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Sample records for 16s ribosomal dna

  1. 16S ribosomal DNA amplification for phylogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Weisburg, W G; Barns, S M; Pelletier, D A; Lane, D J

    1991-01-01

    A set of oligonucleotide primers capable of initiating enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction) on a phylogenetically and taxonomically wide range of bacteria is described along with methods for their use and examples. One pair of primers is capable of amplifying nearly full-length 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from many bacterial genera; the additional primers are useful for various exceptional sequences. Methods for purification of amplified material, direct sequencing, cloning, sequencing, and transcription are outlined. An obligate intracellular parasite of bovine erythrocytes, Anaplasma marginale, is used as an example; its 16S rDNA was amplified, cloned, sequenced, and phylogenetically placed. Anaplasmas are related to the genera Rickettsia and Ehrlichia. In addition, 16S rDNAs from several species were readily amplified from material found in lyophilized ampoules from the American Type Culture Collection. By use of this method, the phylogenetic study of extremely fastidious or highly pathogenic bacterial species can be carried out without the need to culture them. In theory, any gene segment for which polymerase chain reaction primer design is possible can be derived from a readily obtainable lyophilized bacterial culture.

  2. Amplification of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K H; Blitchington, R B; Greene, R C

    1990-09-01

    The sequence of small-subunit rRNA varies in an orderly manner across phylogenetic lines and contains segments that are conserved at the species, genus, or kingdom level. By directing oligonucleotide primers at sequences conserved throughout the eubacterial kingdom, we amplified bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences with the polymerase chain reaction. Priming sites were located at the extreme 5' end, the extreme 3' end, and the center of 16S ribosomal DNA. The isolates tested with these primers included members of the genera Staphylococcus, Coxiella, Rickettsia, Clostridium, Neisseria, Mycobacterium, Bilophila, Eubacterium, Fusobacterium, and Lactobacillus and the family Enterobacteriaceae. Initially, the yields from the reactions were erratic because the primers were self-complementary at the 3' ends. Revised primers that were not self-complementary gave more reproducible results. With the latter primers, 0.4 pg of Escherichia coli DNA consistently gave a visible band after amplification. This method should be useful for increasing the amounts of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences for the purposes of sequencing and probing. It should have a broad range of applications, including the detection and identification of known pathogens that are difficult to culture. This approach may make it possible to identify new, nonculturable bacterial pathogens.

  3. Differentiation of Mycoplasma Species by 16S Ribosomal DNA PCR and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, Laura; Ellis, Richard J.; Ayling, Roger D.; Nicholas, Robin A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of a 16S ribosomal DNA PCR product was used to differentiate 32 mycoplasma species of veterinary significance. Twenty-seven (85%) species could be differentiated by DGGE. This method could enable the rapid identification of many mycoplasma species for which there is no specific PCR available and which are currently identified by using culture and serological tests. PMID:14532239

  4. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects.

    PubMed

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic; Leese, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  5. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  6. RNA–DNA differences in human mitochondria restore ancestral form of 16S ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Avital, Gal; Levin, Liron; Richards, Allison L.; Hachen, Naomi; Rebolledo Jaramillo, Boris; Nekrutenko, Anton; Zarivach, Raz; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-01-01

    RNA transcripts are generally identical to the underlying DNA sequences. Nevertheless, RNA–DNA differences (RDDs) were found in the nuclear human genome and in plants and animals but not in human mitochondria. Here, by deep sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and RNA, we identified three RDD sites at mtDNA positions 295 (C-to-U), 13710 (A-to-U, A-to-G), and 2617 (A-to-U, A-to-G). Position 2617, within the 16S rRNA, harbored the most prevalent RDDs (>30% A-to-U and ∼15% A-to-G of the reads in all tested samples). The 2617 RDDs appeared already at the precursor polycistrone mitochondrial transcript. By using traditional Sanger sequencing, we identified the A-to-U RDD in six different cell lines and representative primates (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pigmaeus, and Macaca mulatta), suggesting conservation of the mechanism generating such RDD. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 1700 vertebrate mtDNA sequences supported a thymine as the primate ancestral allele at position 2617, suggesting that the 2617 RDD recapitulates the ancestral 16S rRNA. Modeling U or G (the RDDs) at position 2617 stabilized the large ribosomal subunit structure in contrast to destabilization by an A (the pre-RDDs). Hence, these mitochondrial RDDs are likely functional. PMID:23913925

  7. Molecular detection of bacteria in plant tissues, using universal 16S ribosomal DNA degenerated primers

    PubMed Central

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Tsiamis, George; Koutinas, Nikolaos; Mantell, Sinclair

    2014-01-01

    Highly specific, sensitive and rapid tests are required for the detection and identification of covert bacterial contaminations in plant tissue cultures. Current methods available for this purpose are tedious, time consuming, highly error prone, expensive, require advanced technical expertise and are sometimes ineffective. We report here the development of a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method for the rapid detection and identification of bacteria occurring in plant tissue cultures. A total of 121 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) coding regions from 14 different groups of bacteria, algae and plants, available in the Gene Bank/European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases, were aligned and several conserved DNA sequences of bacterial origin were identified. From those, five degenerated primers were designed in order to amplify only the bacterial DNA present in mixed plant/bacteria genomic DNA extracts. A known amount of bacterial suspension of either covert Pseudomonas or covert Bacillus were added to in vitro plant leaves and total plant/bacterial DNA extracted using three different methods to determine the lowest number of bacteria required to be present in order to allow their detection. The highest sensitivity of the bacterial cell detection was 2.5 × 106 cells of both Bacillus and Pseudomonas inoculums, using template DNA prepared by the MiniPrep method. Generation of PCR amplification fragments was achieved only for the 16S rDNA bacterial gene by using four combinations of degenerated primers. Successive sequence analysis of these amplified fragments led to the rapid detection and molecular identification of bacteria covertly associated with plants. PMID:26019546

  8. Evolutionary relationships among members of the genus Chlamydia based on 16S ribosomal DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, B; Andersson, A; Leitner, T; Olsvik, O; Uhlén, M; Storey, C; Black, C M

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from strains of the four species currently in the genus Chlamydia, C. pecorum, C. pneumoniae, C. psittaci, and C. trachomatis were investigated. In vitro-amplified RNA genes of the ribosomal small subunit from 30 strains of C. pneumoniae and C. pecorum were subjected to solid-phase DNA sequencing of both strands. The human isolates of C. pneumoniae differed in only one position in the 16S rRNA gene, indicating genetic homogeneity among these strains. Interestingly, horse isolate N16 of C. pneumoniae was found to be closely related to the human isolates of this species, with a 98.9% nucleotide similarity between their 16S rRNA sequences. The type strain and koala isolates of C. pecorum were also found to be very similar to each other, possessing two different 16S rRNA sequences with only one-nucleotide difference. Furthermore, the C. pecorum strains truncated the 16S rRNA molecule by one nucleotide compared to the molecules of the other chlamydial species. This truncation was found to result in loss of a unilaterally bulged nucleotide, an attribute present in all other eubacteria. The phylogenetic structure of the genus Chlamydia was determined by analysis of 16S rRNA sequences. All phylogenetic trees revealed a distinct line of descent of the family Chlamydiaceae built of two main clusters which we denote the C. pneumoniae cluster and the C. psittaci cluster. The clusters were verified by bootstrap analysis of the trees and signature nucleotide analysis. The former cluster contained the human isolates of C. pneumoniae and equine strain N16. The latter cluster consisted of C. psittaci, C. pecorum, and C. trachomatis. The members of the C. pneumoniae cluster showed tight clustering and strain N16 is likely to be a subspecies of C. pneumoniae since these strains also share some antigenic cross-reactivity and clustering of major outer membrane protein gene sequences. C. psittaci and strain N16 branched early out of the respective cluster, and

  9. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    PubMed

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis).

  10. Phylogeny of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group inferred from morphological comparisons, genomic fingerprinting, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1996-01-01

    Phase-contrast light microscopy revealed that only one of eight cultivated strains belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of sheathed bacteria actually produced a sheath in standard growth media. Two Sphaerotilus natans strains produced branched cells, but other morphological characteristics that were used to identify these bacteria were consistent with previously published descriptions. Genomic fingerprints, which were obtained by performing PCR amplification with primers corresponding to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, were useful for distinguishing between the genera Sphaerotilus and Leptothrix, as well as among individual strains. The complete 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of two strains of "Leptothrix discophora" (strains SP-6 and SS-1) were determined. In addition, partial sequences (approximately 300 nucleotides) of one strain of Leptothrix cholodnii (strain LMG 7171), an unidentified Leptothrix strain (strain NC-1), and four strains of Sphaerotilus natans (strains ATCC 13338T [T = type strain], ATCC 15291, ATCC 29329, and ATCC 29330) were determined. We found that two of the S. natans strains (ATCC 15291 and ATCC 13338T), which differed in morphology and in their genomic fingerprints, had identical sequences in the 300-nucleotide region sequenced. Both parsimony and distance matrix methods were used to infer the evolutionary relationships of the eight strains in a comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences of these organisms with 16S rDNA sequences obtained from ribosomal sequence databases. All of the strains clustered in the Rubrivivax subdivision of the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which confirmed previously published conclusions concerning selected individual strains. Additional analyses revealed that all of the S. natans strains clustered in one closely related group, while the Leptothrix strains clustered in two separate lineages that were approximately equidistant from the S. natans cluster. This finding

  11. Phylogeny of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group inferred from morphological comparisons, genomic fingerprinting, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1996-01-01

    Phase-contrast light microscopy revealed that only one of eight cultivated strains belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of sheathed bacteria actually produced a sheath in standard growth media. Two Sphaerotilus natans strains produced branched cells, but other morphological characteristics that were used to identify these bacteria were consistent with previously published descriptions. Genomic fingerprints, which were obtained by performing PCR amplification with primers corresponding to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, were useful for distinguishing between the genera Sphaerotilus and Leptothrix, as well as among individual strains. The complete 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of two strains of "Leptothrix discophora" (strains SP-6 and SS-1) were determined. In addition, partial sequences (approximately 300 nucleotides) of one strain of Leptothrix cholodnii (strain LMG 7171), an unidentified Leptothrix strain (strain NC-1), and four strains of Sphaerotilus natans (strains ATCC 13338T [T = type strain], ATCC 15291, ATCC 29329, and ATCC 29330) were determined. We found that two of the S. natans strains (ATCC 15291 and ATCC 13338T), which differed in morphology and in their genomic fingerprints, had identical sequences in the 300-nucleotide region sequenced. Both parsimony and distance matrix methods were used to infer the evolutionary relationships of the eight strains in a comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences of these organisms with 16S rDNA sequences obtained from ribosomal sequence databases. All of the strains clustered in the Rubrivivax subdivision of the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which confirmed previously published conclusions concerning selected individual strains. Additional analyses revealed that all of the S. natans strains clustered in one closely related group, while the Leptothrix strains clustered in two separate lineages that were approximately equidistant from the S. natans cluster. This finding

  12. Phylogenetic Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Associated with Paddy Rice Silage as Determined by 16S Ribosomal DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ennahar, Saïd; Cai, Yimin; Fujita, Yasuhito

    2003-01-01

    A total of 161 low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria isolated from whole-crop paddy rice silage were classified and subjected to phenotypic and genetic analyses. Based on morphological and biochemical characters, these presumptive lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates were divided into 10 groups that included members of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, and Weissella. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by phenotypic analysis and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of representative strains. The virtually complete 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank reference strains (between 98.7 and 99.8%). Phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rDNA sequence displayed high consistency, with nodes supported by high bootstrap values. With the exception of one species, the genetic data was in agreement with the phenotypic identification. The prevalent LAB, predominantly homofermentative (66%), consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum (24%), Lactococcus lactis (22%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (20%), Pediococcus acidilactici (11%), Lactobacillus brevis (11%), Enterococcus faecalis (7%), Weissella kimchii (3%), and Pediococcus pentosaceus (2%). The present study, the first to fully document rice-associated LAB, showed a very diverse community of LAB with a relatively high number of species involved in the fermentation process of paddy rice silage. The comprehensive 16S rDNA-based approach to describing LAB community structure was valuable in revealing the large diversity of bacteria inhabiting paddy rice silage and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving its fermentation quality. PMID:12514026

  13. Phylogenetic relationships among cirrate octopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) resolved using mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piertney, Stuart B; Hudelot, Cendrine; Hochberg, F G; Collins, Martin A

    2003-05-01

    PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE CIRRATE OCTOPODS (MOLLUSCA: Cephalopoda) were investigated using partial sequences of the 16S rRNA mitochondrial gene. The derived phylogeny supports the traditional separation of cirrate families based on web form. Genera with a single web (Opisthoteuthis, Grimpoteuthis, Luteuthis, and Cirroctopus) are clearly distinct from those with an intermediate or secondary web (Cirroteuthis, Cirrothauma, and Stauroteuthis). The cirrates with a single web are separated into three groups. The first group is represented by Opisthoteuthis species, the second by Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis, and the third by members of the genus Cirroctopus. There is no support for the isolation of Luteuthis in a separate family (Luteuthidae). There is, however, evidence of two groupings within the genus Opisthoteuthis. The data suggest the following revisions in the systematic classification of the cirrates: (1) Cirrothauma, Cirroteuthis, and Stauroteuthis be united in the Cirroteuthidae; (2) Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis be placed in the Grimpoteuthidae; (3) Opisthoteuthis in the Opisthoteuthidae, and; (4) Cirroctopus be considered sufficiently distinct from both Opisthoteuthidae and Grimpoteuthidae to warrant placement in a new family.

  14. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis confirms the close relationship between the genera Xanthobacter, Azorhizobium, and Aquabacter and reveals a lack of phylogenetic coherence among Xanthobacter species

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, F.A.; Wiegel, J.

    1996-04-01

    A comparative 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis was used to investigate the phylogenetic position of members of the genus Xanthobacter. We determined 16S rDNA sequence data for the type strains of the three Xanthobacter species and five additional Xanthobacter strains. The close relationship between the genera Xanthobacter, Azorhizobium, and Aquabacter previously demonstrated by DNA-rRNA hybridization studies was confirmed. The results of our phylogenetic analysis indicate that members of the genera Xanthobacter, Azorhizobium, and Aquabacter are intermixed and that there is no clear genetic cluster consisting of the Xanthobacter species. A comparison of the Xanthobacter sequences with the 16S rDNA sequences available from environmental clone studies indicated that members of this genus have not been detected by nonculturing approaches.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Dehalococcoides 16S Ribosomal DNA from Chloroethene-Contaminated Sites throughout North America and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Edwin R.; Payne, Jo Ann; Young, Roslyn M.; Starr, Mark G.; Perry, Michael P.; Fahnestock, Stephen; Ellis, David E.; Ebersole, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    The environmental distribution of Dehalococcoides group organisms and their association with chloroethene-contaminated sites were examined. Samples from 24 chloroethene-dechlorinating sites scattered throughout North America and Europe were tested for the presence of members of the Dehalococcoides group by using a PCR assay developed to detect Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequences. Sequences identified by sequence analysis as sequences of members of the Dehalococcoides group were detected at 21 sites. Full dechlorination of chloroethenes to ethene occurred at these sites. Dehalococcoides sequences were not detected in samples from three sites at which partial dechlorination of chloroethenes occurred, where dechlorination appeared to stop at 1,2-cis-dichloroethene. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA amplicons confirmed that Dehalococcoides sequences formed a unique 16S rDNA group. These 16S rDNA sequences were divided into three subgroups based on specific base substitution patterns in variable regions 2 and 6 of the Dehalococcoides 16S rDNA sequence. Analyses also demonstrated that specific base substitution patterns were signature patterns. The specific base substitutions distinguished the three sequence subgroups phylogenetically. These results demonstrated that members of the Dehalococcoides group are widely distributed in nature and can be found in a variety of geological formations and in different climatic zones. Furthermore, the association of these organisms with full dechlorination of chloroethenes suggests that they are promising candidates for engineered bioremediation and may be important contributors to natural attenuation of chloroethenes. PMID:11823182

  16. Combined Use of 16S Ribosomal DNA and 16S rRNA To Study the Bacterial Community of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Balbina; Moore, Edward R. B.; Llobet-Brossa, Enrique; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Amann, Rudolf; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial diversity assessed from clone libraries prepared from rRNA (two libraries) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (one library) from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-polluted soil has been analyzed. A good correspondence of the community composition found in the two types of library was observed. Nearly 29% of the cloned sequences in the rDNA library were identical to sequences in the rRNA libraries. More than 60% of the total cloned sequence types analyzed were grouped in phylogenetic groups (a clone group with sequence similarity higher than 97% [98% for Burkholderia and Pseudomonas-type clones]) represented in both types of libraries. Some of those phylogenetic groups, mostly represented by a single (or pair) of cloned sequence type(s), were observed in only one of the types of library. An important difference between the libraries was the lack of clones representative of the Actinobacteria in the rDNA library. The PCB-polluted soil exhibited a high bacterial diversity which included representatives of two novel lineages. The apparent abundance of bacteria affiliated to the beta-subclass of the Proteobacteria, and to the genus Burkholderia in particular, was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The possible influence on apparent diversity of low template concentrations was assessed by dilution of the RNA template prior to amplification by reverse transcription-PCR. Although differences in the composition of the two rRNA libraries obtained from high and low RNA concentrations were observed, the main components of the bacterial community were represented in both libraries, and therefore their detection was not compromised by the lower concentrations of template used in this study. PMID:11282645

  17. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  18. Microheterogeneity in 16S Ribosomal DNA-Defined Bacterial Populations from a Stratified Planktonic Environment Is Related to Temporal Changes and to Ecological Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Casamayor, Emilio O.; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Muyzer, Gerard; Amann, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    Temporal changes of the bacterioplankton from a meromictic lake (Lake Vilar, Banyoles, Spain) were analyzed with four culture-independent techniques: epifluorescence microscopy, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, fluorescence in situ whole-cell hybridization and flow cytometry sorting. Microscopically, blooms of one cyanobacterium (Synechococcus sp.-like), one green sulfur bacterium (Chlorobium phaeobacteroides-like), and one purple sulfur bacterium (Thiocystis minor-like) were observed at different depths and times. DGGE retrieved these populations and, additionally, populations related to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum as predominant community members. The analyses of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences from the DGGE fingerprints (550 bp analyzed) revealed higher genetic diversity than expected from microscopic observation for most of these groups. Thus, the sequences of two Synechococcus spp. (both had a similarity of 97% to Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6307 in 16S rRNA), two Thiocystis spp. (similarities to Thiocystis minor of 93 and 94%, respectively), and three Cytophaga spp. (similarities to Cytophaga fermentans of 88 and 89% and to Cytophaga sp. of 93%, respectively) were obtained. The two populations of Synechococcus exhibited different pigment compositions and temporal distributions and their 16S rRNA sequences were 97.3% similar. The two Thiocystis populations differed neither in pigment composition nor in morphology, but their 16S rRNA sequences were only 92.3% similar and they also showed different distributions over time. Finally, two of the Cytophaga spp. showed 96.2% similarity between the 16S rRNA sequences, but one of them was found to be mostly attached to particles and only in winter. Thus, the identity of the main populations changed over time, but the function of the microbial guilds was maintained. Our data showed that temporal shifts in the identity of the predominant population is a new

  19. Clade-Specific 16S Ribosomal DNA Oligonucleotides Reveal the Predominance of a Single Marine Synechococcus Clade throughout a Stratified Water Column in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Nicholas J.; Marie, Dominique; Partensky, Frédéric; Vaulot, Daniel; Post, Anton F.; Scanlan, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among members of the marine Synechococcus genus were determined following sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from 31 novel cultured isolates from the Red Sea and several other oceanic environments. This revealed a large genetic diversity within the marine Synechococcus cluster consistent with earlier work but also identified three novel clades not previously recognized. Phylogenetic analyses showed one clade, containing halotolerant isolates lacking phycoerythrin (PE) and including strains capable, or not, of utilizing nitrate as the sole N source, which clustered within the MC-A (Synechococcus subcluster 5.1) lineage. Two copies of the 16S rRNA gene are present in marine Synechococcus genomes, and cloning and sequencing of these copies from Synechococcus sp. strain WH 7803 and genomic information from Synechococcus sp. strain WH 8102 reveal these to be identical. Based on the 16S rDNA sequence information, clade-specific oligonucleotides for the marine Synechococcus genus were designed and their specificity was optimized. Using dot blot hybridization technology, these probes were used to determine the in situ community structure of marine Synechococcus populations in the Red Sea at the time of a Synechococcus maximum during April 1999. A predominance of genotypes representative of a single clade was found, and these genotypes were common among strains isolated into culture. Conversely, strains lacking PE, which were also relatively easily isolated into culture, represented only a minor component of the Synechococcus population. Genotypes corresponding to well-studied laboratory strains also appeared to be poorly represented in this stratified water column in the Red Sea. PMID:12732508

  20. Efficient Detection of Pathogenic Leptospires Using 16S Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Janet; Wunder, Elsio A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Ledizet, Michel; Ko, Albert; Pal, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira species cause a prevalent yet neglected zoonotic disease with mild to life-threatening complications in a variety of susceptible animals and humans. Diagnosis of leptospirosis, which primarily relies on antiquated serotyping methods, is particularly challenging due to presentation of non-specific symptoms shared by other febrile illnesses, often leading to misdiagnosis. Initiation of antimicrobial therapy during early infection to prevent more serious complications of disseminated infection is often not performed because of a lack of efficient diagnostic tests. Here we report that specific regions of leptospiral 16S ribosomal RNA molecules constitute a novel and efficient diagnostic target for PCR-based detection of pathogenic Leptospira serovars. Our diagnostic test using spiked human blood was at least 100-fold more sensitive than corresponding leptospiral DNA-based quantitative PCR assays, targeting the same 16S nucleotide sequence in the RNA and DNA molecules. The sensitivity and specificity of our RNA assay against laboratory-confirmed human leptospirosis clinical samples were 64% and 100%, respectively, which was superior then an established parallel DNA detection assay. Remarkably, we discovered that 16S transcripts remain appreciably stable ex vivo, including untreated and stored human blood samples, further highlighting their use for clinical detection of L. interrogans. Together, these studies underscore a novel utility of RNA targets, specifically 16S rRNA, for development of PCR-based modalities for diagnosis of human leptospirosis, and also may serve as paradigm for detection of additional bacterial pathogens for which early diagnosis is warranted. PMID:26091292

  1. Numerical Analysis of Grassland Bacterial Community Structure under Different Land Management Regimens by Using 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequence Data and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Banding Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, Allison E.; Glover, L. Anne; Prosser, James I.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in unimproved and improved grassland soils was assessed by PCR amplification of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from directly extracted soil DNA, followed by sequencing of ∼45 16S rDNA clones from each of three unimproved and three improved grassland samples (A. E. McCaig, L. A. Glover, and J. I. Prosser, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:1721–1730, 1999) or by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of total amplification products. Semi-improved grassland soils were analyzed only by DGGE. No differences between communities were detected by calculation of diversity indices and similarity coefficients for clone data (possibly due to poor coverage). Differences were not observed between the diversities of individual unimproved and improved grassland DGGE profiles, although considerable spatial variation was observed among triplicate samples. Semi-improved grassland samples, however, were less diverse than the other grassland samples and had much lower within-group variation. DGGE banding profiles obtained from triplicate samples pooled prior to analysis indicated that there was less evenness in improved soils, suggesting that selection for specific bacterial groups occurred. Analysis of DGGE profiles by canonical variate analysis but not by principal-coordinate analysis, using unweighted data (considering only the presence and absence of bands) and weighted data (considering the relative intensity of each band), demonstrated that there were clear differences between grasslands, and the results were not affected by weighting of data. This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of data obtained by community profiling methods, such as DGGE, can reveal differences between complex microbial communities. PMID:11571155

  2. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  3. Bacterial communities associated with host-adapted populations of pea aphids revealed by deep sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Outreman, Yannick; Mieuzet, Lucie; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Associations between microbes and animals are ubiquitous and hosts may benefit from harbouring microbial communities through improved resource exploitation or resistance to environmental stress. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is the host of heritable bacterial symbionts, including the obligate endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola and several facultative symbionts. While obligate symbionts supply aphids with key nutrients, facultative symbionts influence their hosts in many ways such as protection against natural enemies, heat tolerance, color change and reproduction alteration. The pea aphid also encompasses multiple plant-specialized biotypes, each adapted to one or a few legume species. Facultative symbiont communities differ strongly between biotypes, although bacterial involvement in plant specialization is uncertain. Here, we analyse the diversity of bacterial communities associated with nine biotypes of the pea aphid complex using amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Combined clustering and phylogenetic analyses of 16S sequences allowed identifying 21 bacterial OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit). More than 98% of the sequencing reads were assigned to known pea aphid symbionts. The presence of Wolbachia was confirmed in A. pisum while Erwinia and Pantoea, two gut associates, were detected in multiple samples. The diversity of bacterial communities harboured by pea aphid biotypes was very low, ranging from 3 to 11 OTUs across samples. Bacterial communities differed more between than within biotypes but this difference did not correlate with the genetic divergence between biotypes. Altogether, these results confirm that the aphid microbiota is dominated by a few heritable symbionts and that plant specialization is an important structuring factor of bacterial communities associated with the pea aphid complex. However, since we examined the microbiota of aphid samples kept a few generations in controlled conditions, it may be that bacterial diversity was

  4. Bacterial communities associated with host-adapted populations of pea aphids revealed by deep sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Outreman, Yannick; Mieuzet, Lucie; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Associations between microbes and animals are ubiquitous and hosts may benefit from harbouring microbial communities through improved resource exploitation or resistance to environmental stress. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is the host of heritable bacterial symbionts, including the obligate endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola and several facultative symbionts. While obligate symbionts supply aphids with key nutrients, facultative symbionts influence their hosts in many ways such as protection against natural enemies, heat tolerance, color change and reproduction alteration. The pea aphid also encompasses multiple plant-specialized biotypes, each adapted to one or a few legume species. Facultative symbiont communities differ strongly between biotypes, although bacterial involvement in plant specialization is uncertain. Here, we analyse the diversity of bacterial communities associated with nine biotypes of the pea aphid complex using amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Combined clustering and phylogenetic analyses of 16S sequences allowed identifying 21 bacterial OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit). More than 98% of the sequencing reads were assigned to known pea aphid symbionts. The presence of Wolbachia was confirmed in A. pisum while Erwinia and Pantoea, two gut associates, were detected in multiple samples. The diversity of bacterial communities harboured by pea aphid biotypes was very low, ranging from 3 to 11 OTUs across samples. Bacterial communities differed more between than within biotypes but this difference did not correlate with the genetic divergence between biotypes. Altogether, these results confirm that the aphid microbiota is dominated by a few heritable symbionts and that plant specialization is an important structuring factor of bacterial communities associated with the pea aphid complex. However, since we examined the microbiota of aphid samples kept a few generations in controlled conditions, it may be that bacterial diversity was

  5. Identification of 16S Ribosomal DNA-Defined Bacterial Populations at a Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Vent near Milos Island (Greece)

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Stefan M.; Kuever, Jan; Muyzer, Gerard

    2000-01-01

    In a recent publication (S. M. Sievert, T. Brinkhoff, G. Muyzer, W. Ziebis, and J. Kuever, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:3834–3842, 1999) we described spatiotemporal changes in the bacterial community structure at a shallow-water hydrothermal vent in the Aegean Sea near the isle of Milos (Greece). Here we describe identification and phylogenetic analysis of the predominant bacterial populations at the vent site and their distribution at the vent site as determined by sequencing of DNA molecules (bands) excised from denaturing gradient gels. A total of 36 bands could be sequenced, and there were representatives of eight major lineages of the domain Bacteria. Cytophaga-Flavobacterium and Acidobacterium were the most frequently retrieved bacterial groups. Less than 33% of the sequences exhibited 90% or more identity with cultivated organisms. The predominance of putative heterotrophic populations in the sequences retrieved is explained by the input of allochthonous organic matter at the vent site. PMID:10877814

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the butterfly tribe Satyrini (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) with emphasis on the utility of ribosomal mitochondrial genes 16s rDNA and nuclear 28s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-07-09

    The tribe Satyrini is one of the most diverse groups of butterflies, but no robust phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has been achieved. Two rarely used 16s and 28s ribosomal and another seven protein-coding genes were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the Satyrini, with further aim to evaluate the informativeness of the ribosomal genes. Our maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses consistently recovered three well-supported clades for the eleven sampled subtribes of Satyrini: clade I includes Eritina and Coenonymphina, being sister to the clade II + clade III; clade II contains Parargina, Mycalesina and Lethina, and the other six subtribes constitute clade III. The placements of the taxonomically unstable Davidina Oberthür and geographically restricted Paroeneis Moore in Satyrina are confirmed for the first time based on molecular evidence. The close relationships of Callerebia Butler, Loxerebia Watkins and Argestina Riley are well-supported. We suggest that Rhaphicera Butler belongs to Lethina. The partitioned Bremer support (PBS) values of MP analysis show that the 16s rDNA contributes well to the nodes representing all the taxa from subtribe to species levels, and the 28s rDNA is informative at the subtribe level. Furthermore, our ML analyses show that the ribosomal genes 16s rDNA and 28s rDNA are informative, because most node support values are lower in the ML tree after the removal of them than that in ML tree constructed based on the full nine-gene dataset. This indicates that some other ribosomal genes should be tentatively used through combining with traditionally used protein-coding genes in further analysis on phylogeny of Satyrini, providing that proper representatives are sampled.

  7. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  8. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  9. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  10. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  11. Oligonucleotide probes for Bordetella bronchiseptica based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Taneda, A; Futo, S; Mitsuse, S; Seto, Y; Okada, M; Sakano, T

    1994-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was cloned and identified. On the basis of information from computer-assisted sequence comparison of the B. bronchiseptica 16S RRNA sequences with that of other bacterial species, we constructed B. bronchiseptica-specific oligonucleotide probes complementary to variable regions in the 16S rRNA molecule. Specificity of these 32P-labeled oligo-nucleotide probes was tested in a RNA/DNA hybridization with B. bronchiseptica strains and other bacterial strains. Probe BB4 was more specific than three other oligonucleotide probes. This probe BB4 was sensitive enough to be able to detect 10(4) bacterial cells. PMID:9133055

  12. Sequence and secondary structure of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Krakowetz, Chantel N; Chilton, Neil B

    2015-02-01

    The complete DNA sequences and secondary structure of the mitochondrial (mt) 16S ribosomal (r) RNA gene were determined for six Ixodes scapularis adults. There were 44 variable nucleotide positions in the 1252 bp sequence alignment. Most (95%) nucleotide alterations did not affect the integrity of the secondary structure of the gene because they either occurred at unpaired positions or represented compensatory changes that maintained the base pairing in helices. A large proportion (75%) of the intraspecific variation in DNA sequence occurred within Domains I, II and VI of the 16S gene. Therefore, several regions within this gene may be highly informative for studies of the population genetics and phylogeography of I. scapularis, a major vector of pathogens of humans and domestic animals in North America.

  13. Collection of small subunit (16S- and 16S-like) ribosomal RNA structures: 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R

    1994-01-01

    A collection of diverse 16S and 16S-like rRNA secondary structure diagrams are available. This set of rRNAs contains representative structures from all of the major phylogenetic groupings--Archaea, (eu)Bacteria, and the nucleus, mitochondrion, and chloroplast of Eucarya. Within this broad phylogenetic sampling are examples of the major forms of structural diversity currently known for this class of rRNAs. These structure diagrams are available online through our computer-network WWW server and anonymous ftp, as well as from the author in hardcopy format. PMID:7524024

  14. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  15. Next-generation Sequencing of 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Yergeau, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    One of the major questions in microbial ecology is “who is there?” This question can be answered using various tools, but one of the long-lasting gold standards is to sequence 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons generated by domain-level PCR reactions amplifying from genomic DNA. Traditionally, this was performed by cloning and Sanger (capillary electrophoresis) sequencing of PCR amplicons. The advent of next-generation sequencing has tremendously simplified and increased the sequencing depth for 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The introduction of benchtop sequencers now allows small labs to perform their 16S rRNA sequencing in-house in a matter of days. Here, an approach for 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using a benchtop next-generation sequencer is detailed. The environmental DNA is first amplified by PCR using primers that contain sequencing adapters and barcodes. They are then coupled to spherical particles via emulsion PCR. The particles are loaded on a disposable chip and the chip is inserted in the sequencing machine after which the sequencing is performed. The sequences are retrieved in fastq format, filtered and the barcodes are used to establish the sample membership of the reads. The filtered and binned reads are then further analyzed using publically available tools. An example analysis where the reads were classified with a taxonomy-finding algorithm within the software package Mothur is given. The method outlined here is simple, inexpensive and straightforward and should help smaller labs to take advantage from the ongoing genomic revolution. PMID:25226019

  16. A functional relationship between helix 1 and the 900 tetraloop of 16S ribosomal RNA within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, François; Théberge-Julien, Gabriel; Cunningham, Philip R; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2005-06-01

    The conserved 900 tetraloop that caps helix 27 of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) interacts with helix 24 of 16S rRNA and also with helix 67 of 23S rRNA, forming the intersubunit bridge B2c, proximal to the decoding center. In previous studies, we investigated how the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and helix 24 participates in subunit association and translational fidelity. In the present study, we investigated whether the 900 tetraloop is involved in other undetected interactions with different regions of the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. Using a genetic complementation approach, we selected mutations in 16S rRNA that compensate for a 900 tetraloop mutation, A900G, which severely impairs subunit association and translational fidelity. Mutations were randomly introduced in 16S rRNA, using either a mutagenic XL1-Red E. coli strain or an error-prone PCR strategy. Gain-offunction mutations were selected in vivo with a specialized ribosome system. Two mutations, the deletion of U12 and the U12C substitution, were thus independently selected in helix 1 of 16S rRNA. This helix is located in the vicinity of helix 27, but does not directly contact the 900 tetraloop in the crystal structures of the ribosome. Both mutations correct the subunit association and translational fidelity defects caused by the A900G mutation, revealing an unanticipated functional interaction between these two regions of 16S rRNA.

  17. Ribosomal protein-dependent orientation of the 16 S rRNA environment of S15.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-01-30

    Ribosomal protein S15 binds specifically to the central domain of 16 S ribosomal RNA (16 S rRNA) and directs the assembly of four additional proteins to this domain. The central domain of 16 S rRNA along with these five proteins form the platform of the 30 S subunit. Previously, directed hydroxyl radical probing from Fe(II)-S15 in small ribonucleoprotein complexes was used to study assembly of the central domain of 16 S rRNA. Here, this same approach was used to understand the 16 S rRNA environment of Fe(II)-S15 in 30 S subunits and to determine the ribosomal proteins that are involved in forming the mature S15-16 S rRNA environment. We have identified additional sites of Fe(II)-S15-directed cleavage in 30S subunits compared to the binary complex of Fe(II)-S15/16 S rRNA. Along with novel targets in the central domain, sites within the 5' and 3' minor domains are also cleaved. This suggests that during the course of 30S subunit assembly these elements are positioned in the vicinity of S15. Besides the previously determined role for S8, roles for S5, S6+S18, and S16 in altering the 16 S rRNA environment of S15 were established. These studies reveal that ribosomal proteins can alter the assembly of regions of the 30 S subunit from a considerable distance and influence the overall conformation of this ribonucleoprotein particle.

  18. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons to monitor changes in fecal bacterial populations of weaning pigs after introduction of Lactobacillus reuteri strain MM53.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J M; McCracken, V J; Gaskins, H R; Mackie, R I

    2000-11-01

    The diversity and stability of the fecal bacterial microbiota in weaning pigs was studied after introduction of an exogenous Lactobacillus reuteri strain, MM53, using a combination of cultivation and techniques based on genes encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA). Piglets (n = 9) were assigned to three treatment groups (control, daily dosed, and 4th-day dosed), and fresh fecal samples were collected daily. Dosed animals received 2.5 x 10(10) CFU of antibiotic-resistant L. reuteri MM53 daily or every 4th day. Mean Lactobacillus counts for the three groups ranged from 1 x 10(9) to 4 x 10(9) CFU/g of feces. Enumeration of strain L. reuteri MM53 on MRS agar (Difco) plates containing streptomycin and rifampin showed that the introduced strain fluctuated between 8 x 10(3) and 5 x 10(6) CFU/g of feces in the two dosed groups. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments, with primers specific for variable regions 1 and 3 (V1 and V3), was used to profile complexity of fecal bacterial populations. Analysis of DGGE banding profiles indicated that each individual maintained a unique fecal bacterial population that was stable over time, suggesting a strong host influence. In addition, individual DGGE patterns could be separated into distinct time-dependent clusters. Primers designed specifically to restrict DGGE analysis to a select group of lactobacilli allowed examination of interspecies relationships and abundance. Based on relative band migration distance and sequence determination, L. reuteri was distinguishable within the V1 region 16S rDNA gene patterns. Daily fluctuations in specific bands within these profiles were observed, which revealed an antagonistic relationship between L. reuteri MM53 (band V1-3) and another indigenous Lactobacillus assemblage (band V1-6).

  19. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, J; Palmer, M L; Kennedy, P J; Noller, H F

    1978-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 16S RNA gene from the rrnB cistron of Escherichia coli has been determined by using three rapid DNA sequencing methods. Nearly all of the structure has been confirmed by two to six independent sequence determinations on both DNA strands. The length of the 16S rRNA chain inferred from the DNA sequence is 1541 nucleotides, in close agreement with previous estimates. We note discrepancies between this sequence and the most recent version of it reported from direct RNA sequencing [Ehresmann, C., Stiegler, P., Carbon, P. & Ebel, J.P. (1977) FEBS Lett. 84, 337-341]. A few of these may be explained by heterogeneity among 16S rRNA sequences from different cistrons. No nucleotide sequences were found in the 16S rRNA gene that cannot be reconciled with RNase digestion products of mature 16S rRNA. Images PMID:368799

  1. Primary sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, C; Stiegler, P; Mackie, G A; Zimmermann, R A; Ebel, J P; Fellner, P

    1975-01-01

    Recent progress in the nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA from E. coli is described. The sequence which has been partially or completely determined so far encompasses 1520 nucleotides, i.e. about 95% of the molecule. Possible features of the secondary structure are suggested on the basis of the nucleotide sequence and data on sequence heterogeneities, repetitions and the location of modified nucleotides are presented. In the accompanying paper, the use of the nucleotide sequence data in studies of the ribosomal protein binding sites is described. PMID:1091918

  2. The evolution of the Vahlkampfiidae as deduced from 16S-like ribosomal RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, G; Sogin, M L

    1993-01-01

    The amoebae, a phenotypically diverse, paraphyletic group of protists, have been largely neglected by molecular phylogeneticists. To better understand the evolution of amoebae, we sequenced and analyzed the 16S-like ribosomal RNA genes of three vahlkampfiid amoebae: Paratetramitus jugosus, Tetramitus rostratus and Vahlkampfia lobospinosa. The Vahlkampfiidae lineage is monophyletic, branches early along the eukaryotic line of descent, and is not a close relative of the multicellular amoebae that also reversibly transform from amoebae to flagellates.

  3. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  4. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  5. 16S rRNA sequences of uncultivated hot spring cyanobacterial mat inhabitants retrieved as randomly primed cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R; Weller, J W; Ward, D M

    1991-01-01

    Cloning and analysis of cDNAs synthesized from rRNAs is one approach to assess the species composition of natural microbial communities. In some earlier attempts to synthesize cDNA from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat, a dominance of short 16S rcDNAs was observed, which appear to have originated only from certain organisms. Priming of cDNA synthesis from small ribosomal subunit RNA with random deoxyhexanucleotides can retrieve longer sequences, more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. Here we report the retrieval of 16S rRNA sequences from three formerly uncultured community members. One sequence type, which was retrieved three times from a total of five sequences analyzed, can be placed in the cyanobacterial phylum. A second sequence type is related to 16S rRNAs from green nonsulfur bacteria. The third sequence type may represent a novel phylogenetic type. Images PMID:1711832

  6. 16S rRNA sequences of uncultivated hot spring cyanobacterial mat inhabitants retrieved as randomly primed cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.; Ward, D.M. ); Weller, J.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Cloning and analysis of cDNAs synthesized from rRNAs is one approach to assess the species composition of natural microbial communities. In some earlier attempts to synthesize cDNA from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat, a dominance of short 16S rcDNAs was observed, which appear to have originated only from certain organisms. Priming of cDNA synthesis from small ribosomal subunit RNA with random deoxyhexanucleotides can retrieve longer sequences, more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. Here we report the retrieval of 16S rRNA sequences form three formerly uncultured community members. One sequence type, which was retrieved three times from a total of five sequences analyzed, can be placed in the cyanobacterial phylum. A second sequence type is related to 16S rRNAs from green nonsulfur bacteria. The third sequence type may represent a novel phylogenetic type.

  7. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    PubMed

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species.

  8. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  9. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  10. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA from lyophilized cell cultures facilitates studies in molecular systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the major portion of a Bacillus cycloheptanicus strain SCH(T) 16S rRNA gene is reported. This sequence suggests that B. cycloheptanicus is genetically quite distinct from traditional Bacillus strains (e.g., B. subtilis) and may be properly regarded as belonging to a different genus. The sequence was determined from DNA that was produced by direct amplification of ribosomal DNA from a lyophilized cell pellet with straightforward polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. By obviating the need to revive cell cultures from the lyophile pellet, this approach facilitates rapid 16S rDNA sequencing and thereby advances studies in molecular systematics.

  11. Molecular Approaches to Studying Microbial Communities: Targeting the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Midori; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Saito, Mitsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Culture-independent methods to detect microorganisms have been developed in parallel with traditional culture-based methods ever since the classification of bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequences was advocated in the 1970s. The development and the prevalence of culture-independent molecular technologies have provided revolutionary progress in microbial studies. The development of these technologies contributes significantly to the research of microorganisms that cannot be detected by traditional methods such as culture-dependent methods.Many molecular methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library analysis, and next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been applied to various microbial studies. Notably, the advent of NGS technologies enabled a large-scale research of the bacterial community. Many recent studies using the NGS technologies have revealed that a larger number of bacteria and taxa than previously thought inhabit various parts of the human body and various places on the earth. The principles and characteristics of each molecular method are different, and each method possesses individual advantages; for example target specificity, comprehensiveness, rapidness, and cost efficiency. Therefore it is important that the methods used in studies are suitable for the objective and materials. Herein, we highlights molecular approaches targeting the 16S rRNA gene in bacterial community analysis, and focuses on the advantages and limitations of each technology. PMID:27627970

  12. Highly conserved base A55 of 16S ribosomal RNA is important for the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Khade, Prashant K; Joseph, Simpson

    2013-09-24

    Accurate decoding of mRNA requires the precise interaction of protein factors and tRNAs with the ribosome. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided detailed structural information about the 70S ribosome with protein factors and tRNAs trapped during translation. Crystal structures showed that one of the universally conserved 16S rRNA bases, A55, in the shoulder domain of the 30S subunit interacts with elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G, respectively). The exact functional role of A55 in protein synthesis is not clear. We changed A55 to U and analyzed the effect of the mutation on the elongation cycle of protein synthesis using functional assays. Expression of 16S rRNA with the A55U mutation in cells confers a dominant lethal phenotype. Additionally, ribosomes with the A55U mutation in 16S rRNA show substantially reduced in vitro protein synthesis activity. Equilibrium binding studies showed that the A55U mutation considerably inhibited the binding of the EF-Tu·GTP·tRNA ternary complex to the ribosome. Furthermore, the A55U mutation slightly inhibited the peptidyl transferase reaction, the binding of EF-G·GTP to the ribosome, and mRNA-tRNA translocation. These results indicate that A55 is important for fine-tuning the activity of the ribosome during the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

  13. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  14. Evaluation of general 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR primers for classical and next-generation sequencing-based diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Klindworth, Anna; Pruesse, Elmar; Schweer, Timmy; Peplies, Jörg; Quast, Christian; Horn, Matthias; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2013-01-01

    16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) amplicon analysis remains the standard approach for the cultivation-independent investigation of microbial diversity. The accuracy of these analyses depends strongly on the choice of primers. The overall coverage and phylum spectrum of 175 primers and 512 primer pairs were evaluated in silico with respect to the SILVA 16S/18S rDNA non-redundant reference dataset (SSURef 108 NR). Based on this evaluation a selection of 'best available' primer pairs for Bacteria and Archaea for three amplicon size classes (100-400, 400-1000, ≥ 1000 bp) is provided. The most promising bacterial primer pair (S-D-Bact-0341-b-S-17/S-D-Bact-0785-a-A-21), with an amplicon size of 464 bp, was experimentally evaluated by comparing the taxonomic distribution of the 16S rDNA amplicons with 16S rDNA fragments from directly sequenced metagenomes. The results of this study may be used as a guideline for selecting primer pairs with the best overall coverage and phylum spectrum for specific applications, therefore reducing the bias in PCR-based microbial diversity studies.

  15. Ribosome Shut-Down by 16S rRNA Fragmentation in Stationary-Phase Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luidalepp, Hannes; Berger, Stefan; Joss, Oliver; Tenson, Tanel; Polacek, Norbert

    2016-05-22

    Stationary-phase bacterial cells are characterized by vastly reduced metabolic activities yielding a dormant-like phenotype. Several hibernation programs ensure the establishment and maintenance of this resting growth state. Some of the stationary phase-specific modulations affect the ribosome and its translational activity directly. In stationary-phase Escherichia coli, we observed the appearance of a 16S rRNA fragmentation event at the tip of helix 6 within the small ribosomal subunit (30S). Stationary-phase 30S subunits showed markedly reduced activities in protein biosynthesis. On the other hand, the functional performance of stationary-phase large ribosomal subunits (50S) was indistinguishable from particles isolated from exponentially growing cells. Introduction of the 16S rRNA cut in vitro at helix 6 of exponential phase 30S subunits renders them less efficient in protein biosynthesis. This indicates that the helix 6 fragmentation is necessary and sufficient to attenuate translational activities of 30S ribosomal subunits. These results suggest that stationary phase-specific cleavage of 16S rRNA within the 30S subunit is an efficient means to reduce global translation activities under non-proliferating growth conditions. PMID:27067112

  16. Asaia bogorensis peritonitis identified by 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis in a patient receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard W; Ruhe, Jorg; Kobrin, Sidney; Wasserstein, Alan; Doline, Christa; Nachamkin, Irving; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-08-01

    Here the authors report a case of refractory peritonitis leading to multiple hospitalizations and the loss of peritoneal dialysis access in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis, caused by Asaia bogorensis, a bacterium not previously described as a human pathogen. This organism was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Unusual microbial agents may cause peritonitis, and molecular microbiological techniques are important tools for identifying these agents.

  17. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  18. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  19. Expression of gyrB and 16S ribosomal RNA genes as indicators of growth and physiological activities of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Toshihiro; Tani, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the DNA gyrase (gyrB) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes can be used as indicators of the biological activities of Legionella pneumophila, the expression levels were estimated. The ratio of mRNA/DNA in gyrB was 0.7 in mid log phase and decreased drastically after the log phase. For 16S rRNA, the ratio was highest in mid log phase (7.0×10(3)), and the value that was about 10% of that in the log phase was maintained for six days. The rRNA may be vital in the resting or active but nonculturable cells that are not growing but physiologically active. The expression levels of gyrB mRNA and 16S rRNA can be used as indicators of the growth activity and the physiological activity of L. pneumophila, respectively. Therefore, by measurement of these indicators, we can evaluate the activities of Legionella cells in various environments.

  20. Megraft: A software package to graft ribosomal small subunit (16S/18S) fragments onto full-length sequences for accurate species richness and sequencing depth analysis in pyrosequencing-length metagenomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metagenomic libraries represent subsamples of the total DNA found at a study site and offer unprecedented opportunities to study ecological and functional aspects of microbial communities. To examine the depth of the sequencing effort, rarefaction analysis of the ribosomal small sub-unit (SSU/16S/18...

  1. Study of the functional interaction of the 900 Tetraloop of 16S ribosomal RNA with helix 24 within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, François; Gagnon, Matthieu G; Steinberg, Sergey V; Cunningham, Philip R; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2004-05-01

    The 900 tetraloop that caps helix 27 of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is amongst the most conserved regions of rRNA. This tetraloop forms a GNRA motif that docks into the minor groove of three base-pairs at the bottom of helix 24 of 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Both the tetraloop and its receptor in helix 24 contact the 23S rRNA, forming the intersubunit bridge B2c. Here, we investigated the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and its receptor by genetic complementation. We used a specialized ribosome system in combination with an in vivo instant evolution approach to select mutations in helix 24 compensating for a mutation in the 900 tetraloop (A900G) that severely decreases ribosomal activity, impairing subunit association and translational fidelity. We selected two mutants where the G769-C810 base-pair of helix 24 was substituted with either U-A or C x A. When these mutations in helix 24 were investigated in the context of a wild-type 900 tetraloop, the C x A but not the U-A mutation severely impaired ribosome activity, interfering with subunit association and decreasing translational fidelity. In the presence of the A900G mutation, both mutations in helix 24 increased the ribosome activity to the same extent. Subunit association and translational fidelity were increased to the same level. Computer modeling was used to analyze the effect of the mutations in helix 24 on the interaction between the tetraloop and its receptor. This study demonstrates the functional importance of the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and helix 24.

  2. The structure of the archaebacterial ribosomal protein S7 and its possible interaction with 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, H; Yao, M; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 is one of the ubiquitous components of the small subunit of the ribosome. It is a 16S rRNA-binding protein positioned close to the exit of the tRNA, and it plays a role in initiating assembly of the head of the 30S subunit. Previous structural analyses of eubacterial S7 have shown that it has a stable alpha-helix core and a flexible beta-arm. Unlike these eubacterial proteins, archaebacterial or eukaryotic S7 has an N-terminal extension of approximately 60 residues. The crystal structure of S7 from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhoS7) has been determined at 2.1 A resolution. The final model of PhoS7 consists of six major alpha-helices, a short 3(10)-helix and two beta-stands. The major part (residues 18-45) of the N-terminal extension of PhoS7 reinforces the alpha-helical core by well-extended hydrophobic interactions, while the other part (residues 46-63) is not visible in the crystal and is possibly fixed only by interacting with 16S rRNA. These differences in the N-terminal extension as well as in the insertion (between alpha1 and alpha2) of the archaebacterial S7 structure from eubacterial S7 are such that they do not necessitate a major change in the structure of the currently available eubacterial 16S rRNA. Some of the inserted chains might pass through gaps formed by helices of the 16S rRNA.

  3. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  4. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization. PMID:25477935

  5. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; Khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  6. Studies on the ability of partially iodinated 16S RNA to participate in 30S ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schendel, P L; Craven, G R

    1976-11-01

    Deproteinated 16S RNA was iodinated at pH 5.0 in an aqueous solution containing TlCl3 plus KI for 1-5 hours at 42 degrees C. Under these conditions 33 moles of iodine are incorporated per mole of RNA. As judged by sucrose gradient sedimentation, the iodinated RNA does not exhibit any large alteration in conformation as compared to unmodified 16S. The iodinated RNA was examined for its ability to reconstitute with total 30S proteins. Sedimentation velocity analysis reveals that the reconstituted subunit has a sedimentation constant of approximately 20S. In addition, protein analysis of particles reconstituted with 16S RNA iodinated for 5 hours indicates that proteins S2, S10, S13, S14, S15, S17, S18, S19, and S21 are no longer able to participate in the 30S assembly process and that proteins S6, S16 and S20 are present in reduced amounts. The ramifications of these results concerning protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions occurring in ribosome assembly are discussed.

