cognitive impairment. Therefore, admixture of two normal but different mouse mtDNAs can be genetically unstable and can produce adverse physiological effects, factors that may explain the advantage of uniparental inheritance of mtDNA.

  2. Interpretation guidelines of mtDNA control region sequence electropherograms in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Manuel Crespillo

    2012-01-01

    Forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is a complementary technique to forensic nuclear DNA (nDNA) and trace evidence analysis. Its use has been accepted by the vast majority of courts of law around the world. However for the forensic community it is crucial to employ standardized methods and procedures to guaranty the quality of the results obtained in court. In this chapter, we describe the most important aspects regarding the interpretation and assessment of mtDNA analysis, and offer a simple guide which places particular emphasis on those aspects that can impact the final interpretation of the results. These include the criteria for authenticating a sequence excluding the contaminant origin, defining the quality of a sequence, editing procedure, alignment criteria for searching the databases, and the statistical evaluation of matches. It is not easy to establish a single guide to interpretation for mtDNA analysis; however, it is important to understand all variables that may in some way affect the final conclusion in the context of a forensic case. As a general rule, laboratories should be cautious before issuing the final conclusion of an mtDNA analysis, and consider any significant limitations regarding current understanding of specific aspects of the mtDNA molecule.

  3. Metformin Uniquely Prevents Thrombosis by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and mtDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Guang; Wei, Zeliang; Ji, Chengjie; Zheng, Huajie; Gu, Jun; Ma, Limei; Huang, Wenfang; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Chaoyi; Wen, Li; Xing, Zhihua; Cao, Yu; Xia, Qing; Lu, Yanrong; Li, Ke; Niu, Hai; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis and its complications are the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes. Metformin, a first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, is the only drug demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. However, whether metformin can effectively prevent thrombosis and its potential mechanism of action is unknown. Here we show, metformin prevents both venous and arterial thrombosis with no significant prolonged bleeding time by inhibiting platelet activation and extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Specifically, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I and thereby protects mitochondrial function, reduces activated platelet-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species overload and associated membrane damage. In mitochondrial function assays designed to detect amounts of extracellular mtDNA, we found that metformin prevents mtDNA release. This study also demonstrated that mtDNA induces platelet activation through a DC-SIGN dependent pathway. Metformin exemplifies a promising new class of antiplatelet agents that are highly effective at inhibiting platelet activation by decreasing the release of free mtDNA, which induces platelet activation in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. This study has established a novel therapeutic strategy and molecular target for thrombotic diseases, especially for thrombotic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27805009

  4. Microbial community of salt crystals processed from Mediterranean seawater based on 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Baati, Houda; Guermazi, Sonda; Gharsallah, Neji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was used to investigate for the first time the structure of the microbial community that inhabits salt crystals retrieved from the bottom of a solar saltern, located in the coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea (Sfax, Tunisia). This community lives in an extremely salty environment of 250-310 g/L total dissolved salt. A total of 78 bacterial 16S rRNA clone sequences making up to 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), determined by the DOTUR program to 97% sequence similarity, was analyzed. These OTUs were affiliated to Bacteroidetes (71.4% of OTUs), and gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria (equally represented by 14.2% of the OTUs observed). The archaeal community composition appeared more diverse with 68 clones, resulting in 44 OTUs, all affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Of the bacterial and archaeal clones showing <97% 16S rRNA sequence identity with sequences in public databases, 47.6% and 84.1% respectively were novel clones. Both rarefaction curves and diversity measurements (Simpson, Shannon-Weaver, Chao) showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the Tunisian solar saltern pond. The analysis of an increasing clone's number may reveal additional local diversity.

  5. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies

    PubMed Central

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users’ own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org. PMID:27659943

  6. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-09-23

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users' own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org.

  7. Microbial diversity in the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient studied with 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Armougom, F; Bittar, F; Stremler, N; Rolain, J-M; Robert, C; Dubus, J-C; Sarles, J; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies using 16S rRNA gene amplification followed by clonal Sanger sequencing in cystic fibrosis demonstrated that cultured microorganisms are only part of the infecting flora. The purpose of this paper was to compare pyrosequencing and clonal Sanger sequencing on sputum. The sputum of a patient with cystic fibrosis was analysed by culture, Sanger clone sequencing and pyrosequencing after 16S rRNA gene amplification. A total of 4,499 sequencing reads were obtained, which could be attributed to six consensus sequences, but the length of reads leads to fastidious data analysis. Compared to clonal Sanger sequencing and to cultivation results, pyrosequencing recovers greater species richness and gives a more reliable estimate of the relative abundance of bacterial species. The 16S pyrosequencing approach expands our knowledge of the microbial diversity of cystic fibrosis sputum. The current lack of phylogenetic resolution at the species level for the GS 20 sequencing reads will be overcome with the next generation of pyrosequencing apparatus.