  7. Assessing diversity of the female urine microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Urine within the urinary tract is commonly regarded as "sterile" in cultivation terms. Here, we present a comprehensive in-depth study of bacterial 16S rDNA sequences associated with urine from healthy females by means of culture-independent high-throughput sequencing techniques. Results Sequencing of the V1V2 and V6 regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 GS FLX system was performed to characterize the possible bacterial composition in 8 culture-negative (<100,000 CFU/ml) healthy female urine specimens. Sequences were compared to 16S rRNA databases and showed significant diversity, with the predominant genera detected being Lactobacillus, Prevotella and Gardnerella. The bacterial profiles in the female urine samples studied were complex; considerable variation between individuals was observed and a common microbial signature was not evident. Notably, a significant amount of sequences belonging to bacteria with a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for individual samples varied substantially and was in the range of 20 - 500. Conclusions Normal female urine displays a noticeable and variable bacterial 16S rDNA sequence richness, which includes fastidious and anaerobic bacteria previously shown to be associated with female urogenital pathology. PMID:22047020

  8. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA from mycoplasmas by direct solid-phase DNA sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, B; Johansson, K E; Uhlén, M

    1994-01-01

    Automated solid-phase DNA sequencing was used for determination of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of mycoplasmas. The sequence information was used to establish phylogenetic relationships of 11 different mycoplasmas whose 16S rRNA sequences had not been determined earlier. A biotinylated fragment corresponding to positions 344 to 939 in the Escherichia coli sequence was generated by PCR. The PCR product was immobilized onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and direct sequencing was performed in both directions. One previously unclassified avian mycoplasma was found to belong to the Mycoplasma lipophilum cluster of the hominis group. Microheterogeneities were discovered in the rRNA operons of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (SC type), confirming the existence of two different rRNA operons. The 16S rRNA sequence of M. mycoides subsp. capri was identical to that of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides (type SC), except that no microheterogeneities were revealed. Furthermore, automated solid-phase DNA sequencing was used to identify a mycoplasmal contamination of a cell culture as Mycoplasma hyorhinis, which proved to be very difficult by conventional methods. The results suggest that the direct solid-phase DNA sequencing procedure is a powerful tool for identification of mycoplasmas and is also useful in taxonomic studies. Images PMID:7521158

  9. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3′ major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion. PMID:11160889

  10. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Robert, F; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2001-02-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion.

  11. Algae-bacteria association inferred by 16S rDNA similarity in established microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Dagmar; Nohynek, Liisa; Rischer, Heiko

    2014-06-01

    Forty cultivable, visually distinct bacterial cultures were isolated from four Baltic microalgal cultures Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus obliquus, Isochrysis sp., and Nitzschia microcephala, which have been maintained for several years in the laboratory. Bacterial isolates were characterized with respect to morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. A total of 17 unique bacterial strains, almost all belonging to one of three families, Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Erythrobacteraceae, were subsequently isolated. The majority of isolated bacteria belong to Rhodobacteraceae. Literature review revealed that close relatives of the bacteria isolated in this study are not only often found in marine environments associated with algae, but also in lakes, sediments, and soil. Some of them had been shown to interact with organisms in their surroundings. A Basic Local Alignment Search Tool study indicated that especially bacteria isolated from the Isochrysis sp. culture were highly similar to microalgae-associated bacteria. Two of those isolates, I1 and I6, belong to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, members of which are known to occur in close communities with microalgae. An UniFrac analysis revealed that the bacterial community of Isochrysis sp. significantly differs from the other three communities.

  12. Genetic variability of Echinococcus granulosus based on the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Jiahai; Hu, Dandan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Zhongrong; Yang, Aiguo; Deng, Shijin; Guo, Li; Tsering, Dawa; Wang, Shuxian; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is the etiological agent of cystic echinococcosis, a major zoonotic disease of both humans and animals. In this study, we assessed genetic variability and genetic structure of E. granulosus in the Tibet plateau, using the complete mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal RNA gene for the first time. We collected and sequenced 62 isolates of E. granulosus from 3 populations in the Tibet plateau. A BLAST analysis indicated that 61 isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto (genotypes G1-G3), while one isolate belonged to E. canadensis (genotype G6). We detected 16 haplotypes with a haplotype network revealing a star-like expansion, with the most common haplotype occupying the center of the network. Haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity were low, while negative values were observed for Tajima's D and Fu's Fs. AMOVA results and Fst values revealed that the three geographic populations were not genetically differentiated. Our results suggest that a population bottleneck or population expansion has occurred in the past, and that this explains the low genetic variability of E. granulosus in the Tibet Plateau.

  13. Diagnostics of neisseriaceae and moraxellaceae by ribosomal DNA sequencing: ribosomal differentiation of medical microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, D; Singer, C; Rothgänger, J; Tønjum, T; de Hoog, G S; Shah, H; Albert, J; Frosch, M

    2001-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of microbial isolates is a fundamental goal of clinical microbiology. However, in the case of some fastidious gram-negative bacterial species, classical phenotype identification based on either metabolic, enzymatic, or serological methods is difficult, time-consuming, and/or inadequate. 16S or 23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) bacterial sequencing will most often result in accurate speciation of isolates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to find a hypervariable rDNA stretch, flanked by strongly conserved regions, which is suitable for molecular species identification of members of the Neisseriaceae and Moraxellaceae. The inter- and intrageneric relationships were investigated using comparative sequence analysis of PCR-amplified partial 16S and 23S rDNAs from a total of 94 strains. When compared to the type species of the genera Acinetobacter, Moraxella, and Neisseria, an average of 30 polymorphic positions was observed within the partial 16S rDNA investigated (corresponding to Escherichia coli positions 54 to 510) for each species and an average of 11 polymorphic positions was observed within the 202 nucleotides of the 23S rDNA gene (positions 1400 to 1600). Neisseria macacae and Neisseria mucosa subsp. mucosa (ATCC 19696) had identical 16S and 23S rDNA sequences. Species clusters were heterogeneous in both genes in the case of Acinetobacter lwoffii, Moraxella lacunata, and N. mucosa. Neisseria meningitidis isolates failed to cluster only in the 23S rDNA subset. Our data showed that the 16S rDNA region is more suitable than the partial 23S rDNA for the molecular diagnosis of Neisseriaceae and Moraxellaceae and that a reference database should include more than one strain of each species. All sequence chromatograms and taxonomic and disease-related information are available as part of our ribosomal differentiation of medical microorganisms (RIDOM) web-based service (http://www.ridom.hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de/). Users can submit a

  14. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  15. Group G Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia Characterized by 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the relative importance of the four species of Lancefield group G beta-hemolytic streptococci in causing bacteremia and the factors that determine the outcome for patients with group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia. From 1997 to 2000, 75 group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains were isolated from the blood cultures of 66 patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the group G beta-hemolytic streptococci showed that all 75 isolates were Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. The API system (20 STREP) and Vitek system (GPI) successfully identified 65 (98.5%) and 62 (93.9%) isolates, respectively, as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence, whereas the ATB Expression system (ID32 STREP) only successfully identified 49 isolates (74.2%) as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 33 to 99 years). Fifty-six patients (85%) were over 60 years old. All patients had underlying diseases. No source of the bacteremia was identified (primary bacteremia) in 34 patients (52%), whereas 17 (26%) had cellulitis and 8 (12%) had bed sore or wound infections. Fifty-eight patients (88%) had community-acquired group G streptococcal bacteremia. Sixty-two patients (94%) had group G Streptococcus recovered in one blood culture, whereas 4 patients (6%) had it recovered in multiple blood cultures. Fifty-nine patients (89%) had group G Streptococcus as the only bacterium recovered in their blood cultures, whereas in 7 patients other bacteria were recovered concomitantly with the group G Streptococcus in the blood cultures (Staphylococcus aureus in 3, Clostridium perfringens in 2, Citrobacter freundii in 1, and Bacteroides fragilis in 1). Overall, 10 patients (15%) died. Male sex, diagnosis other than cellulitis, hospital-acquired bacteremia, and multiple positive blood cultures were associated with mortality {P < 0.005 (relative risk [RR] = 7.6), P < 0

  16. A ribonucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli containing two contiguous domains of the 16 S RNA.

    PubMed

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Avital, S; Abramowitz, R

    1982-08-11

    Ribonucleoprotein fragments of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli have been prepared by limited ribonuclease digestion and mild heating of the ribosome in a constant ionic environment. One such fragment has been described previously. A second electrophoretically homogeneous fragment has now been isolated and its RNA and protein moieties have been characterized. It contains the 5' half of the 16 S RNA, encompassing domains I and II except for the extreme 5' terminus and several small gaps. Seven proteins are present: S4, S5, S6, S8, S12, S15 and S20. The RNA binding sites of five of these proteins are known, and all are RNA sequences that are present in the fragment. Published neutron scattering and immuno-electron microscopic data indicate that six of the proteins are clustered together in a cross sectional slice through the center of the subunit. After deproteinization, the RNA moiety gives two bands in gel electrophoresis, one containing domains I and II and the other, essentially only domain II. The former, although larger, migrates faster in gel electrophoresis, indicating that RNA domains I and II interact with each other in such a way as to become more compact than domain II by itself.

  17. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Corynebacterium striatum confirmed by 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequencing: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are non-fermentous Gram-positive bacilli that are normal flora of human skin and mucous membranes and are commonly isolated in clinical specimens. Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium are regarded as contaminants when found in blood culture. Currently, Corynebacterium striatum is considered one of the emerging nosocomial agents implicated in endocarditis and serious infections. We report a case of native-valve infective endocarditis caused by C. striatum, which was misidentified by automated identification system but identified accurately by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, in a 55-year-old male patient. The patient had two mobile vegetations on his mitral valve, both of which had high embolic risk. Through surgical valve replacement and an antibiotic regimen, the patient recovered completely. In unusual clinical scenarios, C. striatum should not be simply dismissed as a contaminant when isolated from clinical specimens. The possibility of C. striatum infection should be considered even in an immunocompetent patient, and we suggest a genotypic assay, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, to confirm species identity. PMID:27659439

  18. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    PubMed

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  19. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  20. Culture-negative endocarditis diagnosed using 16S DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Duffett, Stephen; Missaghi, Bayan; Daley, Peter

    2012-01-01

    16S DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a molecular amplification technique that can be used to identify bacterial pathogens in culture-negative endocarditis. Bacterial DNA can be isolated from surgically excised valve tissue or from blood collected in EDTA vials. Use of this technique is particularly helpful in identifying the bacterial pathogen in cases of culture-negative endocarditis. A case involving a 48-year-old man who presented with severe aortic regurgitation and a four-month prodrome of low-grade fever is reported. Blood and valve tissue cultures following valve replacement were negative. A valve tissue sample was sent for investigation with 16S DNA PCR, which successfully identified Streptococcus salivarius and was interpreted as the true diagnosis. A review of the literature suggests that 16S DNA PCR from valve tissue is a more sensitive diagnostic test than culture. It is also extremely specific, based on a sequence match of at least 500 base pairs.

  1. Complementarity of Bacillus subtilis 16S rRNA with sites of antibiotic-dependent ribosome stalling in cat and erm leaders.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, E J; Ambulos, N P; Lovett, P S

    1990-01-01

    Inducible cat and erm genes are regulated by translational attenuation. In this regulatory model, gene activation results from chloramphenicol- or erythromycin-dependent stalling of a ribosome at a precise site in the leader region of cat or erm transcripts. The stalled ribosome is believed to destabilize a downstream region of RNA secondary structure that sequesters the ribosome-binding site for the cat or erm coding sequence. Here we show that the ribosome stall sites in cat and erm leader mRNAs, designated crb and erb, respectively, are largely complementary to an internal sequence in 16S rRNA of Bacillus subtilis. A tetracycline resistance gene that is likely regulated by translational attenuation also contains a sequence in its leader mRNA, trb, which is complementary to a sequence in 16S rRNA that overlaps with the crb and erb complements. An in vivo assay is described which is designed to test whether 16S rRNA of a translating ribosome can interact with the crb sequence in mRNA in an inducer-dependent reaction. The assay compares the growth rate of cells expressing crb-86 with the growth rate of cells lacking crb-86 in the presence of subinhibitory levels of inducers of cat-86, chloramphenicol, fluorothiamphenicol, amicetin, or erythromycin. Under these conditions, crb-86 retarded growth. Deletion of the crb-86 sequence, insertion of ochre mutations into crb-86, or synonymous codon changes in crb-86 that decreased its complementarity with 16S rRNA all eliminated from detection inducer-dependent growth retardation. Lincomycin, a ribosomally targeted antibiotic that is not an inducer of cat-86, failed to selectively retard the growth of cells expressing crb-86. We suggest that cat-86 inducers enable the crb-86 sequence in mRNA to base pair with 16S rRNA of translating ribosome. When the base pairing is extensive, as with crb-86, ribosomes become transiently trapped on crb and are temporarily withdrawn from protein synthesis to the extent that growth rate

  2. Flow Cytometry-assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs fromComplex 16S ribosomal RNA Gene Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.L.; Schramm, A.; Bernhard, A.E.; van den Engh, G.J.; Stahl, D.A.

    2004-07-21

    A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screeningand recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. Thisapproach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting-assisted cloning,was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within theBacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNAgenes. Retrieval and sequence analysis of phylogenetically informativegenes has become a standard cultivation-independent technique toinvestigate microbial diversity in nature (7, 18). Genes encoding the 16SrRNA, because of the relative ease of their selective amplification, havebeen most frequently employed for general diversity surveys (16).Environmental studies have also focused on specific subpopulationsaffiliated with a phylogenetic group or identified by genes encodingspecific metabolic functions (e.g., ammonia oxidation, sulfaterespiration, and nitrate reduction) (8,15,20). However, specificpopulations may be of low abundance (1,23), or the genes encodingspecific metabolic functions may be insufficiently conserved to providepriming sites for general PCR amplification. Three general approacheshave been used to obtain 16S rRNA sequence information from low-abundancepopulations: screening hundreds to thousands of clones in a general 16SrRNA gene library (21), flow cytometric sorting of a subpopulation ofenvironmentally derived cells labeled by fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) (27), or selective PCR amplification using primersspecific for the subpopulation (2,23). While the first approach is simplytime-consuming and tedious, the second has been restricted to fairlylarge and strongly fluorescent cells from aquatic samples (5, 27). Thethird approach often generates fragments of only a few hundred bases dueto the limited number of specific priming sites. Partial sequenceinformation often degrades analysis, obscuring or distorting thephylogenetic placement of the new sequences (11, 20). A more robustcharacterization of environ

  3. Synthesis and characterization of modified nucleotides in the 970 hairpin loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abeydeera, N. Dinuka

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of the 6-O-DPC-2-N-methylguanosine (m2G) nucleoside and the corresponding 5′-O-DMT-2′-O-TOM-protected 6-O-DPC-2-N-methylguanosine phosphoramidite is reported [DPC, diphenyl carbamoyl; DMT, 4, 4′-dimethoxytrityl; TOM, [(triisopropylsilyl)oxy]methyl]. The availability of the phosphoramidite allows for syntheses of hairpin RNAs with site-selective incorporation of 2-N-methylguanosine modification. Four 18-nt hairpin RNA analogues representing the 970-loop region (helix 31 or h31; U960–A975) of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA were synthesized with and without modifications in the loop region. Subsequently, stabilities and conformations of the singly and doubly modified RNAs were examined and compared with the corresponding unmodified RNA. Thermodynamic parameters and circular dichroism spectra are presented for the four helix 31 RNA analogues. Surprisingly, methylations in the loop region of helix 31 slightly destabilize the hairpin, which may have subtle effects on ribosome function. The hairpin construct is suitable for future ligand-binding experiments. PMID:19628400

  4. A system to simultaneously detect tick-borne pathogens based on the variability of the 16S ribosomal genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays can be used to quickly and sensitively identify several different pathogens in one step. Our previously developed DNA microarray, based on the detection of variable regions in the 16S rDNA gene (rrs), which are specific for each selected bacterial genus, allowed the concurrent detection of Borrelia spp., Anaplasma spp., Francisella spp., Rickettsia spp. and Coxiella spp. Methods In this study, we developed a comprehensive detection system consisting of a second generation DNA microarray and quantitative PCRs. New oligonucleotide capture probes specific for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. genospecies and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis were included. This new DNA microarray system required substantial changes in solution composition, hybridization conditions and post-hybridization washes. Results This second generation chip displayed high specificity and sensitivity. The specificity of the capture probes was tested by hybridizing the DNA microarrays with Cy5-labeled, PCR-generated amplicons encoding the rrs genes of both target and non-target bacteria. The detection limit was determined to be 103 genome copies, which corresponds to 1–2 pg of DNA. A given sample was evaluated as positive if its mean fluorescence was at least 10% of the mean fluorescence of a positive control. Those samples with fluorescence close to the threshold were further analyzed using quantitative PCRs, developed to identify Francisella spp., Rickettsia spp. and Coxiella spp. Like the DNA microarray, the qPCRs were based on the genus specific variable regions of the rrs gene. No unspecific cross-reactions were detected. The detection limit for Francisella spp. was determined to be only 1 genome copy, for Coxiella spp. 10 copies, and for Rickettsia spp., 100 copies. Conclusions Our detection system offers a rapid method for the comprehensive identification of tick-borne bacteria, which is applicable to clinical samples. It can also be used to identify both pathogenic

  5. Selective Recovery of 16S rRNA Sequences from Natural Microbial Communities in the Form of cDNA.

    PubMed

    Weller, R; Ward, D M

    1989-07-01

    Cloning of cDNA obtained from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) selectively retrieves species-specific sequence information useful for analyzing the composition and structure of natural microbial communities. With this technique we obtained recombinant 16S rcDNA libraries from Escherichia coli and from a model hot-spring cyanobacterial-mat community. The recombinant plasmids contained exclusively 16S rRNA-derived inserts. This selective approach is independent of biasing culture techniques and eliminates the laborious screening required to locate 16S rRNA gene-bearing recombinants in genomic DNA libraries obtained from natural communities. PMID:16347975

  6. Evolutionary relationships among Magnetospirillum strains inferred from phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J G; Kawaguchi, R; Sakaguchi, T; Thornhill, R H; Matsunaga, T

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the evolutionary relationships between two facultatively anaerobic Magnetospirillum strains (AMB-1 and MGT-1) and fastidious, obligately microaerophilic species, such as Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, using a molecular phylogenetic approach. Genomic DNA from strains MGT-1 and AMB-1 was used as a template for amplification of the genes coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) by the polymerase chain reaction. Amplified DNA fragments were sequenced (1,424 bp) and compared with sequences for M. magnetotacticum MS-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Phylogenetic analysis of the aligned 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the two new magnetic spirilla, AMB-1 and MGT-1, lie within the alpha subdivision (alpha-1) of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria and are closely related to Rhodospirillum fulvum and to several endosymbiotic bacteria. Strains AMB-1, MGT-1, and MS-1 formed a cluster, termed group I, in which they were more closely related to each other than to group II, which contained M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Group I strains were also physiologically distinct from strain MSR-1. Sequence alignment studies allowed elucidation of genus-specific regions of the 16S rDNA, and oligonucleotide primers complementary to two of these regions were used to develop a specific polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of magnetic spirilla in natural samples. Images PMID:7691800

  7. The identification of spermine binding sites in 16S rRNA allows interpretation of the spermine effect on ribosomal 30S subunit functions

    PubMed Central

    Amarantos, Ioannis; Zarkadis, Ioannis K.; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L.

    2002-01-01

    A photoreactive analogue of spermine, N1-azidobenzamidino (ABA)-spermine, was covalently attached after irradiation to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits or naked 16S rRNA. By means of RNase H digestion and primer extension, the cross-linking sites of ABA-spermine in naked 16S rRNA were characterised and compared with those identified in 30S subunits. The 5′ domain, the internal and terminal loops of helix H24, as well as the upper part of helix H44 in naked 16S rRNA, were found to be preferable binding sites for polyamines. Association of 16S rRNA with ribosomal proteins facilitated its interaction with photoprobe, except for 530 stem–loop nt, whose modification by ABA-spermine was abolished. Association of 30S with 50S subunits, poly(U) and AcPhe-tRNA (complex C) further altered the susceptibility of ABA-spermine cross-linking to 16S rRNA. Complex C, modified in its 30S subunit by ABA-spermine, reacted with puromycin similarly to non-photolabelled complex. On the contrary, poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes reconstituted from photolabelled 30S subunits and untreated 50S subunits bound AcPhe-tRNA more efficiently than untreated ribosomes, but were less able to recognise and reject near cognate aminoacyl-tRNA. The above can be interpreted in terms of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, induced by the incorporation of ABA-spermine. PMID:12087167

  8. Photoinduced cross-linkage, in situ, of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to 16S rRNA: identification of cross-linked proteins and relationships between reactivity and ribosome structure.

    PubMed

    Gorelic, L

    1976-08-10

    The kinetics of photoinduced cross-linkage of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to the 16S-rRNA molecule in the intact Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit was studied in this report. All of the 30S ribosomal proteins become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA before changes in the sedimentation characteristics of the 30S ribosomal subunit can be detected. The proteins exhibit different reactivities in the cross-linkage reaction. One group of proteins-S3, S7-S9, S11, S12, and S15-S19-is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by single-hit kinetics, or by photoprocesses of nonunity but low multiplicities. A second group of proteins--S1, S2, S4-S6, S10, S13, S14, and S21--is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of a complex nature. A comparison of these data with other properties of the individual 30S ribosomal proteins related to ribosome structure indicated that most of the 30S ribosomal proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of low multiplicities had been classified rRNA-binding proteins by nonphotochemical methods, and most of the proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of large multiplicities had been classified as nonbinding proteins. There were certain exceptions to these correlations. Proteins S4 and S20, both RNA-binding proteins, become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocessses of large multiplicities, and proteins S3, S11, S12, and S18, none of which have been classified RNA-binding proteins, exhibited low multiplicities in the cross-linkage reaction. All of these exceptions could be explained in terms of limitations inherent in the photochemical methods used in this study and in other types of methods that have been used to study RNA-protein interactions in the 30S ribosomal subunit. The data presented here also suggest that labile RNA-protein cross-links are present in the uv-irradiated 30S ribosomal subunits, and that neither peptide-bond cleavage nor photoinduced modification of the charged side-chain groups in

  9. Evidence that E. coli ribosomal protein S13 has two separable functional domains involved in 16S RNA recognition and protein S19 binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarzbauer, J; Craven, G R

    1985-09-25

    We have found that E. coli ribosomal protein S13 recognizes multiple sites on 16S RNA. However, when protein S19 is included with a mixture of proteins S4, S7, S8, S16/S17 and S20, the S13 binds to the complex with measurably greater strength and with a stoichiometry of 1.5 copies per particle. This suggests that the protein may have two functional domains. We have tested this idea by cleaving the protein into two polypeptides. It was found that one of the fragments, composed of amino acid residues 84-117, retained the capacity to bind 16S RNA at multiple sites. Protein S19 had no affect on the strength or stoichiometry of the binding of this fragment. These data suggest that S13 has a C-terminal domain primarily responsible for RNA recognition and possibly that the N-terminal region is important for association with protein S19.

  10. Interaction of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 with 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Powers, T; Changchien, L M; Noller, H F

    1988-06-20

    We have examined the effects of assembly of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 on the reactivities of residues in 16 S rRNA towards chemical probes. The results show that S6, S18 and S11 interact with the 690-720 and 790 loop regions of 16 S rRNA in a highly co-operative manner, that is consistent with the previously defined assembly map relationships among these proteins. The results also indicate that these proteins, one of which (S18) has previously been implicated as a component of the ribosomal P-site, interact with residues near some of the recently defined P-site (class II tRNA protection) nucleotides in 16 S rRNA. In addition, assembly of protein S12 has been found to result in the protection of residues in both the 530 stem/loop and the 900 stem regions; the latter group is closely juxtaposed to a segment of 16 S rRNA recently shown to be protected from chemical probes by streptomycin. Interestingly, both S5 and S12 appear to protect, to differing degrees, a well-defined set of residues in the 900 stem/loop and 5'-terminal regions. These observations are discussed in terms of the effects of S5 and S12 on streptomycin binding, and in terms of the class III tRNA protection found in the 900 stem of 16 S rRNA. Altogether these results show that many of the small subunit proteins, which have previously been shown to be functionally important, appear to be associated with functionally implicated segments of 16 S rRNA.

  11. Heterogeneity between 16S ribosomal RNA gene copies borne by one Desulfitobacterium strain is caused by different 100-200 bp insertions in the 5' region.

    PubMed

    Villemur, Richard; Constant, Philippe; Gauthier, Annie; Shareck, Martine; Beaudet, Réjean

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Desulfitobacterium hafniense, such as strains PCP-1, DP7, TCE1, and TCP-A, have unusual long 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes due to an insertion of approximately 100 bp in the 5' region. In this report, we analyzed the 16S rRNA genes of different Desulfitobacterium strains to determine if such an insertion is a common feature of desulfitobacteria. We amplified this region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from eight Desulfitobacterium strains (D. hafniense strains PCP-1, DP7, TCP-A, TCE1, and DCB-2; D. dehalogenans; D. chlororespirans; and Desulfitobacterium sp. PCE1) and resolved each PCR product by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). All strains had from two to seven DGGE- migrating bands, suggesting heterogeneity in their 16S rRNA gene copies. For each strain, the 5' region of the 16S rRNA genes was amplified and a clone library was derived. Clones corresponding to most PCR-DGGE migration bands were isolated. Sequencing of representative clones revealed that the heterogeneity was generated by insertions of 100-200 bp. An insertion was found in at least one copy of the 16S rRNA gene in all examined strains. In total, we found eight different types of insertions (INS1-INS8) that varied from 123 to 193 nt in length. Two-dimensional structural analyses of transcribed sequences predicted that all insertions would form an energetically stable loop. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments revealed that most of the observed insertions in the Desulfitobacterium strains were excised from the mature 16S rRNA transcripts. Insertions were not commonly found in bacterial 16S rRNA genes, and having a different insertion in several 16S rRNA gene copies borne by a single bacterial species was rarely observed. The function of these insertions is not known, but their occurrence can have an important impact in deriving 16S rRNA oligonucleotidic fluorescence in situ hybridization probes, as these insertions can be excised from 16S rRNA transcripts.

  12. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  13. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  14. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I. Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The ‘p’ values are distinctly different from intraspecific ‘p’ distance (0–0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus – B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  15. Extrachromosomal circular ribosomal DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerink, J H; Klootwijk, J; Planta, R J; van der Ende, A; van Bruggen, E F

    1979-01-01

    Purified ribosomal DNA from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis contains a small proportion of circular DNA molecules with a contour length of 3 micron or integral multiples thereof. Hybridization of yeast ribosomal DNA with 26 S rRNA, using the R-loop technique, reveals that these circular molecules contain sequences complementary to yeast ribosomal RNA. We suggest that these extrachromosomal rRNA genes may be intermediates in the amplification of rRNA genes in yeast. Images PMID:493145

  16. New parachlamydial 16S rDNA phylotypes detected in human clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle; Valassina, Marcello

    2002-11-01

    Chlamydiales are important intracellular bacterial pathogens, causing a wide variety of diseases in vertebrates, including humans. Besides the well-known species in the family Chlamydiaceae, new chlamydial organisms have recently been discovered, forming three new families: Parachlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and Waddliaceae. Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis are currently investigated as emerging human respiratory pathogens. Additional chlamydial lineages have been discovered by 16S rDNA-based molecular studies, and their implication in human infections is poorly known. By using a pan-chlamydia 16S rDNA PCR, we have searched for the presence of chlamydiae in 228 clinical samples that all previously had been shown to be PCR-negative for Chlamydophila pneumoniae: 170 respiratory samples, 45 atheromatic plaques and 13 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Nine respiratory samples tested positive. Sequence analysis has allowed us to assign four sequences to Chlamydophila psittaci, three sequences to Chlamydophila felis, and two sequences to two novel phylotypes belonging to the Parachlamydiaceae. These latter sequences showed similarity values of more than 93% with each other and with the P. acanthamoebae sequence, thus belonging to novel, unrecognized species. In conclusion, this report showed that a variety of non-C. pneumoniae chlamydial respiratory infection is present in humans, and that new parachlamydiae distinct from P. acanthamoebae may be detected in human clinical samples. Future studies will be of interest in order to estimate the diversity of these novel chlamydiae in both clinical and environmental samples, as well as their possible clinical implication in human and animal infections.

  17. Analysis of the conformation of the 3' major domain of Escherichia coli16S ribosomal RNA using site-directed photoaffinity crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Montpetit, A; Payant, C; Nolan, J M; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1998-01-01

    The 3' major domain of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA, which occupies the head of the small ribosomal subunit, is involved in several functions of the ribosome. We have used a site-specific crosslinking procedure to gain further insights into the higher-order structure of this domain. Circularly permuted RNAs were used to introduce an azidophenacyl group at specific positions within the 3' major domain. Crosslinks were generated in a high-ionic strength buffer that has been used for ribosome reconstitution studies and so enables the RNA to adopt a structure recognized by ribosomal proteins. The crosslinking sites were identified by primer extension and confirmed by assessing the mobility of the crosslinked RNA lariats in denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Eight crosslinks were characterized. Among them, one crosslink demonstrates that helix 28 is proximal to the top of helix 34, and two others show that the 1337 region, located in an internal loop at the junction of helices 29, 30, 41, and 42, is proximal to the center of helix 30 and to a segment connecting helix 28 to helix 29. These relationships of vicinity have previously been observed in native 30S subunits, which suggests that the free domain adopts a conformation similar to that within the 30S subunit. Furthermore, crosslinks were obtained in helix 34, which suggest that the upper and lower portions of this helix are in close proximity. PMID:9814765

  18. A Case of Sepsis in a 92-Year-Old Korean Woman Caused by Aerococcus urinae and Identified by Sequencing the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Myeong Hee; Lee, Woo In; Kang, So Young; Jeon, You La

    2016-05-01

    Aerococcus urinae is an uncommon pathogen that was first identified in 1992. Herein, we report a case of bloodstream infection caused by A. urinae, which occurred in a 92-year-old Korean female patient with an underlying urologic infection who had altered consciousness. The blood culture yielded positive results for A. urinae; however, identifying A. urinae was challenging. Ultimately, we used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing to identify the organism. The patient recovered after being treated with ertapenem and meropenem. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of A. urinae sepsis in South Korea. PMID:26868516

  19. Optimal eukaryotic 18S and universal 16S/18S ribosomal RNA primers and their application in a study of symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Gao, Zhao Ming; Bougouffa, Salim; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene primers that feature a wide coverage are critical in detecting the composition of eukaryotic microscopic organisms in ecosystems. Here, we predicted 18S rRNA primers based on consecutive conserved sites and evaluated their coverage efficiency and scope of application to different eukaryotic groups. After evaluation, eight of them were considered as qualified 18S primers based on coverage rate. Next, we examined common conserved regions in prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA sequences to design 16S/18S universal primers. Three 16S/18S candidate primers, U515, U1390 and U1492, were then considered to be suitable for simultaneous amplification of the rRNA sequences in three domains. Eukaryotic 18S and prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes in a sponge were amplified simultaneously using universal primers U515 and U1390, and the subsequent sorting of pyrosequenced reads revealed some distinctive communities in different parts of the sample. The real difference in biodiversity between prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts could be discerned as the dissimilarity between OTUs was increased from 0.005 to 0.1. A network of the communities in external and internal parts of the sponge illustrated the co-variation of some unique microbes in certain parts of the sponge, suggesting that the universal primers are useful in simultaneous detection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities.

  20. The phylogeny of the genus Yersinia based on 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A; Goebel, B M; Liesack, W; Griffiths, M; Stackebrandt, E

    1993-12-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Yersinia were investigated by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. A stretch of approximately 1450 nucleotides was sequenced from representatives of ten of the eleven validly described species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that yersinae form a coherent cluster within the gamma subgroup of Proteobacteria. The intrageneric relationship was characterized by five sublines with Y. enterocolitica, Y. rohdei, and Y. ruckeri forming separate sublines each represented by a single species. A separate subline was formed by Y. pestis, Y pseudotuberculosis and Y. kristensenii, while Y. mollaretii, Y. intermedia, Y. bercovieri, Y. aldovae, and Y. kristensenii formed a fifth subline. The phylogenetic distinctness of the yersiniae sublines is compared to published phenotypic properties and results of DNA-DNA similarity studies.

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of paradoxical frogs (Anura, Hylidae, Pseudae) inferred from 12S and 16S mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Garda, Adrian A; Cannatella, David C

    2007-07-01

    We used mitochondrial DNA sequences of 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA genes to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of the nine species of South American aquatic hylids known as paradoxical frogs. Pseudis minuta and P. cardosoi form the sister-group to a clade comprising Lysapsus and the remaining Pseudis. We suggest the resurrection of Podonectes, including P. minutus and P. cardosoi, to avoid the nonmonophyly of Pseudis. Some doubt is cast on the species status of P. cardosoi. Lysapsus limellum, P. bolbodactyla, and P. paradoxa each may comprise more than one species, but lack of comprehensive geographic and morphological appraisals precludes taxonomic changes. Biogeographic implications of the phylogeny are discussed. The correlation between hydrographic basins and Pseudis species is not fully supported, and a recent contact between Amazon populations in eastern Bolivia and western Brazil (Rondônia) and Paraná basin populations in the Pantanal is suggested. A dispersal-vicariance analysis showed that major diversification of Pseudis and Lysapsus species occurred in the Brazilian Shield, and that the presence of P. paradoxa and L. limellum in the Amazon and Paraná basins is due to recent dispersals. Evidence suggests a vicariant event, most likely caused by Miocene marine introgressions, as the cause for the restricted distribution of L. laevis in the Guiana Shield. PMID:17275349

  2. Phylogeny of giant clams (Cardiidae: Tridacninae) based on partial mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J A; Foighil, D O

    1999-10-01

    We have performed the first DNA molecular phylogenetic analysis of giant clams. An approximately 462-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit (16S) was sequenced for all eight species of giant clams and two species of an outgroup taxon, the edible cockle Cerastoderma. The data were analyzed using a maximum parsimony approach and a single most parsimonious tree was found. The resulting phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that the genera Hippopus and Tridacna are monophyletic sister taxa. Tridacna (Chametrachea) is the sister taxon to (T. tevoroa (T. derasa + T. gigas)), with these latter three taxa all being placed in a single subgenus, Tridacna (Tridacna). The number of recognized giant clam species has increased by one-third over the last two decades with the discovery of two rare new species having restricted geographic ranges: H. porcellanus (Palau and the Sulu Archipelago) and T. tevoroa (Tonga and Fiji). These two species lack a known fossil record but exhibit greater genetic distances from sister taxa than do extant giant clam species pairs which are recognizable in Neogene strata, e.g., T. gigas/T. derasa and T. maxima/T. squamosa. We propose that the two new species represent ancient relict lineages of Miocene origin.

  3. Lactobacillus species identification by amplified ribosomal 16S-23S rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandes, S H C; Alvin, L B; Silva, B C; Zanirati, D F; Jung, L R C; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria strains are commonly used for animal and human consumption due to their probiotic properties. One of the major genera used is Lactobacillus, a highly diverse genus comprised of several closely related species. The selection of new strains for probiotic use, especially strains of Lactobacillus, is the focus of several research groups. Accurate identification to species level is fundamental for research on new strains, as well as for safety assessment and quality assurance. The 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) is a deeply homologous region among prokaryotes that is commonly used for identification to the species level because it is able to acquire and accumulate mutations without compromising general bacterial metabolism. In the present study, 16S-23S ITS regions of 45 Lactobacillus species (48 strains) were amplified and subjected to independent enzymatic digestions, using 12 restriction enzymes that recognise six-base sequences. Twenty-nine species showed unique restriction patterns, and could therefore be precisely identified solely by this assay (64%). This approach proved to be reproducible, allowing us to establish simplified restriction patterns for each evaluated species. The restriction patterns of each species were similar among homologous strains, and to a large extent reflected phylogenetic relationships based on 16S rRNA sequences, demonstrating the promising nature of this region for evolutionary studies.

  4. Bacterial diversity in the rumen of Indian Surti buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), assessed by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, P R; Singh, K M; Parnerkar, S; Tripathi, A K; Mehta, H H; Rank, D N; Kothari, R K; Joshi, C G

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial communities in buffalo rumen were characterized using a culture-independent approach for a pooled sample of rumen fluid from 3 adult Surti buffaloes. Buffalo rumen is likely to include species of various bacterial phyla, so 16S rDNA sequences were amplified and cloned from the sample. A total of 191 clones were sequenced and similarities to known 16S rDNA sequences were examined. About 62.82% sequences (120 clones) had >90% similarity to the 16S rDNA database sequences. Furthermore, about 34.03% of the sequences (65 clones) were 85-89% similar to 16S rDNA database sequences. For the remaining 3.14%; the similarity was lower than 85% Phylogenetic analyses were also used to infer the makeup of bacterial communities in the rumen of Surti buffalo. As a result, we distinguished 42 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on unique 16S r DNA sequences: 19 OTUs affiliated to an unidentified group (45.23% of total OTUs), 11 OTUs of the phylum Firmicutes, also known as the low G+C group (26.19%), 7 OTUs of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides phylum (16.66%), 4 OTUs of Spirochaetes (9.52%), and 1 OTU of Actinobacteria (2.38%). These include 10 single-clone OTUs, so Good's coverage (94.76%) of 16S rRNA libraries indicated that sequences identified in the libraries represent the majority of bacterial diversity present in rumen. PMID:20720314

  5. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. III. The topography of the functional centre.

    PubMed

    Mueller, F; Stark, H; van Heel, M; Rinke-Appel, J; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    We describe the locations of sites within the 3D model for the 16 S rRNA (described in two accompanying papers) that are implicated in ribosomal function. The relevant experimental data originate from many laboratories and include sites of foot-printing, cross-linking or mutagenesis for various functional ligands. A number of the sites were themselves used as constraints in building the 16 S model. (1) The foot-print sites for A site tRNA are all clustered around the anticodon stem-loop of the tRNA; there is no "allosteric" site. (2) The foot-print sites for P site tRNA that are essential for P site binding are similarly clustered around the P site anticodon stem-loop. The foot-print sites in 16 S rRNA helices 23 and 24 are, however, remote from the P site tRNA. (3) Cross-link sites from specific nucleotides within the anticodon loops of A or P site-bound tRNA are mostly in agreement with the model, whereas those from nucleotides in the elbow region of the tRNA (which also exhibit extensive cross-linking to the 50 S subunit) are more widely spread. Again, cross-links to helix 23 are remote from the tRNAs. (4) The corresponding cross-links from E site tRNA are predominantly in helix 23, and these agree with the model. Electron microscopy data are presented, suggestive of substantial conformational changes in this region of the ribosome. (5) Foot-prints for IF-3 in helices 23 and 24 are at a position with close contact to the 50 S subunit. (6) Foot-prints from IF-1 form a cluster around the anticodon stem-loop of A site tRNA, as do also the sites on 16 S rRNA that have been implicated in termination. (7) Foot-print sites and mutations relating to streptomycin form a compact group on one side of the A site anticodon loop, with the corresponding sites for spectinomycin on the other side. (8) Site-specific cross-links from mRNA (which were instrumental in constructing the 16 S model) fit well both in the upstream and downstream regions of the mRNA, and indicate that the

  6. Evidence for tertiary structural RNA-RNA interactions within the protein S4 binding site at the 5'-end of 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli.+.

    PubMed Central

    Ungewickell, E; Ehresmann, C; Stiegler, P; Garrett, R

    1975-01-01

    Evidence is presented for tertiary structural interaction(s) (interactions(s) between two regions of an RNA molecule that are widely separated in the RNA sequence) within the 5'-one third of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli that constitutes the binding site of protein S4. The two main interacting RNA regions were separated by about 120 nucleotides (sections Q to M) of the 16S RNA sequence. A second, smaller gap, of 13 nucleotides, occurred within section C". The two main interacting regions contain about 150 nucleotides (sections H" to Q) and 160 nucleotides (sections M to C"). They are folded back on one another and, especially in the presence of protein S4, are strongly protected against ribonuclease digestion. The intermediate region (sections Q to M), however, is relatively accessible to ribonucleases in the S4-RNP. By partial removal of subfragments from the RNA complex it was possible to localise the two main interacting sites within sections H" - H and sections I" - C". Three main criteria for the specificity of the RNA-RNA interactions were invoked and satisfied. The possibility of other tertiary structural RNA-RNA interactions occurring in other regions of the 16S RNA is discussed. Finally, all the structural information on the S4-RNP is summarised and a tentative model is proposed. Images PMID:1103089

  7. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  8. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  9. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus ribosomal protein S8 reveals a unique subdomain that contributes to an extremely tight association with 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Menichelli, Elena; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Recht, Michael I; Williamson, James R

    2012-01-20

    The assembly of ribonucleoprotein complexes occurs under a broad range of conditions, but the principles that promote assembly and allow function at high temperature are poorly understood. The ribosomal protein S8 from Aquifex aeolicus (AS8) is unique in that there is a 41-residue insertion in the consensus S8 sequence. In addition, AS8 exhibits an unusually high affinity for the 16S ribosomal RNA, characterized by a picomolar dissociation constant that is approximately 26,000-fold tighter than the equivalent interaction from Escherichia coli. Deletion analysis demonstrated that binding to the minimal site on helix 21 occurred at the same nanomolar affinity found for other bacterial species. The additional affinity required the presence of a three-helix junction between helices 20, 21, and 22. The crystal structure of AS8 was solved, revealing the helix-loop-helix geometry of the unique AS8 insertion region, while the core of the molecule is conserved with known S8 structures. The AS8 structure was modeled onto the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from E. coli, suggesting the possibility that the unique subdomain provides additional backbone and side-chain contacts between the protein and an unpaired base within the three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22. Point mutations in the protein insertion subdomain resulted in a significantly reduced RNA binding affinity with respect to wild-type AS8. These results indicate that the AS8-specific subdomain provides additional interactions with the three-way junction that contribute to the extremely tight binding to ribosomal RNA.

  10. Phylogeography of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) estimated by diversity at ribosomal 16S and cytochrome oxidase I mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Marquez, J G; Cummings, M A; Krafsur, E S

    2007-11-01

    The blood-feeding cosmopolitan stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: Muscidae), is thought to disperse rapidly and widely, and earlier studies of allozyme variation were consistent with high vagility in this species. The geographic origins of New World populations are unknown. Diversity at mitochondrial loci r16S and cytochrome oxidase I was examined in 277 stable flies from 11 countries, including five zoogeographical regions. Of 809 nucleotides, 174 were polymorphic and 133 were parsimony informative. Seventy-six haplotypes were found in frequencies consistent with the Wright-Fisher infinite allele model. None were shared among four or more zoogeographical regions. The null hypothesis of mutation neutrality was not rejected, thereby validating the observed distribution. Fifty-nine haplotypes were singular, eight were private and confined to the Old World, and three of 76 haplotypes were shared between the Old and New World. Only 19 haplotypes were found in the New World, 14 of which were singletons. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were heterogeneous among countries and regions. The most diversity was observed in sub-Saharan Africa. Regional differentiation indices were C(RT) = 0.26 and N(RT) = 0.31, indicating populations were highly structured macrogeographically. Palearctic and New World flies were the least differentiated from each other. There were strong genetic similarities among populations in the Nearctic, Neotropical, and Palearctic regions, and it is most likely that New World populations were derived from the Palearctic after 1492 CE, in the colonial era. PMID:18047198

  11. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  12. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julie M; Burleigh, J Gordon; Light, Jessica E; Reed, David L

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  13. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. II. The RNA-protein interaction data.

    PubMed

    Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    The map of the mass centres of the 21 proteins from the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal subunit, as determined by neutron scattering, was fitted to a cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM) model at a resolution of 20 A of 70 S ribosomes in the pre-translocational state, carrying tRNA molecules at the A and P sites. The fit to the 30 S moiety of the 70 S particles was accomplished with the help of the well-known distribution of the ribosomal proteins in the head, body and side lobe regions of the 30 S subunit, as determined by immuno electron microscopy (IEM). Most of the protein mass centres were found to lie close to the surface (or even outside) of the cryo-EM contour of the 30 S subunit, supporting the idea that the ribosomal proteins are arranged peripherally around the rRNA. The ribosomal protein distribution was then compared with the corresponding model for the 16 S rRNA, fitted to the same EM contour (described in an accompanying paper), in order to analyse the mutual compatibility of the arrangement of proteins and rRNA in terms of the available RNA-protein interaction data. The information taken into account included the hydroxyl radical and base foot-printing data from Noller's laboratory, and our own in situ cross-linking results. Proteins S1 and S14 were not considered, due to the lack of RNA-protein data. Among the 19 proteins analysed, 12 (namely S2, S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S15, S17 and S21) showed a fit to the rRNA model that varied from being excellent to at least acceptable. Of the remaining 7, S3 and S13 showed a rather poor fit, as did S18 (which is considered in combination with S6 in the foot-printing experiments). S16 was difficult to evaluate, as the foot-print data for this protein cover a large area of the rRNA. S19 and S20 showed a bad fit in terms of the neutron map, but their foot-print and cross-link sites were clustered into compact groups in the rRNA model in those regions of the 30 S subunit where these proteins have

  14. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, T.; Reeves, R. H.; Gilichinsky, D. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite).

  15. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  16. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  17. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of vertically transmitted psyllid endosymbionts (Candidatus Carsonella ruddii) based on atpAGD and rpoC: comparisons with 16S-23S rDNA-derived phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Thao, M L; Clark, M A; Burckhardt, D H; Moran, N A; Baumann, P

    2001-06-01

    Psyllids are insects that harbor endosymbionts (Candidatuus Carsonella ruddii) within specialized cells found in the insect's body cavity. Previous phylogenetic analyses based on endosymbiont 16S-23S ribosomal DNA and a host gene were concordant (M.L. Thao, et al., Appl. Env. Microbiol. 66:2898, 2000). Additional analyses with atpAGD and rpoBC gave similar trees showing the agreement expected from organisms that evolve through vertical transmission with no gene exchange.

  19. Analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (IGSs) of marine vibrios for species-specific signature DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon K Y; Wang, H Z; Law, Sheran H W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Kong, Richard Y C

    2002-05-01

    Vibrios are widespread in the marine environment and a few pathogenic species are known to be commonly associated with outbreaks of diarrheal diseases in humans due to the consumption of raw or improperly cooked seafood. However, there are also many Vibrio species which are potentially pathogenic to vertebrate and invertebrate aquatic animals, and of which little is known. In an attempt to develop rapid PCR detection methods for these latter class of vibrios, we have examined the 16S-23S intergenic spacers (IGSs) of 10 lesser-known Vibrio species and successfully developed species-specific primers for eight of them--Vibrio costicola, V. diazotrophicus, V. fluvialis, V. nigripulchritudo, V. proteolyticus, V. salmonicida, V. splendidus and V. tubiashii. The IGS amplicons were amplified using primers complementary to conserved regions of the 16S and 23S rRNA genes, and cloned into plasmid vectors and sequenced. Analysis of the IGS sequences showed that 37 ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons representing seven different IGS types have been cloned from the 10 vibrios. The three IGS types--IGS(0), IGS(IA) and IGS(Glu)--were the most prevalent forms detected. Multiple alignment of representative sequences of these three IGS types from different Vibrio species revealed several domains of high sequence variability, which were used to design species-specific primers for PCR. The specificity of the primers were evaluated using total DNA prepared from different Vibrio species and bacterial genera. The results showed that the PCR method can be used to reliably detect eight of the 10 Vibrio species in marine waters in this study.

  20. Analysis of the unexplored features of rrs (16S rDNA) of the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny based on rrs (16S rDNA) sequencing is being vigorously pursued. In fact, it has been stated that novel biological findings are driven by comparison and integration of massive data sets. In spite of a large reservoir of rrs sequencing data of 1,237,963 entries, this analysis invariably needs supplementation with other genes. The need is to divide the genetic variability within a taxa or genus at their rrs phylogenetic boundaries and to discover those fundamental features, which will enable the bacteria to naturally fall within them. Within the large bacterial community, Clostridium represents a large genus of around 110 species of significant biotechnological and medical importance. Certain Clostridium strains produce some of the deadliest toxins, which cause heavy economic losses. We have targeted this genus because of its high genetic diversity, which does not allow accurate typing with the available molecular methods. Results Seven hundred sixty five rrs sequences (> 1200 nucleotides, nts) belonging to 110 Clostridium species were analyzed. On the basis of 404 rrs sequences belonging to 15 Clostridium species, we have developed species specific: (i) phylogenetic framework, (ii) signatures (30 nts) and (iii) in silico restriction enzyme (14 Type II REs) digestion patterns. These tools allowed: (i) species level identification of 95 Clostridium sp. which are presently classified up to genus level, (ii) identification of 84 novel Clostridium spp. and (iii) potential reduction in the number of Clostridium species represented by small populations. Conclusions This integrated approach is quite sensitive and can be easily extended as a molecular tool for diagnostic and taxonomic identification of any microbe of importance to food industries and health services. Since rapid and correct identification allows quicker diagnosis and consequently treatment as well, it is likely to lead to reduction in economic losses and mortality

  1. Investigating bacterial populations in styrene-degrading biofilters by 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Portune, Kevin J; Pérez, M Carmen; Álvarez-Hornos, F Javier; Gabaldón, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are essential components in the elimination of pollutants within biofilters, yet still little is known regarding the complex relationships between microbial community structure and biodegradation function within these engineered ecosystems. To further explore this relationship, 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing was applied to samples taken at four time points from a styrene-degrading biofilter undergoing variable operating conditions. Changes in microbial structure were observed between different stages of biofilter operation, and the level of styrene concentration was revealed to be a critical factor affecting these changes. Bacterial genera Azoarcus and Pseudomonas were among the dominant classified genera in the biofilter. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and correlation analysis revealed that the genera Brevundimonas, Hydrogenophaga, and Achromobacter may play important roles in styrene degradation under increasing styrene concentrations. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) could be detected between biofilter operational/functional parameters and biodiversity measurements, although biological heterogeneity within biofilms and/or technical variability within pyrosequencing may have considerably affected these results. Percentages of selected bacterial taxonomic groups detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were compared to results from pyrosequencing in order to assess the effectiveness and limitations of each method for identifying each microbial taxon. Comparison of results revealed discrepancies between the two methods in the detected percentages of numerous taxonomic groups. Biases and technical limitations of both FISH and pyrosequencing, such as the binding of FISH probes to non-target microbial groups and lack of classification of sequences for defined taxonomic groups from pyrosequencing, may partially explain some differences between the two methods.

  2. Identification and environmental detection of Rhodococcus species by 16S rDNA-targeted PCR.

    PubMed

    Bell, K S; Kuyukina, M S; Heidbrink, S; Philp, J C; Aw, D W; Ivshina, I B; Christofi, N

    1999-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus can degrade a wide range of organic pollutants and catalyse many useful biotransformations. There is a need for improved tests to identify Rhodococcus species. PCR-based methods for species identification offer advantages in terms of speed and accuracy over traditional methods and can allow direct detection of microbes in environmental samples., PCR tests, using primers targeted at species-specific sequences in the 16S rRNA gene, were successfully developed for R. globerulus, R. erythropolis, R. opacus and R. ruber. These tests gave positive results with all or most strains of target species but did not generally cross-react with other species. Cases of apparent cross-reaction were shown to be due to prior misclassification of strains of R. opacus as R. erythropolis and of strains of R. ruber as R. rhodochrous. A simple and rapid method for the extraction and purification of DNA from soil was developed and successfully applied to the PCR detection of indigenous R. erythropolis in an environmental sample. Cell lysis in the samples was achieved by lysozyme and sarkosyl treatment, aided by freeze-thaw cycles. Removal of humic compounds inhibitory to PCR was accomplished by CTAB treatment with solvent extraction and, if necessary, passage of extracts through Sepharose CL-6B in a spun-column format. Extracts prepared using a tris-EDTA buffer were much clearer than those prepared using a sodium phosphate buffer, indicating lower levels of humic compounds. A detection limit of 104 cfu g-1 of soil was achieved and the use of a secondary PCR allowed detection of 1 cfu g-1.

  3. Functional analysis of the residues C770 and G771 of E. coli 16S rRNA implicated in forming the intersubunit bridge B2c of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Man; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Ha, Hye-Jung; Kim, Jong-Myung; Lee, Kangseok

    2007-07-01

    Structural analyses have shown that nucleotides at the positions 770 and 771 of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA are implicated in forming one of highly conserved intersubunit bridges of the ribosome, B2c. To examine a functional role of these residues, base substitutions were introduced at these positions and mutant ribosomes were analyzed for their protein synthesis ability using a specialized ribosome system. The results showed requirement of a pyrimidine at the position 770 for ribosome function regardless of the nucleotide identity at the position 771. Sucrose gradient profiles of ribosomes revealed that the loss of protein-synthesis ability of mutant ribosome bearing a base substitution from C to G at the position 770 stems from its inability to form 70S ribosomes. These findings indicate involvement of nucleotide at the position 770, not 771, in ribosomal subunit association and provide a useful rRNA mutation that can be used as a target to investigate the physical interaction between 16S and 23S rRNA.

  4. Methanogen diversity in the rumen of Indian Surti buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), assessed by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Tripathi, A K; Pandya, P R; Parnerkar, S; Rank, D N; Kothari, R K; Joshi, C G

    2012-06-01

    The methanogenic communities in buffalo rumen were characterized using a culture-independent approach of a pooled sample of rumen fluid from three adult Surti buffaloes. Buffalo rumen is likely to include species of various methanogens, so 16S rDNA sequences were amplified and cloned from the sample. A total of 171 clones were sequenced to examine 16S rDNA sequence similarity. About 52.63% sequences (90 clones) had ≥ 90% similarity, whereas, 46.78% of the sequences (81 clones) were 75-89% similar to 16S rDNA database sequences, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses were also used to infer the makeup of methanogenic communities in the rumen of Surti buffalo. As a result, we distinguished 23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on unique 16S rDNA sequences: 12 OTUs (52.17%) affiliated to Methanomicrobiales order, 10 OTUs (43.47%) of the order Methanobacteriales and one OTU (4.34%) of Methanosarcina barkeri like clone, respectively. In addition, the population of Methanomicrobiales and Methabacteriales orders were also observed, accounting 4% and 2.17% of total archea. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens phylotypes ever identified from rumen of Surti buffaloes. PMID:21507441

  5. Molecular characterization of dichloromethane-degrading Hyphomicrobium strains using 16S rDNA and DCM dehalogenase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Nikolausz, Marcell; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Ziller, Katja; Kästner, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 6 strains of dichloromethane (DCM) utilizing bacteria was performed. Based on the almost complete 16S rDNA sequence determination, all strains clustered together and showed high sequence similarity to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans, except for the strain MC8b, which is only moderately related to them and probably represents a distinct species. The 16S rDNA-based phylogenetic tree was compared to the one obtained from the DNA sequence data of the dcmA gene coding DCM dehalogenase, the key enzyme of DCM utilization. The topology of the two trees is in good agreement and may suggest an ancient origin of DCM dehalogenase, but also raises questions about the original role of the enzyme. PMID:16156115

  6. Common DNA structural features exhibited by eukaryotic ribosomal gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Marilley, M; Pasero, P

    1996-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of DNA regions containing eukaryotic ribosomal promoters were analysed using strategies designed to reveal sequence-directed structural features. DNA curvature, duplex stability and pattern of twist angle variation were studied by computer modelling. Although ribosomal promoters are known to lack sequence homology (unless very closely related species are considered), investigation of these structural characteristics uncovered striking homologies in all the taxonomic groups examined so far. This wide conservation of DNA structures, while DNA sequence is not conserved, suggests that the determined structures are fundamental for ribosomal promoter function. Moreover, this result agrees well with the recent observations showing that RNA polymerase I transcription factors have not evolved as intensively as previously suspected. PMID:8710487

  7. PCR Primers for Metazoan Nuclear 18S and 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Metagenetic analyses, which amplify and sequence target marker DNA regions from environmental samples, are increasingly employed to assess the biodiversity of communities of small organisms. Using this approach, our understanding of microbial diversity has expanded greatly. In contrast, only a few studies using this approach to characterize metazoan diversity have been reported, despite the fact that many metazoan species are small and difficult to identify or are undescribed. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the availability of universal primers for the target taxa. In microbial studies, analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA is standard. In contrast, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In the present study, we have designed primers that amplify the nuclear 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences of most metazoan species with the goal of providing effective approaches for metagenetic analyses of metazoan diversity in environmental samples, with a particular emphasis on marine biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Conserved regions suitable for designing PCR primers were identified using 14,503 and 1,072 metazoan sequences of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA regions, respectively. The sequence similarity of both these newly designed and the previously reported primers to the target regions of these primers were compared for each phylum to determine the expected amplification efficacy. The nucleotide diversity of the flanking regions of the primers was also estimated for genera or higher taxonomic groups of 11 phyla to determine the variable regions within the genes. Conclusions/Significance The identified nuclear ribosomal DNA primers (five primer pairs for 18S and eleven for 28S) and the results of the nucleotide diversity analyses provide options for primer combinations for metazoan metagenetic analyses. Additionally, advantages and disadvantages of not only the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, but also other marker regions as targets

  8. 16S ribosomal RNA pseudouridine synthase RsuA of Escherichia coli: deletion, mutation of the conserved Asp102 residue, and sequence comparison among all other pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Conrad, J; Niu, L; Rudd, K; Lane, B G; Ofengand, J

    1999-06-01

    The gene for RsuA, the pseudouridine synthase that converts U516 to pseudouridine in 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli, has been deleted in strains MG1655 and BL21/DE3. Deletion of this gene resulted in the specific loss of pseudouridine516 in both cell lines, and replacement of the gene in trans on a plasmid restored the pseudouridine. Therefore, rsuA is the only gene in E. coli with the ability to produce a protein capable of forming pseudouridine516. There was no effect on the growth rate of rsuA- MG1655 either in rich or minimal medium at either 24, 37, or 42 degrees C. Plasmid rescue of the BL21/DE3 rsuA- strain using pET15b containing an rsuA gene with aspartate102 replaced by asparagine or threonine demonstrated that neither mutant was active in vivo. This result supports a role for this aspartate, located in a unique GRLD sequence in this gene, at the catalytic center of the synthase. Induction of wild-type and the two mutant synthases in strain BL21/DE3 from genes in pET15b yielded a strong overexpression of all three proteins in approximately equal amounts showing that the mutations did not affect production of the protein in vivo and thus that the lack of activity was not due to a failure to produce a gene product. Aspartate102 is found in a conserved motif present in many pseudouridine synthases. The conservation and distribution of this motif in nature was assessed.

  9. Interspecific and intrapopulation variation in mitochondrial ribosomal DNA sequences of Mytilus spp. (Bivalvia: Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Geller, J B; Carlton, J T; Powers, D A

    1993-02-01

    A 560-base pair portion of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (16S rDNA) from three morphologically similar mussels, Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus, was amplified with the polymerase chain reaction, and 349 base pairs were sequenced. These data showed that this gene in M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis has not diverged; however, the north Pacific mussel, M. trossulus, showed fixed differences from M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis at 5 nucleotide positions. Furthermore, the population of M. trossulus at Tillamook Bay, Oregon, was found to contain two very divergent 16S rDNA genotypes that differ at 37 nucleotide positions. Thus, intraspecific variation in this gene in M. trossulus is greater than that seen interspecifically in M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis. Despite this large difference, in the absence of evidence of genetic isolation between these groups of M. trossulus, no taxonomic changes are proposed. These data are consistent with a north Pacific origin of the genus with subsequent dispersal to the Atlantic Ocean across the Artic Sea, giving rise to M. edulis in northern Europe and subsequently M. galloprovincialis in southern Europe and the Mediterranean Sea.

  10. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics. PMID:10836793

  11. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics.

  12. 'Candidatus Phytoplasmas pruni', a novel taxon associated with X-disease of stone fruits, Prunus spp.: multilocus characterization based on 16S rRNA, secY, and ribosomal protein genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    X-disease is one of the most serious diseases known in peach (Prunus persica). Based on RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, peach X-disease phytoplasma strains from eastern and western United States and eastern Canada were classified in 16S rDNA RFLP group 16SrIII, subgroup A. Phylogenetic a...

  13. 16S rDNA-based probes for two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Feldhake, D.J.; Loper, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    PAHs are a class of widespread pollutants, some of which have been shown to be genotoxic, hence the fate of these compounds in the environment is of considerable interest. Research on the biodegradation of 4 and 5 ring PAHs has been limited by the general lack of microbial isolates or consortia which can completely degrade these toxicants. Heitkamp and Cerniglia have described an oxidative soil Mycobacterium-strain PYR-1 that metabolizes pyrene and fluoranthene more rapidly than the 2 and 3 ring naphthalene and phenanthrene; although some metabolites of benzo-(a)-pyrene (BaP) were detected, no mineralization of BaP was observed. In 1991 Grosser et al. reported the isolation of a Mycobacterium sp. which mineralizes pyrene and also causing some mineralization of BaP. Their study describes a comparative analysis of these two strains, which show very similar colony morphology, growth rate and yellow-orange pigmentation. Genetic differences were shown by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) using two arbitrary GC-rich octanucleotide primers, and by sequence comparison of PCR amplified 16S rDNA, although both strains show similarity closest to that of the genus Mycobacteria. These 16S rDNA sequences are in use for the construction of strain-specific DNA probes to monitor the presence, survival and growth of these isolates in PAH-contaminated soils in studies of biodegradation.

  14. Molecular and functional diversity of PGPR fluorescent Pseudomonads based on 16S rDNA-RFLP and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhim Pratap

    2015-09-01

    The genetic and functional diversity of plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) fluorescent pseudomonads associated with chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) rhizosphere was analyzed. In total, 34 isolates along with two reference isolates were screened for various plant growth promoting traits (phosphorous solubilization, ACC deaminase, HCN, IAA and siderophore productions) and antagonist activity against four fungal phytopathogens and three bacterial pathogens. Most of the isolates, that showed PGPR activity, also showed antagonistic activity against all the three fungal pathogens. The genetic relationship was assessed by using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (16S rDNA-RFLP). Relationship between both the markers was analyzed based on mantel test and a negative correlation was observed. The study concluded that PGPR traits appeared to be strain specific rather than specific to any phylogenetic group. The study also reported that 16S rDNA based profiling differentiated PGPR fluorescent Pseudomonas on the basis of location rather than biological trait. RAPD profiling could be useful to differentiate among the closely related isolates. The genetic and functional diversity of fluorescent pseudomonads, associated with the chickpea rhizosphere, has useful ecological role and potential utilization in sustainable agriculture.

  15. 16S and 23S plastid rDNA phylogenies of Prototheca species and their auxanographic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Aren; Brubaker, Shane; Somanchi, Aravind; Yu, Esther; Rudenko, George; Reyes, Nina; Espina, Karen; Grossman, Arthur; Franklin, Scott

    2014-08-01

    Because algae have become more accepted as sources of human nutrition, phylogenetic analysis can help resolve the taxonomy of taxa that have not been well studied. This can help establish algal evolutionary relationships. Here, we compare Auxenochlorella protothecoides and 23 strains of Prototheca based on their complete 16S and partial 23S plastid rDNA sequences along with nutrient utilization (auxanographic) profiles. These data demonstrate that some of the species groupings are not in agreement with the molecular phylogenetic analyses and that auxanographic profiles are poor predictors of phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25937672

  16. 16S and 23S plastid rDNA phylogenies of Prototheca species and their auxanographic phenotypes1

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Aren; Brubaker, Shane; Somanchi, Aravind; Yu, Esther; Rudenko, George; Reyes, Nina; Espina, Karen; Grossman, Arthur; Franklin, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Because algae have become more accepted as sources of human nutrition, phylogenetic analysis can help resolve the taxonomy of taxa that have not been well studied. This can help establish algal evolutionary relationships. Here, we compare Auxenochlorella protothecoides and 23 strains of Prototheca based on their complete 16S and partial 23S plastid rDNA sequences along with nutrient utilization (auxanographic) profiles. These data demonstrate that some of the species groupings are not in agreement with the molecular phylogenetic analyses and that auxanographic profiles are poor predictors of phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25937672

  17. Microbial diversity of bovine mastitic milk as described by pyrosequencing of metagenomic 16s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Georgios; Machado, Vinicius Silva; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Dairy cow mastitis is an important disease in the dairy industry. Different microbial species have been identified as causative agents in mastitis, and are traditionally diagnosed by bacterial culture. The objective of this study was to use metagenomic pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to investigate bacterial DNA diversity in milk samples of mastitic and healthy dairy cows and compare the results with those obtained by classical bacterial culture. One hundred and thirty-six milk samples were collected from cows showing signs of mastitis and used for microbiological culture. Additionally, 20 milk samples were collected from healthy quarters. Bacterial DNA was isolated from the same milk samples and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and pyrosequenced. Discriminant analysis showed that the groups of samples that were most clearly different from the rest and thus easily discriminated were the normal milk samples from healthy cows and those characterised by culture as Trueperella pyogenes and Streptococcus spp. The mastitis pathogens identified by culture were generally among the most frequent organisms detected by pyrosequencing, and in some cases (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococcus uberis mastitis) the single most prevalent microorganism. Trueperella pyogenes sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Trueperella pyogenes by culture, Streptococcus dysgalactiae sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Streptococcus dysgalactiae by culture, and Staphyloccocus aureus sequences were the third most prevalent in mastitis cases diagnosed as Staphylococcus aureus by culture. In samples that were aerobic culture negative, pyrosequencing identified DNA of bacteria that are known to cause mastitis, DNA of bacteria that are known pathogens but have so far not been associated with mastitis, and DNA of bacteria that are currently not known to be pathogens. A

  18. Microbial Diversity of Bovine Mastitic Milk as Described by Pyrosequencing of Metagenomic 16s rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Georgios; Machado, Vinicius Silva; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Dairy cow mastitis is an important disease in the dairy industry. Different microbial species have been identified as causative agents in mastitis, and are traditionally diagnosed by bacterial culture. The objective of this study was to use metagenomic pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to investigate bacterial DNA diversity in milk samples of mastitic and healthy dairy cows and compare the results with those obtained by classical bacterial culture. One hundred and thirty-six milk samples were collected from cows showing signs of mastitis and used for microbiological culture. Additionally, 20 milk samples were collected from healthy quarters. Bacterial DNA was isolated from the same milk samples and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and pyrosequenced. Discriminant analysis showed that the groups of samples that were most clearly different from the rest and thus easily discriminated were the normal milk samples from healthy cows and those characterised by culture as Trueperella pyogenes and Streptococcus spp. The mastitis pathogens identified by culture were generally among the most frequent organisms detected by pyrosequencing, and in some cases (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococcus uberis mastitis) the single most prevalent microorganism. Trueperella pyogenes sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Trueperella pyogenes by culture, Streptococcus dysgalactiae sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Streptococcus dysgalactiae by culture, and Staphyloccocus aureus sequences were the third most prevalent in mastitis cases diagnosed as Staphylococcus aureus by culture. In samples that were aerobic culture negative, pyrosequencing identified DNA of bacteria that are known to cause mastitis, DNA of bacteria that are known pathogens but have so far not been associated with mastitis, and DNA of bacteria that are currently not known to be pathogens. A

  19. [Analysis of DNA homology and 16S rDNA sequence of rhizobia, a new phenotypic subgroup, isolated from Xizang Autonomous Region of China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-ying; Yang, Xiao-li; Li, Hai-feng; Liu, Jie

    2006-02-01

    Based on the studies of numerical taxonomy, the seven rhizobial strains isolated from the root nodules of leguminous plants Trigonella spp. and Astragalus spp. growing in the Xizang Autonomous Region of China constituted a new phenotypic subgroup, where wide phenotypic and genotypic diversity among legume crops had been reported due to complex terrain and various climate. The new phenotypic subgroup were further identified to clarify its taxonomic position by DNA homology analysis and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. The mol% G + C ratio of the DNA among members of the new subgroup ranged from 59.5 to 63.3 mol% as determined by T (m) assay. The levels of DNA relatedness, determined by using the DNA liquid hybridization method, among the members of the new subgroup were between 74.3% and 92.3%, while level of DNA relatedness between the central strains XZ2-3 of the new subgroup and the type strains of known species of Rhizobium was less than 47.4%. These results indicated that the new phenotypic subgroup is a DNA homological group different from described species of Rhizobium. Therefore, this new phenotypic subgroup was supposed to be a new species in the genus of Rhizobium since the strains in the same species generally exhibit levels of DNA homology ranging from 70 to 100%. A systematic identification method-16S rDNA gene sequence comparison was carried out to determine the phylogenetic relationships of the new subgroup with the described species of Rhizobium. The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of the central strain XZ2-3 of the new subgroup is DQ099745. The full-length 16S rDNA gene sequence were sequenced by chain terminator techniques and analyzed with PHYLIP. The phylogenetic trees were constructed by using the programs DRAWTREE. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that new subgroup occupy a independent sub-branch in phylogenetic tree. The sequence similarities between the center strain XZ2-3 and the closest relatives, strain R. leguminosarum USDA

  20. The Evolution of Ribosomal DNA: Divergent Paralogues and Phylogenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Buckler-IV, E. S.; Ippolito, A.; Holtsford, T. P.

    1997-01-01

    Although nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats evolve together through concerted evolution, some genomes contain a considerable diversity of paralogous rDNA. This diversity includes not only multiple functional loci but also putative pseudogenes and recombinants. We examined the occurrence of divergent paralogues and recombinants in Gossypium, Nicotiana, Tripsacum, Winteraceae, and Zea ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Some of the divergent paralogues are probably rDNA pseudogenes, since they have low predicted secondary structure stability, high substitution rates, and many deamination-driven substitutions at methylation sites. Under standard PCR conditions, the low stability paralogues amplified well, while many high-stability paralogues amplified poorly. Under highly denaturing PCR conditions (i.e., with dimethylsulfoxide), both low- and high-stability paralogues amplified well. We also found recombination between divergent paralogues. For phylogenetics, divergent ribosomal paralogues can aid in reconstructing ancestral states and thus serve as good outgroups. Divergent paralogues can also provide companion rDNA phylogenies. However, phylogeneticists must discriminate among families of divergent paralogues and recombinants or suffer from muddled and inaccurate organismal phylogenies. PMID:9055091

  1. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications.

  2. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications. PMID:26450835

  3. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  4. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  5. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  6. Affinity of ribosomal protein S8 from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria for 16S rRNA correlates with the growth temperatures of the organisms.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thomas; Köhrer, Caroline; Lung, Birgit; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Piendl, Wolfgang

    2003-08-14

    The ribosomal protein S8 plays a pivotal role in the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Using filter binding assays, S8 proteins from mesophilic, and (hyper)thermophilic species of the archaeal genus Methanococcus and from the bacteria Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus were tested for their affinity to their specific 16S rRNA target site. S8 proteins from hyperthermophiles exhibit a 100-fold and S8 from thermophiles exhibit a 10-fold higher affinity than their mesophilic counterparts. Thus, there is a striking correlation of affinity of S8 proteins for their specific RNA binding site and the optimal growth temperatures of the respective organisms. The stability of individual rRNA-protein complexes might modulate the stability of the ribosome, providing a maximum of thermostability and flexibility at the growth temperature of the organism.

  7. A carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study of the 3'-terminus of 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli specifically labeled with carbon-13 in the methylgroups of the m6(2)Am6(2)A sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Van Charldorp, R; Verhoeven, J J; Van Knippenberg, P H; Haasnoot, C A; Hilbers, C W

    1982-01-01

    30S ribosomes were isolated from a kasugamycin resistant mutant of E. coli that lacks methylgroups on two adjacent adenines in 16S ribosomal RNA. These ribosomes were methylated in vitro with a purified methylating enzyme and 5-S-adenosyl-(13C-methyl)-L-methionine chloride ((13C-methyl)-SAM) as methyldonor. After in situ cleavage of the 16S ribosomal RNA by the bacteriocin cloacin DF13, the 49 nucleotide fragment from the 3'-end of the RNA was isolated. The carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fragment at various temperatures were compared with those of 6-N-dimethyladenosine (m6(2)A) and 6-N-dimethyladenylyl-(3' leads to 5')-6-N-dimethyladenosine (m6(2)Am6(2)A). The data show that the two methylated adenines, which are part of a four membered hairpin loop, show a strong tendency to be stacked in analogy to the dinucleotide m6(2)Am6(2). PMID:6750555

  8. Employment of 16 S rDNA gene sequencing techniques to identify culturable environmental eubacteria in a tertiary referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Smyth, C L; Buchanan, J A; Dolan, A; Rooney, P J; Millar, B C; Goldsmith, C E; Elborn, J S; Moore, J E

    2004-05-01

    Universal or 'broad-range' eubacterial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on 53 isolates from environmental water-associated sites in a haematology unit (N = 22) and the outer surfaces of cleaning lotion containers sited throughout a tertiary referral hospital (N = 31) 16 S rDNA PCR was performed using two sets of universal primers, including the novel reverse primer, XB4, to generate a composite amplicon of 1068 bp, which was sequenced to obtain each isolate's identity. Sequence analysis was able to identify 51 isolates. Most (75% from the haematology unit and 81% from cleaner containers) were Gram-positive. Nine different genera were identified from the haematology unit and 13 from the cleaning lotion containers. This study provides the first reports of Terrabacter spp. and Brachybacterium paraconglomeratum isolated from a hospital environment. As unusual and difficult-to-identify environmental organisms are unlikely to be clinically significant, and molecular identification is costly and labour-intensive, we recommend that molecular methods are only used as an adjunct to first-line phenotypic identification schemes where a definitive identification is required. Where molecular identification methods are justified, partial 16 S rDNA PCR and sequencing employing the novel universal primer XB4, is a valuable and reliable technique.

  9. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control. PMID:17367680

  10. Identifying the bacterial community on the surface of Intralox belting in a meat boning room by culture-dependent and culture-independent 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, Gale; Boerema, Jackie; Mills, John; Mowat, Eilidh; Pulford, David

    2006-05-25

    We examined the bacterial community present on an Intralox conveyor belt system in an operating lamb boning room by sequencing the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of bacteria extracted in the presence or absence of cultivation. RFLP patterns for 16S rDNA clone library and cultures were generated using HaeIII and MspI restriction endonucleases. 16S rDNA amplicons produced 8 distinct RFLP pattern groups. RFLP groups I-IV were represented in the clone library and RFLP groups I and V-VIII were represented amongst the cultured isolates. Partial DNA sequences from each RFLP group revealed that all group I, II and VIII representatives were Pseudomonas spp., group III were Sphingomonas spp., group IV clones were most similar to an uncultured alpha proteobacterium, group V was similar to a Serratia spp., group VI with an Alcaligenes spp., and group VII with Microbacterium spp. Sphingomonads were numerically dominant in the culture-independent clone library and along with the group IV alpha proteobacterium were not represented amongst the cultured isolates. Serratia, Alcaligenes and Microbacterium spp. were only represented with cultured isolates. Pseudomonads were detected by both culture-dependent (84% of isolates) and culture-independent (12.5% of clones) methods and their presence at high frequency does pose the risk of product spoilage if transferred onto meat stored under aerobic conditions. The detection of sphingomonads in large numbers by the culture-independent method demands further analysis because sphingomonads may represent a new source of meat spoilage that has not been previously recognised in the meat processing environment. The 16S rDNA collections generated by both methods were important at representing the diversity of the bacterial population associated with an Intralox conveyor belt system.

  11. Identification of causative pathogens in mouse eyes with bacterial keratitis by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong-Yan; Qiu, Bao-Feng; Liu, Chun; Zhu, Shun-Xing; Wang, Sheng-Cun; Miao, Jin; Jing, Jing; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The clone library method using PCR amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was used to identify pathogens from corneal scrapings of C57BL/6-corneal opacity (B6-Co) mice with bacterial keratitis. All 10 samples from the eyes with bacterial keratitis showed positive PCR results. All 10 samples from the normal cornea showed negative PCR results. In all 10 PCR-positive samples, the predominant and second most predominant species accounted for 20.9 to 40.6% and 14.7 to 26.1%, respectively, of each clone library. The predominant species were Staphylococcus lentus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The microbiota analysis detected a diverse group of microbiota in the eyes of B6-Co mice with bacterial keratitis and showed that the causative pathogens could be determined based on percentages of bacterial species in the clone libraries. The bacterial species detected in this study were mostly in accordance with results of studies on clinical bacterial keratitis in human eyes. Based on the results of our previous studies and this study, the B6-Co mouse should be considered a favorable model for studying bacterial keratitis. PMID:25312507

  12. Genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori indexed with respect to clinical symptomatology, using a 16S rRNA and a species-specific DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Linton, D; Owen, R J; Cameron, H; Stanley, J

    1993-12-01

    DNA probes are described which identify group and fingerprint strains of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, on the basis of well-defined band homologies. A 544 bp internal fragment of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers derived from the Escherichia coli rRNA gene sequence. In genomic Southern blots this probe detected restriction site variation around these loci, generating simple but strain-specific molecular fingerprints. A small conserved chromosomal fragment of 1.2 kbp, Hps, species-specific for H. pylori, was obtained by cloning random HindIII fragments into pUC19. It was useful for dot-blot identification, and also separated isolates into one major and two minor groups. When results for these two probes were combined, a baseline characterization of genotype was obtained. A band-matching database of molecular fingerprints for the type strain and 63 clinical isolates of H. pylori from asymptomatic, ulcer and gastritis contexts is presented. No significant association between the genotypes at this level of definition and the associated clinical symptomatology of the isolates was detected.

  13. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  14. Evaluation of Faecalibacterium 16S rDNA genetic markers for accurate identification of swine faecal waste by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chuanren; Cui, Yamin; Zhao, Yi; Zhai, Jun; Zhang, Baoyun; Zhang, Kun; Sun, Da; Chen, Hang

    2016-10-01

    A genetic marker within the 16S rRNA gene of Faecalibacterium was identified for use in a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect swine faecal contamination in water. A total of 146,038 bacterial sequences were obtained using 454 pyrosequencing. By comparative bioinformatics analysis of Faecalibacterium sequences with those of numerous swine and other animal species, swine-specific Faecalibacterium 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified and Polymerase Chain Okabe (PCR) primer sets designed and tested against faecal DNA samples from swine and non-swine sources. Two PCR primer sets, PFB-1 and PFB-2, showed the highest specificity to swine faecal waste and had no cross-reaction with other animal samples. PFB-1 and PFB-2 amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from 50 samples of swine with positive ratios of 86 and 90%, respectively. We compared swine-specific Faecalibacterium qPCR assays for the purpose of quantifying the newly identified markers. The quantification limits (LOQs) of PFB-1 and PFB-2 markers in environmental water were 6.5 and 2.9 copies per 100 ml, respectively. Of the swine-associated assays tested, PFB-2 was more sensitive in detecting the swine faecal waste and quantifying the microbial load. Furthermore, the microbial abundance and diversity of the microbiomes of swine and other animal faeces were estimated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The species specificity was demonstrated for the microbial populations present in various animal faeces. PMID:27353369

  15. Microbial community dynamics in manure composts based on 16S and 18S rDNA T-RFLP profiles.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, S M

    2005-10-01

    Compost processing is assumed to be related to the microbial communities present. However, methods that will evaluate these relationships are not well understood. In this study, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to evaluate the diversity of PCR-amplified bacterial 16S and fungal 18S rDNA communities from manure composts at different stages of composting (initial [day 0], thermophilic [day 24], and mature [day 104]). Results showed that the bacterial and fungal community profiles changed over the composting process, with bacterial communities showing a higher diversity compared with the fungal communities. During the thermophilic stage (day 24), the diversity of the bacterial communities increased, while the fungal communities decreased. As the compost reached maturity (day 104), a reverse pattern was observed between the diversity of bacterial and fungal communities. That is, the 18S rDNA T-RFLP-based diversity indices increased, while the 16S rDNA T-RFLP-based diversity decreased. Differences in temperature profiles at different stages of composting impacted the chemical properties and the diversity of the microbial communities. The day 104 compost (mature) had lower water, organic matter and C contents and higher C and OM loss compared with the day 0 (initial) and day 24 (thermophilic) composts, which affected the diversity of the microbial communities. The results presented here demonstrated that distinctive community patterns from manure composts could be rapidly generated using T-RFLP analysis. The succession of peaks in combination of increasing and decreasing peak heights at different stage of composting indicates the high potential of T-RFLP technique to monitor the dynamics of microbial communities, and their variation qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. Evolutionary Mobility of the Ribosomal DNA Array in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Proux-Wéra, Estelle; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of eukaryotes is organized as large tandem arrays. Here, we compare the genomic locations of rDNA among yeast species and show that, despite its huge size (>1 Mb), the rDNA array has moved around the genome several times within the family Saccharomycetaceae. We identify an ancestral, nontelomeric, rDNA site that is conserved across many species including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Within the genus Lachancea, however, the rDNA apparently transposed from the ancestral site to a new site internal to a different chromosome, becoming inserted into a short intergenic region beside a tRNA gene. In at least four other yeast lineages, the rDNA moved from the ancestral site to telomeric locations. Remarkably, both the ancestral rDNA site and the new site in Lachancea are adjacent to protein-coding genes whose products maintain the specialized chromatin structure of rDNA (HMO1 and CDC14, respectively). In almost every case where the rDNA was lost from the ancestral site, the entire array disappeared without any other rearrangements in the region, leaving just an intergenic spacer of less than 2 kb. The mechanism by which this large and complex locus moves around the genome is unknown, but we speculate that it may involve the formation of double-strand DNA breaks by Fob1 protein or the formation of extrachromosomal rDNA circles. PMID:23419706

  17. Detection of novel organisms associated with salpingitis, by use of 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hebb, Jennifer K; Cohen, Craig R; Astete, Sabina G; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Totten, Patricia A

    2004-12-15

    Although Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are established causes of salpingitis, the majority of cases have no known etiology. We used broad-range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction to identify novel, possibly uncultivable, bacteria associated with salpingitis and identified bacterial 16S sequences in Fallopian-tube specimens from 11 (24%) of 45 consecutive women with laparoscopically confirmed acute salpingitis (the case patients) and from 0 of 44 women seeking tubal ligations (the control subjects) at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Bacterial phylotypes most closely related to Leptotrichia spp. were detected as the sole phylotypes in 1, and mixed with other bacterial phylotypes in 2, specimens. Novel bacterial phylotypes and those associated with bacterial vaginosis, including Atopobium vaginae, were identified in 3 specimens. N. gonorrhoeae and Streptococcus pyogenes were identified in 2 and 1 specimens, respectively. The finding of novel phylotypes associated with salpingitis has important implications for the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of this important reproductive-tract disease syndrome. PMID:15551209

  18. Phylogenetic analyses among octocorals (Cnidaria): mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences (lsu-rRNA, 16S and ssu-rRNA, 18S) support two convergent clades of branching gorgonians.

    PubMed

    Armando Sánchez, Juan; Lasker, Howard R; Taylor, Derek J

    2003-10-01

    Gorgonian octocorals lack corroborated hypotheses of phylogeny. This study reconstructs genealogical relationships among some octocoral species based on published DNA sequences from the large ribosomal subunit of the mitochondrial RNA (lsu-rRNA, 16S: 524bp and 21 species) and the small subunit of the nuclear RNA (ssu-rRNA, 18S: 1815bp and 13 spp) using information from insertions-deletions (INDELS) and the predicted secondary structure of the lsu-rRNA (16S). There were seven short (3-10bp) INDELS in the 18S with consistent phylogenetic information. The INDELS in the 16S corresponded to informative signature sequences homologous to the G13 helix found in Escherichia coli. We found two main groups of gorgonian octocorals using a maximum parsimony analysis of the two genes. One group corresponds to deep-water taxa including species from the suborders Calcaxonia and Scleraxonia characterized by an enlargement of the G13 helix. The second group has species from Alcyoniina, Holaxonia and again Scleraxonia characterized by insertions in the 18S. Gorgonian corals, branching colonies with a gorgonin-containing flexible multilayered axis (Holaxonia and Calcaxonia), do not form a monophyletic group. These corroborated results from maternally inherited (16S) and biparentally inherited (18S) genes support a hypothesis of independent evolution of branching in the two octocoral clades.

  19. Description of the male, redescription of the female and 16S rDNA sequence of Ixodes aulacodi (Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Chiţimia-Dobler, Lidia; D'Amico, Gianluca; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Kalmár, Zsuzsa; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Estrada-Peña, Agustin

    2016-04-01

    Ixodes (Afrixodes) aulacodiArthur, 1956 is a poorly known species that has been recorded predominantly in the wet countries of western and central Africa, mainly associated to the greater cane rat Thryonomys swinderianus (Temmink). We herein redescribe the female, describe the male (ascribed to the species from specimens found in copula) and provide the 16S rDNA sequence. We also provide complete illustrations of the adults based on specimens found on greater cane rats in Ivory Coast. Ixodes aulacodi is included in the group of species of the subgenus Afrixodes that have horseshoe shaped anal groove, and which lack auriculae and cornua. The female is easily separated when compared with other species because of a unique combination of characters: All the coxae have internal spurs, coxa II has two external spurs, syncoxae are absent, and trochanters I-III have one spur each. The male has a notched hypostome and lacks syncoxae, auriculae and cornua. PMID:26803353

  20. Surface water-borne multidrug and heavy metal-resistant Staphylococcus isolates characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Fadime; Orman, Nazlı; Serim, Gamze; Kochan, Ceren; Ergene, Aysun; Icgen, Bulent

    2013-12-01

    Four Staphylococcus isolates having both multidrug- and multimetal-resistant ability were isolated from surface water. Further identification of the isolates was obtained through biochemical tests and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. One methicillin-resistant and two methicillin-sensitive isolates were determined as Staphylococcus aureus. The other isolate was identified as Staphylococcus warneri. The antibiotic and heavy metal resistance profiles of the Staphylococcus isolates were determined by using 26 antibiotics and 17 heavy metals. S. aureus isolates displayed resistance to most of the β-lactam antibiotics tested. All Staphylococcus isolates were resistant to heavy metals including silver, lithium, and barium. Due to a possible health risk of these pathogenic bacteria, a need exists for an accurate assessment of their acquired resistance to multiple drugs and metals.

  1. Advantages and limitations of ribosomal RNA PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of bacteria in cardiac valves of danish patients.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette; Kjerulf, Anne; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Christensen, John; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon 6; Bruun, Niels Eske; Dargis, Rimtas; Andresen, Keld; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the value of culture-independent molecular identification of bacteria in cardiac valves are mostly restricted to comparing agreement of identification to what is obtained by culture to the number of identified bacteria in culture-negative cases. However, evaluation of the usefulness of direct molecular identification should also address weaknesses, their relevance in the given setting, and possible improvements. In this study cardiac valves from 56 Danish patients referred for surgery for infective endocarditis were analysed by microscopy and culture as well as by PCR targeting part of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing of the PCR product. PCR and DNA sequencing identified significant bacteria in 49 samples from 43 patients, including five out of 13 culture-negative cases. No rare, exotic, or intracellular bacteria were identified. There was a general agreement between bacterial identity obtained by ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing from the valves and bacterial isolates from blood culture. However, DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene did not discriminate well among non-haemolytic streptococci, especially within the Streptococcus mitis group. Ribosomal PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing is an efficient and reliable method of identifying the cause of IE, but exact species identification of some of the most common causes, i.e. non-haemolytic streptococci, may be improved with other molecular methods. PMID:24403979

  2. Differentiation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains based on 16S-23S rDNA spacer polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Rogério F; Novo, Maria Teresa M; Veríssimo, Ricardo V; Paulino, Luciana C; Stoppe, Nancy C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Manfio, Gilson P; Prado, Paulo Inácio; Garcia, Oswaldo; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2004-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) were used for differentiating Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains from other related acidithiobacilli, including A. ferrooxidans and A. caldus. RFLP fingerprints obtained with AluI, DdeI, HaeIII, HinfI and MspI enabled the differentiation of all Acidithiobacillus reference strains into species groups. The A. thiooxidans strains investigated (metal mine isolates) yielded identical RFLP patterns to the A. thiooxidans type strain (ATCC 19377(T)), except for strain DAMS, which had a distinct pattern for all enzymes tested. Fourteen A. ferrooxidans mine strains were assigned to 3 RFLP groups, the majority of which were grouped with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T). The spacer region of one representative strain from each of the RFLP groups obtained was subjected to sequence analysis, in addition to eleven additional A. thiooxidans strains isolated from sediment and water samples, and A. caldus DSM 8584(T). The tRNA(IIe) and tRNA(Ala) genes, present in all strains analyzed, showed high sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences differentiated all three Acidithiobacillus species. Inter- and infraspecific genetic variations detected were mainly due to the size and sequence polymorphism of the ITS3 region. Mantel tests showed no significant correlation between ITS sequence similarity and the geographical origin of strains. The results showed that the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region is a useful target for the development of molecular-based methods aimed at the detection, rapid differentiation and identification of acidithiobacilli.

  3. Systematics of New World monkeys (Platyrrhini, Primates) based on 16S mitochondrial DNA sequences: a comparative analysis of different weighting methods in cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, I; Meyer, A

    1995-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of different weighting methods on a phylogeny reconstruction based on DNA sequences and to evaluate the phylogenetic information content of various secondary structures, a fragment of the large ribosomal mitochondrial gene (16S) was sequenced from 13 species of New World monkeys, three species of catarrhines, and Tarsius. The data were analyzed cladistically without weighting characters or changes, and with different weighting methods: a priori differential weights for transitions and transversions, two variants of dynamic weighting for each kind and direction of change, and successive approximations, using both the character consistency index (CI) and the rescaled consistency index (RC). The results were compared with published trees constructed from nuclear sequences of E-globins and morphological characters by different authors. The result of the analysis of the mtDNA data set with successive approximations, using the RC as weighting function, was the closest to the topology on which all molecular and morphological trees concur. Other relationships were unique to this tree. "Loops" were the type of secondary structure that showed maximum variation in sequence length and sites with the lowest character CI and RC. A large number of sites within loops showed high values for these indices, however, which suggests that uniform downweighting of these regions represents a large loss of phylogenetic information. Successive weighting, which assigns a weight for each particular character, seems to be a desirable alternative to this practice. We propose a new variant of dynamic weighting, which we call homoplasy-correcting dynamic weighting, that like dynamic weighting, is applicable to any kind of sequence, coding or noncoding.

  4. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can rapidly display the bacterial diversity contained in 16S rDNA clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Burr, M D; Clark, S J; Spear, C R; Camper, A K

    2006-05-01

    Two different strategies for molecular analysis of bacterial diversity, 16S rDNA cloning and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), were combined into a single protocol that took advantage of the best attributes of each: the ability of cloning to package DNA sequence information and the ability of DGGE to display a community profile. In this combined protocol, polymerase chain reaction products from environmental DNA were cloned, and then DGGE was used to screen the clone libraries. Both individual clones and pools of randomly selected clones were analyzed by DGGE, and these migration patterns were compared to the conventional DGGE profile produced directly from environmental DNA. For two simple bacterial communities (biofilm from a humics-fed laboratory reactor and planktonic bacteria filtered from an urban freshwater pond), pools of 35-50 clones produced DGGE profiles that contained most of the bands visible in the conventional DGGE profiles, indicating that the clone pools were adequate for identifying the dominant genotypes. However, DGGE profiles of two different pools of 50 clones from a lawn soil clone library were distinctly different from each other and from the conventional DGGE profile, indicating that this small number of clones poorly represented the bacterial diversity in soil. Individual clones with the same apparent DGGE mobility as prominent bands in the humics reactor community profiles were sequenced from the clone plasmid DNA rather than from bands excised from the gel. Because a longer fragment was cloned (approximately 1500 bp) than was actually analyzed in DGGE (approximately 350 bp), far more sequence information was available using this approach that could have been recovered from an excised gel band. This clone/DGGE protocol permitted rapid analysis of the microbial diversity in the two moderately complex systems, but was limited in its ability to represent the diversity in the soil microbial community. Nonetheless, clone/DGGE is

  5. Ribosomal DNA Comparisons of Globodera from Two Continents

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, V. R.; Miller, L. I.; Faghihi, J.; Ferris, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence data were compared for five species of Globodera, including G. rostochiensis, G. pallida, G. virginiae, and two undescribed Globodera isolates from Mexico collected from weed species and maintained on Solanum dulcamara. The rDNA comparisons included both internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), the 5.8S rRNA gene, and small portions of the 3' end of the 18S gene and the 5' end of the 28S gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the rDNA sequence data indicated that the two potato cyst nematodes, G. pallida and especially G. rostochiensis, are closely related to the Mexican isolates, whereas G. virginiae is relatively dissimilar to the others and more distantly related. The data are consistent with the thesis that Mexico is the center of origin for the potato cyst nematodes. PMID:19277290

  6. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  7. The localization of multiple sites on 16S RNA which are cross-linked to proteins S7 and S8 in Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits by treatment with 2-iminothiolane.

    PubMed

    Wower, I; Brimacombe, R

    1983-03-11

    RNA-protein cross-links were introduced into E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits by reaction with 2-iminothiolane followed by a mild ultraviolet irradiation treatment. After removal of non-reacted protein and partial nuclease digestion of the cross-linked 16S RNA-protein moiety, a number of individual cross-linked complexes could be isolated and the sites of attachment of the proteins to the RNA determined. Protein S8 was cross-linked to the RNA at three different positions, within oligo-nucleotides encompassing positions 629-633, 651-654, and (tentatively) 593-597 in the 16S sequence. Protein S7 was cross-linked within two oligonucleotides encompassing positions 1238-1240, and 1377-1378. In addition, a site at position 723-724 was observed, cross-linked to protein S19, S20 or S21.

  8. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  9. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  10. 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in determining proportions of coexisting Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Ihalin, Riikka; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2006-06-01

    Certain serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans seem to prefer coexistence in vivo. The 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested for its capability to distinguish coexisting A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of different serotypes or genetic lineages and to determine their proportions in vitro. The migration pattern of the PCR amplicon from serotype c differed from those of the other serotypes. Contrary to the strains of serotypes c, d, and e, strains of serotypes a, b, and f consistently demonstrated intra-serotype migration patterns similar to each other. Since the migration patterns differed between serotype c and b strains a strain of each was used to determine their proportional representation in a strain mixture. The strains were distinguishable from each other above the 5% PCR-DGGE detection level (12.5 ng DNA/1.5 x 10(6) cells). DGGE provides a promising tool for in vitro studies on the coexistence of different genetic lineages of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  11. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems.

  12. PAGE analysis of the heteroduplexes formed between PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes: estimation of sequence similarity and rDNA complexity.

    PubMed

    Espejo, R T; Feijóo, C G; Romero, J; Vásquez, M

    1998-06-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes retrieved directly from different environments has proven to be a powerful tool that has greatly expanded our knowledge of microbial diversity and phylogeny. It is shown here that sequence similarity between 80 and 100% among 16S rDNAs can be estimated by the electrophoretic migration of their heteroduplexes. This was measured by hybridization and electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels of the product obtained after PCR amplification of almost the entire 16S rRNA gene from different bacterial species. These heteroduplexes were also observed after amplification of samples containing DNA from two or more bacterial species and a procedure was applied to identify reliably heteroduplexes among the amplification products. The electrophoretic migration of the heteroduplexes observed after PCR was used to detect the presence of 16S rDNAs with different sequences in DNA extracted from both a mixture of two bacterial species and samples containing a natural bacterial community.

  13. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  14. Phylogeny of hard- and soft-tick taxa (Acari: Ixodida) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Black, W C; Piesman, J

    1994-01-01

    Ticks are parasitiform mites that are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. A phylogeny for tick families, subfamilies, and genera has been described based on morphological characters, life histories, and host associations. To test the existing phylogeny, we sequenced approximately 460 bp from the 3' end of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) in 36 hard- and soft-tick species; a mesostigmatid mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, was used as an outgroup. Phylogenies derived using distance, maximum-parsimony, or maximum-likelihood methods were congruent. The existing phylogeny was largely supported with four exceptions. In hard ticks (Ixodidae), members of Haemaphysalinae were monophyletic with the primitive Amblyomminae and members of Hyalomminae grouped within the Rhipicephalinae. In soft ticks (Argasidae), the derived phylogeny failed to support a monophyletic relationship among members of Ornithodorinae and supported placement of Argasinae as basal to the Ixodidae, suggesting that hard ticks may have originated from an Argas-like ancestor. Because most Argas species are obligate bird octoparasites, this result supports earlier suggestions that hard ticks did not evolve until the late Cretaceous. PMID:7937832

  15. The phylogeny of native and exotic scallops cultured in China based on 16S rDNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baozhong; Dong, Bo; Xiang, Jianhai; Wang, Zaizhao

    2007-01-01

    Scallops of the Family Pectinidae are a valuable resource in marine industry of the world. Understanding the phylogeny of the family is important for the development of the industry. In this study, partial 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes were obtained from 8 scallop species that are commonly cultured indigenous and transplanted species in China. Phylogenetic relationships of Pectinidae were analyzed based on the 8 sequences and other 5 published ones in GenBank, representing 9 genera of the family. The molecular phylogeny trees were constructed using 3 methods with software PHYLIP. The results showe that total 13 species of scallops clustered in 4 clades. Pecten maximus joins P. jacobaeus then Amusium pleuronectes in cluster, indicating close relationship of genus Amusium with Pecten in evolution. P. yessoensis is close to Chlamys farreri and C. islandica. No enough material was available to single out genus Patinopecten as an independent monophyletic subfamily. The position of Adamussium colbecki indicates that it is far from genus Pecten but near to genus Chlamys in evolution.

  16. Pattern of 4-thiouridine-induced cross-linking in 16S ribosomal RNA in the Escherichia coli 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kavita; Wollenzien, Paul

    2004-07-20

    The locations of RNA-RNA cross-links in 16S rRNA were determined after in vivo incorporation of 4-thiouridine (s(4)U) into RNA in a strain of Escherichia coli deficient in pyrimidine synthesis and irradiation at >320 nm. This was done as an effort to find RNA cross-links different from UVB-induced cross-links that would be valuable for monitoring the 30S subunit in functional complexes. Cross-linked 16S rRNA was separated on the basis of loop size, and cross-linking sites were identified by reverse transcription, RNase H cleavage, and RNA sequencing. A limited number of RNA-RNA cross-links in nine regions were observed. In five regions-s(4)U562 x C879-U884, s(4)U793 x A1519, s(4)U1189 x U1060-G1064, s(4)U1183 x A1092, and s(4)U991 x C1210-U1212-the s(4)U-induced cross-links are similar to UVB-induced cross-links observed previously. In four other regions-s(4)U960 x A1225, s(4)U820 x G570, s(4)U367 x A55-U56, and s(4)U239 x A120-the s(4)U-induced cross-links are different from UVB-induced cross-links. The pattern of cross-linking is not limited by the distribution of s(4)U, because there are at least 112 s(4)U substitution sites in the 16S rRNA. The relatively small number of s(4)U-mediated cross-links is probably determined by the organization of the RNA in the 30S subunit, which allows RNA conformational flexibility needed for cross-link formation in just a limited region.

  17. Simple DNA extraction protocol for a 16S rDNA study of bacterial diversity in tropical landfarm soil used for bioremediation of oil waste.

    PubMed

    Maciel, B M; Santos, A C F; Dias, J C T; Vidal, R O; Dias, R J C; Gross, E; Cascardo, J C M; Rezende, R P

    2009-03-31

    Landfarm soil is used to bioremediate oil wastes from petrochemical industries. We developed a simplified protocol for microbial DNA extraction of tropical landfarm soil using only direct lysis of macerated material. Two samples of tropical landfarm soil from a Brazilian refinery were analyzed by this protocol (one consisted of crude oil-contaminated soil; the other was continuously enriched for nine months with petroleum). The soil samples were lysed by maceration with liquid nitrogen, eliminating the need for detergents, organic solvents and enzymatic cell lysis. Then, the DNA from the lysed soil sample was extracted using phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol or guanidium isothiocyanate, giving high DNA yields (more than 1 micro g DNA/g soil) from both soil types. This protocol compared favorably with an established method of DNA template preparation that included mechanical, chemical and enzymatic treatment for cell lysis. The efficiency of this extraction protocol was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning assays. Fifty-one different clones were obtained; their sequences were classified into at least seven different phyla of the Eubacteria group (Proteobacteria - alpha, gamma and delta, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobac teria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes). Forty percent of the sequences could not be classified into these phyla, demonstrating the genetic diversity of this microbial community. Only eight isolates had sequences similar to known sequences of 16S rRNA of cultivable organisms or of known environmental isolates and therefore could be identified to the genus level. This method of DNA extraction is a useful tool for analysis of the bacteria responsible for petroleum degradation in contaminated environments.

  18. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  19. Distribution and 16S rDNA sequences of Argas monachus (Acari: Argasidae), a soft tick parasite of Myiopsitta monachus (Aves: Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Mastropaolo, Mariano; Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo; Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Mangold, Atilio J

    2011-11-01

    Specimens of Argas monachus Keirans et al. were collected from Myiopsitta monachus nests in 42 localities in Argentina and Paraguay from 2006 to 2010. A list of localities where this tick has been found is presented. 16S rDNA sequences of specimens of A. monachus from different localities were compared to confirm whether they belong to the same specific taxon. Argas monachus is present in the phytogeographic provinces of Chaco, Espinal, and Monte, but not in the Pampa (all from de Chaco Domain) where the host is well distributed. No differences were found among 16S rDNA sequences of geographically distant specimens.

  20. Epistasis analysis of 16S rRNA ram mutations helps define the conformational dynamics of the ribosome that influence decoding.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lanqing; Fredrick, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The ribosome actively participates in decoding, with a tRNA-dependent rearrangement of the 30S A site playing a key role. Ribosomal ambiguity (ram) mutations have mapped not only to the A site but also to the h12/S4/S5 region and intersubunit bridge B8, implicating other conformational changes such as 30S shoulder rotation and B8 disruption in the mechanism of decoding. Recent crystallographic data have revealed that mutation G299A in helix h12 allosterically promotes B8 disruption, raising the question of whether G299A and/or other ram mutations act mainly via B8. Here, we compared the effects of each of several ram mutations in the absence and presence of mutation h8Δ2, which effectively takes out bridge B8. The data obtained suggest that a subset of mutations including G299A act in part via B8 but predominantly through another mechanism. We also found that G299A in h12 and G347U in h14 each stabilize tRNA in the A site. Collectively, these data support a model in which rearrangement of the 30S A site, inward shoulder rotation, and bridge B8 disruption are loosely coupled events, all of which promote progression along the productive pathway toward peptide bond formation.