  8. New Screening Software Shows that Most Recent Large 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries Contain Chimeras†

    PubMed Central

    Ashelford, Kevin E.; Chuzhanova, Nadia A.; Fry, John C.; Jones, Antonia J.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/. PMID:16957188

  9. Diversity of thermophiles in a Malaysian hot spring determined using 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chia Sing; Chan, Kok-Gan; Tay, Yea-Ling; Chua, Yi-Heng; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-01-01

    The Sungai Klah (SK) hot spring is the second hottest geothermal spring in Malaysia. This hot spring is a shallow, 150-m-long, fast-flowing stream, with temperatures varying from 50 to 110°C and a pH range of 7.0-9.0. Hidden within a wooded area, the SK hot spring is continually fed by plant litter, resulting in a relatively high degree of total organic content (TOC). In this study, a sample taken from the middle of the stream was analyzed at the 16S rRNA V3-V4 region by amplicon metagenome sequencing. Over 35 phyla were detected by analyzing the 16S rRNA data. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented approximately 57% of the microbiome. Approximately 70% of the detected thermophiles were strict anaerobes; however, Hydrogenobacter spp., obligate chemolithotrophic thermophiles, represented one of the major taxa. Several thermophilic photosynthetic microorganisms and acidothermophiles were also detected. Most of the phyla identified by 16S rRNA were also found using the shotgun metagenome approaches. The carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism within the SK hot spring community were evaluated by shotgun metagenome sequencing, and the data revealed diversity in terms of metabolic activity and dynamics. This hot spring has a rich diversified phylogenetic community partly due to its natural environment (plant litter, high TOC, and a shallow stream) and geochemical parameters (broad temperature and pH range). It is speculated that symbiotic relationships occur between the members of the community.

  10. Quantifying Microbial Diversity: Morphotypes, 16S rRNA Genes, and Carotenoids of Oxygenic Phototrophs in Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kühl, Michael; Muyzer, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    We quantified the diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms present in eight hypersaline microbial mats on the basis of three cultivation-independent approaches. Morphological diversity was studied by microscopy. The diversity of carotenoids was examined by extraction from mat samples and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The diversity of 16S rRNA genes from oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms was investigated by extraction of total DNA from mat samples, amplification of 16S rRNA gene segments from cyanobacteria and plastids of eukaryotic algae by phylum-specific PCR, and sequence-dependent separation of amplification products by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. A numerical approach was introduced to correct for crowding the results of chromatographic and electrophoretic analyses. Diversity estimates typically varied up to twofold among mats. The congruence of richness estimates and Shannon-Weaver indices based on numbers and proportional abundances of unique morphotypes, 16S rRNA genes, and carotenoids unveiled the underlying diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms in the eight mat communities studied. PMID:9925563

  11. Multiplex 16S rRNA‐derived geno‐biochip for detection of 16 bacterial pathogens from contaminated foods

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne diseases caused by various pathogenic bacteria occur worldwide. To prevent foodborne diseases and minimize their impacts, it is important to inspect contaminated foods and specifically detect many types of pathogenic bacteria. Several DNA oligonucleotide biochips based on 16S rRNA have been investigated to detect bacteria; however, a mode of detection that can be used to detect diverse pathogenic strains and to examine the safety of food matrixes is still needed. In the present work, a 16S rRNA gene‐derived geno‐biochip detection system was developed after screening DNA oligonucleotide specific capture probes, and it was validated for multiple detection of 16 pathogenic strains that frequently occur with a signature pattern. rRNAs were also used as detection targets directly obtained from cell lysates without any purification and amplification steps in the bacterial cells separated from 8 food matrixes by simple pretreatments. Thus, the developed 16S rRNA‐derived geno‐biochip can be successfully used for the rapid and multiple detection of the 16 pathogenic bacteria frequently isolated from contaminated foods that are important for food safety. PMID:27492058

  12. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  13. Designation of Streptomycete 16S and 23S rRNA-based target regions for oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Witt, D; Kemmerling, C; Kroppenstedt, R; Liesack, W

    1991-05-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA of various Streptomyces species were partially sequenced and screened for the presence of stretches that could define all members of the genus, groups of species, or individual species. Nucleotide 929 (Streptomyces ambofaciens nomenclature [J.L. Pernodet, M.T. Alegre, F. Boccard, and M. Guerineau, Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) is a nucleotide highly unique to Streptomyces species which, in combination with flanking regions, allowed the designation of a genus-specific probe. Regions 158 through 203 of the 16S rRNA and 1518 through 1645 of the 23S rRNA (helix 54 [Pernodet et al., Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) have a high potential to define species, whereas the degree of variation in regions 982 through 998 and 1102 through 1122 of the 16S rRNA is less pronounced but characteristic for at least certain species. Alone or in combination with each other, these regions may serve as target sites for synthetic oligonucleotide probes and primers to be used in the determination of pure cultures and in the characterization of community structures. The specificity of several probes is demonstrated by dot blot hybridization.