  1. Performance of 16s rDNA Primer Pairs in the Study of Rhizosphere and Endosphere Bacterial Microbiomes in Metabarcoding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the methods for studying microbial ecology by enabling high-resolution community profiling. However, the use of these technologies in unraveling the plant microbiome remains challenging. Many bacterial 16S rDNA primer pairs also exhibit high affinity for non-target DNA such as plastid (mostly chloroplast) DNA and mitochondrial DNA. Therefore, we experimentally tested a series of commonly used primers for the analysis of plant-associated bacterial communities using 454 pyrosequencing. We evaluated the performance of all selected primer pairs in the study of the bacterial microbiomes present in the rhizosphere soil, root, stem and leaf endosphere of field-grown poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) based on (a) co-amplification of non-target DNA, (b) low amplification efficiency for pure chloroplast DNA (real-time PCR), (c) high retrieval of bacterial 16S rDNA, (d) high operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Inverse Simpson diversity and (e) taxonomic assignment of reads. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provide valuable information that could contribute in the selection of suitable primer pairs for 16S rDNA metabarcoding studies in plant-microbiota research. Furthermore, we show that primer pair 799F-1391R outperforms all other primer pairs in our study in the elimination of non-target DNA and retrieval of bacterial OTUs. PMID:27242686

  2. Performance of 16s rDNA Primer Pairs in the Study of Rhizosphere and Endosphere Bacterial Microbiomes in Metabarcoding Studies.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the methods for studying microbial ecology by enabling high-resolution community profiling. However, the use of these technologies in unraveling the plant microbiome remains challenging. Many bacterial 16S rDNA primer pairs also exhibit high affinity for non-target DNA such as plastid (mostly chloroplast) DNA and mitochondrial DNA. Therefore, we experimentally tested a series of commonly used primers for the analysis of plant-associated bacterial communities using 454 pyrosequencing. We evaluated the performance of all selected primer pairs in the study of the bacterial microbiomes present in the rhizosphere soil, root, stem and leaf endosphere of field-grown poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) based on (a) co-amplification of non-target DNA, (b) low amplification efficiency for pure chloroplast DNA (real-time PCR), (c) high retrieval of bacterial 16S rDNA, (d) high operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Inverse Simpson diversity and (e) taxonomic assignment of reads. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provide valuable information that could contribute in the selection of suitable primer pairs for 16S rDNA metabarcoding studies in plant-microbiota research. Furthermore, we show that primer pair 799F-1391R outperforms all other primer pairs in our study in the elimination of non-target DNA and retrieval of bacterial OTUs. PMID:27242686

  3. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  4. Then and now: use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for bacterial identification and discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C Y; Lau, S K P; Teng, J L L; Tse, H; Yuen, K-Y

    2008-10-01

    In the last decade, as a result of the widespread use of PCR and DNA sequencing, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a pivotal role in the accurate identification of bacterial isolates and the discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories. For bacterial identification, 16S rDNA sequencing is particularly important in the case of bacteria with unusual phenotypic profiles, rare bacteria, slow-growing bacteria, uncultivable bacteria and culture-negative infections. Not only has it provided insights into aetiologies of infectious disease, but it also helps clinicians in choosing antibiotics and in determining the duration of treatment and infection control procedures. With the use of 16S rDNA sequencing, 215 novel bacterial species, 29 of which belong to novel genera, have been discovered from human specimens in the past 7 years of the 21st century (2001-2007). One hundred of the 215 novel species, 15 belonging to novel genera, have been found in four or more subjects. The largest number of novel species discovered were of the genera Mycobacterium (n = 12) and Nocardia (n = 6). The oral cavity/dental-related specimens (n = 19) and the gastrointestinal tract (n = 26) were the most important sites for discovery and/or reservoirs of novel species. Among the 100 novel species, Streptococcus sinensis, Laribacter hongkongensis, Clostridium hathewayi and Borrelia spielmanii have been most thoroughly characterized, with the reservoirs and routes of transmission documented, and S. sinensis, L. hongkongensis and C. hathewayi have been found globally. One of the greatest hurdles in putting 16S rDNA sequencing into routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories is automation of the technology. The only step that can be automated at the moment is input of the 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolate for identification into one of the software packages that will generate the result of the identity of the isolate on the basis of its sequence database. However

  5. DNA-based classification and sequence heterogeneities in the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and related species.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Alejandra; Molin, Göran; Pettersson, Bertil; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv

    2005-07-01

    The sequence differences within the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and related species, Lactobacillus zeae and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, were investigated. Thirty-seven strains of mostly human or cheese origin were grouped by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of the total chromosomal DNA and by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. REA verified that all strains were genomically unique and singled out three major clusters, one L. rhamnosus-cluster and two clusters containing L. paracasei strains. The groups obtained by TTGE corresponded with one exception to the REA-clusters. In the TTGE clustering all L. paracasei strains formed one general group with one TTGE-band in common, and this group was sub-divided into five subgroups due to the presence of more than one TTGE-band in four of the subgroups. The occurrence of multiple TTGE-bands was investigated by amplifying and cloning of the 16S rRNA genes from the strains showing this phenomenon, thereby 12 clones from each strain were sequenced, demonstrating polymorphisms in almost all the cases. Subjecting the clones displaying sequence variations to TTGE as well as sequencing of 16S rDNA revealed by ribotyping of the strains, verified the presence of polymorphisms within the 16S rRNA genes. The migration characteristic of amplified DNA from a single clone corresponded to a specific band in the TTGE-pattern of the strain from which the clone originated. Southern blot hybridisation with a 16S rDNA probe demonstrated the presence of at least five 16S rRNA genes in L. casei/paracasei. A higher degree of variable positions than previously reported was observed in the 16S rRNA gene fragments of the members in the complex. Sequence comparison between the 16S rRNA gene copies of L. casei (CCUG 21451T) and L. zeae (CCUG 35515T) demonstrated that the two species shared almost the same sequence in some copies while the others were more different

  6. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  7. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  8. Design and application of specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers for assessing endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale using nested PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Zhou, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Sui-Juan; Liu, Wen-Hong; Hu, Xiu-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Novel specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers were successfully designed and applied to the characterization of endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale. Using the popular universal bacterial primers 27f/1492r, the fragments of chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNA were amplified from D. officinale. They shared high nucleotide identity with the chloroplast 16S rDNAs (99-100 %) and with the mitochondrion 18S rDNAs (93-100 %) from various plants, respectively, and both shared 73-86 % identities with the bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in GenBank. The current bacterial universal primers, including 27f/1492r, match well with the chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNAs, which accordingly renders these primers not useful for endophytic diversity analysis. Novel 16S rDNA-targeted primers fM1 (5'-CCGCGTGNRBGAHGAAGGYYYT-3') and rC5 (5'-TAATCCTGTTTGCTCC CCAC-3') were designed, which show good specificity compared to the 16S/18S rDNAs of D. officinale, and perfect universality within bacteria except for Cyanobacteria. The primers fM1/rC5, together with 515f-GC/rC5, which overlaps the whole V4 region of 16S rDNA, were subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) to analyze the diversity of endophytic bacteria in D. officinale from three different sources in China. The results showed diversities in roots and stems of the plants from all three locations. Altogether, 29 bands were identified as bacteria, with the dominant group being Proteobacteria and the dominant genus being Burkholderia, some of which commonly has the function of nitrogen fixation and thus may play potentially important roles in D. officinale. Therefore, the nested PCR-DGGE method based on the novel primers provides a good alternative for investigating the communities and roles of endophytes in D. officinale.

  9. Practical identification of human originated Lactobacillus species by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for probiotic use.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Meterelliyöz, Merve

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics are gaining popularity and increasing the importance of their accurate speciation. Lactobacillus species are commonly used as probiotic strains mostly of clinical importance. Present knowledge indicates that at least 14 Lactobacillus species are associated with the human intestinal tract. Currently, researchers are interested in developing efficient techniques for screening and selecting probiotics bacteria, but unfortunately most of these methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive and costly. The aim of this study is to develop reliable, rapid and accurate method to identify 14 references Lactobacillus species that could have been found in the human alimentary tract by 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. In this study, to develop an effective method for the genotype-based identification of the reference Lactobacillus species, 1.5 kb of 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences of 14 Lactobacillus were collected from the Gene Bank aligned, in silico restricted and analyzed in respect to their 16S-rRNA restriction fragment polymorphism. In silico restriction profiles of 16S-rRNA indicated that FspBI, HinfI and DraI restriction enzymes (RE) are convenient for differentiation of 14 Lactobacillus species in human intestinal tract except Lb. casei and Lb. paracasei. The patterns of our experimental findings obtained from 16S PCR-ARDRA completely confirmed our in silico patterns. The present work demonstrated that 16S PCR-ARDRA method with FspBI, HinfI and DraI RE is a rapid, accurate and reliable method for the identification of Lactobacillus species from human alimentary tract, especially during the identification of large numbers of isolates and any laboratory equipped with a thermo cycler for probiotic use.

  10. Ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing for detection and identification of bacteria: experience from 6 years of routine analyses of patient samples.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristine Helander; Dargis, Rimtas; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Kemp, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The use of broad range PCR and DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for routine diagnostics of bacterial infections was evaluated. Here, the results from more than 2600 analyses during a 6-year period (2003-2009) are presented. Almost half of the samples were from joints and bones, and the second most frequent origin of samples was from the central nervous system. Overall, 26% of all samples were positive for bacterial DNA and bacterial identification was obtained in 80% of the PCR-positive samples by subsequent DNA sequencing. Ambiguous species identification was noticed among non-haemolytic streptococci, especially within the mitis group. The data show that ribosomal PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the PCR product is a most valuable supplement to culture for identifying bacterial agents of both acute and prolonged infections. However, some bacteria, including non-haemolytic streptococci, may not be precisely identified.

  11. Ribosomal DNA nanoprobes studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Jaciara; Castilho, Maiara L; Téllez Soto, Claudio A; Vieira, Laís de Souza; Canevari, Renata A; Fávero, Priscila P; Martin, Airton A; Raniero, Leandro

    2014-01-24

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (P. brasiliensis) is a thermo-dimorphic fungus that causes paracoccidioidomycosis. Brazil epidemiological data shows that endemic areas are the subtropical regions, especially where agricultural activities predominate such as the Southeast, South, and Midwest. There are several tests to diagnose paracoccidioidomycosis, but they have many limitations such as low sensitivity, high cost, and a cross-reacting problem. In this work, gold nanoprobes were used to identify P. brasiliensis as an alternative diagnostic technique, which is easier to apply, costs less, and has great potential for application. The specific Ribosomal sequence of P. brasiliensis DNA was amplified and used to design the nanoprobes using a thiol-modified oligonucleotide. The results of positive and negative tests were done by UV-visible and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) measurements. The deconvolution of FT-IR sample spectra showed differences in the vibrational modes from the hydrogen bridge NHN and NHO bands that form the double helix DNA for samples matching the DNA sequence of nanoprobes that could be used to classify the samples.

  12. The phylogeny of acetic acid bacteria based on the partial sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA: the elevation of the subgenus Gluconoacetobacter to the generic level.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Hoshino, K; Ishikawa, T

    1997-08-01

    Thirty-six strains of acetic acid bacteria classified in the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Acidomonas were examined for their partial base sequences in positions 1220 through 1375, 156 bases, of 16S rRNA. The strains of the Q10-equipped Gluconobacter species examined were divided into two subgroups, which included the type strains of Gluconobacter oxydans, the type species of the genus Gluconobacter, and of a second species, Gluconobacter cerinus, respectively. The base differences numbered four between the two type strains. The strains of the Q9-equipped species examined classified in the type subgenus Acetobacter of the genus Acetobacter were not very distant phylogenetically from those of the genus Gluconobacter. The calculated number of base differences was 9-6 between the type strains of G. oxydans and G. cerinus and the type strains of Acetobacter aceti and Acetobacter pasteurianus. In contrast, the strains of the Q10-equipped species examined classified in the subgenus Gluconoacetobacter of the genus Acetobacter were very distant phylogenetically from those of the Acetobacter and Gluconobacter species mentioned above. The number of base differences was calculated to be 14-8. Furthermore, the strains of the methanol-assimilating, Q10-equipped species of the genus Acidomonas examined were located in phylogenetically isolated positions. The type strain of Acidomonas methanolica (identical to Acetobacter methanolicus), the type species of the genus Acidomonas, had 16-9 base differences. The data obtained here indicated that the members of the subgenus Gluconoacetobacter of the genus Acetobacter can be distinguished at the generic level. The new genus Gluconoacetobacter was proposed with the type species, Gluconoacetobacter liquefaciens, in recognition of the genus Acidomonas along with the genera Acetobacter and Gluconobacter in the classification of the acetic acid bacteria.

  13. Coamplification of eukaryotic DNA with 16S rRNA gene-based PCR primers: possible consequences for population fingerprinting of complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Vanhoutte, Tom; Joossens, Marie; Mahious, Amal S; De Brandt, Evie; Vermeire, Severine; Swings, Jean

    2008-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of three commonly used 16S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets for bacterial community analysis of samples contaminated with eukaryotic DNA. The specificity of primer sets targeting the V3, V3-V5, and V6-V8 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene was investigated in silico and by community fingerprinting of human and fish intestinal samples. Both in silico and PCR-based analysis revealed cross-reactivity of the V3 and V3-V5 primers with the 18S rRNA gene of human and sturgeon. The consequences of this primer anomaly were illustrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of microbial communities in human feces and mixed gut of Siberian sturgeon. DGGE profiling indicated that the cross-reactivity of 16S rRNA gene primers with nontarget eukaryotic DNA might lead to an overestimation of bacterial biodiversity. This study has confirmed previous sporadic indications in literature indicating that several commonly applied 16S rRNA gene primer sets lack specificity toward bacteria in the presence of eukaryotic DNA. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity is a potential source of systematic error in all biodiversity studies where no subsequent analysis of individual community amplicons by cloning and sequencing is performed.

  14. The 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Composition of Bacteria Implicated in Sulfur Redox Cycles and Associated Sulfur Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, B. T.; Batts, J. E.; Krouse, H. R.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of sulfate ion to sulfide species by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is accompanied by sulfur isotope fractionation, measured in terms of changes in the δ^{34}S values for sulfate and sulfide ions relative to a defined standard. In open environments, the S-isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide can be affected by loss from the system of sulfide species as gaseous H2S, insoluble metal sulfides such as FeS2, organic complexes or by re-oxidation. The S-isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial sulfate reduction in nature is often much larger than the maxima obtained in chemical and bacterial sulfate reduction experiments in the laboratory. One mechanism postulated for the large natural S-isotope selectivity depends on repetitive reduction-oxidation cycles. In turn, this would require a level of tolerance to oxygen by SRB in the sedimentary environment, contrary to laboratory experience with SRB strains. Bird Lake (The Coorong, South Australia) is a small calcareous, evaporative lake, where average Δ^{34}S (δ^{34}Ssulfate - δ^{34}Ssulfide) values for groundwater at 16 of the 27 sites sampled periodically since 1974, vary from 15.0 ‰ to 62.3 ‰ within the range -1.8 ‰ to 70.6 ‰. Wide fluctuations in δ34Ssulfide values at individual sites are the significant factor affecting the variability of Δ^{34}S values. Values for δ18Osulfate are elevated over that of the sulfate source to an unusual extent, reflecting re-oxidation of sulfur species and O- isotope exchange between some of these species and water. One aspect of investigations at Bird Lake was the evaluation of bacterial populations in subsurface sediments and their role in sulfur cycling. To achieve this, microcosms were established with subsurface sediment and incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere, for up to 119 days. These were sampled at various times to determine sulfur species concentrations and sulfur isotope fractionation and to generate 16S rDNA clone libraries. Results

  15. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  16. Analysis of bacterial diversity in river biofilms using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE: methodological settings and fingerprints interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lyautey, Emilie; Lacoste, Bénédicte; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Rols, Jean-Luc; Garabetian, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Reliability of bacterial diversity assessment using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rDNA fragments was evaluated for a particular complex microbial assemblage: river epilithic biofilm. By comparing 3 routine protocols on replicates of one river biofilm sample, we found that common DNA extraction procedures gave comparable diversity (from 28.0 to 30.7 bands detected) and community composition (> 75% of homology) despite differences in the total amount of extracted DNA (from 0.9 to 4.2 microg). Therefore methodological improvements only concerned electrophoretic separation of DNA fragments (range of denaturing gradient from 35% to 70% and migration time=18h) and standardisation of DNA amounts used (PCR-template=50 ng, gel loading=700 ng). Using such a standardised methodology we found a good reproducibility of all steps of the procedure. When an Escherichia coli strain was introduced as a contaminant in a biofilm sample, we were able to recover ribotypes from the strain. As concerns fields sampling, a satisfactory repeatability of banding patterns from neighbouring pebbles (sampling point) allowed discriminating between the biofilm intrasite variability (various points from a cross-profile). These trials confirmed that PCR-DGGE is suitable to assess a reliable genetic fingerprint of epilithic biofilms in the river. Phylogenetic analysis of 40 partial sequences of 16S rDNA from DGGE gels of two sets of river biofilms samples proved evidences for the retrieval of DNA fragments related to phototroph Eukarya. However, in both cases plastidial 16S rDNA represented less than 25% of the analysed operational taxonomic units. Taking into account that Cyanobacteria, as members of the Bacteria, were also detected, sequence analysis of relevant bands from the pattern is required to target "bacteria", i.e. the functional group of prokaryotic microorganisms to which one commonly refers as a key component in sustaining

  17. Intraspecific Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Dirofilaria immitis Samples from Western China Using Complete ND1 and 16S rDNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liang, Yinan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Hu, Dandan; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) is the causative agent of an important zoonotic disease that is spread by mosquitoes. In this study, molecular and phylogenetic characterization of D. immitis were performed based on complete ND1 and 16S rDNA gene sequences, which provided the foundation for more advanced molecular diagnosis, prevention, and control of heartworm diseases. The mutation rate and evolutionary divergence in adult heartworm samples from seven dogs in western China were analyzed to obtain information on genetic diversity and variability. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayes methods based on the complete gene sequences. The results suggest that D. immitis formed an independent monophyletic group in which the 16S rDNA gene has mutated more rapidly than has ND1. PMID:24639299

  18. [Investigation of bacterial diversity in the biological desulfurization reactor for treating high salinity wastewater by the 16S rDNA cloning method].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Guo; Liang, Cun-Zhen; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Ping; Liu, Miao-Miao

    2013-02-01

    The bacterial diversity in the biological desulfurization reactor operated continuously for 1 year was studied by the 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing method. Forty clones were randomly selected and their partial 16S rDNA genes (ca. 1,400 bp) were sequenced and blasted. The results indicated that there were dominant bacterias in the biological desulfurization reactor, where 33 clones belonged to 3 different published phyla, while 1 clone belonged to unknown phylum. The dominant bacterial community in the system was Proteobacteria, which accounted for 85.3%. The bacterial community succession was as follows: the gamma-Proteobacteria(55.9%), beta-Proteobacteria(17.6%), Actinobacteridae (8.8%), delta-Proteobacteria (5.9%) , alpha-Proteobacteria(5.9%), and Sphingobacteria (2.9%). Halothiobacillus sp. ST15 and Thiobacillus sp. UAM-I were the major desulfurization strains.

  19. Characterization of bacterial diversity in pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic fermented beverage, as determined by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Adelfo; Rodríguez, María Elena; Martínez, Alfredo; López-Munguía, Agustín; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2004-06-15

    The bacterial diversity in pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic fermented beverage, was studied in 16S rDNA clone libraries from three pulque samples. Sequenced clones identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus strain ASF360, L. kefir, L. acetotolerans, L. hilgardii, L. plantarum, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Microbacterium arborescens, Flavobacterium johnsoniae, Acetobacter pomorium, Gluconobacter oxydans, and Hafnia alvei, were detected for the first time in pulque. Identity of 16S rDNA sequenced clones showed that bacterial diversity present among pulque samples is dominated by Lactobacillus species (80.97%). Seventy-eight clones exhibited less than 95% of relatedness to NCBI database sequences, which may indicate the presence of new species in pulque samples.

  20. Identification of bacteria in enrichment cultures of sulfate reducers in the Cariaco Basin water column employing Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cariaco Basin is characterized by pronounced and predictable vertical layering of microbial communities dominated by reduced sulfur species at and below the redox transition zone. Marine water samples were collected in May, 2005 and 2006, at the sampling stations A (10°30′ N, 64°40′ W), B (10°40′ N, 64°45′ W) and D (10°43’N, 64°32’W) from different depths, including surface, redox interface, and anoxic zones. In order to enrich for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), water samples were inoculated into anaerobic media amended with lactate or acetate as carbon source. To analyze the composition of enrichment cultures, we performed DNA extraction, PCR-DGGE, and sequencing of selected bands. Results DGGE results indicate that many bacterial genera were present that are associated with the sulfur cycle, including Desulfovibrio spp., as well as heterotrophs belonging to Vibrio, Enterobacter, Shewanella, Fusobacterium, Marinifilum, Mariniliabilia, and Spirochaeta. These bacterial populations are related to sulfur coupling and carbon cycles in an environment of variable redox conditions and oxygen availability. Conclusions In our studies, we found an association of SRB-like Desulfovibrio with Vibrio species and other genera that have a previously defined relevant role in sulfur transformation and coupling of carbon and sulfur cycles in an environment where there are variable redox conditions and oxygen availability. This study provides new information about microbial species that were culturable on media for SRB at anaerobic conditions at several locations and water depths in the Cariaco Basin. PMID:23981583

  1. The presence of highly disruptive 16S rRNA mutations in clinical samples indicates a wider role for mutations of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Elson, Joanna L.; Smith, Paul M.; Greaves, Laura C.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are well recognized as an important cause of disease, with over two hundred variants in the protein encoding and mt-tRNA genes associated with human disorders. In contrast, the two genes encoding the mitochondrial rRNAs (mt-rRNAs) have been studied in far less detail. This is because establishing the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations is a major diagnostic challenge. Only two disease causing mutations have been identified at these loci, both mapping to the small subunit (SSU). On the large subunit (LSU), however, the evidence for the presence of pathogenic LSU mt-rRNA changes is particularly sparse. We have previously expanded the list of deleterious SSU mt-rRNA mutations by identifying highly disruptive base changes capable of blocking the activity of the mitoribosomal SSU. To do this, we used a new methodology named heterologous inferential analysis (HIA). The recent arrival of near-atomic-resolution structures of the human mitoribosomal LSU, has enhanced the power of our approach by permitting the analysis of the corresponding sites of mutation within their natural structural context. Here, we have used these tools to determine whether LSU mt-rRNA mutations found in the context of human disease and/or ageing could disrupt the function of the mitoribosomal LSU. Our results clearly show that, much like the for SSU mt-rRNA, LSU mt-rRNAs mutations capable of compromising the function of the mitoribosomal LSU are indeed present in clinical samples. Thus, our work constitutes an important contribution to an emerging view of the mitoribosome as an important element in human health. PMID:26349026

  2. Seasonal Succession Leads to Habitat-Dependent Differentiation in Ribosomal RNA:DNA Ratios among Freshwater Lake Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors. PMID:27199936

  3. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA genemore » sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.« less

  4. Seasonal Succession Leads to Habitat-Dependent Differentiation in Ribosomal RNA:DNA Ratios among Freshwater Lake Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Denef, Vincent J; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A; Schmidt, Marian L

    2016-01-01

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors. PMID:27199936

  5. Thinking beside the box: Should we care about the non-coding strand of the 16S rRNA gene?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Barcenas-Walls, Jose R

    2016-08-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) codes for RNA that plays a fundamental role during translation in the ribosome and is used extensively as a marker gene to establish relationships among bacteria. However, the complementary non-coding 16S rDNA (nc16S rDNA) has been ignored. An idea emerged in the course of analyzing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in search for nucleotide composition and substitution patterns: Does the nc16S rDNA code? If so, what does it code for? More importantly: Does 16S rDNA evolution reflect its own evolution or the evolution of its counterpart nc16S rDNA? The objective of this minireview is to discuss these thoughts. nc strands often encode small RNAs (sRNAs), ancient components of gene regulation. nc16S rDNA sequences from different bacterial groups were used to search for possible matches in the Bacterial Small Regulatory RNA Database. Intriguingly, the sequence of one published sRNA obtained from Legionella pneumophila (GenBank: AE0173541) showed high non-random similarity with nc16S rDNA corresponding in part to the V5 region especially from Legionella and relatives. While the target(s) of this sRNA is unclear at the moment, its mere existence might open up a new chapter in the use of the 16S rDNA to study relationships among bacteria. PMID:27412167

  6. Thinking beside the box: Should we care about the non-coding strand of the 16S rRNA gene?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Barcenas-Walls, Jose R

    2016-08-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) codes for RNA that plays a fundamental role during translation in the ribosome and is used extensively as a marker gene to establish relationships among bacteria. However, the complementary non-coding 16S rDNA (nc16S rDNA) has been ignored. An idea emerged in the course of analyzing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in search for nucleotide composition and substitution patterns: Does the nc16S rDNA code? If so, what does it code for? More importantly: Does 16S rDNA evolution reflect its own evolution or the evolution of its counterpart nc16S rDNA? The objective of this minireview is to discuss these thoughts. nc strands often encode small RNAs (sRNAs), ancient components of gene regulation. nc16S rDNA sequences from different bacterial groups were used to search for possible matches in the Bacterial Small Regulatory RNA Database. Intriguingly, the sequence of one published sRNA obtained from Legionella pneumophila (GenBank: AE0173541) showed high non-random similarity with nc16S rDNA corresponding in part to the V5 region especially from Legionella and relatives. While the target(s) of this sRNA is unclear at the moment, its mere existence might open up a new chapter in the use of the 16S rDNA to study relationships among bacteria.

  7. When molecules support morphology: Phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Onuphidae (Eunicida, Annelida) based on 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Budaeva, Nataliya; Schepetov, Dmitry; Zanol, Joana; Neretina, Tatiana; Willassen, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Onuphid polychaetes are tubicolous marine worms commonly reported worldwide from intertidal areas to hadal depths. They often dominate in benthic communities and have economic importance in aquaculture and recreational fishing. Here we report the phylogeny of the family Onuphidae based on the combined analyses of nuclear (18S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA) genes. Results of Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses supported the monophyly of Onuphidae and its traditional subdivision into two monophyletic subfamilies: Onuphinae and Hyalinoeciinae. Ten of 22 recognized genera were monophyletic with strong node support; four more genera included in this study were either monotypic or represented by a single species. None of the genera appeared para- or polyphyletic and this indicates a strong congruence between the traditional morphology-based systematics of the family and the newly obtained molecular-based phylogenetic reconstructions. Intergeneric relationships within Hyalinoeciinae were not resolved. Two strongly supported monophyletic groups of genera were recovered within Onuphinae: ((Onuphis, Aponuphis), Diopatra, Paradiopatra) and (Hirsutonuphis, (Paxtonia, (Kinbergonuphis, Mooreonuphis))). A previously accepted hypothesis on the subdivision of Onuphinae into the Onuphis group of genera and the Diopatra group of genera was largely rejected.

  8. Detection of Morganella morganii, a prolific histamine former, by the polymerase chain reaction assay with 16S rDNA-targeted primers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; An, Haejung; Field, Katharine G; Wei, Cheng-I; Velazquez, Jorge Barros; Ben-Gigirey, Begoña; Morrissey, Michael T; Price, Robert J; Pitta, Thomas P

    2003-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of the most prolific histamine former, Morganella morganii, was developed. 16S rDNA targeted PCR primers were designed, and the primer specificity and sensitivity of the PCR assay were evaluated. The 16S rDNA sequence (1,503 bp) for M. morganii showed 95% identity to those for enteric bacteria, i.e., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., Hafnia alvei, Proteus spp., and Providencia spp. The unique primers for M. morganii were designed on the basis of the variable regions in the 16S rDNA sequence. The primers showed positive reactions with all M. morganii strains tested. However, PCR amplification was not detected when the primers were tested with other enteric or marine bacteria. When the sensitivity of the assay was evaluated, M. morganii was detected at levels ranging from 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml in albacore homogenate after the PCR amplification. The sensitivity of the assay was greatly improved with the enrichment of samples, and 9 CFU of M. morganii per ml of albacore homogenate was detected after 6 h of enrichment at 37 degrees C.

  9. Utility of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 16S mitochondrial DNA sequences for species identification and phylogenetic inference within the Rhinonyssus coniventris species complex (Acari: Rhinonyssidae).

    PubMed

    de Rojas, Manuel; Ubeda, José Manuel; Cutillas, Cristina; Mora, Maria Dolores; Ariza, Concepción; Guevara, Diego

    2007-04-01

    The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S rDNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA and a 390-bp region of the 16S rDNA gene from five taxa belonging to Rhinonyssus (Rhinonyssus vanellus, Rhinonyssus tringae, Rhinonyssus neglectus, Rhinonyssus echinipes from Kentish plover, and Rhinonyssus echinipes from grey plover) were sequenced to examine the level of sequence variation and the taxonomic levels to show utility in phylogeny estimation. Our data show that these molecular markers can help to discriminate between species and populations included in the Rhinonyssus coniventris complex (R. tringae, R. neglectus, R. echinipes), which are morphologically very close and difficult to separate by classic methods. A comparative study with sequences from other rhinonyssid mites previously published was also carried out. The resulting phylogenetic tree inferred from ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequences obtained in this paper, together with those from other 11 taxa of rhinonyssid, shows slight differences from the current taxonomy of the Rhinonyssidae. This study appeals for the revision of the taxonomic status of the R. coniventris complex, as well as for the species included within it.

  10. Development of a PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer for identification of strictly anaerobic bacterium Zymophilus.

    PubMed

    Felsberg, Jurgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Kubizniaková, Petra; Matoulková, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    PCR-primers were designed for identification of strictly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Zymophilus based on genus-specific sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. The specificity of the primers was tested against 37 brewery-related non-target microorganisms that could potentially occur in the same brewery specimens. None DNA was amplified from any of the non-Zymophilus strains tested including genera from the same family (Pectinatus, Megasphaera, Selenomonas), showing thus 100% specificity. PCR assay developed in this study allows an extension of the spectra of detected beer spoilage microorganisms in brewery laboratories. PMID:25725268

  11. Electrochemical detection of synthetic DNA and native 16S rRNA fragments on a microarray using a biotinylated intercalator as coupling site for an enzyme label.

    PubMed

    Zimdars, Andreas; Gebala, Magdalena; Hartwich, Gerhard; Neugebauer, Sebastian; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    The direct electrochemical detection of synthetic DNA and native 16S rRNA fragments isolated from Escherichia coli is described. Oligonucleotides are detected via selective post-labeling of double stranded DNA and DNA-RNA duplexes with a biotinylated intercalator that enables high-specific binding of a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase conjugate. The alkaline phosphatase catalyzes formation of p-aminophenol that is subsequently oxidized at the underlying gold electrode and hence enables the detection of complementary hybridization of the DNA capture strands due to the enzymatic signal amplification. The hybridization assay was performed on microarrays consisting of 32 individually addressable gold microelectrodes. Synthetic DNA strands with sequences representing six different pathogens which are important for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections could be detected at concentrations of 60 nM. Native 16S rRNA isolated from the different pathogens could be detected at a concentration of 30 fM. Optimization of the sensing surface is described and influences on the assay performance are discussed.

  12. Genetic variants of ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial DNA between swamp and river buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Miyakoshi, Y; Takada, T; Kikkawa, Y; Suzuki, H

    1994-06-01

    To clarify the genetic relationship between Swamp and River buffaloes, the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of nuclear genomic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were analysed. Blood or liver samples from 73 Swamp and three River buffaloes were collected in East and South-east Asian countries. DNA samples from cattle, goats and sheep were used for comparisons. The analysis of rDNA allowed water buffaloes, cattle, goats and sheep to be characterized by four distinct repeat-types. However, swamp and river buffaloes showed the same repeat-type. Divergence of water buffalo and cattle is considered to have occurred approximately four to six million years ago. The RFLPs for mtDNA divided water buffaloes into three haplotypes, swamp-1, swamp-2 and river types. Swamp-1 accounted for 91% of all swamp buffaloes while swamp-2 was observed only in water buffaloes from Thailand (9%). All river buffaloes were of the same haplotype. No differences were observed between swamp and river buffaloes at the rDNA level. In contrast, a few distinct differences between them were found at the mtDNA level. Therefore, mtDNA polymorphisms provide an adequate means for classifying water buffaloes into either swamp or river buffaloes.

  13. Behavior of variable V3 region from 16S rDNA of lactic acid bacteria in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ercolini, D; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    2001-03-01

    Separation of amplified V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested as a tool for differentiation of lactic acid bacteria commonly isolated from food. Variable V3 regions of 21 reference strains and 34 wild strains referred to species belonging to the genera Pediococcus, Enterococcus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Weissella, and Streptococcus were analyzed. DGGE profiles obtained were species-specific for most of the cultures tested. Moreover, it was possible to group the remaining LAB reference strains according to the migration of their 16S V3 region in the denaturing gel. The results are discussed with reference to their potential in the analysis of LAB communities in food, besides shedding light on taxonomic aspects.

  14. Carbonate formation by anaerobic oxidation of methane: Evidence from lipid biomarker and fossil 16S rDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnitskaia, A.; Nadezhkin, D.; Abbas, B.; Blinova, V.; Ivanov, M. K.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2008-04-01

    Carbonate chimneys and other carbonate structures occur widespread in the Gulf of Cadiz and probably reflect the presence of cold seeps and associated release of methane in the geological past, possibly in the Early Pleistocene, but it is unclear under what conditions and by which processes these carbonates were formed. We studied a fossil methane-related carbonate crust collected from the Kidd mud volcano in the gulf. Concentrations of microbial lipids, their stable carbon isotope composition, sequences of fossil 16S rRNA genes of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea in combination with mineralogical and carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate were obtained for seven different horizons of the crust. This combination of organic and inorganic geochemical techniques with molecular ecological methods gave a consistent view on processes resulting in the formation of the crust and indicated that it took place in two phases and in a downward direction. Archaeal lipid biomarkers and fossil 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed the dominance of archaeal ANME-2 group and elevated methane partial pressures during the formation of the top part of the crust. The lower part of the carbonate was likely formed in an environment with reduced methane fluxes as revealed by the dominance of fossil remains of ANME-1 archaea. The combination of these methods can be used as an effective tool to reconstruct in unprecedented detail the palaeo-biogeochemical processes resulting in the formation of carbonate fabrics. This interdisciplinary strategy may also be applied for other fossil methane-derived carbonates, generating new concepts and knowledge about past methane-related carbonate systems.

  15. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity.

  16. Microbial diversity in polluted harbor sediments I: Bacterial community assessment based on four clone libraries of 16S rDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Ki, Jang-Seu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bacteria, as the most abundant sediment organism, play a major role in the fate of pollutants. Therefore, many pollutant-related bacteria have been studied in harbor sediments, yet the entire bacterial profiles have not been reported. The bacterial diversity and community structures from sediments in Victoria Harbor (Hong Kong), including two polluted (VH and VHW) and two adjacent (open oceanic, TLC; estuary discharge affected, PC) sites, were characterized by analyses of four 16S rDNA clone libraries. Upon comparisons of RFLP patterns from 254 clones in the libraries, 178 unique phylotypes were retrieved. LIBSHUFF and Rarefaction analyses indicated that the sediment bacterial communities at the four sites showed high 16S rDNA richness and were significantly different from each other. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length 16S rDNA revealed 19 bacterial phyla in Victoria Harbor sediments. γ- and δ-proteobacteria, holophaga/acidobacteria, and planctomycetales were recorded in all the libraries. In addition, γ- and δ-proteobacteria were dominant at all sites (33.33-11.67%). Besides these two phyla, ɛ-proteobacteria, firmicutes, aminobacterium, holophaga/acidobacteria and bacteroidetes were judged to be major components of a given library since they constituted 10% or more of the total OTUs of the given library. The cyanobacteria, verrucomicrobia, β-proteobacteria, aminobacterium, chlorofiexi, and candidate division OP1, OP8 were detected in minor proportions in various libraries. A portion of the clones were only distantly related to sequences in the GenBank, suggesting bacteria in Victoria Harbor sediments were unique and diversified.

  17. Diverse and related 16S rRNA-encoding DNA sequences in prostate tissues of men with chronic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Riley, D E; Berger, R E; Miner, D C; Krieger, J N

    1998-06-01

    Treatment of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is often empirical because clinical culture methods fail to detect prostate-associated pathogens in >90% of patients. Previously, we tested a variety of specific-microorganism PCRs and began a DNA sequence study after we found that 77% of prostatitis patients were PCR positive for prokaryotic rRNA-encoding DNA sequences (rDNAs) despite negative cultures using optimal techniques. In the present study, 36 rDNA clones from 23 rDNA-positive patients were sequenced. This study represents more than twice the total rDNA sequence and more than twice the number of patients in the previous study. The increased number of patients and clones sequenced allowed enhanced phylogenetic analyses and refinements in our view of rDNA species inhabiting the prostate. A continuum of related rDNAs that might be arbitrarily described as two major groups of rDNAs and several minor groups was found. Sequences termed Pros A, identified in 8 (35%) of 23 rDNA-positive patients, grouped with Aeromonas spp. in phylogenetic studies. Sequences termed Pros B, identified in 17 (74%) of 23 rDNA-positive patients, were distinct from previously reported sequences, although all were >90% similar to known gram-negative bacteria. Of the nine patients for whom multiple rDNAs were sequenced, six had biopsy specimens containing rDNAs from more than one species. Four (17%) patients had rDNAs different from those of the Pros A and Pros B groups. Of these four, one patient had rDNA similar to that of Flavobacterium spp., another had rDNA similar to that of Pseudomonas testosteroni, and two patients had rDNAs <70% similar to known rDNAs. These findings suggest that the prostate can harbor bacteria undetectable by traditional approaches. Most of these diverse sequences are not reported in environments outside the prostate. The sequence similarities suggest adaptation of limited groups of bacteria to the microenvironment of the prostate. Further studies

  18. Characterization of Hafnia alvei by biochemical tests, random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ridell, J; Siitonen, A; Paulin, L; Lindroos, O; Korkeala, H; Albert, M J

    1995-01-01

    Hafnia alvei strains which possess the attachment-effacement gene (eaeA) may have clinical importance as new diarrhea-causing pathogens and should therefore be differentiated from other H. alvei strains. We characterized diarrheal H. alvei strains, which were positive in the PCR test for the eaeA gene, using biochemical tests not routinely used for identification of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and compared them with eaeA-negative strains isolated from different clinical and nonclinical sources to find characteristics useful for identification. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were utilized to study the genetic diversity of the isolates. The eaeA-positive strains were found to have many characteristic biochemical properties. Negative reactions in the 2-ketogluconate and histidine assimilation tests and a positive reaction in the 3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation test may be useful in routine diagnostics. Nearly identical RAPD-PCR profiles and identical 353-bp fragments of the 16S rRNA genes indicated little genetic diversity among the eaeA-positive strains. The low level of homology (92%) in the partial 16S rRNA genes of eaeA-positive and -negative H. alvei strains raises questions about the taxonomic positioning of eaeA-positive H. alvei. PMID:7494030

  19. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  20. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A.; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  1. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  2. Vertical stratification of microbial communities in the Red Sea revealed by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Qian, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Lau, Stanley C K; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Wong, Tim Y H

    2011-03-01

    The ecosystems of the Red Sea are among the least-explored microbial habitats in the marine environment. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities in the water column overlying the Atlantis II Deep and Discovery Deep in the Red Sea. Taxonomic classification of pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed vertical stratification of microbial diversity from the surface water to 1500 m below the surface. Significant differences in both bacterial and archaeal diversity were observed in the upper (20 [corrected] and 50 m) and deeper layers (200 and 1500 m). There were no obvious differences in community structure at the same depth for the two sampling stations. The bacterial community in the upper layer was dominated by Cyanobacteria whereas the deeper layer harbored a large proportion of Proteobacteria. Among Archaea, Euryarchaeota, especially Halobacteriales, were dominant in the upper layer but diminished drastically in the deeper layer where Desulfurococcales belonging to Crenarchaeota became the dominant group. The results of our study indicate that the microbial communities sampled in this study are different from those identified in water column in other parts of the world. The depth-wise compositional variation in the microbial communities is attributable to their adaptations to the various environments in the Red Sea. PMID:20668490

  3. Different conformations of ribosomal DNA in active and inactive chromatin in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, C; Riccardi, P

    1985-12-20

    The chromatin structure of the ribosomal DNA in Xenopus laevis was studied by micrococcal nuclease digestions of blood, liver and embryonic cell nuclei. We have found that BglI-restricted DNA from micrococcal nuclease-digested blood cell nuclei has an increased electrophoretic mobility compared to the undigested control. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of liver cell nuclei causes a very slight shift in mobility, only in the region of the spacer containing the "Bam Islands". In contrast, the mobility of ribosomal DNA in chromatin of embryonic cells, under identical digestion conditions, remains unaffected by the nuclease activity. Denaturing gels or ligase action on the nuclease-treated DNA abolishes the differences in the electrophoretic mobility. Ionic strength and ethidium bromide influence the relative electrophoretic migration of the two DNA fragment populations, suggesting that secondary structure may play an important role in the observed phenomena. In addition, restriction analysis under native electrophoretic conditions of DNA prepared from blood, liver and embryonic cells shows that blood cell DNA restriction fragments always have a faster mobility than the corresponding fragments of liver and embryo cell DNA. We therefore propose that nicking activity by micrococcal nuclease modifies the electrophoretic mobility of an unusual DNA conformation, present in blood cell, and to a lesser extent, in liver cell ribosomal chromatin. A possible function for these structures is discussed. The differences of the ribosomal chromatin structures in adult and embryonic tissues may reflect the potential of the genes to be expressed.

  4. Diversity of Geobacteraceae species inhabiting metal-polluted freshwater lake sediments ascertained by 16S rDNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D E; Snoeyenbos-West, O L; Newby, D T; Niggemyer, A M; Lovley, D R; Achenbach, L A; Rosenzweig, R F

    2003-08-01

    The abundance, distribution, and phylogenetic diversity of members of the Fe(III)-reducing family Geobacteraceae were studied along a gradient of metal contaminants in Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Partial 16S rRNA gene fragments were amplified by PCR using primers directed toward conserved regions of the gene within the family Geobacteraceae. Analysis of amplicons separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) suggested within-site variation was as great as between-site variation. Amplicons were cloned and grouped by RFLP type and DGGE migration distance and representatives were sequenced. Grouping clones with 3% or less sequence dissimilarity, 15 distinct phylotypes were identified compared to 16 distinct DGGE bands. Only 1 phylotype was recovered from all sites. This clone, B14, is most closely related to Geobacter metallireducens and constituted a greater portion of the pristine community than of the contaminated communities. A second phylotype, Q2, predominated in the contaminated communities and was notably absent from the pristine libraries. Clone Q2 presents a high degree of sequence similarity to two Geobacter spp. previously isolated from this region of Lake Coeur d'Alene. Six phylotypes were unique to the contaminated sediments, whereas two were found only in the pristine sediments. Indices of diversity (Shannon and Simpson) were consistently higher when calculated with DGGE data than when clone library data were used. Most-probable-number PCR and real-time PCR suggested that the Geobacteraceae phylotypes were spread relatively evenly across all three sites along the gradient. Our data indicate that the Geobacteraceae are diverse and abundant in Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments, regardless of metals content. These results provide insight into the ability of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria to colonize habitats with elevated metal concentrations, and they have important implications for the management and remediation of metal

  5. DNA sequence heterogeneity in the three copies of the long 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Rao, Y; Pearson, S R; Bates, S M; Mayall, B C

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of intragenic heterogeneity between copies of the long intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region (LISR) was investigated by specific amplification of this region from 21 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Three copies of the LISR (rrnA, B and C) were demonstrated by hybridization of the LISR to genomic DNA cleaved with I-Ceul and SmaI. When the LISR amplicon was digested with Tsp509I, two known nucleotide substitutions were detected, one 4 nt upstream from the 5' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (allele rrnB has the Tsp509I site and rrnA and C do not) and the other 22 nt downstream from the 3' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (rrnC has the Tsp509I site). Sequence differences at these sites were detected at the allelic level (alleles rrnA, B and C) and different combinations of these alleles were designated Tsp Types. Using densitometry to analyse bands from electrophoresis gels, the intra-isolate ratios of the separate alleles (rrnA:rrnB:rrnC) were determined in each Tsp Type: I (0:3:0), II (1:2:0), III (2:0:1), IV (3:0:0), V (2:1:0) and VI (1:1:1). Sequence variation between the three copies of the LISR was confirmed by the detection of at least five other intra-isolate nucleotide substitutions using heteroduplex analysis by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) that were not detected by Tsp509I cleavage. Perpendicular denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was capable of resolving homoduplexes; six to seven out of a possible nine curves were obtained in some isolates. In the isolate where seven curves were obtained one or more further nucleotide substitutions, not detected by Tsp509I cleavage or CSGE, were detected. On the basis of LISR sequence heterogeneity, isolates were categorized into homogeneous (only one allele sequence present) and heterogeneous (two or three allele sequences present). The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous LISRs may be useful in studying evolutionary mechanisms between E. faecalis isolates.

  6. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies. PMID:27242682

  7. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction—Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies. PMID:27242682

  8. Cultivable bacterial community from South China Sea sponge as revealed by DGGE fingerprinting and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyong; He, Liming; Miao, Xiaoling

    2007-12-01

    The cultivable bacterial communities associated with four South China Sea sponges-Stelletta tenuis, Halichondria rugosa, Dysidea avara, and Craniella australiensis in mixed cultures-were investigated by microbial community DNA-based DGGE fingerprinting and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis. Diverse bacteria such as alpha-, gamma-, delta-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were cultured, some of which were previously uncultivable bacteria, potential novel strains with less than 95% similarity to their closest relatives and sponge symbionts growing only in the medium with the addition of sponge extract. According to 16S rDNA BLAST analysis, most of the bacteria were cultured from sponge for the first time, although similar phyla of bacteria have been previously recognized. The selective pressure of sponge extract on the cultured bacterial species was suggested, although the effect of sponge extract on bacterial community in high nutrient medium is not significant. Although alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria appeared to form the majority of the dominant cultivable bacterial communities of the four sponges, the composition of the cultivable bacterial community in the mixed culture was different, depending on the medium and sponge species. Greater bacterial diversity was observed in media C and CS for Stelletta tenuis, in media F and FS for Halichondria rugosa and Craniella australiensis. S. tenuis was found to have the highest cultivable bacterial diversity including alpha-, gamma-, delta-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, followed by sponge Dysidea avara without delta-Proteobacteria, sponge Halichondria rugosa with only alpha-, gamma-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and sponge C. australiensis with only alpha-, gamma-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Based on this study, by the strategy of mixed cultivation integrated with microbial community DNA-based DGGE fingerprinting and phylogenetic analysis, the cultivable bacterial community of sponge could be

  9. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  10. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the use of soil bacterial 16S rDNA DNA markers in sediment fingerprinting in two small endorheic lagoons in southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Landa del Castillo, Blanca; Guzman, Gema; Petticrew, Ellen L.; Owens, Phillip N.

    2016-04-01

    bulk community of DNA was extracted from 250 mg of soil samples (three replicates per sample) using the procedure described in Landa et al. (2014). The bacterial 16S rRNA gene V1-V2 hypervariable regions were amplified in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequencing procedure was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations using MiSeq Reagent Kit v2 for 300 cycles on MiSeq desktop sequencer. The raw dataset for each sample consisted of the number of counts for each of the 6640 operational taxonomic units (OTU) analyzed. All the screening and analysis was performed independently for each lagoon. Given the large number of OTUs, a first screening was made discarding any OTU that did not presented at least five samples with counts >20 for that OTU. This lowered the number of OTUs to 205 in Dulce and 217 in Zoñar. Because of the limited number of samples, we did not perform independent analysis for each soil depth. All the analyses were performed twice; one with the original number of counts and another with the normalized number of counts. We screened the OTU following a 4-step method to determine those with the best ability to discriminate among the three potential source areas. These steps were: 1) eliminate OTUs with no readings or very few, that could be experimental noise; 2) keep only OTUs that are different among source areas; 3) eliminate OTUs that range outside of feasible solutions to explain average values found in sediment; and 4) eliminate OTUs with the largest variability. Afterwards, several over-determined mixing models were solved considering different combinations of OTUs using limSolve (Soetaert et al., 2014) in R. Preliminary results show that 0.2 to 0.6 % of the searched OTUs (i.e. 14 to 42) had the potential for use in the mixing models after the four-step screening process. The results indicate a large variability in the number of counts among the samples from different areas within the subcatchments ranging, on average, from 49 to

  12. Identification of the Bacterial Community of Maple Sap by Using Amplified Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Restriction Analysis and rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lagacé, L.; Pitre, M.; Jacques, M.; Roy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial community of maple sap was characterized by analysis of samples obtained at the taphole of maple trees for the 2001 and 2002 seasons. Among the 190 bacterial isolates, 32 groups were formed according to the similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified by 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing. Results showed a wide variety of organisms, with 22 different genera encountered. Pseudomonas and Ralstonia, of the γ- and β-Proteobacteria, respectively, were the most frequently encountered genera. Gram-positive bacteria were also observed, and Staphylococcus, Plantibacter, and Bacillus were the most highly represented genera. The sampling period corresponding to 50% of the cumulative sap flow percentage presented the greatest bacterial diversity according to its Shannon diversity index value (1.1). γ-Proteobacteria were found to be dominant almost from the beginning of the season to the end. These results are providing interesting insights on maple sap microflora that will be useful for further investigation related to microbial contamination and quality of maple products and also for guiding new strategies on taphole contamination control. PMID:15066796

  13. Quantification of Selenomonas sputigena in Chronic Periodontitis in Smokers Using 16S rDNA Based PCR Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Suresh Vasant; Jain, Pinal Mahendra; Mali, Pradnya; Medikeri, Manjushri Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Selenomonas species have been associated with chronic periodontitis and have been implicated in converting periodontal health to disease. Scanty literature is available in Indian population. Hence, the objective of the study was to detect the prevalence of Selenomonas sputigena in healthy and chronic periodontitis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in Indian population and to check whether smoking affects the subgingival microflora of this organism in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods A total of 60 subjects with severe chronic periodontitis with or without smoking and periodontal healthy subjects underwent clinical and microbiological assessment. A deep subgingival plaque sample was collected and genomic DNA was extracted from each sample and analysed for detection of Selnomonas sputigena using PCR. The frequency and quantification of bacteria were also estimated. Results All groups differed statistically significant in the frequency of detection of Selenomonas sputigena. On comparison of patients with chronic periodontitis in smokers and non-smokers, there was no statistically significant difference. When the results were quantified, statistically non-significant results were seen among all groups. Plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were statistically non-significant in chronic periodontitis with smokers and non-smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of Selenomonas sputigena showed significant differences with respect to the frequency of detection when comparing the disease group to the healthy population. But no significant difference was seen when the results were quantified. Smoking has no influence on number of Selenomonas sputigena. This study highlights presence as well as quantity of the organism is very important in elucidating its role in causation and progression of the disease. PMID:26023635

  14. Optimized sequence retrieval from single bands of temperature gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the amplified 16S rDNA fragments from an activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueli; Yan, Xing; Gao, Pingping; Wang, Linghua; Zhou, Zhihua; Zhao, Liping

    2005-01-01

    Sequence retrieval from single bands of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gel electrophoresis (DGE) profiles is an important but often difficult step for molecular diversity analysis of complex microbial communities such as activated sludge systems. We analyzed the temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) profiles of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from an activated sludge sample of a coking wastewater treatment plant. Single bands were excised, and a clone library was constructed for each. Sequence heterogeneity in each single band was found to be significantly overestimated due to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) contamination formed during the PCR amplification, since only 10-60% of library clones of each single TGGE band had identical migration behavior compared with the parent band. Three methods, digestion with mung bean nuclease, optimization of PCR amplification, and purification via denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (d-PAGE), were compared for their ability to minimize ssDNA contamination, with the last one being the most efficient. After using d-PAGE to minimize ssDNA to a nearly nondetectable level, 70-100% of library clones for each single TGGE band had identical migration compared with the parent band. Several sequences were found in each of six single bands, and this co-migration could be predicted with the Poland software. The predominant bacteria of the activated sludge were assessed via a combination of sequence retrieval from each single TGGE band and band intensity analysis. Only beta and alpha subclasses of the Proteobacteria were detected, 93.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Our work suggests that prior to constructing a clone library to retrieve the actual sequence diversity of a single DGE band, it is advisable to minimize ssDNA contamination to a nondetectable level.

  15. Sequence-Based Identification of Mycobacterium Species Using the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Leonard, Debra G. B.; Pan, Xai; Musser, James M.; Berman, Richard E.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Sequencing Kit (PE Applied Biosystems), a 500-bp sequence-based identification system, for its ability to identify clinical Mycobacterium isolates. The organism identity was determined by comparing the 16S rDNA sequence to the MicroSeq database, which consists primarily of type strain sequences. A total of 113 isolates (18 different species), previously recovered and identified by routine methods from two clinical laboratories, were analyzed by the MicroSeq method. Isolates with discordant results were analyzed by hsp65 gene sequence analysis and in some cases repeat phenotypic identification, AccuProbe rRNA hybridization (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.), or high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. For 93 (82%) isolates, the MicroSeq identity was concordant with the previously reported identity. For 18 (16%) isolates, the original identification was discordant with the MicroSeq identification. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 7 (six unique sequences) were originally misidentified by phenotypic analysis or the AccuProbe assay but were correctly identified by the MicroSeq assay. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 11 (seven unique sequences) were unusual species that were difficult to identify by phenotypic methods and, in all but one case, by molecular methods. The remaining two isolates (2%) failed definitive phenotypic identification, but the MicroSeq assay was able to definitively identify one of these isolates. The MicroSeq identification system is an accurate and rapid method for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. PMID:10618095

  16. PCR assay based on DNA coding for 16S rRNA for detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Kox, L F; van Leeuwen, J; Knijper, S; Jansen, H M; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    A PCR and a reverse cross blot hybridization assay were developed for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. The PCR amplifies a part of the DNA coding for 16S rRNA with a set of primers that is specific for the genus Mycobacterium and that flanks species-specific sequences within the genes coding for 16S rRNA. The PCR product is analyzed in a reverse cross blot hybridization assay with probes specific for M. tuberculosis complex (pTub1), M. avium (pAvi3), M. intracellulare (pInt5 and pInt7), M. kansasii complex-M. scrofulaceum complex (pKan1), M. xenopi (pXen1), M. fortuitum (pFor1), M. smegmatis (pSme1), and Mycobacterium spp. (pMyc5a). The PCR assay can detect 10 fg of DNA, the equivalent of two mycobacteria. The specificities of the probes were tested with 108 mycobacterial strains (33 species) and 31 nonmycobacterial strains (of 17 genera). The probes pAvi3, pInt5, pInt7, pKan1, pXen1, and pMyc5a were specific. With probes pTub1, pFor1, and pSme1, slight cross hybridization occurred. However, the mycobacterial strains from which the cross-hybridizing PCR products were derived belonged to nonpathogenic or nonopportunistic species which do not occur in clinical samples. The test was used on 31 different clinical specimens obtained from patients suspected of having mycobacterial disease, including a patient with a double mycobacterial infection. The samples included sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, tissue biopsy samples, cerebrospinal fluid, pus, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, and blood. The results of the PCR assay agreed with those of conventional identification methods or with clinical data, showing that the test can be used for the direct and rapid detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. PMID:8586707

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the use of soil bacterial 16S rDNA DNA markers in sediment fingerprinting in two small endorheic lagoons in southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Landa del Castillo, Blanca; Guzman, Gema; Petticrew, Ellen L.; Owens, Phillip N.

    2016-04-01

    bulk community of DNA was extracted from 250 mg of soil samples (three replicates per sample) using the procedure described in Landa et al. (2014). The bacterial 16S rRNA gene V1-V2 hypervariable regions were amplified in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequencing procedure was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations using MiSeq Reagent Kit v2 for 300 cycles on MiSeq desktop sequencer. The raw dataset for each sample consisted of the number of counts for each of the 6640 operational taxonomic units (OTU) analyzed. All the screening and analysis was performed independently for each lagoon. Given the large number of OTUs, a first screening was made discarding any OTU that did not presented at least five samples with counts >20 for that OTU. This lowered the number of OTUs to 205 in Dulce and 217 in Zoñar. Because of the limited number of samples, we did not perform independent analysis for each soil depth. All the analyses were performed twice; one with the original number of counts and another with the normalized number of counts. We screened the OTU following a 4-step method to determine those with the best ability to discriminate among the three potential source areas. These steps were: 1) eliminate OTUs with no readings or very few, that could be experimental noise; 2) keep only OTUs that are different among source areas; 3) eliminate OTUs that range outside of feasible solutions to explain average values found in sediment; and 4) eliminate OTUs with the largest variability. Afterwards, several over-determined mixing models were solved considering different combinations of OTUs using limSolve (Soetaert et al., 2014) in R. Preliminary results show that 0.2 to 0.6 % of the searched OTUs (i.e. 14 to 42) had the potential for use in the mixing models after the four-step screening process. The results indicate a large variability in the number of counts among the samples from different areas within the subcatchments ranging, on average, from 49 to

  18. Phylogeny of coral-inhabiting barnacles (Cirripedia; Thoracica; Pyrgomatidae) based on 12S, 16S and 18S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Simon-Blecher, N; Huchon, D; Achituv, Y

    2007-09-01

    The traditional phylogeny of the coral-inhabiting barnacles, the Pyrgomatidae, is based on morphological characteristics, mainly of the hard parts. It has been difficult to establish the phylogenetic relationships among Pyrgomatidae because of the apparent convergence of morphological characteristics, and due to the use of non-cladistic systematics, which emphasize ancestor-descendant relationships rather than sister-clade relationships. We used partial sequences of two mithochondrial genes, 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA, and a nuclear gene, 18S rDNA, to infer the molecular phylogeny of the pyrgomatids. Our phylogenetic results allowed us to reject previous classifications of Pyrgomatidae based on morphological characteristics. Our results also suggested the possibility of paraphyly of the Pyrgomatidae. The hydrocoral barnacle Wanella is not found on the same clade as the other pyrgomatids, but rather, with the free-living balanids. The basal position of Megatrema and Ceratoconcha is supported. The archeaobalanid Armatobalanus is grouped with Cantellius at the base of the Indo-Pacific pyrgomatines. Fusion of the shell plate and modification of the opercular valves are homoplasious features that occurred more than three times on different clades. The monophyly of the "Savignium" group, comprising four nominal genera, is also not supported, and the different taxa are placed on different clades.

  19. Ribosomal and Mitochondrial DNA Analyses of Xiphinema americanum-Group Populations.

    PubMed

    Lazarova, Stela S; Malloch, Gaynor; Oliveira, Claudio M G; Hübschen, Judith; Neilson, Roy

    2006-12-01

    The 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and cytochrome oxidase I region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were sequenced for 24 Xiphinema americanum-group populations sourced from a number of geographically disparate locations. Sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis and compared. 18S rDNA strongly suggested that only X. pachtaicum, X. simile (two populations) and a X. americanum s.l. population from Portugal were different from the other 20 populations studied, whereas mtDNA indicated some heterogeneity between populations. Phylogenetically, based on mtDNA, an apparent dichotomy existed amongst X. americanum-group populations from North America and those from Asia, South America and Oceania. Analyses of 18S rDNA and mtDNA sequences underpin the classical taxonomic issues of the X. americanum-group and cast doubt on the degree of speciation within the X. americanum-group.

  20. Ribosomal and Mitochondrial DNA Analyses of Xiphinema americanum-Group Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lazarova, Stela S.; Malloch, Gaynor; Oliveira, Claudio M.G.; Hübschen, Judith; Neilson, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and cytochrome oxidase I region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were sequenced for 24 Xiphinema americanum-group populations sourced from a number of geographically disparate locations. Sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis and compared. 18S rDNA strongly suggested that only X. pachtaicum, X. simile (two populations) and a X. americanum s.l. population from Portugal were different from the other 20 populations studied, whereas mtDNA indicated some heterogeneity between populations. Phylogenetically, based on mtDNA, an apparent dichotomy existed amongst X. americanum-group populations from North America and those from Asia, South America and Oceania. Analyses of 18S rDNA and mtDNA sequences underpin the classical taxonomic issues of the X. americanum-group and cast doubt on the degree of speciation within the X. americanum-group. PMID:19259456

  1. cis-acting components in the replication origin from ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Kowalski, D

    1993-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) that colocalizes with a chromosomal origin of replication. We show that a minimal sequence necessary for full ARS function corresponds to a 107-bp rDNA fragment which contains three 10-of-11-bp matches to the ARS consensus sequence. Point mutations in only one of the 10-of-11-bp matches, GTTTAT GTTTT, inactivate the rDNA ARS, indicating that this consensus sequence is essential. A perfect match to a revised ARS consensus is present but not essential. Sequences up to 9 bp 5' from the essential consensus are dispensable. A broad DNA region directly 3' to the essential consensus is required and is easily unwound as indicated by: (i) hypersensitivity to nicking of an approximately 100-bp region by mung bean nuclease in a negatively supercoiled plasmid and (ii) helical instability determined by thermodynamic analysis of the nucleotide sequence. A correlation between DNA helical instability and replication efficiency of wild-type and mutated ribosomal ARS derivatives suggests that a broad region 3' to the essential ARS consensus functions as a DNA unwinding element. Certain point mutations that do not stabilize the DNA helix in the 3' region but reduce ARS efficiency reveal an element distinct from, but overlapping, the DNA unwinding element. The nucleotide sequence of the functionally important constituents in the ARS appears to be conserved among the rDNA repeats in the chromosome. Images PMID:8355687

  2. MALDI-TOF MS performance compared to direct examination, culture, and 16S rDNA PCR for the rapid diagnosis of bone and joint infections.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, E; Coiffier, G; Arvieux, C; Brillet, E; Guggenbuhl, P; Jolivet-Gougeon, A

    2016-05-01

    The rapid identification of bacterial species involved in bone and joint infections (BJI) is an important element to optimize the diagnosis and care of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the rapid diagnosis of bone infections, directly on synovial fluid (SF) or on crushed osteoarticular samples (CS). From January to October 2013, we prospectively analyzed 111 osteoarticular samples (bone and joint samples, BJS) from 78 patients in care at the University Hospital of Rennes, France. The diagnosis procedure leading to the sample collection was linked to a suspicion of infection, inflammatory disease, arthritis, or for any bone or joint abnormalities. Standard bacteriological diagnosis and molecular biology analysis [16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing] were conducted. In addition, analysis by MALDI-TOF MS was performed directly on the osteoarticular samples, as soon as the amount allowed. Culture, which remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of BJI, has the highest sensitivity (85.9 %) and remains necessary to test antimicrobial susceptibility. The 16S rDNA PCR results were positive in the group with positive BJI (28.6 %) and negative in the group without infection. Direct examination remains insensitive (31.7 %) but more effective than MALDI-TOF MS directly on the sample (6.3 %). The specificity was 100 % in all cases, except for culture (74.5 %). Bacterial culture remains the gold standard, especially enrichment in blood bottles. Direct analysis of bone samples with MALDI-TOF MS is not useful, possibly due to the low inoculum of BJS. PMID:26942744

  3. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored. PMID:17380356

  4. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored.

  5. Evaluation of direct 16S rDNA sequencing as a metagenomics-based approach to screening bacteria in bottled water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Trine; Skånseng, Beate; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-09-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of food, feed, and water supplies poses a threat to human health worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection technique that could replace the current labor-intensive and time-consuming culture-based methods is highly desirable. In addition to species-specific assays, such as PCR, there is a need for generic methods to screen for unknown pathogenic microorganisms in samples. This work presents a metagenomics-based direct-sequencing approach for detecting unknown microorganisms, using Bacillus cereus (as a model organism for B. anthracis) in bottled water as an example. Total DNA extraction and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used in combination with principle component analysis and multicurve resolution to study detection level and possibility for identification. Results showed a detection level of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/L. Using this method, it was possible to separate 2 B. cereus strains by the principal component plot, despite the close sequence resemblance. A linear correlation between the artificial contamination level and the relative amount of the Bacillus artificial contaminant in the metagenome was observed, and a relative amount value above 0.5 confirmed the presence of Bacillus. The analysis also revealed that background flora in the bottled water varied between the different water types that were included in the study. This method has the potential to be adapted to other biological matrices and bacterial pathogens for fast screening of unknown bacterial threats in outbreak situations.

  6. Evaluation of direct 16S rDNA sequencing as a metagenomics-based approach to screening bacteria in bottled water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Trine; Skånseng, Beate; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-09-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of food, feed, and water supplies poses a threat to human health worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection technique that could replace the current labor-intensive and time-consuming culture-based methods is highly desirable. In addition to species-specific assays, such as PCR, there is a need for generic methods to screen for unknown pathogenic microorganisms in samples. This work presents a metagenomics-based direct-sequencing approach for detecting unknown microorganisms, using Bacillus cereus (as a model organism for B. anthracis) in bottled water as an example. Total DNA extraction and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used in combination with principle component analysis and multicurve resolution to study detection level and possibility for identification. Results showed a detection level of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/L. Using this method, it was possible to separate 2 B. cereus strains by the principal component plot, despite the close sequence resemblance. A linear correlation between the artificial contamination level and the relative amount of the Bacillus artificial contaminant in the metagenome was observed, and a relative amount value above 0.5 confirmed the presence of Bacillus. The analysis also revealed that background flora in the bottled water varied between the different water types that were included in the study. This method has the potential to be adapted to other biological matrices and bacterial pathogens for fast screening of unknown bacterial threats in outbreak situations. PMID:23971801

  7. Computational and Experimental Characterization of Ribosomal DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Samuel

    DNA G-quadruplexes in human telomeres and gene promoters are being extensively studied for their role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Recent studies strongly suggest that guanine (G)-rich genes encoding pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) are a potential anticancer target through the inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in ribosome biogenesis. However, the structures of ribosomal G-quadruplexes at atomic resolution are unknown, and very little biophysical characterization has been performed on them to date. Here, we have modeled two putative rDNA G-quadruplex structures, NUC 19P and NUC 23P, which we observe via circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to adopt a predominantly parallel topology, and their counterpart rRNA. To validate and refine the putative ribosomal G-quadruplex structures, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the CHARMM36 force field in the presence and absence of stabilizing K + or Na + ions. We optimized the CHARMM36 force field K + parameters to be more consistent with quantum mechanical calculations (and the polarizable Drude model force field) so that the K + ion is predominantly in the G-quadruplex channel. Our MD simulations show that the rDNA G-quadruplex have more well-defined, predominantly parallel-topology structures than rRNA and NUC 19P is more structured than NUC 23P, which features extended loops. Our study demonstrates that they are both potential targets for the design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  8. [Structural organization of 5S ribosomal DNA of Rosa rugosa].

    PubMed

    Tynkevych, Iu O; Volkov, R A

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify molecular organization of the genomic region encoding 5S rRNA in diploid species Rosa rugosa several 5S rDNA repeated units were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed that only one length variant of 5S rDNA repeated units, which contains intact promoter elements in the intergenic spacer region (IGS) and appears to be transcriptionally active is present in the genome. Additionally, a limited number of 5S rDNA pseudogenes lacking a portion of coding sequence and the complete IGS was detected. A high level of sequence similarity (from 93.7 to 97.5%) between the IGS of major 5S rDNA variants of East Asian R. rugosa and North American R. nitida was found indicating comparatively recent divergence of these species.

  9. 16S rDNA analysis of archaea indicates dominance of Methanobacterium and high abundance of Methanomassiliicoccaceae in rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo.

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Deb, S M; Dey, A; Somvanshi, S P S; Singh, D; Rathore, R; Stiverson, J

    2015-10-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens was investigated using 16S rDNA gene library prepared from the rumen contents of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Microbial genomic DNA was isolated from four adult male fistulated buffaloes and PCR conditions were set up using specific primers. Amplified product was cloned into a suitable vector, and the inserts of positive clones were sequenced. A total of 142 clones were examined, and the analysis revealed 46 species level (0.01 distance) operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Twenty six OTUs comprising 89 clones (63% of the total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanobacterium genus and the majority of them had highest percent identity with Methanobacterium flexile among cultured methanogens. Five OTUs comprising 27 clones (19% of total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanomicrobium genus and these clones showed highest sequence identity with Methanomicrobium mobile. Only two OTUs comprising 6 clones (4% of total clones) were assigned to Methanobrevibacter genus. A total of 17 clones belonging to 10 species level OTUs showed highest percent identity (ranging from 85 to 95%) with Methanomassilicoccus luminyensis and were taxonomically classified as Methanomassiliicocaceae. Out of the 142 rDNA clones, 112 clones, which constitute 79% of the total clones representing 42 OTUs, had less than 98.5% sequence identity with any of the cultured strains of methanogens and represent novel species of methanogens. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogen phylotypes ever identified from the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. The study indicates that Methanobacterium is the most dominant methanogen in the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo. This is also the first report on the presence of methanogens phylogenetically close to M. luminyensis, an H2 dependent methylotrophic methanogen, in the rumen of buffaloes at such a high level of abundance. PMID:26103451

  10. 16S rDNA analysis of archaea indicates dominance of Methanobacterium and high abundance of Methanomassiliicoccaceae in rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo.

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Deb, S M; Dey, A; Somvanshi, S P S; Singh, D; Rathore, R; Stiverson, J

    2015-10-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens was investigated using 16S rDNA gene library prepared from the rumen contents of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Microbial genomic DNA was isolated from four adult male fistulated buffaloes and PCR conditions were set up using specific primers. Amplified product was cloned into a suitable vector, and the inserts of positive clones were sequenced. A total of 142 clones were examined, and the analysis revealed 46 species level (0.01 distance) operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Twenty six OTUs comprising 89 clones (63% of the total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanobacterium genus and the majority of them had highest percent identity with Methanobacterium flexile among cultured methanogens. Five OTUs comprising 27 clones (19% of total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanomicrobium genus and these clones showed highest sequence identity with Methanomicrobium mobile. Only two OTUs comprising 6 clones (4% of total clones) were assigned to Methanobrevibacter genus. A total of 17 clones belonging to 10 species level OTUs showed highest percent identity (ranging from 85 to 95%) with Methanomassilicoccus luminyensis and were taxonomically classified as Methanomassiliicocaceae. Out of the 142 rDNA clones, 112 clones, which constitute 79% of the total clones representing 42 OTUs, had less than 98.5% sequence identity with any of the cultured strains of methanogens and represent novel species of methanogens. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogen phylotypes ever identified from the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. The study indicates that Methanobacterium is the most dominant methanogen in the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo. This is also the first report on the presence of methanogens phylogenetically close to M. luminyensis, an H2 dependent methylotrophic methanogen, in the rumen of buffaloes at such a high level of abundance.

  11. [Organization of 5S ribosomal DNA of Melitaea trivia].

    PubMed

    Cherevatov, O V; Volkov, R A

    2011-01-01

    Two length variants of 5S rDNA repeated units were detected in the genome of East European butterfly Melitaea trivia. Both repeat variants contain the 5S rRNA coding region of the same length of 120 bp, but possess the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of different size, 78 and 125 bp, respectively. The level of sequence similarity between the two 5S rDNA variants amounts to 43.9-45.5% in the IGS, whereas the coding region appears to be more conservative. In the IGS, microsatellite sequence motives were found; amplification of these motives could be involved in the evolution of the 5S rDNA.

  12. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John G; Branco, Alan T; Godinho, Susana A; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-02-24

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome.

  13. Isolation of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Purification and characterization of the 40 S ribosomal subunit proteins Sa, Sc, S3a, S3b, S5', S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S15', S16, S17, S18, S19, S20, S21, S26, S27', and S29.

    PubMed

    Collatz, E; Ulbrich, N; Tsurugi, K; Lightfoot, H N; MacKinlay, W; Lin, A; Wool, I G

    1977-12-25

    The proteins of the small subunit of rat liver ribosomes were separated into five main groups by stepwise elution from carboxymethylcellulose with LiCl at pH 6.5. Twenty-one proteins (Sa, Sc, S3a, S3b, S5', S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S15', S16, S17, S18, S19, S20, S21, S26, S27', and S29) were isolated from three groups (A40, C40, and D40) by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, carboxymethylcellulose, and phosphocellulose and by filtration through Sephadex. The amount of protein obtained varied from 0.1 to 11 mg. Six of the proteins (S5', S10, S11, S18, S19, and S27') had no detectable contamination; the impurities in the others were no greater than 9%. The molecular weight of the proteins was estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate; the amino acid composition was determined.

  14. Implication of mammalian ribosomal protein S3 in the processing of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Chubatsu, L S; Admon, A; Stahl, J; Fellous, R; Linn, S

    1995-06-01

    A human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity, called AP endonuclease I, is missing from or altered specifically in cells cultured from Xeroderma pigmentosum group-D individuals (XP-D cells) (Kuhnlein, U., Lee, B., Penhoet, E. E., and Linn, S. (1978) Nucleic Acids Res. 5,951-960). We have now observed that another nuclease activity, UV endonuclease III, is similarly not detected in XP-D cells and is inseparable from the AP endonuclease I activity. This activity preferentially cleaves the phosphodiester backbone of heavily ultraviolet-irradiated DNA at unknown lesions as well as at one of the phosphodiester bonds within a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. The nuclease activities have been purified from mouse cells to yield a peptide of M(r) = 32,000, whose sequence indicates identity with ribosomal protein S3. The nuclease activities all cross-react with immunopurified antibody directed against authentic rat ribosomal protein S3, and, upon expression in Escherichia coli of a cloned rat cDNA for ribosomal protein S3, each of the activities was recovered and was indistinguishable from those of the mammalian UV endonuclease III. Moreover, the protein expressed in E. coli and its activities cross-react with the rat protein antibody. Ribosomal protein S3 contains a potential nuclear localization signal, and the protein isolated as a nuclease also has a glycosylation pattern consistent with a nuclear localization as determined by lectin binding. The unexpected role of a ribosomal protein in DNA damage processing and the unexplained inability to detect the nuclease activities in extracts from XP-D cells are discussed. PMID:7775413

  15. Phylogenetic relationships in Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae): evidence from morphology, chloroplast DNA, and nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Padgett, D J; Les, D H; Crow, G E

    1999-09-01

    The genus Nuphar consists of yellow-flowered waterlilies and is widely distributed in north-temperate bodies of water. Despite regular taxonomic evaluation of these plants, no explicit phylogenetic hypotheses have been proposed for the genus. We investigated phylogenetic relationships in Nuphar using morphology and sequences of the chloroplast gene matK and of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two major lineages within Nuphar are consistently resolved with the morphological and molecular data sets. One lineage comprises New World taxa and the other represents a primarily Old World lineage. Relationships within the major lineages were poorly resolved by morphology and ITS, yet certain relationships were elucidated by all analyses. Most notable is the strong support for a monophyletic lineage of dwarf taxa and the alliance of the North American N. microphylla with the Eurasian taxa. Minor discordance between the independent cladograms is accounted for by hybridization. The common taxonomic practice of uniting all North American and Eurasian taxa under one species is not supported phylogenetically.

  16. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity in the feces of cattle using 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Scot E; Callaway, Todd R; Wolcott, Randall D; Sun, Yan; McKeehan, Trevor; Hagevoort, Robert G; Edrington, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    Background The microbiota of an animal's intestinal tract plays important roles in the animal's overall health, productivity and well-being. There is still a scarcity of information on the microbial diversity in the gut of livestock species such as cattle. The primary reason for this lack of data relates to the expense of methods needed to generate such data. Here we have utilized a bacterial tag-encoded FLX 16s rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) approach that is able to perform diversity analyses of gastrointestinal populations. bTEFAP is relatively inexpensive in terms of both time and labor due to the implementation of a novel tag priming method and an efficient bioinformatics pipeline. We have evaluated the microbiome from the feces of 20 commercial, lactating dairy cows. Results Ubiquitous bacteria detected from the cattle feces included Clostridium, Bacteroides, Porpyhyromonas, Ruminococcus, Alistipes, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, Lachnospira, Enterococcus, Oscillospira, Cytophage, Anaerotruncus, and Acidaminococcus spp. Foodborne pathogenic bacteria were detected in several of the cattle, a total of 4 cows were found to be positive for Salmonella spp (tentative enterica) and 6 cows were positive for Campylobacter spp. (tentative lanienae). Conclusion Using bTEFAP we have examined the microbiota in the feces of cattle. As these methods continue to mature we will better understand the ecology of the major populations of bacteria the lower intestinal tract. This in turn will allow for a better understanding of ways in which the intestinal microbiome contributes to animal health, productivity and wellbeing. PMID:18652685

  17. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byeng R.; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats. PMID:24669219

  18. Comparison of direct boiling method with commercial kits for extracting fecal microbiome DNA by Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Deng, Guan-Hua; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Low cost and high throughput capacity are major advantages of using next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to determine metagenomic 16S rRNA tag sequences. These methods have significantly changed our view of microorganisms in the fields of human health and environmental science. However, DNA extraction using commercial kits has shortcomings of high cost and time constraint. In the present study, we evaluated the determination of fecal microbiomes using a direct boiling method compared with 5 different commercial extraction methods, e.g., Qiagen and MO BIO kits. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) using UniFrac distances and clustering showed that direct boiling of a wide range of feces concentrations gave a similar pattern of bacterial communities as those obtained from most of the commercial kits, with the exception of the MO BIO method. Fecal concentration by boiling method affected the estimation of α-diversity indices, otherwise results were generally comparable between boiling and commercial methods. The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined through direct boiling showed highly consistent frequencies with those determined through most of the commercial methods. Even those for the MO BIO kit were also obtained by the direct boiling method with high confidence. The present study suggested that direct boiling could be used to determine the fecal microbiome and using this method would significantly reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of the sample preparation for studying gut microbiome diversity.

  19. Adaptation of a membrane bioreactor to 1,2-dichloroethane revealed by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and dhlA qPCR.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob E; Liew, Elissa F; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2013-01-01

    A pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was tested for bioremediation of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) in groundwater. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA was used to study changes in the microbiology of the MBR over 137 days, including a 67 day initial adaptation phase of increasing DCA concentration. The bacterial community in the MBR was distinct from those in soil and groundwater at the same site, and was dominated by alpha- and beta- proteobacteria, including Rhodobacter, Methylibium, Rhodopseudomonas, Methyloversatilis, Caldilinea, Thiobacillus, Azoarcus, Hyphomicrobium, and Leptothrix. Biodegradation of DCA in the MBR began after 26 days, and was sustained for the remainder of the experiment. A quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the dehalogenase gene dhlA was developed to monitor DCA-degrading bacteria in the MBR, and a positive correlation was seen between dhlA gene abundance and the cumulative amount of DCA that had entered the MBR. Genera previously associated with aerobic DCA biodegradation (Xanthobacter, Ancylobacter, Azoarcus) were present in the MBR, and the abundance of Azoarcus correlated well with dhlA gene abundance. This study shows that MBRs can be an effective method for removal of DCA from groundwater, and that the dhlA qPCR is a rapid and sensitive method for detection of DCA-degrading bacteria. PMID:24175727

  20. Epitheliocystis hyperinfection in captive spotted eagle rays Aetobatus narinari associated with a novel Chlamydiales 16S rDNA signature sequence.

    PubMed

    Camus, Alvin; Soto, Esteban; Berliner, Aimee; Clauss, Tonya; Sanchez, Susan

    2013-04-29

    This report details 2 cases of epitheliocystis in spotted eagle rays Aetobatus narinari associated with a novel Chlamydiales 16S rDNA signature sequence. Epitheliocystis is a common disease of variable severity affecting >50 species of wild and cultured freshwater and marine teleosts. Disease in elasmobranchs is rarely reported and descriptions are limited. Occurring in gill and skin epithelium, lesions are characterized by large hypertrophied cells with basophilic inclusions containing Gram-negative, chlamydia-like bacteria. Acute lethargy, labored respiration, and abnormal swimming developed in a captive spotted eagle ray following an uneventful quarantine period, and mild epitheliocystis lesions were found microscopically. Three months later, a second animal exhibited similar signs. A gill clip revealed myriad spherical bodies identical to the previous case, and treatment with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline was initiated. Despite therapy, respiration became irregular and euthanasia was elected. Histologically, epitheliocystis inclusions up to 200 µm filled approximately 80% of lamellar troughs. Multifocal mild hypertrophy and hyperplasia of lamellar tips was accompanied by mild to moderate infiltrates of granulocytes and lymphocytes. Electron microscopy revealed a homogeneous population of elongate chlamydia-like bacterial forms similar in size and morphology to the primary long cells described in teleosts. Immunohistochemical staining with a polyclonal anti-chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antibody was positive. Sequence analysis of a unique 296 bp Chlamydiales signature sequence amplicon isolated from the rays showed greatest homology (85 to 87%) to 'Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis'. PMID:23670076

  1. Karyotypic Variability in Ribosomal DNA Subchromosome Size among Colpodid Ciliates, a Possible Tool To Differentiate Colpodid Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A.; Palacios, G.; Olmo, A.; Martin-Gonzalez, A.; Ruiz-Perez, L. M.; Gutierrez, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has been applied to analyze the karyotypic variability among colpodid ciliates. The 18S ribosomal gene was found at different locations in the electrophoretic pattern, and these size variations in the ribosomal DNA subchromosomal molecule seem to be species specific. This could potentially be a useful new tool with which to differentiate colpodid ciliates. PMID:16535582

  2. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on newborn intestinal microbiota using a sequencing approach targeted to multi hypervariable 16S rDNA regions.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Irene; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Luiselli, Donata; De Filippo, Carlotta; Albanese, Davide; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Di Gioia, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Different factors are known to influence the early gut colonization in newborns, among them the perinatal use of antibiotics. On the other hand, the effect on the baby of the administration of antibiotics to the mother during labor, referred to as intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP), has received less attention, although routinely used in group B Streptococcus positive women to prevent the infection in newborns. In this work, the fecal microbiota of neonates born to mothers receiving IAP and of control subjects were compared taking advantage for the first time of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. Seven different 16S rDNA hypervariable regions (V2, V3, V4, V6 + V7, V8, and V9) were amplified and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The results obtained showed significant differences in the microbial composition of newborns born to mothers who had received IAP, with a lower abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as an overrepresentation of Proteobacteria. Considering that the seven hypervariable regions showed different discriminant ability in the taxonomic identification, further analyses were performed on the V4 region evidencing in IAP infants a reduced microbial richness and biodiversity, as well as a lower number of bacterial families with a predominance of Enterobacteriaceae members. In addition, this analysis pointed out a significant reduction in Bifidobacterium spp. strains. The reduced abundance of these beneficial microorganisms, together with the increased amount of potentially pathogenic bacteria, may suggest that IAP infants are more exposed to gastrointestinal or generally health disorders later in age. PMID:26971496

  4. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  5. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  6. Complete nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence amplification and molecular analyses of Bangia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiajie; Jiang, Bo; Chai, Sanming; He, Yuan; Zhu, Jianyi; Shen, Zonggen; Shen, Songdong

    2016-09-01

    Filamentous Bangia, which are distributed extensively throughout the world, have simple and similar morphological characteristics. Scientists can classify these organisms using molecular markers in combination with morphology. We successfully sequenced the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA, approximately 13 kb in length, from a marine Bangia population. We further analyzed the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene (nrSSU) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence regions along with nine other marine, and two freshwater Bangia samples from China. Pairwise distances of the nrSSU and 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene sequences show the marine samples grouping together with low divergences (00.003; 0-0.006, respectively) from each other, but high divergences (0.123-0.126; 0.198, respectively) from freshwater samples. An exception is the marine sample collected from Weihai, which shows high divergence from both other marine samples (0.063-0.065; 0.129, respectively) and the freshwater samples (0.097; 0.120, respectively). A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree based on a combined SSU-ITS dataset with maximum likelihood method shows the samples divided into three clades, with the two marine sample clades containing Bangia spp. from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and one freshwater clade, containing Bangia atropurpurea from North America and China.

  7. Development of a Ribosomal DNA ITS2 Marker for the Identification of the Thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R E; Ruiz-Arce, R; Ciomperlik, M; Vasquez, J D; DeLeón, R

    2010-01-01

    The thrips Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is an invasive pest that poses a significant economical threat to U.S. agriculture and trade. In this study, DNA sequence data and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were utilized to develop a molecular diagnostic marker for S. dorsalis. The DNA sequence variation from the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was analyzed from various thrips species, including S. dorsalis. A primer set and polymerase chain reaction cycling parameters were designed for the amplification of a single marker fragment of S. dorsalis ITS2 rDNA. Specificity tests performed on ten thrips species, efficacy tests performed on fifteen S. dorsalis populations, and tests on primer sensitivity and robustness all demonstrated the diagnostic utility of this marker. This diagnostic PCR assay provides a quick, simple, and reliable molecular technique to be used in the identification of S. dorsalis. PMID:20578948

  8. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of 16S rDNA from seafood, meat and meat products in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Azwai, S.M.; Alfallani, E.A.; Abolghait, S.K.; Garbaj, A.M.; Naas, H.T.; Moawad, A.A.; Gammoudi, F.T.; Rayes, H.M.; Barbieri, I.; Eldaghayes, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vibrio includes several food-borne pathogens that cause a spectrum of clinical conditions including septicemia, cholera and milder forms of gastroenteritis. Several Vibrio spp. are commonly associated with food-borne transmission including Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of Vibrio spp. were carried out for a total of 93 samples of seafood, meat and meat products from different geographic localities in Libya (Tripoli, Regdalin, Janzour and Tobruk). Vibrio spp. were detected by conventional cultural and molecular method using PCR and sequencing of 16S rDNA. Out of the 93 cultured samples only 48 (51.6%) yielded colonies on Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt agar (TCBS) with culture characteristics of Vibrio spp. More than half (n=27) of processed seafood samples (n=46) yielded colonies on TCBS, while only 44.6 % of samples of meat and meat products showed colonies on TCBS. Among cultured seafood samples, the highest bacterial count was recorded in clam with a count of 3.8 ×104 CFU\\g. Chicken burger samples showed the highest bacterial count with 6.5 ×104 CFU\\g. Molecular analysis of the isolates obtained in this study, showed that 11 samples out of 48 (22.9%) were Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahemolyticus was isolated from camel meat for the first time. This study is an initial step to provide a baseline for future molecular research targeting Vibrio spp. foodborne illnesses. This data will be used to provide information on the magnitude of such pathogens in Libyan seafood, meat and meat products. PMID:27004169

  9. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of 16S rDNA from seafood, meat and meat products in Libya.

    PubMed

    Azwai, S M; Alfallani, E A; Abolghait, S K; Garbaj, A M; Naas, H T; Moawad, A A; Gammoudi, F T; Rayes, H M; Barbieri, I; Eldaghayes, I M

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vibrio includes several food-borne pathogens that cause a spectrum of clinical conditions including septicemia, cholera and milder forms of gastroenteritis. Several Vibrio spp. are commonly associated with food-borne transmission including Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of Vibrio spp. were carried out for a total of 93 samples of seafood, meat and meat products from different geographic localities in Libya (Tripoli, Regdalin, Janzour and Tobruk). Vibrio spp. were detected by conventional cultural and molecular method using PCR and sequencing of 16S rDNA. Out of the 93 cultured samples only 48 (51.6%) yielded colonies on Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt agar (TCBS) with culture characteristics of Vibrio spp. More than half (n=27) of processed seafood samples (n=46) yielded colonies on TCBS, while only 44.6 % of samples of meat and meat products showed colonies on TCBS. Among cultured seafood samples, the highest bacterial count was recorded in clam with a count of 3.8 ×10(4) CFU\\g. Chicken burger samples showed the highest bacterial count with 6.5 ×10(4) CFU\\g. Molecular analysis of the isolates obtained in this study, showed that 11 samples out of 48 (22.9%) were Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahemolyticus was isolated from camel meat for the first time. This study is an initial step to provide a baseline for future molecular research targeting Vibrio spp. foodborne illnesses. This data will be used to provide information on the magnitude of such pathogens in Libyan seafood, meat and meat products.

  10. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of 16S rDNA from seafood, meat and meat products in Libya.

    PubMed

    Azwai, S M; Alfallani, E A; Abolghait, S K; Garbaj, A M; Naas, H T; Moawad, A A; Gammoudi, F T; Rayes, H M; Barbieri, I; Eldaghayes, I M

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vibrio includes several food-borne pathogens that cause a spectrum of clinical conditions including septicemia, cholera and milder forms of gastroenteritis. Several Vibrio spp. are commonly associated with food-borne transmission including Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of Vibrio spp. were carried out for a total of 93 samples of seafood, meat and meat products from different geographic localities in Libya (Tripoli, Regdalin, Janzour and Tobruk). Vibrio spp. were detected by conventional cultural and molecular method using PCR and sequencing of 16S rDNA. Out of the 93 cultured samples only 48 (51.6%) yielded colonies on Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt agar (TCBS) with culture characteristics of Vibrio spp. More than half (n=27) of processed seafood samples (n=46) yielded colonies on TCBS, while only 44.6 % of samples of meat and meat products showed colonies on TCBS. Among cultured seafood samples, the highest bacterial count was recorded in clam with a count of 3.8 ×10(4) CFU\\g. Chicken burger samples showed the highest bacterial count with 6.5 ×10(4) CFU\\g. Molecular analysis of the isolates obtained in this study, showed that 11 samples out of 48 (22.9%) were Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahemolyticus was isolated from camel meat for the first time. This study is an initial step to provide a baseline for future molecular research targeting Vibrio spp. foodborne illnesses. This data will be used to provide information on the magnitude of such pathogens in Libyan seafood, meat and meat products. PMID:27004169

  11. Phylogeny and PCR Identification of Clinically Important Zygomycetes Based on Nuclear Ribosomal-DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Kerstin; Cigelnik, Elizabeth; O'donnell, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    A molecular database for all clinically important Zygomycetes was constructed from nucleotide sequences from the nuclear small-subunit (18S) ribosomal DNA and domains D1 and D2 of the nuclear large-subunit (28S) ribosomal DNA. Parsimony analysis of the aligned 18S and 28S DNA sequences was used to investigate phylogenetic relationships among 42 isolates representing species of Zygomycetes reported to cause infections in humans and other animals, together with commonly cultured contaminants, with emphasis on members of the Mucorales. The molecular phylogeny provided strong support for the monophyly of the Mucorales, exclusive of Echinosporangium transversale and Mortierella spp., which are currently misclassified within the Mucorales. Micromucor ramannianus, traditionally classified within Mortierella, and Syncephalastrum racemosum represent the basal divergences within the Mucorales. Based on the 18S gene tree topology, Absidia corymbifera and Rhizomucor variabilis appear to be misplaced taxonomically. A. corymbifera is strongly supported as a sister group of the Rhizomucor miehei-Rhizomucor pusillus clade, while R. variabilis is nested within Mucor. The aligned 28S sequences were used to design 13 taxon-specific PCR primer pairs for those taxa most commonly implicated in infections. All of the primers specifically amplified DNA of the size predicted based on the DNA sequence data from the target taxa; however, they did not cross-react with phylogenetically related species. These primers have the potential to be used in a PCR assay for the rapid and accurate identification of the etiological agents of mucormycoses and entomophthoromycoses. PMID:10565914

  12. Mapping of replication initiation sites in human ribosomal DNA by nascent-strand abundance analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Y; Sanchez, J A; Brun, C; Huberman, J A

    1995-01-01

    New techniques for mapping mammalian DNA replication origins are needed. We have modified the existing nascent-strand size analysis technique (L. Vassilev and E.M. Johnson, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:7693-7705, 1989) to provide an independent means of studying replication initiation sites. We call the new method nascent-strand abundance analysis. We confirmed the validity of this method with replicating simian virus 40 DNA as a model. We then applied nascent-strand abundance and nascent-strand size analyses to mapping of initiation sites in human (HeLa) ribosomal DNA (rDNA), a region previously examined exclusively by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis methods (R.D. Little, T.H.K. Platt, and C.L. Schildkraut, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:6600-6613, 1993). Our results partly confirm those obtained by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques. Both studies suggest that replication initiates at relatively high frequency a few kilobase pairs upstream of the transcribed region and that many additional low-frequency initiation sites are distributed through most of the remainder of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. PMID:7739533

  13. Phylogenetic Information Content of Copepoda Ribosomal DNA Repeat Units: ITS1 and ITS2 Impact

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, Maxim V.; Lazareva, Valentina I.; Grishanin, Andrey K.; Mukha, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000 bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals. PMID:25215300

  14. High-Density Microarray of Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth H.; Wilson, Wendy J.; Radosevich, Jennifer L.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Viswanathan, Vijay S.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, originally conceived as a way to provide a universal phylogeny for life forms, has proven useful in many areas of biological research. Some of the most promising applications of this approach are presently limited by the rate at which sequences can be analyzed. As a step toward overcoming this limitation, we have investigated the use of photolithography chip technology to perform sequence analyses on amplified small-subunit rRNA genes. The GeneChip (Affymetrix Corporation) contained 31,179 20-mer oligonucleotides that were complementary to a subalignment of sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) (B. L. Maidak et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 29:173-174, 2001). The chip and standard Affymetrix software were able to correctly match small-subunit ribosomal DNA amplicons with the corresponding sequences in the RDP database for 15 of 17 bacterial species grown in pure culture. When bacteria collected from an air sample were tested, the method compared favorably with cloning and sequencing amplicons in determining the presence of phylogenetic groups. However, the method could not resolve the individual sequences comprising a complex mixed sample. Given these results and the potential for future enhancement of this technology, it may become widely useful. PMID:11976131

  15. Differentiation and identification of iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria using cultivation techniques and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie; Okibe, Naoko; Hallberg, Kevin B

    2005-03-01

    Acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms are important both environmentally and in biotechnological applications. Although, as a group, they are readily detected by their ability to generate ferric iron (resulting in a distinctive color change in liquid media), these microbes highly diverse phylogenetically. Various other characteristics, such as optimum growth temperature, response to organic carbon sources, and cellular morphologies, facilitate, in some cases, identification of isolates to a genus or species level, although this approach has limitations and may give erroneous results. In this study, a combined approach of using physiological traits together with amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis (ARDREA) has been successful in identifying all known acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria to the species level. Computer-generated maps were used to identify restriction enzymes that allow the differentiation of the acidophiles, and these were confirmed experimentally using authentic bacterial strains. To test further the validity of this approach, six acidophilic moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria isolated from Montserrat (West Indies) were analysed using the ARDREA protocol. Three of the isolates were identified as Sulfobacillus acidophilus-like, and one as Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans-like bacteria. The fifth isolate gave DNA digest patterns that were distinct from all known strains of iron-oxidizing acidophiles. Subsequent sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of these isolates confirmed the identity of the four Sulfobacillus isolates, and also that the fifth isolate was a novel species. Schematic diagrams showing how ARDREA may be used to rapidly identify all known acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria are presented.

  16. Characterization of polybacterial clinical samples using a set of group-specific broad-range primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing and RipSeq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lekang, Katrine; Langeland, Nina; Wiker, Harald G.

    2011-01-01

    The standard use of a single universal broad-range PCR in direct 16S rDNA sequencing from polybacterial samples leaves the minor constituents at risk of remaining undetected because all bacterial DNA will be competing for the same reagents. In this article we introduce a set of three broad-range group-specific 16S rDNA PCRs that together cover the clinically relevant bacteria and apply them in the investigation of 25 polybacterial clinical samples. Mixed DNA chromatograms from samples containing more than one species per primer group were analysed using RipSeq Mixed (iSentio, Norway), a web-based application for the interpretation of chromatograms containing up to three different species. The group-specific PCRs reduced complexity in the resulting DNA chromatograms and made the assay more sensitive in situations with unequal species concentrations. Together this allowed for identification of a significantly higher number of bacterial species than did standard direct sequencing with a single universal primer pair and RipSeq analysis (95 vs 51). The method could improve microbiological diagnostics for important groups of patients and can be established in any laboratory with experience in direct 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:21436365

  17. Reversible Top1 cleavage complexes are stabilized strand-specifically at the ribosomal replication fork barrier and contribute to ribosomal DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Claudia; Dion, Vincent; Schär, Primo; Fritsch, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    Various topological constraints at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus impose an extra challenge for transcription and DNA replication, generating constant torsional DNA stress. The topoisomerase Top1 is known to release such torsion by single-strand nicking and re-ligation in a process involving transient covalent Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1cc) with the nicked DNA. Here we show that Top1ccs, despite their usually transient nature, are specifically targeted to and stabilized at the ribosomal replication fork barrier (rRFB) of budding yeast, establishing a link with previously reported Top1 controlled nicks. Using ectopically engineered rRFBs, we establish that the rRFB sequence itself is sufficient for induction of DNA strand-specific and replication-independent Top1ccs. These Top1ccs accumulate only in the presence of Fob1 and Tof2, they are reversible as they are not subject to repair by Tdp1- or Mus81-dependent processes, and their presence correlates with Top1 provided rDNA stability. Notably, the targeted formation of these Top1ccs accounts for the previously reported broken replication forks at the rRFB. These findings implicate a novel and physiologically regulated mode of Top1 action, suggesting a mechanism by which Top1 is recruited to the rRFB and stabilized in a reversible Top1cc configuration to preserve the integrity of the rDNA.

  18. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  19. GC-biased gene conversion impacts ribosomal DNA evolution in vertebrates, angiosperms, and other eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan S; Glémin, Sylvain; Galtier, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is one of the most conserved genes in eukaryotes. The multiples copies of rDNA in the genome evolve in a concerted manner, through unequal crossing over and/or gene conversion, two mechanisms related to homologous recombination. Recombination increases local GC content in several organisms through a process known as GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). gBGC has been well characterized in mammals, birds, and grasses, but its phylogenetic distribution across the tree of life is poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that recombination affects the evolution of base composition in 18S rDNA and examine the reliability of this thoroughly studied molecule as a marker of gBGC in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA in vertebrates and angiosperms reveal significant heterogeneity in the evolution of base composition across both groups. Mammals, birds, and grasses experience increases in the GC content of the 18S rDNA, consistent with previous genome-wide analyses. In addition, we observe increased GC contents in Ostariophysi ray-finned fishes and commelinid monocots (i.e., the clade including grasses), suggesting that the genomes of these two groups have been affected by gBGC. Polymorphism analyses in rDNA confirm that gBGC, not mutation bias, is the most plausible explanation for these patterns. We also find that helix and loop sites of the secondary structure of ribosomal RNA do not evolve at the same pace: loops evolve faster than helices, whereas helices are GC richer than loops. We extend analyses to major lineages of eukaryotes and suggest that gBGC might have also affected base composition in Giardia (Diplomonadina), nudibranch gastropods (Mollusca), and Asterozoa (Echinodermata). PMID:21444650

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the 16S - 23S spacer region in an rRNA gene cluster from tobacco chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Takaiwa, F; Sugiura, M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a spacer region between 16S and 23S rRNA genes from tobacco chloroplasts has been determined. The spacer region is 2080 bp long and encodes tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes which contain intervening sequences of 707 bp and 710 bp, respectively. Strong homology between the two intervening sequences is observed. These spacer tRNAs are synthesized as part of an 8.2 kb precursor molecule containing 16S and 23S rRNA sequences. Images PMID:6281739

  1. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  2. Ribosomal DNA variations in Erianthus, a wild sugarcane relative (Andropogoneae-Saccharinae).

    PubMed

    Besse, P; McIntyre, C L; Berding, N

    1996-05-01

    Variation at the 18S+26S and 5S ribosomal DNA loci was assessed on 62 Erianthus Michx. clones, representing 11 species, and 15 clones from two Saccharum L. species used as a reference. Genus-specific markers for Erianthus Michx. sect. Ripidium Henrard (Old World species) were identified. Ribosomal DNA units in Erianthus sect. Ripidium exhibited an additional BamHI site compared to Saccharum, and 5S units showed length and restriction-site differences between Erianthus and Saccharum. These markers will be useful to follow introgression in Saccharum x Erianthus hybrids. Six ribosomal units (for 18+26S genes) were revealed in Erianthus sect. Ripidium, differing by restriction-site positions and/or length. These results provided new information on species relationships and evolution within the genus Erianthus. The Indonesian and Indian forms of E. arundinaceus (Retz.) Jeswiet gave different restriction patterns, which were similar to those of E. bengalense (Retz.) R. C. Bharadwaja and E. procerus (Roxb.) Raizade, respectively. The two 2n=20 species, E. ele-phantinus Hook.f. and E. ravennae (L.) P. Beauv., could also be differentiated at this locus. Two of the New World Erianthus species studied, E. rufipilus (Steud.) Griseb. and E. longisetosus Andersson, appeared more like Erianthus sect. Ripidium, whereas E. trinii Hack, and E. brevibardis Michx. showed patterns consistent with Miscanthus sinensis Andersson and S. spontaneum L., respectively. Finally, the comparison of rDNA restriction maps among Erianthus sect. Ripidium, Saccharum, sorghum and maize, led to unexpected conclusions concerning the relationships between the different genera and the position of Erianthus in the "Saccharum complex".

  3. 18S Ribosomal RNA Evaluation as Preanalytical Quality Control for Animal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Novacco, Marilisa; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is present in all eukaryotic cells. In this study, we evaluated the use of this gene to verify the presence of PCR-amplifiable host (animal) DNA as an indicator of sufficient sample quality for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. We compared (i) samples from various animal species, tissues, and sample types, including swabs; (ii) multiple DNA extraction methods; and (iii) both fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Results showed that 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplification was possible from all tissue samples evaluated, including avian, reptile, and FFPE samples and most swab samples. A single swine rectal swab, which showed sufficient DNA quantity and the demonstrated lack of PCR inhibitors, nonetheless was negative by 18S qPCR. Such a sample specifically illustrates the improvement of determination of sample integrity afforded by inclusion of 18S rRNA gene qPCR analysis in addition to spectrophotometric analysis and the use of internal controls for PCR inhibition. Other possible applications for the described 18S rRNA qPCR are preselection of optimal tissue specimens for studies or preliminary screening of archived samples prior to acceptance for biobanking projects.