  14. Comparison of 16S rDNA analysis and rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting for molecular identification of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Song, Mi-Ok; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Ki-Jung; Chung, Sang-In; Choi, Chul-Soon; Park, Yong-Ha

    2003-01-01

    16S rDNA sequence analysis and repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprinting were evaluated on 11 type strains of the genus Yersinia and 17 recognized serotype strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis to investigate their genetic relatedness and to establish the value of techniques for the identification of Y. pseudotuberculosis. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 16S rDNA sequences showed that the type strains of Yersinia species formed distinct clusters with the exception of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. Moreover, Y. pestis NCTC 5923T was found to be closely related to Y. pseudotuberculosis serotypes 1b, 3, and 7. Dendrograms generated from REP-PCR, and ERIC-PCR data revealed that members of the genus Yersinia differed from each other with the degree of similarity 62% and 58%, respectively. However, the BOX-PCR results showed that Y. pestis 5923T clustered with the Y. pseudotuberculosis group with a degree of similarity 74%. According to these findings, 16S rDNA sequence analysis was unable to reliably discriminate Y. pseudotuberculosis from Y. pestis. However, REP-PCR and especially ERIC-PCR provided an effective means of differentiating between members of the taxa.

  15. Escherichia coli 16S rRNA 3'-end formation requires a distal transfer RNA sequence at a proper distance.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    The 16S rRNA species in bacterial precursor rRNAs is followed by two evolutionarily conserved features: (i) a double-stranded stem formed by complementary sequences adjacent to the 5' and 3' ends of the 16S rRNA; and (ii) a 3'-transfer RNA sequence. To assess the possible role of these features, plasmid constructs with precursor-specific features deleted were tested for their capacity to form mature rRNA. Stem-forming sequences were dispensable for both 5' and 3' terminus formation; whereas an intact spacer tRNA positioned greater than 24 nucleotides downstream of the 16S RNA sequence was required for correct 3'-end maturation. These results suggest that spacer tRNA at an appropriate location helps form a conformation obligate for pre-rRNA processing, perhaps by binding to a nascent binding site in preribosomes. Thus, spacer tRNAs may be an obligate participant in ribosome formation. Images PMID:2684637

  16. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  17. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  18. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion.

  19. Cumulative mtDNA damage and mutations contribute to the progressive loss of RGCs in a rat model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-hong; Zhang, Sheng-hai; Nickerson, John M; Gao, Feng-juan; Sun, Zhongmou; Chen, Xin-ya; Zhang, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Rong; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jun-yi; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yan; Sun, Xing-huai

    2015-02-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations have been documented as a key component of many neurodegenerative disorders. However, whether mtDNA alterations contribute to the progressive loss of RGCs and the mechanism whereby this phenomenon could occur are poorly understood. We investigated mtDNA alterations in RGCs using a rat model of chronic intraocular hypertension and explored the mechanisms underlying progressive RGC loss. We demonstrate that the mtDNA damage and mutations triggered by intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation are initiating, crucial events in a cascade leading to progressive RGC loss. Damage to and mutation of mtDNA, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced levels of mtDNA repair/replication enzymes, and elevated reactive oxygen species form a positive feedback loop that produces irreversible mtDNA damage and mutation and contributes to progressive RGC loss, which occurs even after a return to normal IOP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mtDNA damage and mutations increase the vulnerability of RGCs to elevated IOP and glutamate levels, which are among the most common glaucoma insults. This study suggests that therapeutic approaches that target mtDNA maintenance and repair and that promote energy production may prevent the progressive death of RGCs.

  20. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  1. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  2. Development of an Analysis Pipeline Characterizing Multiple Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Using Mock Samples

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Jennifer J.; Oler, Andrew J.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Chalmers, Natalia; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Cashion, Ann; Munson, Peter J.; Ames, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is much speculation on which hypervariable region provides the highest bacterial specificity in 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimum solution to prevent bias and to obtain a comprehensive view of complex bacterial communities would be to sequence the entire 16