  4. 18S Ribosomal RNA Evaluation as Preanalytical Quality Control for Animal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Novacco, Marilisa; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is present in all eukaryotic cells. In this study, we evaluated the use of this gene to verify the presence of PCR-amplifiable host (animal) DNA as an indicator of sufficient sample quality for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. We compared (i) samples from various animal species, tissues, and sample types, including swabs; (ii) multiple DNA extraction methods; and (iii) both fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Results showed that 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplification was possible from all tissue samples evaluated, including avian, reptile, and FFPE samples and most swab samples. A single swine rectal swab, which showed sufficient DNA quantity and the demonstrated lack of PCR inhibitors, nonetheless was negative by 18S qPCR. Such a sample specifically illustrates the improvement of determination of sample integrity afforded by inclusion of 18S rRNA gene qPCR analysis in addition to spectrophotometric analysis and the use of internal controls for PCR inhibition. Other possible applications for the described 18S rRNA qPCR are preselection of optimal tissue specimens for studies or preliminary screening of archived samples prior to acceptance for biobanking projects. PMID:27672657

  5. Structure and variation of human ribosomal DNA: the external transcribed spacer and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Szura, L L; Rushford, C; Jackson, D; Erickson, J

    1982-01-01

    A group of human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombinants that include the probable site for initiation of transcription have been examined for sequence polymorphism. A detailed restriction map of one rDNA insert was constructed using plasmid subclones and end-labeled segments. Comparison of 16 similar rDNA inserts by restriction and heteroduplex analysis demonstrated striking conservation of the external transcribed spacer and 18S gene regions, but defined a region where restriction sites for the enzymes Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I become frequent or variable. This region extends for about 400--800 base pairs (bp) at the left end of the rDNA insert and is postulated to contain nontranscribed spacer sequences. The use of cloned rDNA segments as probes for the restriction analysis of genomic rDNA has demonstrated certain fixed sites in the nontranscribed spacer that do not vary significantly among different individuals or tumor cell lines. In contrast, restriction with the enzyme Sal I reveals several variable fragments, one of which has been found only in a retinoblastoma cell line. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6282117

  6. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of fossil 16S rDNA fragments of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the sediments of Lake Cadagno.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, D F; Peduzzi, S; Guidi, V; Peduzzi, R; Wirth, S B; Gilli, A; Tonolla, M

    2012-05-01

    Lake Cadagno is a crenogenic meromictic lake situated in the southern range of the Swiss Alps characterized by a compact chemocline that has been the object of many ecological studies. The population dynamics of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the chemocline has been monitored since 1994 with molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To reconstruct paleo-microbial community dynamics, we developed a quantitative real-time PCR methodology for specific detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences of purple and green sulfur bacteria populations from sediment samples. We detected fossil 16S rDNA of nine populations of phototrophic sulfur bacteria down to 9-m sediment depth, corresponding to about 9500 years of the lake's biogeological history. These results provide the first evidence for the presence of 16S rDNA of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in Holocene sediments of an alpine meromictic lake and indicate that the water column stratification and the bacterial plume were already present in Lake Cadagno thousands of years ago. The finding of Chlorobium clathratiforme remains in all the samples analyzed shows that this population, identified in the water column only in 2001, was already a part of the lake's biota in the past.

  7. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  8. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Chujo, Takeshi; Ishigami, Yuma; Chemla, Yonatan; Blumberg, Amit; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  9. Characterization of the Complete Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Sequences of Paramphistomum cervi

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xu; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Si-Qin; Lou, Yan; Duan, Hong; Guo, Dong-Hui; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Sequences of the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene from five individual Paramphistomum cervi were determined for the first time. The five complete rDNA sequences, which included the 18S rDNA, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), the 5.8S rDNA, the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), the 28S rDNA, and the intergenic spacer (IGS) regions, had a length range of 8,493–10,221 bp. The lengths of the investigated 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2, and 28S rDNA sequences, which were 1,994 bp, 1,293 bp, 157 bp, 286 bp, and 4,186 bp, respectively, did not vary. However, the IGS rDNA sequences had a length range of 577–2,305 bp. The 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences had 100% identity among the five investigated samples, while the identities among the IGS had a range of 53.7–99.8%. A comparative analysis revealed that different types and numbers of repeats were found within each ITS1 and IGS region, which may be related to the length polymorphism of IGS. The phylogenetic position of P. cervi in Paramphistomatidae was analyzed based on the 18S rDNA sequences. These results will aid in studying the intra- and interspecific variation of the Paramphistomatidae and the systematics and phylogenetics of Digenea. PMID:25140347

  10. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  11. Analysis of histone modifications at human ribosomal DNA in liver cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng; Shen, Xingyong; Fan, Li; Yu, Zhaocai

    2015-01-01

    Human liver cancer is the cancer commonly seen clinically. The transcription of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a critical step for cells, and epigenetic marks such as post-translational histone modifications have been involved in the regulation of rDNA transcription. But less is known about the pathogenesis of the liver cancers concerning the rDNA transcription regulation. Here we aligned the ChIP-seq data of histone modification markers and CTCF to the human genome assembly which contains a single rDNA repeat in human liver cancer cell and validated their distribution with ChIP-QPCR. Human liver cancer cell possesses a higher enrichment of H3K4me1 and H3K27me3 at ~28 kb within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of rDNA and a higher enrichment of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac upstream of TSS. Furtherly, we studied whether UBF could affect histone modification markers and CTCF at rDNA in human liver cancer cell. UBF depletion leads to a decrease of gene activation mark H3K4me3 across the rDNA promoter. And other histone modification marks and CTCF were not altered after UBF depletion. Taken together, our data showed a high resolution map of histone modification marks at rDNA in human liver cancer cell and provide novel evidence to decipher chromatin-mediated regulation of rDNA in liver cancer. PMID:26657029

  12. Polymorphism and evolution of ribosomal DNA in tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Li, Lijia; Hasegawa, Masami; Lu, Fan; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Wenju

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats often exhibit a high level of within-species homogeneity, but intra-individual polymorphism of rDNA has been found in Camellia species. In order to reveal the evolutionary pattern of rDNA repeats in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze], we identified the 45S rDNA loci, estimated their copy number, and cloned partial regions of them from different PCR products and from digested genomic DNA. The results show that there are 3 loci (6 sites) containing 45S rDNA in the tea genome; they are located at the ends of the short arms of 6 chromosomes and consist of a maximum of ∼6500 repeat units. On one hand, 164 sequences of the 26S rDNA cloned from PCR products contained 147 haplotypes, consisting of 62% pseudogenes, 24% putative functional genes, and 14% PCR-mediated recombinants, suggesting that the 45S rDNA of tea maintains an extremely high level of polymorphism and divergence; on the other hand, rDNA fragments cloned directly from genomic DNA exhibited a very high level of homogeneity: only one of 33 rDNA fragments was from a pseudogene. These results demonstrate that although over 60% of the 26S rDNA sequences identified in PCR products belong to pseudogenes, most 45S rDNA repeats are functional genes and have undergone concerted evolution. In this study, strong PCR bias and PCR-mediated recombination greatly increased the apparent proportion of pseudogenes in PCR products. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic divergence values for 26S rDNA sequences obtained in this study show that many pseudogenes have originated independently from functional genes at different times, and despite thus escaping from concerted evolution, they have failed to be eliminated from the tea genome over a long period, some of them having even produced addition copies by rapid expansion. Importantly, our study suggests that in order to determine the true pattern of evolution of rDNA it is necessary to combine data from more than one method rather than relying only

  13. Geographically localised bursts of ribosomal DNA mobility in the grasshopper Podisma pedestris.

    PubMed

    Veltsos, P; Keller, I; Nichols, R A

    2009-07-01

    We report extraordinary variation in the number and the chromosomal location of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays within populations of the alpine grasshopper Podisma pedestris; even greater differences were found between populations. The sites were detected by in situ hybridisation of labelled rDNA to chromosomal preparations. The total number of rDNA sites in an individual varied from three to thirteen. In the most extreme case, individuals from populations only 10 km apart had no rDNA loci in common. A survey of the geographical distribution of this variation identified clusters of populations with relatively similar chromosomal distribution of rDNA loci. These clusters correspond to those identified earlier by analysis of rDNA sequences. To explain this geographical clustering, we reconstructed the post-glacial colonisation of the region by assuming that the species' distribution has ascended to its current altitudinal range as the climate warmed. The reconstruction suggests that each cluster is descended from a colonisation route up a different alpine valley. That history would imply rapid establishment of rDNA differences, conceivably during the last 10,000 years since the last glaciation. The proposal for rapid change is consistent with the extensive within-population variation, which indicates that the processes responsible for the change in rDNA's chromosomal location continue to occur at a higher rate. We discuss whether our reconstruction of colonisation routes implies movement of the hybrid zone, which would indicate that a neo-XY sex chromosome system has spread through extant populations.

  14. Systematic analysis and evolution of 5S ribosomal DNA in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Vierna, J; Wehner, S; Höner zu Siederdissen, C; Martínez-Lage, A; Marz, M

    2013-11-01

    Several studies on 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) have been focused on a subset of the following features in mostly one organism: number of copies, pseudogenes, secondary structure, promoter and terminator characteristics, genomic arrangements, types of non-transcribed spacers and evolution. In this work, we systematically analyzed 5S rDNA sequence diversity in available metazoan genomes, and showed organism-specific and evolutionary-conserved features. Putatively functional sequences (12,766) from 97 organisms allowed us to identify general features of this multigene family in animals. Interestingly, we show that each mammal species has a highly conserved (housekeeping) 5S rRNA type and many variable ones. The genomic organization of 5S rDNA is still under debate. Here, we report the occurrence of several paralog 5S rRNA sequences in 58 of the examined species, and a flexible genome organization of 5S rDNA in animals. We found heterogeneous 5S rDNA clusters in several species, supporting the hypothesis of an exchange of 5S rDNA from one locus to another. A rather high degree of variation of upstream, internal and downstream putative regulatory regions appears to characterize metazoan 5S rDNA. We systematically studied the internal promoters and described three different types of termination signals, as well as variable distances between the coding region and the typical termination signal. Finally, we present a statistical method for detection of linkage among noncoding RNA (ncRNA) gene families. This method showed no evolutionary-conserved linkage among 5S rDNAs and any other ncRNA genes within Metazoa, even though we found 5S rDNA to be linked to various ncRNAs in several clades.

  15. Correlation between ribosomal DNA polymorphism and electrophoretic enzyme polymorphism in Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Picard-Pasquier, N; Picard, B; Heeralal, S; Krishnamoorthy, R; Goullet, P

    1990-08-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphism was compared with electrophoretic enzyme polymorphism for the intra- and interspecies differentiation of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. frederiksenii and Y. kristensenii. DNA from 90 strains previously classified into six zymotypes (Y. enterocolitica and Y. frederiksenii) and into distinct enzyme electrophoretic patterns (the four other species) was digested with EcoRI or HindIII and analysed by Southern blotting. The six species were clearly differentiated from each other. In Y. enterocolitica, the subclassification of biotype 1 into zymotypes 1A and 1B was also reflected in the rDNA and the four other bio-zymotypes gave four different classes of restriction pattern. In Y. frederiksenii, both EcoRI and HindIII gave five distinct riboclasses which correlated with the zymotypes. In the four other species, the phenotype polymorphism appeared to be better correlated with the restriction fragment length polymorphism data in some enzymes than others. The data demonstrate that the inter- and intraspecies classification by rDNA polymorphism using two restriction enzymes is similar to that based on electrophoretic enzyme polymorphism. The analysis could be refined for taxonomic and epidemiological purposes by using other restriction enzymes.

  16. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Dass, Randall A; Sarshad, Aishe A; Carson, Brittany B; Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kaur, Amanpreet; Obrdlik, Ales; Parks, Matthew M; Prakash, Varsha; Love, Damon K; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M C; Vincent, C Theresa

    2016-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  17. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Randall A.; Sarshad, Aishe A.; Feenstra, Jennifer M.; Kaur, Amanpreet; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C.; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M. C.; Vincent, C. Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  18. Structural basis for the methylation of A1408 in 16S rRNA by a panaminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase NpmA from a clinical isolate and analysis of the NpmA interactions with the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nilofer; Obranić, Sonja; Koscinski, Lukasz; Seetharaman, J.; Babić, Fedora; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Maravić-Vlahoviček, Gordana; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    NpmA, a methyltransferase that confers resistance to aminoglycosides was identified in an Escherichia coli clinical isolate. It belongs to the kanamycin–apramycin methyltransferase (Kam) family and specifically methylates the 16S rRNA at the N1 position of A1408. We determined the structures of apo-NpmA and its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.4, 2.7 and 1.68 Å, respectively. We generated a number of NpmA variants with alanine substitutions and studied their ability to bind the cofactor, to methylate A1408 in the 30S subunit, and to confer resistance to kanamycin in vivo. Residues D30, W107 and W197 were found to be essential. We have also analyzed the interactions between NpmA and the 30S subunit by footprinting experiments and computational docking. Helices 24, 42 and 44 were found to be the main NpmA-binding site. Both experimental and theoretical analyses suggest that NpmA flips out the target nucleotide A1408 to carry out the methylation. NpmA is plasmid-encoded and can be transferred between pathogenic bacteria; therefore it poses a threat to the successful use of aminoglycosides in clinical practice. The results presented here will assist in the development of specific NpmA inhibitors that could restore the potential of aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:21062819

  19. An abundant nucleolar phosphoprotein is associated with ribosomal DNA in Tetrahymena macronuclei.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, K E; Smothers, J F; Dadd, C A; Madireddi, M T; Gorovsky, M A; Allis, C D

    1997-01-01

    An abundant 52-kDa phosphoprotein was identified and characterized from macronuclei of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. Immunoblot analyses combined with light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry demonstrate that this polypeptide, termed Nopp52, is enriched in the nucleoli of transcriptionally active macronuclei and missing altogether from transcriptionally inert micronuclei. The cDNA sequence encoding Nopp52 predicts a polypeptide whose amino-terminal half consists of multiple acidic/serine-rich regions alternating with basic/proline-rich regions. Multiple serines located in these acidic stretches lie within casein kinase II consensus motifs, and Nopp52 is an excellent substrate for casein kinase II in vitro. The carboxyl-terminal half of Nopp52 contains two RNA recognition motifs and an extreme carboxyl-terminal domain rich in glycine, arginine, and phenylalanine, motifs common in many RNA processing proteins. A similar combination and order of motifs is found in vertebrate nucleolin and yeast NSR1, suggesting that Nopp52 is a member of a family of related nucleolar proteins. NSR1 and nucleolin have been implicated in transcriptional regulation of rDNA and rRNA processing. Consistent with a role in ribosomal gene metabolism, rDNA and Nopp52 colocalize in situ, as well as by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments, demonstrating an association between Nopp52 and rDNA in vivo. Images PMID:9017598

  20. Novel extraction strategy of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from cheese for PCR-based investigations.

    PubMed

    Bonaïti, Catherine; Parayre, Sandrine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2006-03-15

    Cheese microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, constitute a complex ecosystem that plays a central role in cheeses ripening. The molecular study of cheese microbial diversity and activity is essential but the extraction of high quality nucleic acid may be problematic: the cheese samples are characterised by a strong buffering capacity which negatively influenced the yield of the extracted rRNA. The objective of this study is to develop an effective method for the direct and simultaneous isolation of yeast and bacterial ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from the same cheese samples. DNA isolation was based on a protocol used for nucleic acids isolation from anaerobic digestor, without preliminary washing step with the combined use of the action of chaotropic agent (acid guanidinium thiocyanate), detergents (SDS, N-lauroylsarcosine), chelating agent (EDTA) and a mechanical method (bead beating system). The DNA purification was carried out by two washing steps of phenol-chloroform. RNA was isolated successfully after the second acid extraction step by recovering it from the phenolic phase of the first acid extraction. The novel method yielded pure preparation of undegraded RNA accessible for reverse transcription-PCR. The extraction protocol of genomic DNA and rRNA was applicable to complex ecosystem of different cheese matrices.

  1. [Identification of fish species based on ribosomal DNA ITS2 locus].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wan-An

    2010-04-01

    To prevent illegal fishing and sale, the most difficult problem is identification of marketed fish species, especially the parts that are difficult to be differentiated with morphological method (e.g., larval, eggs, scales, meat, products etc. To assist conservation and management of fishery resources, this paper reported a molecular genetic approach based on ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus. The method includes two steps: (1) the order general primers were designed according to the conservative nature of 5.8SrRAN and 28SrRNA genes within an order, and the DNA ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus fragment were then amplified and sequenced. (2) The species-specific ladders and the species-specific primers for each species were designed according to the sequencing results. The map of molecular taxonomy was constructed. This approach employs multiplex PCR that is formatted for fish species identification. We tested 210 single-species samples and 40 mix-species samples from different regions of China. The approach distinguished accurately and sensitively samples from each of the five species. This genetic and molecular approach will be useful for fish conservation, assessment, management and exploitation, strengthen in law enforcement of fishery manager, combat rare and endangered fish smuggling, and prevent commercial fraud and biological invasion by harmful nonnative species.

  2. Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres). In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i) rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii) a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii) 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv) a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion) also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome repatterning observed

  3. Metagenomic retrieval of a ribosomal DNA repeat array from an uncultured marine alveolate.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Karniol, Baruch; Pommier, Thomas; Bodaker, Idan; Béjà, Oded

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the use of large-scale sequencing to better describe the genome content of naturally occurring, uncultured protists. We constructed a metagenomic fosmid library from a picoplanktonic assemblage (0.2-3 mum size cells) collected at the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory (Western Mediterranean). Seven clones contained a small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) affiliating with prasinophytes and uncultured alveolates. One clone (FBB25; 35 kb in size) was completely sequenced and found to be a tandem repeat array (5.5 times) of the rDNA operon, including three rRNA genes (SSU, large-subunit and 5.8S rDNAs) and three spacer regions (internal transcribed spacers 1, 2 and intergenic spacer). The SSU rDNA of FBB25 affiliated with the marine alveolates group I, cluster 1, and was almost identical to sequences retrieved only in marine surveys from a wide geographic and ecological range. Phylogenetic trees using the different rRNA genes showed FBB25 as an independent branch among the main alveolate groups, but their closest affiliation varied between the SSU tree (dinoflagellates) and the large-subunit and 5.8S trees (perkinsids). The spacer regions of FBB25 were particularly short when compared with other eukaryotes, indicating a possible genome streamlining in this picoeukaryote. Finally, not a single polymorphism was found in the rDNA repeat array, suggesting that the high SSU rDNA variability typically found in molecular surveys derives from organismal and not intragenomic diversity. This first report on the rDNA genomic structure of an uncultured marine alveolate improves their phylogenetic position and helps interpreting data generated during picoeukaryotic molecular surveys.

  4. Sequence analysis and comparison of ribosomal DNA from bovine Neospora to similar coccidial parasites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, A E; Barr, B C; Sverlow, K; Ho, M; Dubey, J P; Conrad, P A

    1995-08-01

    The nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA (nss-rRNA) gene sequence of Neospora spp. isolated from cattle was analyzed and compared to the sequences from several closely related cyst-forming coccidial parasites. Double-stranded DNA sequencing of 5 bovine Neospora spp. isolates (BPA1-4), 2 Neospora caninum isolates (NC-1 and NC-3), and 3 Toxoplasma gondii isolates (RH, GT-1, CT-1) were performed and compared to each other, as well as to other sequences available in GenBank for the NC-1 isolate, Sarcocystis muris, and Cryptosporidium parvum. There were no nucleotide differences detected between the Neospora spp. isolates from cattle and dogs. Four nucleotide differences were consistently detected when sequences of Neospora spp. isolates were compared to those of the T. gondii isolates. These results indicate that Neospora spp. and T. gondii are closely related, but distinct, species.

  5. 16S rDNA-based analysis reveals cosmopolitan occurrence but limited diversity of two cyanobacterial lineages with contrasted patterns of intracellular carbonate mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Ragon, Marie; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are mainly thought to induce carbonate precipitation extracellularly via their photosynthetic activity combined with the nucleation potential of exopolymeric substances. The discovery in microbialites of the alkaline lake Alchichica (Mexico) of Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, a cyanobacterium forming large amounts of intracellular Mg-Ca-Sr-Ba carbonate spherules, showed that intracellular biomineralization in cyanobacteria is also possible. A second cyanobacterium isolated from the same environment, Candidatus Synechococcus calcipolaris G9, has been recently shown to also form intracellular calcium carbonates at the cell poles, a capability shared by all cultured species of the Thermosynechococcus clade, to which it belongs. To explore the diversity of these two distant cyanobacterial lineages representing two different patterns of intracellular calcification, we designed specific primers against their 16S rRNA genes and looked for their occurrence in a wide variety of samples. We identified the presence of members of the Gloeomargarita and Thermosynechococcus/S. calcipolaris lineages in microbialites collected from Lake Alchichica and three other neighboring Mexican lakes. The two clades also occurred in karstic areas and in some thermophilic or hypersaline microbial mats collected in South America and/or Southern Europe. Surprisingly, the within-group diversity in the two clades was low, especially within the S. calcipolaris clade, with all 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved sharing more than 97% identity. This suggests that these clades are composed of a limited number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with cosmopolitan distribution. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry showed the presence of intracellularly calcifying Gloeomargarita-like cyanobacteria in fresh samples where this clade was relatively abundant, suggesting that these cyanobacteria do precipitate carbonates intracellularly

  6. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  7. Ribosomal DNA sequence of Nucleospora salmonis Hedrick, Groff and Baxa, 1991 (Microsporea:Enterocytozoonidae): implications for phylogeny and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F; Kent, M L; Hervio, D M; Khattra, J S; Weiss, L M; Cali, A; Devlin, R H

    1997-01-01

    Rules of zoological nomenclature, morphological data, and ribosomal DNA sequence data support the validity of the genus Nucleospora, and its placement in the family Enterocytozoonidae. Although Nucleospora exhibits most of the distinguishing morphological characteristics of the family Enterocytozoonidae Cali and Owen, 1990, the distinctively different hosts (fish and humans, respectively) and sites of development (the nuclei of immature blood cells and the cytoplasm of enterocytes) support the placement of Nucleospora and Enterocytozoon into separate genera. Ribosomal DNA sequence comparisons between Nucleospora salmonis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi showed 19.8% genetic divergence in the large and small subunit regions. Although more inter- and intrageneric comparisons are needed before percent homology of ribosomal DNA can be used as a criterion for the separation of genera, the genetic divergence between the two species is sufficiently large to deter suppression of the genus Nucleospora as a junior synonym of Enterocytozoon. A polymerase chain reaction test for the detection of N. salmonis in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), based on N. salmonis-specific ribosomal DNA sequence, is described.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Sorghum and related taxa using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Skinner, D Z; Liang, G H; Hulbert, S H

    1994-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the genus Sorghum and related genera were studied by sequencing the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). DNA was extracted from 15 Sorghum accessions, including one accession from each of the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum, four accessions from Parasorghum, two accessions from Stiposorghum, and seven representatives from three species of the section Sorghum (one accession from each of S. propinquum and S. halepense, and five races of S. bicolor). The maize (Zea mays) line, H95, and an accession from Cleistachne sorghoides were also included in the study. Variable nucleotides were used to construct a strict consensus phylogenetic tree. The analyses indicate that S. propinquum, S. halepense and S. bicolor subsp. arundinaceum race aethiopicum may be the closest wild relatives of cultivated sorghum; Sorghum nitidum may be the closest 2n=10 relative to S. bicolor, the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum appear closely related to each other and more closely related to the section Sorghum than Parasorghum; and the section Parasorghum is not monophyletic. The results also indicate that the genus Sorghum is a very ancient and diverse group.

  9. SIRT1 regulates the ribosomal DNA locus: epigenetic candles twinkle longevity in the Christmas tree.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes arrange themselves in a tandem pattern in nucleolus and during the transcription of rRNA genes, the elongating nascent rRNA transcripts create a structure called Christmas tree. rRNA genes in the rDNA locus can be either active or silent depending on the epigenetic regulation of the chromatin structure. Yeast Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) protein containing complexes can repress the recombination in the rDNA locus and subsequently extend the replicative lifespan of the budding yeast. The mammalian rDNA locus is also under the epigenetic regulation by protein complexes, such as NoRC (nucleolar remodeling complex) and eNoSC (energy-dependent nucleolar silencing complex), involving histone deacetylases and methyltransferases. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, is the key component in the eNoSC complex and hence energetic changes can regulate the activation of eNoSC complex and in this way mediate the epigenetic silencing of rRNA gene expression. The eNoSC complex links SIRT1-induced longevity regulation to the metabolic rate theory of aging.

  10. Phylogeography of East Asian Lespedeza buergeri (Fabaceae) based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence variations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Pil; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Xu, Bo; Choi, Byoung-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic changes in land configuration during the Quaternary that were accompanied by climatic oscillations have significantly influenced the current distribution and genetic structure of warm-temperate forests in East Asia. Although recent surveys have been conducted, the historical migration of forest species via land bridges and, especially, the origins of Korean populations remains conjectural. Here, we reveal the genetic structure of Lespedeza buergeri, a warm-temperate shrub that is disjunctively distributed around the East China Sea (ECS) at China, Korea, and Japan. Two non-coding regions (rpl32-trnL, psbA-trnH) of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrITS) were analyzed for 188 individuals from 16 populations, which covered almost all of its distribution. The nrITS data demonstrated a genetic structure that followed geographic boundaries. This examination utilized AMOVA, comparisons of genetic differentiation based on haplotype frequency/genetic mutations among haplotypes, and Mantel tests. However, the cpDNA data showed contrasting genetic pattern, implying that this difference was due to a slower mutation rate in cpDNA than in nrITS. These results indicated frequent migration by this species via an ECS land bridge during the early Pleistocene that then tapered gradually toward the late Pleistocene. A genetic isolation between western and eastern Japan coincided with broad consensus that was suggested by the presence of other warm-temperate plants in that country. For Korean populations, high genetic diversity indicated the existence of refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum on the Korean Peninsula. However, their closeness with western Japanese populations at the level of haplotype clade implied that gene flow from western Japanese refugia was possible until post-glacial processing occurred through the Korea/Tsushima Strait land bridge. PMID:27206725

  11. The D1-D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal DNA as barcode for ciliates.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, T; Przybos, E; Dunthorn, M

    2014-05-01

    Ciliates are a major evolutionary lineage within the alveolates, which are distributed in nearly all habitats on our planet and are an essential component for ecosystem function, processes and stability. Accurate identification of these unicellular eukaryotes through, for example, microscopy or mating type reactions is reserved to few specialists. To satisfy the demand for a DNA barcode for ciliates, which meets the standard criteria for DNA barcodes defined by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), we here evaluated the D1-D2 region of the ribosomal DNA large subunit (LSU-rDNA). Primer universality for the phylum Ciliophora was tested in silico with available database sequences as well as in the laboratory with 73 ciliate species, which represented nine of 12 ciliate classes. Primers tested in this study were successful for all tested classes. To test the ability of the D1-D2 region to resolve conspecific and congeneric sequence divergence, 63 Paramecium strains were sampled from 24 mating species. The average conspecific D1-D2 variation was 0.18%, whereas congeneric sequence divergence averaged 4.83%. In pairwise genetic distance analyses, we identified a D1-D2 sequence divergence of <0.6% as an ideal threshold to discriminate Paramecium species. Using this definition, only 3.8% of all conspecific and 3.9% of all congeneric sequence comparisons had the potential of false assignments. Neighbour-joining analyses inferred monophyly for all taxa but for two Paramecium octaurelia strains. Here, we present a protocol for easy DNA amplification of single cells and voucher deposition. In conclusion, the presented data pinpoint the D1-D2 region as an excellent candidate for an official CBOL barcode for ciliated protists.

  12. Comparative sequence analyses on the 16S rRNA (rDNA) of Bacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus acidoterrestris, and Bacillus cycloheptanicus and proposal for creation of a new genus, Alicyclobacillus gen. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.; Deinhard, G.; Poralla, K.

    1992-01-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA (rDNA) sequence analyses performed on the thermophilic Bacillus species Bacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus acidoterrestris, and Bacillus cycloheptanicus revealed that these organisms are sufficiently different from the traditional Bacillus species to warrant reclassification in a new genus, Alicyclobacillus gen. nov. An analysis of 16S rRNA sequences established that these three thermoacidophiles cluster in a group that differs markedly from both the obligately thermophilic organisms Bacillus stearothermophilus and the facultatively thermophilic organism Bacillus coagulans, as well as many other common mesophilic and thermophilic Bacillus species. The thermoacidophilic Bacillus species B. acidocaldarius, B. acidoterrestris, and B. cycloheptanicus also are unique in that they possess omega-alicylic fatty acid as the major natural membranous lipid component, which is a rare phenotype that has not been found in any other Bacillus species characterized to date. This phenotype, along with the 16S rRNA sequence data, suggests that these thermoacidophiles are biochemically and genetically unique and supports the proposal that they should be reclassified in the new genus Alicyclobacillus.

  13. Variation in Ribosomal DNA among Isolates of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Cenococcum Geophilum FR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobuglio, Katherine Frances

    1990-01-01

    Cenococcum geophilum Fr., a cosmopolitan mycorrhizal fungus, is well-known for its extremely wide host and habitat range. The ecological diversity of C. geophilum sharply contrasts its present taxonomic status as a monotypic form -genus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to assess the degree of genetic variation among 72 isolates of C. geophilum. The probe used in this study was the rDNA repeat cloned from C. geophilum isolate A145 (pCG15). Length of the rDNA repeat was approximately 9 kb. The rDNA clone was mapped for 5 restriction endonucleases. Hybridization with cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA (pSR118, and pSR125 containing the 18S, and 5.8-25S rRNA genes respectively), and alignment of restriction endonuclease sites conserved in the rDNA genes of other fungi, were used to position the corresponding rDNAs of C. geophilum. Southern hybridizations with EcoRI, HindIII, XhoI, and PstI digested DNAs indicated extensive variation among the C. geophilum isolates, greater than has been previously reported to occur within a fungal species. Most of the rDNA polymorphisms occurred in the IGS region. Restriction endonuclease site and length polymorphisms were also observed in the 5.8S-26S genic regions. Sixteen size categories of length mutations, 6 restriction endonuclease site additions, and 4 restriction endonuclease site deletions were determined using isolate A145 as a reference. The rDNA repeat length among the isolates varied from approximately 8.5 to 10.2 kb. RFLPs were also observed in the mitochondrial (mt) 24S rRNA gene and flanking regions of HindIII digested DNAs of C. geophilum isolates representing both geographically distinct and similar origins. Among the C. geophilum isolates analyzed there were fewer RFLPs in mt-DNA than in nuclear rDNA. EcoRI rDNA phenotypes between C. geophilum and Elaphomyces anthracinus, its proposed teleomorph or sexual state, did not correspond. In addition, the four

  14. Application of the Ribosomal DNA ITS2 Region of Physalis (Solanaceae): DNA Barcoding and Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Mengying; Shi, Yujun; Jiao, Kaili; Shen, Chenjia; Lu, Jiangjie; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, commercial interest in Physalis species has grown worldwide due to their high nutritional value, edible fruit, and potential medicinal properties. However, many Physalis species have similar shapes and are easily confused, and consequently the phylogenetic relationships between Physalis species are poorly understood. This hinders their safe utilization and genetic resource conservation. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region was used to identify species and phylogenetically examine Physalis. Eighty-six ITS2 regions from 45 Physalis species were analyzed. The ITS2 sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA V6.0. The results showed that ITS2 regions have significant intra- and inter-specific divergences, obvious barcoding gaps, and higher species discrimination rates (82.2% for both the BLASTA1 and nearest distance methods). In addition, the secondary structure of ITS2 provided another way to differentiate species. Cluster analysis based on ITS2 regions largely concurred with the relationships among Physalis species established by many previous molecular analyses, and showed that most sections of Physalis appear to be polyphyletic. Our results demonstrated that ITS2 can be used as an efficient and powerful marker in the identification and phylogenetic study of Physalis species. The technique provides a scientific basis for the conservation of Physalis plants and for utilization of resources. PMID:27486467

  15. Application of the Ribosomal DNA ITS2 Region of Physalis (Solanaceae): DNA Barcoding and Phylogenetic Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Mengying; Shi, Yujun; Jiao, Kaili; Shen, Chenjia; Lu, Jiangjie; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, commercial interest in Physalis species has grown worldwide due to their high nutritional value, edible fruit, and potential medicinal properties. However, many Physalis species have similar shapes and are easily confused, and consequently the phylogenetic relationships between Physalis species are poorly understood. This hinders their safe utilization and genetic resource conservation. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region was used to identify species and phylogenetically examine Physalis. Eighty-six ITS2 regions from 45 Physalis species were analyzed. The ITS2 sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA V6.0. The results showed that ITS2 regions have significant intra- and inter-specific divergences, obvious barcoding gaps, and higher species discrimination rates (82.2% for both the BLASTA1 and nearest distance methods). In addition, the secondary structure of ITS2 provided another way to differentiate species. Cluster analysis based on ITS2 regions largely concurred with the relationships among Physalis species established by many previous molecular analyses, and showed that most sections of Physalis appear to be polyphyletic. Our results demonstrated that ITS2 can be used as an efficient and powerful marker in the identification and phylogenetic study of Physalis species. The technique provides a scientific basis for the conservation of Physalis plants and for utilization of resources. PMID:27486467

  16. Molecular characterization of Fasciola gigantica from Mauritania based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Amor, Nabil; Farjallah, Sarra; Salem, Mohamed; Lamine, Dia Mamadou; Merella, Paolo; Said, Khaled; Ben Slimane, Badreddine

    2011-10-01

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda: Digenea) is considered the most important helminth infection of ruminants in tropical countries, causing considerable socioeconomic problems. From Africa, F. gigantica has been previously characterized from Burkina Faso, Senegal, Kenya, Zambia and Mali, while F. hepatica has been reported from Morocco and Tunisia, and both species have been observed from Ethiopia and Egypt on the basis of morphometric differences, while the use of molecular markers is necessary to distinguish exactly between species. Samples identified morphologically as F. gigantica (n=60) from sheep and cattle from different geographical localities of Mauritania were genetically characterized by sequences of the first (ITS-1), the 5.8S, and second (ITS-2) Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes and the mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase I (COI) gene. Comparison of the sequences of the Mauritanian samples with sequences of Fasciola spp. from GenBank confirmed that all samples belong to the species F. gigantica. The nucleotide sequencing of ITS rDNA of F. gigantica showed no nucleotide variation in the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 rDNA sequences among all samples examined and those from Burkina Faso, Kenya, Egypt and Iran. The phylogenetic trees based on the ITS-1 and ITS-2 sequences showed a close relationship of the Mauritanian samples with isolates of F. gigantica from different localities of Africa and Asia. The COI genotypes of the Mauritanian specimens of F. gigantica had a high level of diversity, and they belonged to the F. gigantica phylogenically distinguishable clade. The present study is the first molecular characterization of F. gigantica in sheep and cattle from Mauritania, allowing a reliable approach for the genetic differentiation of Fasciola spp. and providing basis for further studies on liver flukes in the African countries.

  17. A phylogenetic analysis of Prunus and the Amygdaloideae (Rosaceae) using ITS sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Wen, J

    2001-01-01

    The economically important plum or cherry genus (PRUNUS:) and the subfamily Amygdaloideae of the Rosaceae have a controversial taxonomic history due to the lack of a phylogenetic framework. Phylogenetic analysis using the ITS sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was conducted to construct the evolutionary history and evaluate the historical classifications of PRUNUS: and the Amygdaloideae. The analyses suggest two major groups within the Amygdaloideae: (1) PRUNUS: s.l. (sensu lato) and MADDENIA:, and (2) EXOCHORDA:, Oemleria, and PRINSEPIA: The ITS phylogeny supports the recent treatment of including EXOCHORDA: (formerly in the Spiraeoideae) in the Amygdaloideae. MADDENIA: is found to be nested within PRUNUS: s.l. in the parsimony and distance analyses, but basal to PRUNUS: s.l. in the maximum likelihood analysis. Within PRUNUS:, two major groups are recognizable: (1) the AMYGDALUS:-PRUNUS: group, and (2) the CERASUS:-LAUROCERASUS:-PADUS: group. The clades in the ITS phylogeny are not congruent with most subgeneric groups in the widely used classification of PRUNUS: by Rehder. A broadly defined PRUNUS: is supported. PMID:11159135

  18. Hirudinella ventricosa (Pallas, 1774) Baird, 1853 represents a species complex based on ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Dana M; Curran, Stephen S; Pulis, Eric E; Provaznik, Jennifer M; Franks, James S

    2013-10-01

    Digeneans in the genus Hirudinella de Blainville, 1828 (Hirudinellidae) from three species of pelagic fishes, Acanthocybium solandri (Cuvier), Makaira nigricans Lacépède and Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre), and one benthic fish, Mulloidichthys martinicus (Cuvier), from the Gulf of Mexico are investigated using comparison of ribosomal DNA. Four species are identified based on molecular differences: Hirudinella ventricosa (Pallas, 1774) Baird, 1853 from A. solandri, Hirudinella ahi Yamaguti, 1970 from T. albacares, and two unidentified but distinct species of Hirudinella, herein referred to as Hirudinella sp. A (from both M. nigricans and M. martinicus) and Hirudinella sp. B from M. nigricans. Additionally, H. ahi, based tentatively on morphological identification, is reported from Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus). This represents the first record of a hirudinellid from M. martinicus and the first record of H. ahi from T. thynnus. A phylogeny of some Hemiurata Skrjabin & Guschanskaja, 1954 using partial fragments of the 28S rDNA sequences is consistent with earlier phylogenies and the position of the Hirudinellidae Dollfus, 1932 is well-supported as a derived group most closely related to the Syncoeliidae Looss, 1899. PMID:24048751

  19. Variability of ribosomal DNA ITS-2 and its utility in detecting genetic relatedness of pearl oyster.

    PubMed

    He, Maoxian; Huang, Liangmin; Shi, Jianhua; Jiang, Yinping

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect interspecific and intraspecific genetic variations of the second internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (ITS-2), and explore the feasibility of using it as a molecular marker phylogenetic analyses and species identification among pearl oysters. ITS-2 sequences of 6 pearl oysters were amplified via polymerase chain reaction. The amplified DNA fragments were about 500 bp, spanning the partial sequences of 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. The GC contents of all species used in this study were higher than the AT contents. The variations of sequences involved substitutions as well as insertions/deletions and were mainly concentrated in spacer regions. Sequences of about 30-bp in spacer regions showed no variations among 5 Pincatda species. Intraindividual and intraspecific polymorphisms of ITS-2 sequences were detected in some species; the interspecific variability was significantly larger than the variability within species, and the variability at the genus level was higher than that at the species level. Both neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses of ITS-2 sequences revealed the distinguishable species boundary of 6 pearl oysters, and indicated that P. chemnitzi and P. nigra were the closely related species, as were P. maxima and P. margaritifera. The findings revealed that ITS-2 sequences could be an appropriate tool for phylogenetic study of pearl oysters.

  20. Use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect mutation in VS2 of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer amplified from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Barrie, H D; Mayall, B C

    2001-06-01

    To develop a double gradient denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) based typing method that rapidly and accurately types clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, the VS2 region of the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region (ISR) was chosen because of its potential high variation. The VS2 region was amplified with a 40-mer GC-clamp attached to the 5'-end of the reverse primer. The 145 bp PCR product was then separated by DG-DGGE using denaturant concentrations of 25-40% and polyacrylamide concentrations of 6-12%. Of the five mutations identified in 336 S. aureus isolates, one mutation was found to be highly specific for 161/171 (94%) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates from different geographic locations and isolation times. This same mutation was found in 15/160 (9%) of penicillin- or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates. In some isolates two mutations occured together in the one genome suggesting some S. aureus isolates have two copies of VS2. In these 336 isolates nine genotypes with different combinations of the five mutations were identified. In 18 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), the MRSA-specific mutation was found along with two other mutations in all isolates demonstrating consistent differences in the presence of these mutations between CNS and S. aureus. The marked differences in VS2 sequences found between MRSA, methicillin- or penicillin-sensitive S. aureus (SSA), and CNS by DGGE in the present study may be useful in evolutionary studies and in the development of a specific assay for MRSA from clinical specimens.

  1. Fecal microbial diversity in pre-weaned dairy calves as described by pyrosequencing of metagenomic 16S rDNA. Associations of Faecalibacterium species with health and growth.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Georgios; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo Vieira; Foditsch, Carla; Bicalho, Marcela Lucas; Machado, Vinicius Silva; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we use barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the fecal microbiota of neonatal calves and identify possible relationships of certain microbiota profiles with health and weight gain. Fecal samples were obtained weekly from 61 calves from birth until weaning (seventh week of the calves' life). Firmicutes was the most prevalent phylum, with a prevalence ranging from 63.84% to 81.90%, followed by Bacteroidetes (8.36% to 23.93%), Proteobacteria (3.72% to 9.75%), Fusobacteria (0.76% to 5.67%), and Actinobacteria (1.02% to 2.35%). Chao1 index gradually increased from the first to the seventh postnatal week. Chao1 index was lower during the third, fourth, and fifth week of life in calves that suffered from pneumonia and were treated with antibiotics. Diarrhea incidence during the first four weeks of the calves' life was also associated with a reduction of microbial diversity during the third week of life. Increased fecal microbial diversity after the second week of life was associated with higher weight gain. Using discriminant analysis we were able to show differences in the microbiota profiles between different weeks of life, between high and low weight gain groups of calves, and between calves affected and not affected with diarrhea during the first four weeks life. The prevalence of Faecalibacterium spp. in the first week of life was associated with weight gain and the incidence of diarrhea, with higher prevalence being associated with higher weight gain and less diarrhea. Representative sequences from Faecalibacterium spp. were closely affiliated to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results presented here provide new information regarding the intestinal microbiota of neonatal calves and its association with health and growth. Fecal microbial diversity was associated with calf age, disease status and growth rates. Results suggesting a possible beneficial effect of Faecalibacterium spp. on health and growth are promising.

  2. [Sequence of the ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA(nrDNA) in Xinjiang wild Dianthus and its phylogenetic relationship].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Cai, You-Ming; Zhuge, Qiang; Zou, Hui-Yu; Huang, Min-Ren

    2002-06-01

    Xinjiang is a center of distribution and differentiation of genus Dianthus in China, and has a great deal of species resources. The sequences of ITS region (including ITS-1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA from 8 species of genus Dianthus wildly distributed in Xinjiang were determined by direct sequencing of PCR products. The result showed that the size of the ITS of Dianthus is from 617 to 621 bp, and the length variation is only 4 bp. There are very high homogeneous (97.6%-99.8%) sequences between species, and about 80% homogeneous sequences between genus Dianthus and outgroup. The sequences of ITS in genus Dianthus are relatively conservative. In general, there are more conversion than transition in the variation sites among genus Dianthus. The conversion rates are relatively high, and the ratios of conversion/transition are 1.0-3.0. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences the species of Dianthus in China would be divided into three sections. There is a distant relationship between sect. Barbulatum Williams and sect. Dianthus and between sect. Barbulatum Williams and sect. Fimbriatum Williams, and there is a close relationship between sect. Dianthus and sect. Fimbriatum Williams. From the phylogenetic tree of ITS it was found that the origin of sect. Dianthusis is earlier than that of sect. Fimbriatum Williams and sect. Barbulatum Williams.

  3. Deterioration to extinction of wastewater bacteria by non-thermal atmospheric pressure air plasma as assessed by 16S rDNA-DGGE fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Wael S.; Ouf, Salama A.; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of cold plasma jets for inactivation of a variety of microorganisms has recently been evaluated via culture-based methods. Accordingly, elucidation of the role of cold plasma in decontamination would be inaccurate because most microbial populations within a system remain unexplored owing to the high amount of yet uncultured bacteria. The impact of cold atmospheric plasma on the bacterial community structure of wastewater from two different industries was investigated by metagenomic-based polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) utilizing 16S rRNA genes. Three doses of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma were applied to wastewater samples on different time scales. DGGE revealed that the bacterial community gradually changed and overall abundance decreased to extinction upon plasma treatment. The bacterial community in food processing wastewater contained 11 key operational taxonomic units that remained almost completely unchanged when exposed to plasma irradiation at 75.5 mA for 30 or 60 s. However, when exposure time was extended to 90 s, only Escherichia coli, Coliforms, Aeromonas sp., Vibrio sp., and Pseudomonas putida survived. Only E. coli, Aeromonas sp., Vibrio sp., and P. putida survived treatment at 81.94 mA for 90 s. Conversely, all bacterial groups were completely eliminated by treatment at 85.34 mA for either 60 or 90 s. Dominant bacterial groups in leather processing wastewater also changed greatly upon exposure to plasma at 75.5 mA for 30 or 60 s, with Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella sp., Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans being sensitive to and eliminated from the community. At 90 s of exposure, all groups were affected except for Pseudomonas sp. and Citrobacter freundii. The same trend was observed for treatment at 81.94 mA. The variability in bacterial community response to different plasma treatment protocols revealed that plasma had a selective impact on bacterial

  4. Bacterial flora as indicated by PCR-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of 16S rDNA gene fragments from isolated guts of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Guernaoui, S; Garcia, D; Gazanion, E; Ouhdouch, Y; Boumezzough, A; Pesson, B; Fontenille, D; Sereno, D

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we tested the capacity of Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE)-based fingerprinting of 16S rDNA PCR fragments to assess bacterial composition in a single isolated sand fly gut. Bacterial content was studied in different life stages of a laboratory-reared colony of Phlebotomus duboscqi and in a wild-caught Phlebotomus papatasi population. Our study demonstrates that a major reorganization in the gut bacterial community occurs during metamorphosis of sand flies. Chloroflexi spp. was dominant in the guts of pre-imaginal stages, although Microbacterium spp. and another as yet unidentified bacteria were detected in the gut of the adult specimen. Interestingly, Microbacterium spp. was also found in all the adult guts of both species. We demonstrate that the analysis of bacterial diversity in an individualized sand fly gut is possible with fingerprinting of 16S rDNA. The use of such methodology, in conjunction with other culture-based methods, will be of great help in investigating the behavior of the Leishmania-bacterial community in an ecological context.

  5. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P.; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species’ contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  6. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species' contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  7. Restless 5S: the re-arrangement(s) and evolution of the nuclear ribosomal DNA in land plants.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Susann; Costa, Andrea; Muñoz, Jesùs; Quandt, Dietmar

    2011-11-01

    Among eukaryotes two types of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) organization have been observed. Either all components, i.e. the small ribosomal subunit, 5.8S, large ribosomal subunit, and 5S occur tandemly arranged or the 5S rDNA forms a separate cluster of its own. Generalizations based on data derived from just a few model organisms have led to a superimposition of structural and evolutionary traits to the entire plant kingdom asserting that plants generally possess separate arrays. This study reveals that plant nrDNA organization into separate arrays is not a distinctive feature, but rather assignable almost solely to seed plants. We show that early diverging land plants and presumably streptophyte algae share a co-localization of all rRNA genes within one repeat unit. This raises the possibility that the state of rDNA gene co-localization had occurred in their common ancestor. Separate rDNA arrays were identified for all basal seed plants and water ferns, implying at least two independent 5S rDNA transposition events during land plant evolution. Screening for 5S derived Cassandra transposable elements which might have played a role during the transposition events, indicated that this retrotransposon is absent in early diverging vascular plants including early fern lineages. Thus, Cassandra can be rejected as a primary mechanism for 5S rDNA transposition in water ferns. However, the evolution of Cassandra and other eukaryotic 5S derived elements might have been a side effect of the 5S rDNA cluster formation. Structural analysis of the intergenic spacers of the ribosomal clusters revealed that transposition events partially affect spacer regions and suggests a slightly different transcription regulation of 5S rDNA in early land plants. 5S rDNA upstream regulatory elements are highly divergent or absent from the LSU-5S spacers of most early divergent land plant lineages. Several putative scenarios and mechanisms involved in the concerted relocation of hundreds of 5S

  8. Who are the active players of the Iberian Margin deep biosphere? Microbial diversity of borehole U1385 through analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. A.; Orsi, W.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Biddle, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial community structure and activity in marine deep subsurface environments across the globe have been assayed using various molecular biology tools including 16S rDNA sequencing, microarrays, FISH/CARD-FISH, and metagenomics. Many studies involving these techniques are DNA-based. This limits study of microbial function in these environments as DNA does not degrade as quickly as RNA and may lead to misinterpreting relic microbial genes as important for present-day activity. In this study, the diversity of bacteria and archaea from sediments of the Iberian Margin IODP borehole U1385 was analyzed from bulk extracted DNA and RNA at seven different depths ranging from 10 to 123 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Presented data suggests that the picture of microbial diversity obtained from DNA is markedly different from that seen through analysis of RNA. IODP borehole U1385 offers a great comparison to ODP Site 1229, a well characterized borehole on the Peru Margin. Similar sediment depositional history and geochemistry will allow exploration of what represents a 'typical' continental margin sediment microbial community or if microbial endemism is established despite similar conditions. This study represents the first molecular exploration of sediment microbial communities from the Iberian Margin IODP Site U1385.

  9. DNA damage stress induces the expression of ribosomal protein S27a gene in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Nagisa; Kapoor, Neetu Rohit; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-03-15

    The small ribosomal protein RPS27a is known to play a role in the activation of cellular checkpoints via p53 which links ribosome biogenesis to cell cycle progression. Here, we show that RPS27a gene is a direct transcriptional target of p53 and is overexpressed in response to DNA damage. Elevated RPS27a level was associated with increased expression of p53 and its target p21(Waf1) gene. The RPS27a activity was specifically inhibited in the presence of a dominant negative mutant of p53. Down-regulation of ectopically expressed RPS27a by RNA interference blocked the activation of p21(waf1) in response to DNA damage. Thus, RPS27a appears to be a novel stress sensor in the cell which amplifies p53 response to arrest cell cycle.

  10. DNA damage stress induces the expression of ribosomal protein S27a gene in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Nagisa; Kapoor, Neetu Rohit; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-03-15

    The small ribosomal protein RPS27a is known to play a role in the activation of cellular checkpoints via p53 which links ribosome biogenesis to cell cycle progression. Here, we show that RPS27a gene is a direct transcriptional target of p53 and is overexpressed in response to DNA damage. Elevated RPS27a level was associated with increased expression of p53 and its target p21(Waf1) gene. The RPS27a activity was specifically inhibited in the presence of a dominant negative mutant of p53. Down-regulation of ectopically expressed RPS27a by RNA interference blocked the activation of p21(waf1) in response to DNA damage. Thus, RPS27a appears to be a novel stress sensor in the cell which amplifies p53 response to arrest cell cycle. PMID:25592822

  11. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer analysis supports synonomy of Scedosporium inflatum and Lomentospora prolificans.

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, C R; Salkin, I F; Lee, S B

    1994-01-01

    Scedosporium inflatum is a dematiaceous opportunistic pathogen originally described by D. Malloch and I.F. Salkin (Mycotaxon 21:247-255, 1984). However, E. Gueho and G. S. De Hoog (J. Mycol. Med. 118:3-9, 1991) recently suggested reducing this mold to synonomy with Lomentospora prolificans on the basis of their similar morphological and molecular characteristics. We have investigated the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS), i.e., ITS I and ITS II, of 18 isolates, including these two fungi and a closely related pathogen, Scedosporium apiospermum, and its telemorph, Pseudallescheria boydii. Identical ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms were found in eight isolates of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. These results support Gueho and De Hoog's proposal to combine S. inflatum and L. prolificans into the binomial Scedosporium prolificans. However, the ITS I sequence of S. apiospermum and the ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms of S. apiospermum and P. boydii were found to be significantly different from those of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. The ITS restriction pattern differences may be valuable in clinical settings for distinguishing these fungi. Images PMID:7814476

  12. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    PubMed

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia. PMID:21708650

  13. Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstralh, Daniel T. . E-mail: dan.bergstralh@med.unc.edu; Conti, Brian J.; Moore, Chris B.; Brickey, W. June; Taxman, Debra J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of lung cancer response to chemotherapeutic agents showed the accumulation of a Taxol-induced protein that reacted with an anti-phospho-MEK1/2 antibody. Mass spectroscopy identified the protein as nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM), a multifunctional protein with diverse roles: ribosome biosynthesis, p53 regulation, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and centrosome duplication. Our work demonstrates that following cellular exposure to mitosis-arresting agents, NPM is phosphorylated and its chromatographic property is altered, suggesting changes in function during mitosis. To determine the functional relevance of NPM, its expression in tumor cells was reduced by siRNA. Cells with reduced NPM were treated with Taxol followed by microarray profiling accompanied by gene/protein pathway analyses. These studies demonstrate several expected and unexpected consequences of NPM depletion. The predominant downstream effectors of NPM are genes involved in cell proliferation, cancer, and the cell cycle. In congruence with its role in cancer, NPM is over-expressed in primary malignant lung cancer tissues. We also demonstrate a role for NPM in the expression of genes encoding SET (TAF1{beta}) and the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, we show that NPM is required for a previously unobserved G2/M upregulation of TAF1A, which encodes the rDNA transcription factor TAF{sub I}48. These results demonstrate multi-faceted functions of NPM that can affect cancer cells.

  14. A cryptic intracellular green alga in Ginkgo biloba: ribosomal DNA markers reveal worldwide distribution.

    PubMed

    Trémouillaux-Guiller, Jocelyne; Huss, Volker A R

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular symbioses involving eukaryotic microalgae and a variety of heterotrophic protists and invertebrates are widespread, but are unknown in higher plants. Recently, we reported the isolation and molecular identification of a Coccomyxa-like green alga from in vitro cell cultures of Ginkgo biloba L. This alga resides intracellularly in an immature "precursor" form with a nonfunctional chloroplast, implying that algal photosynthetic activity has no role in this endosymbiosis. In necrotizing Ginkgo cells, precursors evolved into mature algae, proliferated, and were liberated into the culture medium after host cell bursting. In the present paper we demonstrate by molecular methods a worldwide distribution of the alga in planta. Endosymbiont-specific sequences of ribosomal DNA could be traced in Ginkgo tissues of each specimen examined from different geographic locations in Europe, North America, and Asia. The Ginkgo/Coccomyca association represents a new kind of intracellular, vertically inherited symbiosis. Storage bodies, probably of lipid nature, present in the cytoplasm of each partner suggest a possible involvement of the endosymbiont in metabolic pathways of its host.

  15. Phylogenetic position of Gromia oviformis Dujardin inferred from nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Burki, Fabien; Berney, Cédric; Pawlowski, Jan

    2002-09-01

    Gromia oviformis Dujardin is a common marine protist characterised by a large, globular test and filose pseudopodia. First considered a foraminifer, Gromia was later placed within the Filosea and recently included among amoebae of uncertain affinities. In order to clarify the phylogenetic position of this genus, we sequenced the complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA gene of G. oviformis collected at five different geographic localities. The high divergence of obtained sequences suggests that G. oviformis is a species complex composed of several genetically distinct sibling species. Sequence analyses show Gromia to be a member of the Cercozoa, a heterogeneous assemblage which includes filose amoebae, the amoeboflagellate cercomonads, the chlorarachniophytes and the plasmodiophorid plant pathogens. Contrary to traditional classification, Gromia is not closely related to other testate filose amoebae (the Euglyphida), but seems to branch early among the Cercozoa. Our analyses also show a close relationship between the Cercozoa and the Acantharea. Because the Cercozoa are related to the Foraminifera based on other molecular data, we propose that most protists possessing filopodia, reticulopodia and axopodia have a common origin.

  16. Seasonal variation in detection of bacterial DNA in arthritic stifle joints of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Muir, Peter; Fox, Robin; Wu, Qiang; Baker, Theresa A; Zitzer, Nina C; Hudson, Alan P; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling

    2010-02-24

    An underappreciated cause and effect relationship between environmental bacteria and arthritis may exist. Previously, we found that stifle arthritis in dogs was associated with the presence of environmental bacteria within synovium. Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is often associated with stifle arthritis in dogs. We now wished to determine whether seasonal variation in detection of bacterial material may exist in affected dogs, and to also conduct analyses of both synovium and synovial fluid. We also wished to analyze a larger clone library of the 16S rRNA gene to further understanding of the microbial population in the canine stifle. Synovial biopsies were obtained from 117 affected dogs from January to December 2006. Using PCR, synovium and synovial fluid were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DNA. Broad-ranging 16S rRNA primers were also used and PCR products were cloned and sequenced for bacterial identification. Overall, 41% of arthritic canine stifle joints contained bacterial DNA. Detection of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid samples was increased, when compared with synovium (p<0.01). Detection rates were highest in the winter and spring and lowest in the summer period, suggesting environmental factors influence the risk of translocation to the stifle. Organisms detected were predominately Gram's negative Proteobacteria, particularly the orders Rhizobiales (32.8% of clones) and Burkholderiales (20.0% of clones), usually as part of a polymicrobial population. PCR-positivity was inversely correlated with severity of arthritis assessed radiographically and with dog age. Bacterial translocation to the canine stifle may be associated with changes to the indoor environment. PMID:19758772

  17. In Situ Detection of Bacteria within Paraffin-embedded Tissues Using a Digoxin-labeled DNA Probe Targeting 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-05-21

    The presence of bacteria within the pocket epithelium and underlying connective tissue in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis has been reported using various methods, including electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence using bacteria-specific antibodies, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe. Nevertheless, these methods are not widely used due to technical limitation or difficulties. Here a method to localize bacteria within paraffin-embedded tissues using DIG-labeled DNA probes has been introduced. The paraffin-embedded tissues are the most common form of biopsy tissues available from pathology banks. Bacteria can be detected either in a species-specific or universal manner. Bacterial signals are detected as either discrete forms (coccus, rod, fusiform, and hairy form) of bacteria or dispersed forms. The technique allows other histological information to be obtained: the epithelia, connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrates, and blood vessels are well distinguished. This method can be used to study the role of bacteria in various diseases, such as periodontitis, cancers, and inflammatory immune diseases.

  18. Pseudanoplocephala crawfordi is a member of genus Hymenolepis based on phylogenetic analysis using ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Qing; Yan, Wen-Chao; Du, Shuai-Zhi; Song, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Wen; Zhao, Yu-Xin; Cheng, Wen-Yu; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Pseudanoplocephala crawfordi is one of the important zoonotic cestodes causing economic significance and public health concern. In the present study, the phylogenetic position of P. crawfordi isolated from pigs was re-inferred using molecular markers of internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) and partial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (pnad1) mitochondrial DNA. The lengths of ITS1, ITS2 rDNA and pnad1 were 757 bp, 628 bp and 458 bp, respectively. Sequence differences in the ITS1, ITS2 rDNA and pnad1 between P. crawfordi and Hymenolepis species were smaller than that between cestodes within genus Hymenolepis. Phylogenetic analyses based on three gene fragments showed that P. crawfordi was grouped into cluster of Hymenolepis species. These results suggested that P. crawfordi would be one member of genus Hymenolepis but not in a new genus Pseudanoplocephala.

  19. Heterochromatin patterns and ribosomal DNA loci distribution in diploid and polyploid Crotalaria species (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae), and inferences on karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Mateus; Aguiar-Perecin, Margarida L R

    2011-09-01

    Most Crotalaria species display a symmetric karyotype with 2n = 16, but 2n = 14 is found in Chrysocalycinae subsection Incanae and 2n = 32 in American species of the section Calycinae. Seven species of the sections Chrysocalycinae, Calycinae, and Crotalaria were analyzed for the identification of heterochromatin types with GC- and AT-specific fluorochromes and chromosomal location of ribosomal DNA loci using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). A major 45S rDNA locus was observed on chromosome 1 in all the species, and a variable number of minor ones were revealed. Only one 5S rDNA locus was observed in the species investigated. Chromomycin A(3) (CMA) revealed CMA(+) bands colocalized with most rDNA loci, small bands unrelated to ribosomal DNA on two chromosome pairs in Crotalaria incana, and CMA(+) centromeric bands that were quenched by distamycin A were detected in species of Calycinae and Crotalaria sections. DAPI(+) bands were detected in C. incana. The results support the species relationships based on flower specialization and were useful for providing insight into mechanisms of karyotype evolution. The heterochromatin types revealed by fluorochromes suggest the occurrence of rearrangements in repetitive DNA families in these heterochromatic blocks during species diversification. This DNA sequence turnover and the variability in number/position of rDNA sites could be interpreted as resulting from unequal crossing over and (or) transposition events. The occurrence of only one 5S rDNA locus and the smaller chromosome size in the polyploids suggest that DNA sequence losses took place following polyploidization events.

  20. Heterochromatin patterns and ribosomal DNA loci distribution in diploid and polyploid Crotalaria species (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae), and inferences on karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Mateus; Aguiar-Perecin, Margarida L R

    2011-09-01

    Most Crotalaria species display a symmetric karyotype with 2n = 16, but 2n = 14 is found in Chrysocalycinae subsection Incanae and 2n = 32 in American species of the section Calycinae. Seven species of the sections Chrysocalycinae, Calycinae, and Crotalaria were analyzed for the identification of heterochromatin types with GC- and AT-specific fluorochromes and chromosomal location of ribosomal DNA loci using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). A major 45S rDNA locus was observed on chromosome 1 in all the species, and a variable number of minor ones were revealed. Only one 5S rDNA locus was observed in the species investigated. Chromomycin A(3) (CMA) revealed CMA(+) bands colocalized with most rDNA loci, small bands unrelated to ribosomal DNA on two chromosome pairs in Crotalaria incana, and CMA(+) centromeric bands that were quenched by distamycin A were detected in species of Calycinae and Crotalaria sections. DAPI(+) bands were detected in C. incana. The results support the species relationships based on flower specialization and were useful for providing insight into mechanisms of karyotype evolution. The heterochromatin types revealed by fluorochromes suggest the occurrence of rearrangements in repetitive DNA families in these heterochromatic blocks during species diversification. This DNA sequence turnover and the variability in number/position of rDNA sites could be interpreted as resulting from unequal crossing over and (or) transposition events. The occurrence of only one 5S rDNA locus and the smaller chromosome size in the polyploids suggest that DNA sequence losses took place following polyploidization events. PMID:21864195

  1. Nucleotide sequence of cDNA coding for dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Legname, G; Bellosta, P; Gromo, G; Modena, D; Keen, J N; Roberts, L M; Lord, J M

    1991-08-27

    Rabbit antibodies raised against dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) leaves, were used to identify a full length dianthin precursor cDNA clone from a lambda gt11 expression library. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of purified dianthin 30 and dianthin 32 confirmed that the clone encoded dianthin 30. The cDNA was 1153 basepairs in length and encoded a precursor protein of 293 amino acid residues. The first 23 N-terminal amino acids of the precursor represented the signal sequence. The protein contained a carboxy-terminal region which, by analogy with barley lectin, may contain a vacuolar targeting signal.

  2. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers.

    PubMed

    Vershinina, Alisa O; Anokhin, Boris A; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG) n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG) n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations.

  3. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    PubMed Central

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  4. Heterogeneous rpoS and rhlR mRNA levels and 16S rRNA/rDNA (rRNA gene) ratios within Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, sampled by laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Williamson, Kerry S; Franklin, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    The local environmental conditions in biofilms are dependent on the impinging aqueous solution, chemical diffusion, and the metabolic activities of cells within the biofilms. Chemical gradients established in biofilms lead to physiological heterogeneities in bacterial gene expression. Previously, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to target defined biofilm subpopulations for gene expression studies. Here, we combined this approach with quantitative PCR of bacterial DNA to normalize the amount of gene expression per cell. By comparing the ratio of 16S rRNA to 16S rDNA (rRNA gene), we demonstrated that cells at the top of thick Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms have 16S rRNA/genome ratios similar to those of cells in a transition from the exponential phase to the stationary phase. Cells in the middle and bottom layers of these biofilms have ratios that are not significantly different from those of stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Since much of each biofilm appeared to be in a stationary-phase-like state, we analyzed the local amounts of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS gene and the quorum-sensing regulator rhlR gene per cell. Surprisingly, the amount of rpoS mRNA was largest at the top of the biofilms at the air-biofilm interface. Less than one rpoS mRNA transcript per cell was observed in the middle or base of the biofilms. The rhlR mRNA content was also greatest at the top of the biofilms, and there was little detectable rhlR expression at the middle or bottom of the biofilms. While the cell density was slightly greater at the bottom of the biofilms, expression of the quorum-sensing regulator occurred primarily at the top of the biofilms, where the cell metabolic activity was greatest, as indicated by local expression of the housekeeping gene acpP and by expression from a constitutive P(trc) promoter. The results indicate that in thick P. aeruginosa biofilms, cells in the 30 microm adjacent to the

  5. Problem-Based Test: Functional Analysis of Mutant 16S rRNAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: ribosome, ribosomal subunits, antibiotics, point mutation, 16S, 5S, and 23S rRNA, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, mRNA, tRNA, palindrome, hairpin, restriction endonuclease, fMet-tRNA, peptidyl transferase, initiation, elongation, termination of translation, expression plasmid, transformation,…

  6. Phylogenetic Relationships in Bupleurum (Apiaceae) Based on Nuclear Ribosomal DNA ITS Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    NEVES, SUSANA S.; WATSON, MARK F.

    2004-01-01

    • Backgroud and Aims The genus Bupleurum has long been recognized as a natural group, but its infrageneric classification is controversial and has not yet been studied in the light of sequence data. • Methods Phylogenetic relationships among 32 species (35 taxa) of the genus Bupleurum were investigated by comparative sequencing of the ITS region of the 18–26S nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat. Exemplar taxa from all currently accepted sections and subsections of the genus were included, along with outgroups from four other early branching Apioideae genera (Anginon, Heteromorpha, Physospermum and Pleurospermum). • Key Results Phylogenies generated by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and neighbour‐joining methods show similar topologies, demonstrating monophyly of Bupleurum and the division of the genus into two major clades. This division is also supported by analysis of the 5.8S coding sequence alone. The first branching clade is formed by all the species of the genus with pinnate‐reticulate veined leaves and B. rigidum with a unique type of leaf venation. The other major clade includes the remaining species studied, all of which have more or less parallel‐veined leaves. • Conclusions These phylogenetic results do not agree with any previous classifications of the genus. Molecular data also suggest that the endemic Macaronesian species B. salicifolium is a neoendemic, as the sequence divergence between the populations in Madeira and Canary Islands, and closer mainland relatives in north‐west Africa is small. All endemic north‐west African taxa are included in a single unresolved but well‐supported clade, and the low nucleotide variation of ITS suggests a recent radiation within this group. The only southern hemisphere species, B. mundii (southern Africa), is shown to be a neoendemic, apparently closely related to B. falcatum, a Eurasian species. PMID:14980972

  7. A phylogenetic study on galactose-containing Candida species based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sugita, Takashi; Nakase, Takashi

    1999-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 33 Candida species containing galactose in the cells were investigated by using 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Galactose-containing Candida species and galactose-containing species from nine ascomycetous genera were a heterogeneous assemblage. They were divided into three clusters (II, III, and IV) which were phylogenetically distant from cluster I, comprising 9 galactose-lacking Candida species, C. glabrata, C. holmii, C. krusei, C. tropicalis (the type species of Candida), C. albicans, C. viswanathii, C. maltosa, C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae, and 17 related ascomycetous yeasts. These three clusters were also phylogenetically distant from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which contains galactomannan in its cell wall. Cluster II comprised C. magnoliae, C. vaccinii, C. apis, C. gropengiesseri, C. etchellsii, C. floricola, C. lactiscondensi, Wickerhamiella domercqiae, C. versatilis, C. azyma, C. vanderwaltii, C. pararugosa, C. sorbophila, C. spandovensis, C. galacta, C. ingens, C. incommunis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Galactomyces geotrichum, and Dipodascus albidus. Cluster III comprised C. tepae, C. antillancae and its synonym C. bondarzewiae, C. ancudensis, C. petrohuensis, C. santjacobensis, C. ciferrii (anamorph of Stephanoascus ciferrii), Arxula terrestris, C. castrensis, C. valdiviana, C. paludigena, C. blankii, C. salmanticensis, C. auringiensis, C. bertae, and its synonym C. bertae var. chiloensis, C. edax (anamorph of Stephanoascus smithiae), Arxula adeninivorans, and C. steatolytica (synonym of Zygoascus hellenicus). Cluster IV comprised C. cantarellii, C. vinaria, Dipodascopsis uninucleata, and Lipomyces lipofer. Two galactose-lacking and Q-8-forming species, C. stellata and Pichia pastoris, and 5 galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. apicola, C. bombi, C. bombicola, C. geochares, and C. insectalens, were included in Cluster II. Two galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. drimydis and C

  8. Detection and identification of the Candida species by 25S ribosomal DNA analysis in the urine of candidal cystitis.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Hattori, Yousuke; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Miyazaki, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Rie; Koie, Hiroshi; Watari, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2002-02-01

    Candida species in clinical urine samples were identified directly by the newly developed method of PCR analysis on 25S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Two dogs were referred to the Animal Medical Center, Nihon University School of Veterinary Medicine, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan for the examination of chronic cystitis. Microscopic examination of urine samples from these dogs revealed yeast cells. Urine culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar at 27 degrees C for 5 days produced white to cream colored colonies. The isolates were identifical to Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis by mycological examination, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of 25S ribosomal DNA from these urine isolates showed 99% similarity to those of a reference strain of Candida albicans or C. parapsilosis. The nucleotide sequences of 25S rDNA obtained directly from urine samples were also identical to C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, respectively. Confirming the results on the isolates cultured from the same urine samples. This PCR analysis method could be available for the direct identification of Candida species in urine samples within 2 days.

  9. Purification of Drosophila ribosomal proteins. Isolation of proteins S8, S13, S14, S16, S19, S20/L24, S22/L26, S24, S25/S27, S26, S29, L4, L10/L11, L12, L13, L16, L18, L19, L27, 1, 7/8, 9, and 11.

    PubMed

    Chooi, W Y

    1980-07-22

    The proteins of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic ribosomes were separated into seven groups (A80 through G80) by stepwise elution from carboxymethylcellulose with lithium chloride at pH 6.5 by procedures previously described [Chooi, W. Y., Sabatini, L. M., MacKlin, M. D., & Fraser, W. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 1425-1433]. Three relatively acidic proteins, S14, S25/S27, and 7/8, have now been isolated from group A80 by ion-exchange chromatog raphy on carboxymethylcellulose eluted with a linear gradient of lithium chloride at pH 4.2. Fractions containing the relatively basic proteins (groups B80 through G80) were furher combined into a total of 24 "pools". The criterion for combination was the migration patterns in one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaDodS04) of every fifth fraction from the carboxymethylcellulose column. Each pool contained between 1 and 12 major proteins. Proteins S8, S13, S16, S19, S20/L24, S22/L26, S24, S26, S29, L4, L10/L11, L12, L13, L16, L18, L19, L27, 1, 9, and 11 have now been isolated from selected pools by gel filtration through Sephadix G-100. The amount of each protein recovered from a starting amount of 1.8 g of total 80S proteins varied form 0.2 to 10.8 mg. Five proteins had no detectable contamination, and in each of the others the impurities were no greater than 9%. The amino acid composition of the individual purified proteins was determined. The molecular weights of the proteins were estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in NaDodSO4.

  10. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V.P.; Filipenko, M.L.; Muravlev, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    To clone the RPL11 cDNA, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the single-stranded cDNA synthesized on the total placentary poly(A){sup +}mRNA with the use of primer M245 containing a 3{prime}-terminal oligo(dT)-tract, the 5{prime}terminal hexadecanucleotide sequence of the M13 universal primer, and a NotiI restriction site between them. On the basis of the known sequence of the 5{prime}-end of the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA, we chose two partially overlapping deoxyribooligonucleotides as 5{prime}-terminal primers in the amplification of the RPL11 cDNA. A pair of partially overlapping oligonucleotides complementary to the oligo(dT)-containing primer were used as 3{prime}-terminal primers.

  11. Phylogenetic position of Rhynchopus sp. and Diplonema ambulator as indicated by analyses of euglenozoan small subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Busse, I; Preisfeld, Angelika

    2002-02-01

    The taxa Rhynchopus Skuja and Diplonema Griessmann were first described as remarkable protists with euglenid affinities. Later on, the placement of Diplonema within the Euglenozoa was confirmed by molecular data. For this study two new sequences were added to the euglenozoan data set. The uncertainly placed Rhynchopus can be identified as a close relative to Diplonema by small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) analysis. The new sequence of Diplonema ambulator is in close relationship to two other Diplonema species. Our molecular analyses clearly support the monophyly of the diplonemids comprising Rhynchopus and Diplonema. Yet the topology at the base of the euglenozoan tree remains unresolved, and especially the monophyly of the euglenids is arguable. SSU rDNA sequence analyses suggest that significantly different GC contents, high mutational saturation in the euglenids, and different evolutionary rates in the euglenozoan clades make it difficult to identify any sister group to the diplonemids.

  12. New Primers for Discovering Fungal Diversity Using Nuclear Large Ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Asemaninejad, Asma; Weerasuriya, Nimalka; Gloor, Gregory B; Lindo, Zoë; Thorn, R Greg

    2016-01-01

    Metabarcoding has become an important tool in the discovery of biodiversity, including fungi, which are the second most speciose group of eukaryotes, with diverse and important ecological roles in terrestrial ecosystems. We have designed and tested new PCR primers that target the D1 variable region of nuclear large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA; one set that targets the phylum Ascomycota and another that recovers all other fungal phyla. The primers yield amplicons compatible with the Illumina MiSeq platform, which is cost-effective and has a lower error rate than other high throughput sequencing platforms. The new primer set LSU200A-F/LSU476A-R (Ascomycota) yielded 95-98% of reads of target taxa from environmental samples, and primers LSU200-F/LSU481-R (all other fungi) yielded 72-80% of target reads. Both primer sets have fairly low rates of data loss, and together they cover a wide variety of fungal taxa. We compared our results with these primers by amplifying and sequencing a subset of samples using the previously described ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers, which amplify the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. With approximately equivalent read depth, our LSU primers recovered a greater number and phylogenetic diversity of sequences than the ITS2 primers. For instance, ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers failed to pick up any members of Eurotiales, Mytilinidiales, Pezizales, Saccharomycetales, or Venturiales within Ascomycota, or members of Exobasidiomycetes, Microbotryomycetes, Pucciniomycetes, or Tremellomycetes within Basidiomycota, which were retrieved in good numbers from the same samples by our LSU primers. Among the OTUs recovered using the LSU primers were 127 genera and 28 species that were not obtained using the ITS2 primers, although the ITS2 primers recovered 10 unique genera and 16 species that were not obtained using either of the LSU primers These features identify the new primer sets developed in this study as useful

  13. New Primers for Discovering Fungal Diversity Using Nuclear Large Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gloor, Gregory B.; Lindo, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Metabarcoding has become an important tool in the discovery of biodiversity, including fungi, which are the second most speciose group of eukaryotes, with diverse and important ecological roles in terrestrial ecosystems. We have designed and tested new PCR primers that target the D1 variable region of nuclear large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA; one set that targets the phylum Ascomycota and another that recovers all other fungal phyla. The primers yield amplicons compatible with the Illumina MiSeq platform, which is cost-effective and has a lower error rate than other high throughput sequencing platforms. The new primer set LSU200A-F/LSU476A-R (Ascomycota) yielded 95–98% of reads of target taxa from environmental samples, and primers LSU200-F/LSU481-R (all other fungi) yielded 72–80% of target reads. Both primer sets have fairly low rates of data loss, and together they cover a wide variety of fungal taxa. We compared our results with these primers by amplifying and sequencing a subset of samples using the previously described ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers, which amplify the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. With approximately equivalent read depth, our LSU primers recovered a greater number and phylogenetic diversity of sequences than the ITS2 primers. For instance, ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers failed to pick up any members of Eurotiales, Mytilinidiales, Pezizales, Saccharomycetales, or Venturiales within Ascomycota, or members of Exobasidiomycetes, Microbotryomycetes, Pucciniomycetes, or Tremellomycetes within Basidiomycota, which were retrieved in good numbers from the same samples by our LSU primers. Among the OTUs recovered using the LSU primers were 127 genera and 28 species that were not obtained using the ITS2 primers, although the ITS2 primers recovered 10 unique genera and 16 species that were not obtained using either of the LSU primers These features identify the new primer sets developed in this study as useful

  14. Loss of Nucleolar Histone Chaperone NPM1 Triggers Rearrangement of Heterochromatin and Synergizes with a Deficiency in DNA Methyltransferase DNMT3A to Drive Ribosomal DNA Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg Olausson, Karl; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoli are prominent nuclear structures assembled and organized around actively transcribed ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The nucleolus has emerged as a platform for the organization of chromatin enriched for repressive histone modifications associated with repetitive DNA. NPM1 is a nucleolar protein required for the maintenance of genome stability. However, the role of NPM1 in nucleolar chromatin dynamics and ribosome biogenesis remains unclear. We found that normal fibroblasts and cancer cells depleted of NPM1 displayed deformed nucleoli and a striking rearrangement of perinucleolar heterochromatin, as identified by immunofluorescence staining of trimethylated H3K9, trimethylated H3K27, and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ/CBX3). By co-immunoprecipitation we found NPM1 associated with HP1γ and core and linker histones. Moreover, NPM1 was required for efficient tethering of HP1γ-enriched chromatin to the nucleolus. We next tested whether the alterations in perinucleolar heterochromatin architecture correlated with a difference in the regulation of rDNA. U1242MG glioma cells depleted of NPM1 presented with altered silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions, coupled to a modest decrease in H3K9 di- and trimethylation at the rDNA promoter. rDNA transcription and cell proliferation were sustained in these cells, indicating that altered organization of heterochromatin was not secondary to inhibition of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A markedly enhanced rDNA transcription in NPM1-depleted U1242MG cells. In summary, this study highlights a function of NPM1 in the spatial organization of nucleolus-associated heterochromatin. PMID:25349213

  15. Loss of nucleolar histone chaperone NPM1 triggers rearrangement of heterochromatin and synergizes with a deficiency in DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A to drive ribosomal DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Holmberg Olausson, Karl; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S

    2014-12-12

    Nucleoli are prominent nuclear structures assembled and organized around actively transcribed ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The nucleolus has emerged as a platform for the organization of chromatin enriched for repressive histone modifications associated with repetitive DNA. NPM1 is a nucleolar protein required for the maintenance of genome stability. However, the role of NPM1 in nucleolar chromatin dynamics and ribosome biogenesis remains unclear. We found that normal fibroblasts and cancer cells depleted of NPM1 displayed deformed nucleoli and a striking rearrangement of perinucleolar heterochromatin, as identified by immunofluorescence staining of trimethylated H3K9, trimethylated H3K27, and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ/CBX3). By co-immunoprecipitation we found NPM1 associated with HP1γ and core and linker histones. Moreover, NPM1 was required for efficient tethering of HP1γ-enriched chromatin to the nucleolus. We next tested whether the alterations in perinucleolar heterochromatin architecture correlated with a difference in the regulation of rDNA. U1242MG glioma cells depleted of NPM1 presented with altered silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions, coupled to a modest decrease in H3K9 di- and trimethylation at the rDNA promoter. rDNA transcription and cell proliferation were sustained in these cells, indicating that altered organization of heterochromatin was not secondary to inhibition of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A markedly enhanced rDNA transcription in NPM1-depleted U1242MG cells. In summary, this study highlights a function of NPM1 in the spatial organization of nucleolus-associated heterochromatin.

  16. Identification and detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by using a DNA amplification fingerprint obtained from the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed Central

    González, N; Galindo, I; Guevara, P; Novak, E; Scorza, J V; Añez, N; Da Silveira, J F; Ramírez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We designed a PCR assay targeted on repeated elements of the ribosomal intergenic spacer which produces highly polymorphic DNA band patterns for different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. By labeling the PCR products with digoxigenin and by chemiluminescence detection, we improved the assay sensitivity by three orders of magnitude to get T. cruzi strain fingerprints in feces of the trypanosome-infected triatomine bug vector. We also developed a capture assay for the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products that allowed us to detect T. cruzi in triatomine bug vector feces and in human serum samples with a solid support. Images PMID:8126172

  17. Genetic differentiation of strongyloides stercoralis from two different climate zones revealed by 18S ribosomal DNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Pakdee, Wallop; Thaenkham, Urusa; Dekumyoy, Paron; Sa-Nguankiat, Surapol; Maipanich, Wanna; Pubampen, Somchit

    2012-11-01

    Over 70 countries in tropical and subtropical zones are endemic areas for Strongyloides stercoralis, with a higher prevalence of the parasite often occurring in tropical regions compared to subtropical ones. In order to explore genetic variations of S. stercoralis form different climate zones, 18S ribosomal DNA of parasite specimens obtained from Thailand were sequenced and compared with those from Japan. The maximum likelihood indicates that S. stercoralis populations from these two different climate zones have genetically diverged. The genetic relationship between S. stercoralis populations is not related to the host species, but rather to moisture and temperature. These factors may directly drive genetic differentiation among isolated populations of S. stercoralis.

  18. Bacterial diversity of a Carolina Bay as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis: Confirmation of novel taxa

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.G.; Shimkets, L.J.; McArthur, J.V.

    1997-04-01

    Carolina bays are naturally occurring shallow elliptical depressions largely fed by rain and shallow ground water. To identify members of the domain Bacteria which inhabit such an environment, we used PCR to construct a library of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) cloned from DNA extracted from the sediments of Rainbow Bay, located on the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, S.C. Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions of 16S rDNA were used as primers for PCR, and gel-purified PCR products were cloned into vector pGEM-T. Partial sequencing of the cloned 16S rDNAs revealed an extensive amount of phylogenetic diversity within this system. Of the 35 clones sequenced, 32 were affiliated with five bacterial groups: 11 clustered with the Proteobacteria division (including members of the alpha, beta, and delta subdivisions), 8 clustered with the Acidobacterium subdivision of the Fibrobacter division (as categorized by the Ribosomal Database Project`s taxonomic scheme, version 5.0), 7 clustered with the Verrucomicrobium subdivision of the Planctomyces division, 3 clustered with the gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium and relatives subdivision), and 3 clustered with the green nonsulfur bacteria. One sequence branched very deeply from the Bacteria and was found not to be associated with any of the major divisions when phylogenetic trees were constructed. Two clones did not consistently cluster with specific groups and may be chimeric sequences. None of the clones exhibited an exact match to any of the 16S rDNA sequences deposited in the databases, suggesting that most of the bacteria in Rainbow Bay are novel species. In particular, the clones related to the Acidobacterium subdivision and the Verrucomicrobium subdivision confirm the presence of novel taxa discovered previously in other molecular surveys of this type. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Bacterial diversity of a Carolina bay as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis: confirmation of novel taxa.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, M G; McArthur, J V; Shimkets, L J

    1997-01-01

    Carolina bays are naturally occurring shallow elliptical depressions largely fed by rain and shallow ground water. To identify members of the domain Bacteria which inhibit such an environment, we used PCR to construct a library of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) cloned from DNA extracted from the sediments of Rainbow bay, located on the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, S.C. Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions of 16S rDNA were used as primers for PCR, and gel-purified PCR products were cloned into vector pGEM-T. Partial sequencing of the cloned 16S rDNAs revealed an extensive amount of phylogenetic diversity within this system. Of the 35 clones sequenced, 32 were affiliated with five bacterial groups: 11 clustered with the Proteobacteria division (including members of the alpha, beta, and delta subdivisions), 8 clustered with the Acidobacterium subdivision of the Fibrobacter division (as categorized by the Ribosomal Database Project's taxonomic scheme, version 5.0), 7 clustered with the Verrucomicrobium subdivision of the Planctomyces division, 3 clustered with the gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium and relatives subdivision), and 3 clustered with the green nonsulfur bacteria. One sequence branched very deeply from the Bacteria and was found not to be associated with any of the major divisions when phylogenetic trees were constructed. Two clones did not consistently cluster with specific groups and may be chimeric sequences. None of the clones exhibited an exact match to any of the 16S rDNA sequences deposited in the databases, suggesting that most of the bacteria in Rainbow Bay are novel species. In particular, the clones related to the Acidobacterium subdivision and the Verrucomicrobium subdivision confirm the presence of novel taxa discovered previously in other molecular surveys of this type. PMID:9097448

  20. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  1. Overexpression of Ribosomal RNA in the Development of Human Cervical Cancer Is Associated with rDNA Promoter Hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Yapei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qing; Gao, Fei; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene encodes rRNA for protein synthesis. Aberrant expression of the rRNA gene has been generally observed in tumor cells and levels of its promoter methylation as an epigenetic regulator affect rRNA gene transcription. The possible relationship between expression and promoter methylation of rDNA has not been examined in human clinical cervical cancer. Here we investigate rRNA gene expression by quantitative real time PCR, and promoter methylation levels by HpaII/MspI digestion and sodium bisulfite sequencing in the development of human cervical cancer. We find that indeed rRNA levels are elevated in most of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) specimens as compared with non-cancer tissues. The rDNA promoter region in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues reveals significant hypomethylation at cytosines in the context of CpG dinucleotides, accompanied with rDNA chromatin decondensation. Furthermore treatment of HeLa cells with the methylation inhibitor drug 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (DAC) demonstrates the negative correlation between the expression of 45S rDNA and the methylation level in the rDNA promoter region. These data suggest that a decrease in rDNA promoter methylation levels can result in an increase of rRNA synthesis in the development of human cervical cancer. PMID:27695092

  2. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Weitemier, Kevin; Straub, Shannon C K; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual's consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the "noncoding" ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  3. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  4. Study on sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers of clams belonging to the Veneridae family (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Liang; Xia, De-Quan; Wu, Ting-Ting; Meng, Xue-Ping; Ji, Hong-Ju; Dong, Zhi-Guo

    2006-08-01

    The first and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions of the ribosomal DNA from four species, Meretrix meretrix L., Cyclina sinensis G., Mercenaria mercenaria L., and Protothaca jedoensis L., belonging to the family Veneridae were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The size of the ITS1 PCR amplification product ranged from 663 bp to 978 bp, with GC contents ranging from 60.78% to 64.97%. The size of the ITS1 sequence ranged from 585 bp to 900 bp, which is the largest range reported thus far in bivalve species, with GC contents ranging from 61.03% to 65.62%. The size of the ITS2 PCR amplification product ranged from 513 bp to 644 bp, with GC contents ranging from 61.29% to 62.73%. The size of the ITS2 sequence ranged from 281 bp to 412 bp, with GC contents ranging from 65.21% to 67.87%. Extensive sequence variation and obvious length polymorphisms were noted for both regions in these species, and sequence similarity of ITS2 was higher than that of ITS1 across species. The complete sequences of 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene were obtained by assembling ITS1 and ITS2 sequences, and the sequence length in all species was 157 bp. The phylogenetic tree of Veneridae clams was reconstructed using ITS2-containing partial sequences of both 5.8S and 28S ribosomal DNA as markers and the corresponding sequence information in Arctica islandica as the outgroup. Tree topologies indicated that P. jedoensis shared a close relationship with M. mercenaria and C. sinensis, a distant relationship with other species.

  5. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  6. Chromosomal diversification in ribosomal DNA sites in Ancistrus Kner, 1854 (Loricariidae, Ancistrini) from three hydrographic basins of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Sandra; Centofante, Liano; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Moreira-Filho, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Populations of seven Ancistrus species were analyzed from streams and rivers of three hydrographic Brazilian basins. All populations showed different diploid numbers (2n), fundamental numbers (FNs), and karyotypes. Some representatives of Loricariidae have 2n = 54 chromosomes, which is very likely an ancestral cytotaxonomic characteristic, but many other representatives show extensive karyotype diversification. In the Ancistrus species studied, extensive karyotypic differentiation, which is generally associated with chromosome number reduction and rearrangement of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sites, was verified. Chromosomal locations of 18S and 5S rDNA were jointly detected using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In all the Ancistrus species analyzed, 18S rDNA sites were detected only on one chromosome pair, though this differed among species. 5S rDNA was located on 1-3 chromosome pairs either separately or in synteny with 18S rDNA in four of the seven species/populations. Hence the karyotype differentiation in Ancistrus species could be associated with a morphological speciation process, suggesting that chromosome fusions, inversions, deletions, duplications, and heterochromatination could contribute to the karyotype evolution of these neotropical armored catfishes. PMID:24260636

  7. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae).

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country's economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 'Azul', Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  8. Intraspecific differentiation of Paramecium novaurelia strains (Ciliophora, Protozoa) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Paramecium novaurelia Beale and Schneller, 1954, was first found in Scotland and is known to occur mainly in Europe, where it is the most common species of the P. aurelia complex. In recent years, two non-European localities have been described: Turkey and the United States of America. This article presents the analysis of intraspecific variability among 25 strains of P. novaurelia with the application of ribosomal and mitochondrial loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 5' large subunit rDNA (5'LSU rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mtDNA). The mean distance observed for all of the studied P. novaurelia sequence pairs was p=0.008/0.016/0.092 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2/5'LSU rDNA/COI). Phylogenetic trees (NJ/MP/BI) based on a comparison of all of the analysed sequences show that the studied strains of P. novaurelia form a distinct clade, separate from the P. caudatum outgroup, and are divided into two clusters (A and B) and two branches (C and D). The occurrence of substantial genetic differentiation within P. novaurelia, confirmed by the analysed DNA fragments, indicates a rapid evolution of particular species within the Paramecium genus.

  9. Ribosomal DNA organization patterns within the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium as revealed by FISH: life cycle and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa Isabel; Cuadrado, Angeles; Stüken, Anke; Rodríguez, Francisco; Fraga, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    Dinoflagellates are a group of protists whose genome differs from that of other eukaryotes in terms of size (contains up to 250pg per haploid cell), base composition, chromosomal organization, and gene expression. But rDNA gene mapping of the active nucleolus in this unusual eukaryotic genome has not been carried out thus far. Here we used FISH in dinoflagellate species belonging to the genus Alexandrium (genome sizes ranging from 21 to 170 pg of DNA per haploid genome) to localize the sequences encoding the 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA genes. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) Each dinoflagellate cell contains only one active nucleolus, with no hybridization signals outside it. However, the rDNA organization varies among species, from repetitive clusters forming discrete nuclear organizer regions (NORs) in some to specialized "ribosomal chromosomes" in other species. The latter chromosomes, never reported before in other eukaryotes, are mainly formed by rDNA genes and appeared in the species with the highest DNA content. 2) Dinoflagellate chromosomes are first characterized by several eukaryotic features, such as structural differentiation (centromere-like constrictions), size differences (dot chromosomes), and SAT (satellite) chromosomes. 3) NOR patterns prove to be useful in discriminating between cryptic species and life cycle stages in protists.

  10. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  11. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Variation and Pathogenic Specialization in Alternaria Fungi Known To Produce Host-Specific Toxins †

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Motoaki; Tsuge, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    A total of 99 strains of 11 Alternaria species, including 68 strains of seven fungi known to produce host-specific toxins, were subjected to analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Total DNA was digested with XbaI, and the Southern blots were probed with a nuclear rDNA clone of Alternaria kikuchiana. The hybridization gave 17 different RFLPs from the 99 strains. On the basis of these RFLPs, populations of host-specific toxin-producing fungi could not be differentiated from one another nor from nonpathogenic A. alternata. Each population of the toxin-producing fungi carried rDNA variants. Nine different types, named A1 to A6 and B1 to B3, were detected among the toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata. All of the populations contained the type A4 variant, and the other rDNA types were also shared by different toxin-producing fungi and A. alternata. In contrast, Alternaria species that are morphologically distinguishable from A. alternata could be differentiated from A. alternata on the basis of the rDNA RFLPs. Polymorphisms in rDNA digested with HaeIII and MspI were also evaluated in 61 Alternaria strains. These restriction enzymes produced 31 variations among all of the samples. The seven toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata could not be resolved by phylogenetic analysis based on the RFLPs, although they could be differentiated from the other Alternaria species studied. These results provide support for the hypothesis that Alternaria fungi known to produce host-specific toxins are intraspecific variants of A. alternata specialized in pathogenicity. Images PMID:16349367

  13. Identification of nine sequence types of the 16S rRNA genes of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni isolated from broilers

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Ingrid; Persson, Marianne; Svensson, Linda; Engvall, Eva Olsson; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter is the most commonly reported bacterial cause of enteritis in humans in the EU Member States and other industrialized countries. One significant source of infection is broilers and consumption of undercooked broiler meat. Campylobacter jejuni is the Campylobacter sp. predominantly found in infected humans and colonized broilers. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene is very useful for identification of bacteria to genus and species level. The objectives in this study were to determine the degree of intraspecific variation in the 16S rRNA genes of C. jejuni and C. coli and to determine whether the 16S rRNA sequence types correlated with genotypes generated by PFGE analysis of SmaI restricted genomic DNA of the strains. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 45 strains of C. jejuni and two C. coli strains isolated from broilers were sequenced and compared with 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from the Ribosomal Database Project or GenBank. The strains were also genotyped by PFGE after digestion with SmaI. Results Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed nine sequence types of the Campylobacter strains and the similarities between the different sequence types were in the range 99.6–99.9%. The number of nucleotide substitutions varied between one and six among the nine 16S rRNA sequence types. One of the nine 16S rRNA sequence profiles was common to 12 of the strains from our study and two of these were identified as Campylobacter coli by PCR/REA. The other 10 strains were identified as Campylobacter jejuni. Five of the nine sequence types were also found among the Campylobacter sequences deposited in GenBank. The three 16S rRNA genes in the analysed strains were identical within each individual strain for all 47 strains. Conclusion C. jejuni and C. coli seem to lack polymorphisms in their 16S rRNA gene, but phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences was not always sufficient for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli. The strains

  14. cDNA Cloning, expression and characterization of an allergenic 60s ribosomal protein of almond (prunus dulcis).

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Mohsen; Roux, Kenneth H

    2009-06-01

    Tree nuts, including almond (prunus dulcis) are a source of food allergens often associated with life-threatening allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. Although the proteins in almonds have been biochemically characterized, relatively little has been reported regarding the identity of the allergens involved in almond sensitivity. The present study was undertaken to identify the allergens of the almond by cDNA library approach. cDNA library of almond seeds was constructed in Uni-Zap XR lamda vector and expressed in E. coli XL-1 blue. Plaques were immunoscreened with pooled sera of allergic patients. The cDNA clone reacting significantly with specific IgE antibodies was selected and subcloned and subsequently expressed in E. coli. The amino acids deducted from PCR product of clone showed homology to 60s acidic ribosomal protein of almond. The expressed protein was 11,450 Dalton without leader sequence. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant 60s ribosomal protein (r60sRP) was evaluated with dot blot analysis using pooled and individual sera of allergic patients. The data showed that r60sRP and almond extract (as positive control) possess the ability to bind the IgE antibodies. The results showed that expressed protein is an almond allergen.Whether this r60sRP represents a major allergen of almond needs to be further studied which requires a large number of sera from the almond atopic patients and also need to determine the IgE-reactive frequencies of each individual allergen.

  15. TALE nickase mediates high efficient targeted transgene integration at the human multi-copy ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Gao, Tieli; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Youjin; Hu, Xuyun; Hu, Zhiqing; Pang, Jialun; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Feng, Mai; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2014-03-28

    Although targeted gene addition could be stimulated strikingly by a DNA double strand break (DSB) created by either zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or TALE nucleases (TALENs), the DSBs are really mutagenic and toxic to human cells. As a compromised solution, DNA single-strand break (SSB) or nick has been reported to mediate high efficient gene addition but with marked reduction of random mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated effective targeted gene addition at the human multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus, a genomic safe harbor for the transgene with therapeutic potential. To improve the transgene integration efficiency by using TALENs while lowering the cytotoxicity of DSBs, we created both TALENs and TALE nickases (TALENickases) targeting this multicopy locus. A targeting vector which could integrate a GFP cassette at the rDNA locus was constructed and co-transfected with TALENs or TALENickases. Although the fraction of GFP positive cells using TALENs was greater than that using TALENickases during the first few days after transfection, it reduced to a level less than that using TALENickases after continuous culture. Our findings showed that the TALENickases were more effective than their TALEN counterparts at the multi-copy rDNA locus, though earlier studies using ZFNs and ZFNickases targeting the single-copy loci showed the reverse. Besides, TALENickases mediated the targeted integration of a 5.4 kb fragment at a frequency of up to 0.62% in HT1080 cells after drug selection, suggesting their potential application in targeted gene modification not being limited at the rDNA locus.

  16. Ribosomal DNA transcription in dorsal raphe nucleus neurons is increased in residual schizophrenia compared to depressed patients with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Busse, Stefan; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2015-12-15

    The central serotonergic system is implicated differentially in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in both disorders. The study was carried out on paraffin-embedded brains from 27 depressed (15 major depressive disorder, MDD and 12 bipolar disorder, BD) and 17 schizophrenia (9 residual and 8 paranoid) patients and 28 matched controls without mental disorders. The transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons was evaluated by the AgNOR silver staining method. A significant effect of diagnosis on rDNA activity was found in the cumulative analysis of all DRN subnuclei. Further analysis revealed an increase in this activity in residual (but not paranoid) schizophrenia compared to depressed (both MDD and BD) patients. The effect was most probably neither confounded by suicide nor related to antidepressant and antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest that increased activity of rDNA in DRN neurons is a distinct phenomenon in residual schizophrenia, related presumably to differentially disturbed inputs to the DRN and/or their local transformation compared with depressive episodes in patients with affective disorders.

  17. A nuclear ribosomal DNA pseudogene in triatomines opens a new research field of fundamental and applied implications in Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuriaga, María Angeles; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    A pseudogene, designated as "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)", paralogous to the 5.8S gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-2 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), has been recently found in many triatomine species distributed throughout North America, Central America and northern South America. Among characteristics used as criteria for pseudogene verification, secondary structures and free energy are highlighted, showing a lower fit between minimum free energy, partition function and centroid structures, although in given cases the fit only appeared to be slightly lower. The unique characteristics of "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)" as a processed or retrotransposed pseudogenic unit of the ghost type are reviewed, with emphasis on its potential functionality compared to the functionality of genes and spacers of the normal rDNA operon. Besides the technical problem of the risk for erroneous sequence results, the usefulness of "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)" for specimen classification, phylogenetic analyses and systematic/taxonomic studies should be highlighted, based on consistence and retention index values, which in pseudogenic sequence trees were higher than in functional sequence trees. Additionally, intraindividual, interpopulational and interspecific differences in pseudogene amount and the fact that it is a pseudogene in the nuclear rDNA suggests a potential relationships with fitness, behaviour and adaptability of triatomine vectors and consequently its potential utility in Chagas disease epidemiology and control. PMID:25760450

  18. Variability and genetics of spacer DNA sequences between the ribosomal-RNA genes of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    May, C E; Appels, R

    1987-09-01

    Using restriction enzyme digests of genomic DNA extracted from the leaves of 25 hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell.) cultivars and their hybrids, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the spacer DNA which separates the ribosomal-RNA genes have been examined. (From one to three thousand of these genes are borne on chromosomes 1B and 6B of hexaploid wheat). The data show that there are three distinct alleles of the 1B locus, designated Nor-B1a, Nor-B1b, and Nor-B1c, and at least five allelic variants of the 6B locus, designated Nor-B2a, Nor-B2b, Nor-B2c, Nor-B2d, and Nor-B2e. A further, previously reported allele on 6B has been named Nor-B2f. Chromosome 5D has only one allelic variant, Nor-D3. Whereas the major spacer variants of the 1B alleles apparently differ by the loss or gain of one or two of the 133 bp sub-repeat units within the spacer DNA, the 6B allelic variants show major differences in their compositions and lengths. This may be related to the greater number of rDNA repeat units at this locus. The practical implications of these differences and their application to wheat breeding are discussed.

  19. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories.

  20. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the ‘Hop stunt viroid’ accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  1. Evolutionary site-number changes of ribosomal DNA loci during speciation: complex scenarios of ancestral and more recent polyploid events

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Moreno-Saiz, Juan C.; Galián, José A.; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2015-01-01

    Several genome duplications have been identified in the evolution of seed plants, providing unique systems for studying karyological processes promoting diversification and speciation. Knowledge about the number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci, together with their chromosomal distribution and structure, provides clues about organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. In this work, we aim to elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of karyological and rDNA site-number variation in all known taxa of subtribe Vellinae, showing a complex scenario of ancestral and more recent polyploid events. Specifically, we aim to infer the ancestral chromosome numbers and patterns of chromosome number variation, assess patterns of variation of both 45S and 5S rDNA families, trends in site-number change of rDNA loci within homoploid and polyploid series, and reconstruct the evolutionary history of rDNA site number using a phylogenetic hypothesis as a framework. The best-fitting model of chromosome number evolution with a high likelihood score suggests that the Vellinae core showing x = 17 chromosomes arose by duplication events from a recent x = 8 ancestor. Our survey suggests more complex patterns of polyploid evolution than previously noted for Vellinae. High polyploidization events (6x, 8x) arose independently in the basal clade Vella castrilensis–V. lucentina, where extant diploid species are unknown. Reconstruction of ancestral rDNA states in Vellinae supports the inference that the ancestral number of loci in the subtribe was two for each multigene family, suggesting that an overall tendency towards a net loss of 5S rDNA loci occurred during the splitting of Vellinae ancestors from the remaining Brassiceae lineages. A contrasting pattern for rDNA site change in both paleopolyploid and neopolyploid species was linked to diversification of Vellinae lineages. This suggests dynamic and independent changes in rDNA site number during speciation processes and a

  2. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  3. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  4. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  5. Novel essential gene Involved in 16S rRNA processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-27

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is a complex process mediated by many factors. While its transcription proceeds, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) folds itself into a characteristic three-dimensional structure through interaction with ribosomal proteins, during which its ends are processed. Here, we show that the essential protein YqgF, a RuvC family protein with an RNase-H-like motif, is involved in the processing of pre-16S rRNA during ribosome maturation. Indeed, pre-16S rRNA accumulated in cells of a temperature-sensitive yqgF mutant (yqgF(ts)) cultured at a non-permissive temperature. In addition, purified YqgF was shown to process the 5' end of pre-16S rRNA within 70S ribosomes in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis of the total proteins in the yqgF(ts) mutant cells showed that the expression of genes containing multiple Shine-Dalgarno-like sequences was observed to be lower than in wild type. These results are interpreted to indicate that YqgF is involved in a novel enzymic activity necessary for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, thereby affecting elongation of translation.

  6. Intraspecific polymorphism of ribosomal DNA loci number and morphology in Brachypodium pinnatum and Brachypodium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Breda, Ewa; Wolny, Elzbieta; Hasterok, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The genus Brachypodium has become the target of extensive cytomolecular studies since one of its representatives, B. distachyon, has been accepted as a model plant for temperate cereals and forage grasses. Recent preliminary studies suggested that intraspecific rDNA polymorphism can occur in at least two members of the genus, B. sylvaticum and B. pinnatum, so the aim of this study was to further analyse this phenomenon. FISH with 25S rDNA and 5S rDNA probes was performed on somatic metaphase chromosomes, supplemented by the silver staining technique which distinguishes transcriptionally active from inactive 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA loci. The number, size and chromosomal distribution of 5S rDNA loci were very constant: two loci were invariably observed in all studied diploid accessions of both species, while four 5S rDNA loci were present in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. In contrast to 5S rDNA loci, those of the 35S rDNA were more variable. Two or three loci were observed in the diploid B. pinnatum and four in tetraploid accessions. In chromosome complements of B. sylvaticum accessions from two to six 35S rDNA sites were detected. Regardless of total rDNA locus number, only two were transcriptionally active in diploid accessions of both species, while two or four were active in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. Additionally, the fluorescent CMA/DAPI banding method was used to identify the relation between rDNA sites and CMA+ bands. It was revealed that the number and chromosomal distribution of CMA+ bands are in congruence only with 35S rDNA loci which gave strong FISH signals. PMID:22893263

  7. Application of broad-range 16S rRNA PCR amplification and DGGE fingerprinting for detection of tick-infecting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Lubitz, Werner; Rölleke, Sabine

    2003-02-01

    Ticks play an important role in the transmission of arthropod-borne diseases of viral, protozoal and bacterial origin. The present article describes a molecular-biological based method, which facilitated the broad-range analyses of bacterial communities in ixodid ticks (Ixodes ricinus). DNA was extracted both from single ticks and pooled adult ticks. Eubacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments (16S rDNA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with broad-range ribosomal primers. Sequences spanning the hypervariable V3 region of the 16S rDNA and representing individual bacterial taxons were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). For phylogenetic identification, DGGE bands were exised, cloned and sequenced. In addition, we set up a 16S rDNA clone library which was screened by DGGE. Sequences were compared with sequences of known bacteria listed in the GenBank database. A number of bacteria were affiliated with the genera Rickettsia, Bartonella, and Borrelia, which are known to be pathogenic and transmitted by ticks. Two sequences were related to the yet to be cultivated Haemobartonella. To our knowledge, Haemobartonella has never been directly detected in I. ricinus. In addition, members of the genera Staphylococcus, Rhodococcus, Pseudomonas, and Moraxella were detected, which have not been identified in ticks so far. Two bacteria were most closely related to a rickettsial endosymbiont of an Acanthamoeba sp., and to an endosymbiont (Legionellaceae, Coxiella group) of the microarthropod Folsomia candida. The results prove that 16S rDNA genotyping in combination with DGGE analysis is a promising approach for the detection and identification of bacteria infecting ticks, regardless of whether these bacteria are fastidious, obligate intracellular or noncultivable.

  8. Ribosomal DNA and Plastid Markers Used to Sample Fungal and Plant Communities from Wetland Soils Reveals Complementary Biotas.

    PubMed

    Porter, Teresita M; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald; Golding, G Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Though the use of metagenomic methods to sample below-ground fungal communities is common, the use of similar methods to sample plants from their underground structures is not. In this study we use high throughput sequencing of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) plastid marker to study the plant community as well as the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers to investigate the fungal community from two wetland sites. Observed community richness and composition varied by marker. The two rDNA markers detected complementary sets of fungal taxa and total fungal composition clustered according to primer rather than by site. The composition of the most abundant plants, however, clustered according to sites as expected. We suggest that future studies consider using multiple genetic markers, ideally generated from different primer sets, to detect a more taxonomically diverse suite of taxa compared with what can be detected by any single marker alone. Conclusions drawn from the presence of even the most frequently observed taxa should be made with caution without corroborating lines of evidence.

  9. Ribosomal DNA and Plastid Markers Used to Sample Fungal and Plant Communities from Wetland Soils Reveals Complementary Biotas

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Teresita M.; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald; Golding, G. Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Though the use of metagenomic methods to sample below-ground fungal communities is common, the use of similar methods to sample plants from their underground structures is not. In this study we use high throughput sequencing of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) plastid marker to study the plant community as well as the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers to investigate the fungal community from two wetland sites. Observed community richness and composition varied by marker. The two rDNA markers detected complementary sets of fungal taxa and total fungal composition clustered according to primer rather than by site. The composition of the most abundant plants, however, clustered according to sites as expected. We suggest that future studies consider using multiple genetic markers, ideally generated from different primer sets, to detect a more taxonomically diverse suite of taxa compared with what can be detected by any single marker alone. Conclusions drawn from the presence of even the most frequently observed taxa should be made with caution without corroborating lines of evidence. PMID:26731732

  10. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  11. Effects of permissible maximum-contamination levels of VOC mixture in water on total DNA, antioxidant gene expression, and sequences of ribosomal DNA of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Doganlar, Oguzhan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu; Tabakcioglu, Kiymet

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with references to the response of D.melanogaster using selected antioxidant gene expressions, RAPD assay and base-pair change of ribosomal 18S, and the internal transcribed spacer, ITS2 rDNA gene sequences. For this purpose, Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R, reared under controlled conditions on artificial diets, were treated with the mixture of thirteen VOCs, which are commonly found in water in concentrations of 10, 20, 50, and 75 ppb for 1 and 5 days. In the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay, band changes were clearly detected, especially at the 50 and 75 ppb exposure levels, for both treatment periods, and the band profiles exhibited clear differences between the treated and untreated flies with changes in band intensity and the loss/appearance of bands. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-synthetase (GS) expressions demonstrated that these markers responded significantly to VOC-induced oxidative stress. Whilst CAT gene expressions increased linearly with increasing concentrations of VOCs and treatment times, the 50- and 75-ppb treatments caused decreases in GS expressions compared to the control at 5 days. Treatment with VOCs at both exposure times, especially in high doses, caused gene mutation of the 18S and the ITS2 ribosomal DNA. According to this research, we thought that the permissible maximum-contamination level of VOCs can cause genotoxic effect especially when mixed.

  12. Fine resolution mapping of double-strand break sites for human ribosomal DNA units.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Mahmood, Khalid; Jung, Chol-Hee; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    DNA breakage arises during a variety of biological processes, including transcription, replication and genome rearrangements. In the context of disease, extensive fragmentation of DNA has been described in cancer cells and during early stages of neurodegeneration (Stephens et al., 2011 Stephens et al. (2011) [5]; Blondet et al., 2001 Blondet et al. (2001) [1]). Stults et al. (2009) Stults et al. (2009) [6] reported that human rDNA gene clusters are hotspots for recombination and that rDNA restructuring is among the most common chromosomal alterations in adult solid tumours. As such, analysis of rDNA regions is likely to have significant prognostic and predictive value, clinically. Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016) Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016) [7], [9] have made major advances in this direction, reporting that sites of human genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur frequently at sites in rDNA that are tightly linked with active transcription - the authors used a RAFT (rapid amplification of forum termini) protocol that selects for blunt-ended sites. They reported the relative frequency of these rDNA DSBs within defined co-ordinate 'windows' of varying size and made these data (as well as the relevant 'raw' sequencing information) available to the public (Tchurikov et al., 2015b). Assay designs targeting rDNA DSB hotspots will benefit greatly from the publication of break sites at greater resolution. Here, we re-analyse public RAFT data and make available rDNA DSB co-ordinates to the single-nucleotide level. PMID:27656414

  13. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Gunter, Lee E; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis -type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  14. Sequence variation in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer of Tridacna crocea.

    PubMed

    Yu, E T; Juinio-Meñez, M A; Monje, V D

    2000-11-01

    DNA-based genetic markers are needed to augment existing allozyme markers in the assessment of genetic diversity of wild giant clam populations. The dearth of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions amplified from known universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers has led us to search other regions of the genome for viable sources of DNA polymorphism. We have designed tridacnid-specific PCR primers for the amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions. Sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer segment (ITS-1) revealed very high polymorphism, showing 29% variation arising from base substitutions alone. Preliminary restriction analysis of the ITS regions using 8 restriction enzymes revealed cryptic changes in the DNA sequence. These mutations are promising as marker tools for differentiating geographically separated populations. Such variation in the ITS region can possibly be used for population genetic analysis.

  15. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  16. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  17. Identification of Carnobacterium species by restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region and species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Rachman, Cinta; Kabadjova, Petia; Valcheva, Rosica; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2004-08-01

    The genus Carnobacterium is currently divided into the following eight species: Carnobacterium piscicola, C. divergens, C. gallinarum, C. mobile, C. funditum, C. alterfunditum, C. inhibens, and C. viridans. An identification tool for the rapid differentiation of these eight Carnobacterium species was developed, based on the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer region (ISR). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of this 16S-23S rDNA ISR was performed in order to obtain restriction profiles for all of the species. Three PCR amplicons, which were designated small ISR (S-ISR), medium ISR (M-ISR), and large ISR (L-ISR), were obtained for all Carnobacterium species. The L-ISR sequence revealed the presence of two tRNA genes, tRNA(Ala) and tRNA(Ile), which were separated by a spacer region that varied from 24 to 38 bp long. This region was variable among the species, allowing the design of species-specific primers. These primers were tested and proved to be species specific. The identification method based on the 16S-23S rDNA ISR, using PCR-RFLP and specific primers, is very suitable for the rapid low-cost identification and discrimination of all of the Carnobacterium species from other phylogenetically related lactic acid bacteria.

  18. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, A. C.; Karanth, P. N.; Lajoie, C. A.; Meyers, A. J.; Gregory, I. R.; Stapleton, R. D.; Taylor, D. E.; Sayler, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial wastewater treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of these clones were members of the beta subdivision, and their sequences showed high homology to sequences of known bacterial species as well as published 16S rDNA sequences from other activated sludge sources. Sixteen clones belonged to the alpha subdivision, 7 of which showed similarity to Hyphomicrobium species. This cluster was chosen for further studies due to earlier work on Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 isolated from this treatment plant. A nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 was 99% similar to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans DSM 1869T in Hyphomicrobium cluster II. Three of the cloned sequences from the activated sludge samples also grouped with those of Hyphomicrobium cluster II, with a 96% sequence similarity to that of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. The other four cloned sequences from the activated sludge sample were more closely related to those of the Hyphomicrobium cluster I organisms (95 to 97% similarity). Whole-cell fluorescence hybridization of microorganisms in the activated sludge with genus-specific Hyphomicrobium probe S-G-Hypho-1241-a-A-19 enhanced the visualization of Hyphomicrobium and revealed that Hyphomicrobium appears to be abundant both on the outside of flocs and within the floc structure. Dot blot hybridization of activated sludge samples from 1995 with probes designed for Hyphomicrobium cluster I and Hyphomicrobium cluster II indicated that Hyphomicrobium cluster II-positive 16S rRNA dominated over Hyphomicrobium cluster I

  19. Neurospora ribosomal DNA sequences are indistinguishable within cell types but distinguishable among heterothallic species

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.; Dutta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    High molecular nuclear DNAs were isolated from three developmental cell types of N. crassa: conidia, mycelia and germinated conidia, and from mycelial cells of two other heterothallic species, N. intermedia and N. sitophila. These nuclear DNAs were treated with several restriction enzymes: EcoR1, Bam H1, Hind III, Hinc II, Bgl II, Sma I and Pst 1. All seven restriction enzymes were tested on 0.7% agarose gels. EcoR1, Hind III, Pst 1, and Hinc II showed band differences among the species, but not among the cell types. Southern blot transfers of restricted DNA gels were then hybridized with TSP-labelled pMF2 rDNAs (probe). This later DNA was prepared from N. crassa rDNA cloned into pBR322 plasmid, obtained from Dr. Robert Metzenberg of the University of Wisconsin. Autoradiograms of these hybrids between southern blots and probe DNA revealed similar rDNA band patterns confirming the observations on restriction gels. In the case of EcoR1 restriction analysis there were differences in fragments on 0.7% agarose gel, but after hybridization of southern blots no differences in band patterns were seen in autoradiograms. This raises the question whether the background bands were all of rDNA sequences. These studies are being continued using ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of N. crassa rDNAs cloned in pBR322 plasmid.

  20. Chromosome breakages associated with 45S ribosomal DNA sequences in spotted snakehead fish Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Barman, Anindya Sundar

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that transcriptionally inactive rRNA genes are correlated with DNA hyper-methylation and histone hypo-methylation and there is clear evidence in humans that DNA and histone modification which alter chromatin structure are related to chromosome fragility. Very little is known about the biological cause of 45S rDNA fragility. In this report we characterized the chromosome breakage or gap associated with 45S rDNA in a fish species Channa punctatus. The rDNA mapping in C. punctatus, showed many chromosome breakages or gap formations, and all occurred exclusively in the 45S rDNA sites in anterior kidney cells. We observed that the number of chromosomes plus chromosome fragments was often more than the expected 32 in most cells. Total 67 % metaphase spread showed the expected or normal 32 chromosomes, while 33 % metaphase spread showed 33 and/or 34 chromosomes and/or chromosome fragments. The chromosome lesions observed in this study are very similar cytologically to that of fragile sites observed in human chromosomes. Possible causes for the spontaneous expression of fragile sites and their potential biological significance are also discussed in present report.

  1. Evaluation of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and species-specific PCR for identification of Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Krízová, Jana; Spanová, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2006-01-01

    Molecular biological methods based on genus-specific PCR, species-specific PCR, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of two PCR amplicons (523 and 914bp) using six restriction enzymes were used to differentiate among species of Bifidobacterium. The techniques were established using DNA from 16 type and reference strains of bifidobacteria of 11 species. The discrimination power of 914bp amplicon digestion was higher than that of 523bp amplicon digestion. The 914bp amplicon digestion by six restrictases provided unique patterns for nine species; B. catenulatum and B. pseudocatenulatum were not differentiated yet. The NciI digestion of the 914bp PCR product enabled to discriminate between each of B. animalis, B. lactis, and B. gallicum. The reference strain B. adolescentis CCM 3761 was reclassified as a member of the B. catenulatum/B. pseudocatenulatum group. The above-mentioned methods were applied for the identification of seven strains of Bifidobacterium spp. collected in the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms (CCDM). The strains collected in CCDM were differentiated to the species level. Six strains were identified as B. lactis, one strain as B. adolescentis.

  2. Analysis of Fungal Flora in Indoor Dust by Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis, Quantitative PCR, and Culture▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pitkäranta, M.; Meklin, T.; Hyvärinen, A.; Paulin, L.; Auvinen, P.; Nevalainen, A.; Rintala, H.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been given to the potential health effects of fungal exposure in indoor environments. We used large-scale sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA to describe the mycoflora of two office buildings over the four seasons. DNA sequencing was complemented by cultivation, ergosterol determination, and quantitative PCR analyses. Sequences of 1,339 clones were clustered into 394 nonredundant fungal operational taxonomical units containing sequences from 18 fungal subclasses. The observed flora differed markedly from that recovered by cultivation, the major differences being the near absence of several typical indoor mold genera such as Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. and a high prevalence of basidiomycetes in clone libraries. A total of 55% of the total diversity constituted of unidentifiable ITS sequences, some of which may represent novel fungal species. Dominant species were Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. herbarum, Cryptococcus victoriae, Leptosphaerulina americana and L. chartarum, Aureobasidium pullulans, Thekopsora areolata, Phaeococcomyces nigricans, Macrophoma sp., and several Malassezia species. Seasonal differences were observed for community composition, with ascomycetous molds and basidiomycetous yeasts predominating in the winter and spring and Agaricomycetidae basidiomycetes predominating in the fall. The comparison of methods suggested that the cloning, cultivation, and quantitative PCR methods complemented each other, generating a more comprehensive picture of fungal flora than any of the methods would give alone. The current restrictions of the methods are discussed. PMID:17981947

  3. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L; Robbins, R T

    2004-03-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  4. G-rich telomeric and ribosomal DNA sequences from the fission yeast genome form stable G-quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and are unwound by the Pfh1 DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Wallgren, Marcus; Mohammad, Jani B; Yan, Kok-Phen; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-07-27

    Certain guanine-rich sequences have an inherent propensity to form G-quadruplex (G4) structures. G4 structures are e.g. involved in telomere protection and gene regulation. However, they also constitute obstacles during replication if they remain unresolved. To overcome these threats to genome integrity, organisms harbor specialized G4 unwinding helicases. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one such candidate helicase is Pfh1, an evolutionarily conserved Pif1 homolog. Here, we addressed whether putative G4 sequences in S. pombe can adopt G4 structures and, if so, whether Pfh1 can resolve them. We tested two G4 sequences, derived from S. pombe ribosomal and telomeric DNA regions, and demonstrated that they form inter- and intramolecular G4 structures, respectively. Also, Pfh1 was enriched in vivo at the ribosomal G4 DNA and telomeric sites. The nuclear isoform of Pfh1 (nPfh1) unwound both types of structure, and although the G4-stabilizing compound Phen-DC3 significantly enhanced their stability, nPfh1 still resolved them efficiently. However, stable G4 structures significantly inhibited adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by nPfh1. Because ribosomal and telomeric DNA contain putative G4 regions conserved from yeasts to humans, our studies support the important role of G4 structure formation in these regions and provide further evidence for a conserved role for Pif1 helicases in resolving G4 structures.

  5. Quantitation of DNA sequences in environmental PCR products by a multiplexed, bead-based method.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Alexander; Lowe, Mary

    2002-02-01

    A first application of a multiplexed, bead-based method is described for determining the abundances of target sequences in an environmental PCR product. Target sequences as little as 0.3% of the total amount of DNA can be quantified. Tests were conducted on 16S ribosomal DNA sequences from microorganisms collected from contaminated groundwater. PMID:11823255

  6. Revealing pancrustacean relationships: Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal protein genes places Collembola (springtails) in a monophyletic Hexapoda and reinforces the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background In recent years, several new hypotheses on phylogenetic relations among arthropods have been proposed on the basis of DNA sequences. One of the challenged hypotheses is the monophyly of hexapods. This discussion originated from analyses based on mitochondrial DNA datasets that, due to an unusual positioning of Collembola, suggested that the hexapod body plan evolved at least twice. Here, we re-evaluate the position of Collembola using ribosomal protein gene sequences. Results In total 48 ribosomal proteins were obtained for the collembolan Folsomia candida. These 48 sequences were aligned with sequence data on 35 other ecdysozoans. Each ribosomal protein gene was available for 25% to 86% of the taxa. However, the total sequence information was unequally distributed over the taxa and ranged between 4% and 100%. A concatenated dataset was constructed (5034 inferred amino acids in length), of which ~66% of the positions were filled. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions, using Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Parsimony, and Bayesian methods, resulted in a topology that supports monophyly of Hexapoda. Conclusion Although ribosomal proteins in general may not evolve independently, they once more appear highly valuable for phylogenetic reconstruction. Our analyses clearly suggest that Hexapoda is monophyletic. This underpins the inconsistency between nuclear and mitochondrial datasets when analyzing pancrustacean relationships. Caution is needed when applying mitochondrial markers in deep phylogeny. PMID:18366624

  7. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product.

  8. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. PMID:26789074

  9. Ribosomal DNA in diploid and polyploid Setaria (Poaceae) species: number and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Cenzi, Gisele; Pereira, Daniele Lais; Davide, Lisete Chamma; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Setaria Beauvois, 1812 is a genus of economically important forage species, including Setaria italica (Linnaeus, 1753) Beauvois, 1812 and Setaria viridis (Linnaeus, 1753) Beauvois, 1812, closely related species and considered as model systems for studies of C4 plants. However, complications and uncertainties related to taxonomy of other species of the genus are frequent due to the existence of numerous synonyms for the same species or multiple species with the same name, and overlapping of morphological characteristics. Cytogenetic studies in Setaria can be useful for taxonomic and evolutionary studies as well as for applications in breeding. Thus, this study is aimed at locating 45S and 5S rDNA sites through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in Setaria italica, Setaria viridis and Setaria sphacelata (Schumacher, 1827) Stapf, Hubbard, Moss, 1929 cultivars (cvs.) Narok and Nandi. Setaria italica and Setaria viridis have 18 chromosomes with karyotype formulas 6m + 3sm and 9m, respectively. The location of 45S and 5S rDNA for these species was in different chromosome pairs among the evaluated species. Setaria viridis presented a more symmetrical karyotype, strengthening the ancestral relationship with Setaria italica. Setaria sphacelata cvs. Narok and Nandi have 36 chromosomes, and karyotype formulas 11m+7sm and 16m+2sm, respectively. The 45S rDNA signals for both cultivars were also observed in distinct chromosome pairs; however chromosomes bearing 5S rDNA are conserved. Karyotypic variations found among the studied species are evidence of chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:26753080

  10. 18S ribosomal DNA sequences provide insight into the phylogeny of patellogastropod limpets (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Won

    2007-02-28

    To investigate the phylogeny of Patellogastropoda, the complete 18S rDNA sequences of nine patellogastropod limpets Cymbula canescens (Gmelin, 1791), Helcion dunkeri (Krauss, 1848), Patella rustica Linnaeus, 1758, Cellana toreuma (Reeve, 1855), Cellana nigrolineata (Reeve, 1854), Nacella magellanica Gmelin, 1791, Nipponacmea concinna (Lischke, 1870), Niveotectura pallida (Gould, 1859), and Lottia dorsuosa Gould, 1859 were determined. These sequences were then analyzed along with the published 18S rDNA sequences of 35 gastropods, one bivalve, and one chiton species. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference. The results of our 18S rDNA sequence analysis strongly support the monophyly of Patellogastropoda and the existence of three subgroups. Of these, two subgroups, the Patelloidea and Acmaeoidea, are closely related, with branching patterns that can be summarized as [(Cymbula + Helcion) + Patella] and [(Nipponacmea + Lottia) + Niveotectura]. The remaining subgroup, Nacelloidea, emerges as basal and paraphyletic, while its genus Cellana is monophyletic. Our analysis also indicates that the Patellogastropoda have a sister relationship with the order Cocculiniformia within the Gastropoda. PMID:17464213

  11. Phylogeny of the Macaronesian endemic Crambe section Dendrocrambe (Brassicaceae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Fuertes-Aguilar, Javier; Kim, Seung-Chul; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo; Crawford, Daniel J; Jansen, Robert K

    2002-12-01

    The 14 species of Crambe L. sect. Dendrocrambe DC. (Brassicaceae) form a monophyletic group endemic to the Canary and Madeira archipelagos. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of sequence data from the two internal transcribed spacer regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships within this section. These analyses support the monophyly of three major clades. No clade is restricted to a single island, and therefore it appears that inter-island colonization has been the main avenue for speciation in these two archipelagos. The two species endemic to Fuerteventura (C. sventenii) and Madeira (C. fruticosa) comprise a clade, providing the first evidence for a floristic link between the Eastern Canary Islands and the archipelago of Madeira. Both maximum likelihood and weighted parsimony analyses show that this clade is sister to the two other clades, although bootstrap support for this relationship is weak. Parsimony optimizations of ecological zones and island distribution suggest a colonization route from the low-altitude areas of the lowland scrub toward the high-elevation areas of the laurel and pine forests. In addition, Tenerife is likely the ancestral island for species endemic to the five westernmost islands of Gran Canaria, La Gomera, El Hierro, La Palma, and Tenerife.

  12. Rapid Diagnosis of Bacteremia by Universal Amplification of 23S Ribosomal DNA Followed by Hybridization to an Oligonucleotide Array

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, R. M.; Brown, T. J.; French, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    The rapid identification of bacteria in blood cultures and other clinical specimens is important for patient management and antimicrobial therapy. We describe a rapid (<4 h) detection and identification system that uses universal PCR primers to amplify a variable region of bacterial 23S ribosomal DNA, followed by reverse hybridization of the products to a panel of oligonucleotides. This procedure was successful in discriminating a range of bacteria in pure cultures. When this procedure was applied directly to 158 unselected positive blood culture broths on the day when growth was detected, 125 (79.7%) were correctly identified, including 4 with mixed cultures. Nine (7.2%) yielded bacteria for which no oligonucleotide targets were present in the oligonucleotide panel, and 16 culture-positive broths (10.3%) produced no PCR product. In seven of the remaining eight broths, streptococci were identified but not subsequently grown, and one isolate of Staphylococcus aureus was misidentified as a coagulase-negative staphylococcus. The accuracy, range, and discriminatory power of the assay can be continually extended by adding further oligonucleotides to the panel without significantly increasing complexity or cost. PMID:10655385

  13. Identification of Ustilago cynodontis as a new producer of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, based on ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2008-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising glycolipid biosurfactants known because of their multifunctionality and biocompatibility. The search for novel producers of MELs was undertaken based on the analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences on basidiomycetous yeasts. The bermuda grass smut fungus Ustilago cynodontis NBRC 7530, which taxonomically relates to Pseudozyma shanxiensis known as a MEL-C producer, was found to accumulate glycolipids in the cultured medium. Under a shake flask culture with soybean oil, the amount of the glycolipids was 1.4 g/L for 7 days at 25 degrees C. As a result of the structural characterization, the main glycolipids was identified as 4-O-[(4'-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl-2'-O-butanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol, and the major fatty acids were C(14) and C(16) ones. The glycolipid was highly hydrophilic MEL-C, and very similar to those produced by P. shanxiensis. The fungi of the genus Ustilago are thus likely to be potential producers of MELs as well as the yeasts of the genus Pseudozyma. PMID:18781055

  14. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution. PMID:26520796

  15. Genetic heterogeneity and phylogeny of Trichuris spp. from captive non-human primates based on ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Cavallero, Serena; De Liberato, Claudio; Friedrich, Klaus G; Di Cave, David; Masella, Valentina; D'Amelio, Stefano; Berrilli, Federica

    2015-08-01

    Nematodes of the genus Trichuris, known as whipworms, are recognized to infect numerous mammalian species including humans and non-human primates. Several Trichuris spp. have been described and species designation/identification is traditionally based on host-affiliation, although cross-infection and hybridization events may complicate species boundaries. The main aims of the present study were to genetically characterize adult Trichuris specimens from captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) and grivets (Chlorocebus aethiops), using the ribosomal DNA (ITS) as molecular marker and to investigate the phylogeny and the extent of genetic variation also by comparison with data on isolates from other humans, non-human primates and other hosts. The phylogenetic analysis of Trichuris sequences from M. fuscata and C. aethiops provided evidences of distinct clades and subclades thus advocating the existence of additional separated taxa. Neighbor Joining and Bayesian trees suggest that specimens from M. fuscata may be distinct from, but related to Trichuris trichiura, while a close relationship is suggested between the subclade formed by the specimens from C. aethiops and the subclade formed by T. suis. The tendency to associate Trichuris sp. to host species can lead to misleading taxonomic interpretations (i.e. whipworms found in primates are identified as T. trichiura). The results here obtained confirm previous evidences suggesting the existence of Trichuris spp. other than T. trichiura infecting non-human living primates.

  16. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution.

  17. Delimitation of Sauropus (Phyllanthaceae) Based on Plastid matK and Nuclear Ribosomal ITS DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Pruesapan, Kanchana; Telford, Ian R. H.; Bruhl, Jeremy J.; Draisma, Stefano G. A.; Van Welzen, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims A recent molecular phylogenetic study showed that Sauropus is deeply embedded within Phyllanthus together with its allies, Breynia and Glochidion. As relationships within Sauropus are still problematic and the relationship with Breynia has long been doubted, more molecular data are needed to test/corroborate such a broad definition of Phyllanthus. This study aims to clarify the status and delimitation of Sauropus and establish its position within Phyllanthaceae. Methods Plastid matK and nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequence data for Sauropus and its allies were used to construct phylogenetic trees using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. Key Results Within Phyllanthus, Sauropus can be split into the mainly south-east Asian Sauropus sensu stricto (s.s.) plus Breynia and the mainly Australian Sauropus (formerly Synostemon). Sauropus s.s. plus Breynia comprise two distinct clades; one is the combination of Sauropus sections Glochidioidei, Sauropus and Schizanthi and the other is the combination of Sauropus sections Cryptogynium and Hemisauropus and the monophyletic genus Breynia. Conclusions Molecular data indicate that Synostemon should be reinstated at the same level as Sauropus s.s. and that Sauropus s.s. should be united with Breynia under the latter, older name. The molecular data corroborate only two of the five infrageneric groups of Sauropus recognized on the basis of morphological data. PMID:18854375

  18. Ribosomal DNA is active in different B chromosome variants of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Estévez, Mercedes; López-León, M Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-09-01

    B chromosomes are considered to be genetically inert elements. However, some of them are able to show nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity, as detected by both cytological and molecular means. The grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans shows a B chromosome polymorphism characterized by the existence of many B variants. One of them, B24, shows NOR activity in about half of B-carrying males in the Torrox population. Molecular data have suggested the recent origin for B chromosomes in this species, and on this basis it would be expected that NOR activity was widespread among the different B variants. Here we test this hypothesis in four different B chromosome variants (B1, B2, B5, and B24) from 11 natural populations of the grasshopper E. plorans covering the south and east of the Iberian Peninsula plus the Balearic Islands. We used two different approaches: (1) the cytological observation of nucleoli attached to the distal region of the B chromosome (where the rDNA is located), and (2) the molecular detection of the rDNA transcripts carrying an adenine insertion characteristic of B chromosome ITS2 sequences. The results showed NOR expression not only for B24 but also for the B1 and B2 variants. However, the level of B-NOR expression in these latter variants, measured by the proportion of cells showing nucleoli attached to the B chromosomes, was much lower than that previously reported for B24. This suggests the possibility that structural or genetic background conditions are enhancing the expressivity of the rDNA in the B24 variant.

  19. Global eukaryote phylogeny: Combined small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA trees support monophyly of Rhizaria, Retaria and Excavata.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bass, David; López-García, Purificación; Chao, Ema; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Resolution of the phylogenetic relationships among the major eukaryotic groups is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology that is still only partially solved. This task was initially addressed using a single marker, the small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), although in recent years it has been shown that it does not contain enough phylogenetic information to robustly resolve global eukaryotic phylogeny. This has prompted the use of multi-gene analyses, especially in the form of long concatenations of numerous conserved protein sequences. However, this approach is severely limited by the small number of taxa for which such a large number of protein sequences is available today. We have explored the alternative approach of using only two markers but a large taxonomic sampling, by analysing a combination of SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences. This strategy allows also the incorporation of sequences from non-cultivated protists, e.g., Radiozoa (=radiolaria minus Phaeodarea). We provide the first LSU rRNA sequences for Heliozoa, Apusozoa (both Apusomonadida and Ancyromonadida), Cercozoa and Radiozoa. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses for 91 eukaryotic combined SSU+LSU sequences yielded much stronger support than hitherto for the supergroup Rhizaria (Cercozoa plus Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and several well-recognised groups and also for other problematic clades, such as the Retaria (Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and, with more moderate support, the Excavata. Within opisthokonts, the combined tree strongly confirms that the filose amoebae Nuclearia are sisters to Fungi whereas other Choanozoa are sisters to animals. The position of some bikont taxa, notably Heliozoa and Apusozoa, remains unresolved. However, our combined trees suggest a more deeply diverging position for Ancyromonas, and perhaps also Apusomonas, than for other bikonts, suggesting that apusozoan zooflagellates may be central for understanding the early evolution of

  20. Evidence that 16S RNA from E. coli can assume two different biologically active conformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hochkeppel, H K; Craven, G R

    1976-01-01

    We have recently shown that 16S RNA can be extracted from 30S ribosomes by an acetic acid-urea precipitation procedure which yields RNA capable of binding 13 individual ribosomal proteins. This is in contrast to phenol extracted 16S RNA which can specifically associate with only 7 proteins2-7. In the experiments reported here, we demonstrate that the difference in protein binding capacities is due to a relatiely more "open" configuration possessed by the acetic acid-urea 16S RNA. Under identical conditions, acetic acid-urea 16S RNA is more susceptible to limited T1-RNase digestion than is phenol-16S RNA. In addition, acetic acid-urea RNA shows a relatively slower electrophoretic mobility. The observable difference in conformation between the two types of RNA is lost by storage at-70 degrees C. This loss is accompanied by a reduction in protein binding capacity of the acetic acid-urea 16S RNA. Images PMID:787927

  1. Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

    2009-06-01

    Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

  2. Arabidopsis MAS2, an Essential Gene That Encodes a Homolog of Animal NF-κ B Activating Protein, Is Involved in 45S Ribosomal DNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Aguilera, Verónica; Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Jover-Gil, Sara; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires stoichiometric amounts of ribosomal proteins and rRNAs. Synthesis of rRNAs consumes most of the transcriptional activity of eukaryotic cells, but its regulation remains largely unclear in plants. We conducted a screen for ethyl methanesulfonate-induced suppressors of Arabidopsis thaliana ago1-52, a hypomorphic allele of AGO1 (ARGONAUTE1), a key gene in microRNA pathways. We identified nine extragenic suppressors as alleles of MAS2 (MORPHOLOGY OF AGO1-52 SUPPRESSED2). Positional cloning showed that MAS2 encodes the putative ortholog of NKAP (NF-κ B activating protein), a conserved eukaryotic protein involved in transcriptional repression and splicing in animals. The mas2 point mutations behave as informational suppressors of ago1 alleles that cause missplicing. MAS2 is a single-copy gene whose insertional alleles are embryonic lethal. In yeast two-hybrid assays, MAS2 interacted with splicing and ribosome biogenesis proteins, and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that MAS2 colocalizes with the 45S rDNA at the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). The artificial microRNA amiR-MAS2 partially repressed MAS2 and caused hypomethylation of 45S rDNA promoters as well as partial NOR decondensation, indicating that MAS2 negatively regulates 45S rDNA expression. Our results thus reveal a key player in the regulation of rRNA synthesis in plants. PMID:26139346

  3. DNaseI-hypersensitive sites at promoter-like sequences in the spacer of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    La Volpe, A; Taggart, M; McStay, B; Bird, A

    1983-01-01

    We have detected a DNAseI hypersensitive site in the ribosomal DNA spacer of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. The site is present in blood and embryonic nuclei of each species. In interspecies hybrids, however, the site is absent in unexpressed borealis rDNA, but is present normally in expressed laevis rDNA. Hypersensitive sites are located well upstream (over lkb) of the pre-ribosomal RNA promoter. Sequencing of the hypersensitive region in borealis rDNA, however, shows extensive homology with the promoter sequence, and with the hypersensitive region in X. laevis. Of two promoter-like duplications in each spacer, only the most upstream copy is associated with hypersensitivity to DNAaseI. Unlike DNAaseI, Endo R. MspI digests the rDNA of laevis blood nuclei at a domain extending downstream from the hypersensitive site to near the 40S promoter. Since the organisation of conserved sequence elements within this "proximal domain" is similar in three Xenopus species whose spacers have otherwise evolved rapidly, we conclude that this domain plays an important role in rDNA function. Images PMID:6310495

  4. [Chromosomal localization of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA in species of Linum L. section Linum (syn=Protolinum and Adenolinum)].

    PubMed

    Muravenko, O V; Amosova, A V; Samatadze, T E; Semenova, O Iu; Nosova, I V; Popov, K V; Shostak, N G; Zoshchuk, S A; Zelenin, A V

    2004-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was for the first time used to study the chromosomal location of the 45S (18-2.5S-26S) and 5S ribosomal genes in the genomes of five flax species of the section Linum (syn. Protolinum and Adenolinum). In L. usitatissimum L. (2n = 30), L. angustifolium Huds. (2n = 30), and L. bienne Mill. (2n = 30), a major hybridization site of 45S rDNA was observed in the pericentric region of a large metacentric chromosome. A polymorphic minor locus of 45S rDNA was found on one of the small chromosomes. Sites of 5S rDNA colocalized with those of 45S rDNA, but direct correlation between signal intensities from the 45S and 5S rDNA sites was observed only in some cases. Other 5S rDNA sites mapped to two chromosomes in these flax species. In L. grandiflorum Desf. (2n = 16) and L. austriacum L. (2n = 18), large regions of 45S and 5S rDNA were similarly located on a pair of homologous satellite-bearing chromosomes. An additional large polymorphic site of 45S and 5S rDNA was found in the proximal region of one arm of a small chromosome in the L. usitatissimum. L. angustifolium, and L. bienne karyotypes. The other arm of this chromosome contained a large 5S rDNA cluster. A similar location of the ribosomal genes in the pericentric region of the pair of satellite-bearing metacentrics confirmed the close relationships of the species examined. The difference in chromosomal location of the ribosomal genes between flax species with 2n = 30 and those with 2n = 16 or 18 testified to their assignment to different sections. The use of ribosomal genes as chromosome markers was assumed to be of importance for comparative genomic studies in cultivated flax, a valuable crop species of Russia, and in its wild relatives. PMID:15065434

  5. Comparison of Biolog GEN III MicroStation semi-automated bacterial identification system with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing for the identification of bacteria of veterinary interest.

    PubMed

    Wragg, P; Randall, L; Whatmore, A M

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic methods have improved the ability of systems to resolve bacterial identities at the species level. Key to the effective use of these systems is the ability to draw upon databases which can be augmented with new data gleaned from atypical or novel isolates. In this study we compared the performance of the Biolog GEN III identification system (hereafter, GEN III) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the identification of isolates of veterinary interest. The use of strains that had proven more difficult to identify by routine methods was designed to test the systems' abilities at the extremes of their performance range. Over an 18month period, 100 strains were analysed by all three methods. To highlight the importance of identification to species level, a weighted scoring system was devised to differentiate the capacity to identify at genus and species levels. The overall relative weighted scores were 0.869:0.781:0.769, achieved by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, GEN III and MALDI-TOF MS respectively, when compared to the 'gold standard'. Performance to the genus level was significantly better using 16S rRNA gene sequencing; however, performance to the species level was similar for all three systems. PMID:25014253

  6. The phylogenetic position of Rhopalura ophiocomae (Orthonectida) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, B; Van Schyndel, D; Adema, C M; Lewis, L A; Loker, E S

    1996-11-01

    The Orthonectida is a small, poorly known phylum of parasites of marine invertebrates. Their phylogenetic placement is obscure; they have been considered to be multicellular protozoans, primitive animals at a "mesozoan" grade of organization, or secondarily simplified flatworm-like organisms. The best known species in the phylum, Rhopalura ophiocomae, was collected on San Juan Island, Wash. and a complete 18S rDNA sequence was obtained. Using the models of minimum evolution and parsimony, phylogenetic analyses were undertaken and the results lend support to the following hypotheses about orthonectids: (1) orthonectids are more closely aligned with triploblastic metazoan taxa than with the protist or diploblastic metazoan taxa considered in this analysis; (2) orthonectids are not derived members of the phylum Platyhelminthes; and (3) orthonectids and rhombozoans are not each other's closest relatives, thus casting further doubt on the validity of the phylum Mesozoa previously used to encompass both groups. PMID:8896370

  7. Small subunit ribosomal DNA suggests that the xenophyophorean Syringammina corbicula is a foraminiferan.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jan; Holzmann, Maria; Fahrni, Jose; Richardson, Susan L

    2003-01-01

    Xenophyophorea are giant deep-sea rhizopodial protists of enigmatic origins. Although species were described as Foraminifera or sponges in the early literature, the xenophyophoreans are currently classified either as a class of Rhizopoda or an independent phylum. To establish the phylogenetic position of Xenophyophorea, we analysed the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence of Syringammina corbicula Richardson, a newly described xenophyophorean species from the Cape Verde Plateau. The SSUrDNA analyses showed that S. corbicula is closely related to Rhizammina algaeformis, a tubular deep-sea foraminiferan. Both species branch within a group of monothalamous (single-chambered) Foraminifera, which include also such agglutinated genera as Toxisarcon, Rhabdammina, and Saccammina, and the organic-walled genera Gloiogullmia and Cylindrogullmia. Our results are congruent with observations of similar cytoplasmic organisation in Rhizammina and Syringammina. Thus, the Xenophyophorea appear to be a highly specialised group of deep-sea Foraminifera.

  8. The phylogenetic position of Rhopalura ophiocomae (Orthonectida) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, B; Van Schyndel, D; Adema, C M; Lewis, L A; Loker, E S

    1996-11-01

    The Orthonectida is a small, poorly known phylum of parasites of marine invertebrates. Their phylogenetic placement is obscure; they have been considered to be multicellular protozoans, primitive animals at a "mesozoan" grade of organization, or secondarily simplified flatworm-like organisms. The best known species in the phylum, Rhopalura ophiocomae, was collected on San Juan Island, Wash. and a complete 18S rDNA sequence was obtained. Using the models of minimum evolution and parsimony, phylogenetic analyses were undertaken and the results lend support to the following hypotheses about orthonectids: (1) orthonectids are more closely aligned with triploblastic metazoan taxa than with the protist or diploblastic metazoan taxa considered in this analysis; (2) orthonectids are not derived members of the phylum Platyhelminthes; and (3) orthonectids and rhombozoans are not each other's closest relatives, thus casting further doubt on the validity of the phylum Mesozoa previously used to encompass both groups.

  9. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. Methodology/Principal Findings The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3–V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination. PMID:26927306

  10. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  11. The evaluation for generic-level monophyly of Ancyrocephalinae (Monogenea, Dactylogyridae) using ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Yun; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Xie, Ming-Quan; Li, An-Xing

    2007-08-01

    To overcome the limited regional and taxonomic coverage in previous studies of the Ancyrocephalinae (Monogenea, Dactylogyridae), we present further findings on the molecular systematics and phylogeny of a broader selection of specimens, aiming to build a molecular phylogeny of the Ancyrocephalinae, and to assess the monophyly of each available genus, using D1-D2 domain of LSU rDNA and the combined LSU and partial sequence of SSU rDNA data sets. Our studies showed that 18 Haliotrema species were highly dispersive to form several clades with species from ten closely related genera. The host range of Euryhaliotrematoides species was not only restricted in butterfly fishes (Chaetodontidae), but widen to include the Lutjanidae. Euryhaliotrema was phylogenetically more closely related to Aliatrema than to Euryhaliotrematoides. Given that the species Haliotrema kurodai, Haliotrema spirotubiforum and Haliotrema anguiformis had a funnel-shaped base of the coiled male copulatory organ (MCO) lacking an accessory piece, and our molecular evidence, we proposed to transfer the three species to the Aliatrema as new combinations. We proposed to combine Bravohollisia and Caballeria into one genus, mainly based on molecular evidence and their similar MCO characters. Using SSU+ITS1 data set, Scutogyrus was robustly resolved as a polyphyletic group and its status should be questioned. Based on the present molecular evidence and their similar MCO characters, we proposed to combine Cichlidogyrus and Scutogyrus into one genus, Cichlidogyrus, by treating Scutogyrus as the synonym of Cichlidogyrus. Generally, the present study indicated that the vagina can make little contribution for understanding the generic-level monophyly, due to its high variability even among phylogenetically very closely related species, but it was useful for species determination. Given that phylogenetically closely related species from the same or closely related host species may have similar MCO characters but

  12. Role of DNA damage and repair in the function of eukaryotic genes: radiation-induced single-strand breaks and their rejoining in chromosomal and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1980-04-01

    The production and rejoining of single-strand breaks (SSB) in chromosomal DNA and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were investigated after sublethal doses of ..gamma.. radiation to exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Hydrogen-3-labeled total nuclear DNA isolated from either control or irradiated cells was heat denatured and electrophoresed in agarose gels containing formaldehyde. Ribosomal DNA was identified by hybridization to (/sup 32/P)rRNA after transferring the DNA from the gels to nitrocellulose strips. It was found that (a) approximately 0.68 SSB is produced in each strand of rDNA exposed to 40 krad; (b) greater than 80% of SSB were rejoined within the first 20 min after irradiation in both chromosomal and rDNA; and (c) the rejoining process in both chromosomal and rDNA proceeded in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, or oxidative metabolism. While the majority of SSB induced by 40 krad is rejoined within 20 min after irradiation, the resumption of rRNA synthesis does not occur until 30 min thereafter; it is concluded that the restoration of the normal size of the rDNA template is probably necessary but not sufficient for the resumption of rRNA synthesis.

  13. Evaluation of PCR-generated chimeras, mutations, and heteroduplexes with 16S rRNA gene-based cloning.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X; Wu, L; Huang, H; McDonel, P E; Palumbo, A V; Tiedje, J M; Zhou, J

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate PCR-generated artifacts (i.e., chimeras, mutations, and heteroduplexes) with the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based cloning approach, a model community of four species was constructed from alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions of the division Proteobacteria as well as gram-positive bacterium, all of which could be distinguished by HhaI restriction digestion patterns. The overall PCR artifacts were significantly different among the three Taq DNA polymerases examined: 20% for Z-Taq, with the highest processitivity; 15% for LA-Taq, with the highest fidelity and intermediate processitivity; and 7% for the conventionally used DNA polymerase, AmpliTaq. In contrast to the theoretical prediction, the frequency of chimeras for both Z-Taq (8.7%) and LA-Taq (6.2%) was higher than that for AmpliTaq (2.5%). The frequencies of chimeras and of heteroduplexes for Z-Taq were almost three times higher than those of AmpliTaq. The total PCR artifacts increased as PCR cycles and template concentrations increased and decreased as elongation time increased. Generally the frequency of chimeras was lower than that of mutations but higher than that of heteroduplexes. The total PCR artifacts as well as the frequency of heteroduplexes increased as the species diversity increased. PCR artifacts were significantly reduced by using AmpliTaq and fewer PCR cycles (fewer than 20 cycles), and the heteroduplexes could be effectively removed from PCR products prior to cloning by polyacrylamide gel purification or T7 endonuclease I digestion. Based upon these results, an optimal approach is proposed to minimize PCR artifacts in 16S rDNA-based microbial community studies.

  14. U-INSERTION/DELETION RNA EDITING MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES AND MITOCHONDRIAL RIBOSOMES IN LEISHMANIA TARENTOLAE ARE LOCATED IN ANTIPODAL NODES ADJACENT TO THE KINETOPLAST DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Richard G; Kazane, Katelynn; Maslov, Dmitri A; Rogers, Kestrel; Aphasizhev, Ruslan; Simpson, Larry

    2015-01-01

    We studied the intramitochondrial localization of several multiprotein complexes involved in U-insertion/deletion RNA editing in trypanosome mitochondria. The editing complexes are located in one or two antipodal nodes adjacent to the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) disk, which are distinct from but associated with the minicircle catenation nodes. In some cases the proteins are in a bilateral sheet configuration. We also found that mitoribosomes have a nodal configuration. This type of organization is consistent with evidence for protein and RNA interactions of multiple editing complexes to form a ~40S editosome and also an interaction of editosomes with mitochondrial ribosomes. PMID:26462764

  15. U-insertion/deletion RNA editing multiprotein complexes and mitochondrial ribosomes in Leishmania tarentolae are located in antipodal nodes adjacent to the kinetoplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Wong, Richard G; Kazane, Katelynn; Maslov, Dmitri A; Rogers, Kestrel; Aphasizhev, Ruslan; Simpson, Larry

    2015-11-01

    We studied the intramitochondrial localization of several multiprotein complexes involved in U-insertion/deletion RNA editing in trypanosome mitochondria. The editing complexes are located in one or two antipodal nodes adjacent to the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) disk, which are distinct from but associated with the minicircle catenation nodes. In some cases the proteins are in a bilateral sheet configuration. We also found that mitoribosomes have a nodal configuration. This type of organization is consistent with evidence for protein and RNA interactions of multiple editing complexes to form an ~40S editosome and also an interaction of editosomes with mitochondrial ribosomes.

  16. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  17. Ribosomal DNA locus variation and REMAP analysis of the diploid and triploid complexes of Lilium lancifolium.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong Xuan; Lee, Sung-Il; Rai, Rameshwar; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Jong Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Lilium lancifolium Thunb. (2n = 2x = 24) is a cytologically conspicuous species with both diploids and triploids in nature. Cytological and molecular genetic analyses were carried out in both diploids and triploids that were collected from 55 geographical locations in Korea, Japan, and China. While the 5S rRNA gene loci were located at duplicated loci on the long arm of chromosome 2, the 45S rRNA gene loci were present in chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11. While the loci on chromosomes 1 and 7 were constant, the loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11 were variable in some plants so that the L. lancifolium accessions were grouped into 7 cytotypes in diploids and 12 cytotypes in triploids. REMAP marker analysis revealed that the diploids were classified into seven clusters, and the triploids were classified into a large cluster. Geographic, cytological, and genetic differentiations were not related in both the diploid and triploid accessions of L. lancifolium. Thus, current genetic variations occurred prior to the geographic differentiation in both diploids and triploids, and the 45S rDNA cytotype variations occurred after geographic differentiation in the current habitats of L. lancifolium. PMID:27458741

  18. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites.

  19. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  20. [Study of the heterogeneity of 16s rRNA gene and groESL operone in the dna samples of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia muris, and "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" determined in the Ixodes persulcatus ticks in the area of Urals, Siberia, and far east of Russia].

    PubMed

    Rar, V A; Epikhina, T I; Livanova, N N; Panov, V V; Doroshenko, E K; Pukhovskaia, N M; Vysochina, N P; Ivanov, L I

    2011-01-01

    A total of 3552 Ixodes persulcatus from Sverdlovsk, Chelyabinsk, Novosibirsk, Irkutsk regions and Khabarovsk Territory were examined on the Ehrlichia and Anaplasma presence by nested PCR based on the 16S rRNA gene. Both Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia muris DNA were found in I. persulcatus in all studied regions. A. Phagocytophilum was detected in 1.3-6.3% of ticks and E. muris - in 2.0-14.1% of ticks. Moreover, "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" DNA was found in 8 ticks collected in Novosibirsk, Irkutsk Regions and Khabarovsk Territory. Partial nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene and groESL operone (1240-1300 bp) were determined for 65 samples of A. Phagocytophilum, 17 samples of E. muris and 4 samples of "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis". Nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene and groESL operone of E. muris and "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" were shown to be highly conservative, and nucleotide sequences of groESL operone of both E. muris and "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" differed from the sequences found previously in other species of Ixodid tick. On the basis of analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and groESL operone sequences it was concluded that all revealed samples A. Phagocytophilum could be divided into 2 groups. GroESL operone sequences of A. Phagocytophilum from the first group were identical to each other but significantly differed from the known groESL operone sequences (less than 98.2% of similarity), whereas their 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical to the sequence of widely distributed and pathogenic for human A. Phagocytophilum genetic variant (CAHU-HGEl, GenBank AF093788) or differed from it by a single nucleotide substitution. The nucleotide sequences of groESL operone of A. Phagocytophilum from the second group differed from each other by 1-4 nucleotides and were closely related (99.2-99.4% of similarity) to the sequences of groESL operone ofA. phagocytophilum isolates found in Europe in Ixodes ricinus and roe deer. The

  1. The Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Nol11 Is Required for Optimal rDNA Transcription and Craniofacial Development in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, John N.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neura