Science.gov

Sample records for 16s rrna gene-based

  1. Community analysis of chronic wound bacteria using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing: impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota.

    PubMed

    Price, Lance B; Liu, Cindy M; Melendez, Johan H; Frankel, Yelena M; Engelthaler, David; Aziz, Maliha; Bowers, Jolene; Rattray, Rogan; Ravel, Jacques; Kingsley, Chris; Keim, Paul S; Lazarus, Gerald S; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2009-07-31

    Bacterial colonization is hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in the non-healing state of chronic wounds. We characterized wound bacteria from a cohort of chronic wound patients using a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing approach and assessed the impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota. We prospectively enrolled 24 patients at a referral wound center in Baltimore, MD; sampled patients' wounds by curette; cultured samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions; and pyrosequenced the 16S rRNA V3 hypervariable region. The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed an average of 10 different bacterial families in wounds--approximately 4 times more than estimated by culture-based analyses. Fastidious anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales family XI were among the most prevalent bacteria identified exclusively by 16S rRNA gene-based analyses. Community-scale analyses showed that wound microbiota from antibiotic treated patients were significantly different from untreated patients (p = 0.007) and were characterized by increased Pseudomonadaceae abundance. These analyses also revealed that antibiotic use was associated with decreased Streptococcaceae among diabetics and that Streptococcaceae was more abundant among diabetics as compared to non-diabetics. The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed complex bacterial communities including anaerobic bacteria that may play causative roles in the non-healing state of some chronic wounds. Our data suggest that antimicrobial therapy alters community structure--reducing some bacteria while selecting for others.

  2. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  3. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  4. Community Analysis of Chronic Wound Bacteria Using 16S rRNA Gene-Based Pyrosequencing: Impact of Diabetes and Antibiotics on Chronic Wound Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B.; Liu, Cindy M.; Melendez, Johan H.; Frankel, Yelena M.; Engelthaler, David; Aziz, Maliha; Bowers, Jolene; Rattray, Rogan; Ravel, Jacques; Kingsley, Chris; Keim, Paul S.; Lazarus, Gerald S.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial colonization is hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in the non-healing state of chronic wounds. We characterized wound bacteria from a cohort of chronic wound patients using a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing approach and assessed the impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota. Methodology/Principal Findings We prospectively enrolled 24 patients at a referral wound center in Baltimore, MD; sampled patients' wounds by curette; cultured samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions; and pyrosequenced the 16S rRNA V3 hypervariable region. The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed an average of 10 different bacterial families in wounds—approximately 4 times more than estimated by culture-based analyses. Fastidious anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales family XI were among the most prevalent bacteria identified exclusively by 16S rRNA gene-based analyses. Community-scale analyses showed that wound microbiota from antibiotic treated patients were significantly different from untreated patients (p = 0.007) and were characterized by increased Pseudomonadaceae abundance. These analyses also revealed that antibiotic use was associated with decreased Streptococcaceae among diabetics and that Streptococcaceae was more abundant among diabetics as compared to non-diabetics. Conclusions/Significance The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed complex bacterial communities including anaerobic bacteria that may play causative roles in the non-healing state of some chronic wounds. Our data suggest that antimicrobial therapy alters community structure—reducing some bacteria while selecting for others. PMID:19649281

  5. Population abundance of potentially pathogenic organisms in intestinal microbiome of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) shown with 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  6. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24058905

  7. High through put 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis of the fecal microbiota of high FCR and low FCR broiler growers.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Shah, T; Deshpande, S; Jakhesara, S J; Koringa, P G; Rank, D N; Joshi, C G

    2012-12-01

    The performance of birds appears to vary among the flock of growing broilers which may in part be due to variation in their gut microbiota. In the view of poultry industry, it is desirable to minimise such variation. We investigated metagenomic profile of fecal bacteria in birds with high and low feed conversion ratio (FCR) to identify microbial community linked to low and high FCR by employing high throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genomic targets. Therefore feeding trial was investigated in order to identify fecal bacteria consistently linked with better feed conversion ratio in bird performance as measured by body weight gain. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing was used to provide a comparative analysis of fecal microbial diversity. The fecal microbial community of birds was predominated by Proteobacteria (48.04 % in high FCR and 49.98 % in low FCR), Firmicutes (26.17 % in high FCR and 36.23 % in low FCR), Bacteroidetes (18.62 % in high FCR and 11.66 % in low FCR), as well as unclassified bacteria (15.77 % in high FCR and 14.29 % in low FCR), suggesting that a large portion of fecal microbiota is novel and could be involved in currently unknown functions. The most prevalent bacterial classes in high FCR and low FCR were Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia and Bacteroidia. However in low FCR birds Phascolarctobacterium, Faecalibacterium and Clostridium predominated among the Clostridia. In FCR comparison of fecal bacteria, about 36 genera were differentially abundant between high and low FCR birds. This information could be used to formulate effective strategies to improve feed efficiency and feed formulation for optimal gut health.

  8. Influence of menstruation on the microbiota of healthy women's labia minora as analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene-based clone library method.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Morotomi, Nobuo; Imamura, Yuri; Mishima, Junko; Imai, Shigeo; Miyazawa, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of menstruation on the bacterial population of healthy Japanese women's vulvas, especially the labia minora. Labia minora swabs were obtained from 10 premenopausal, nonpregnant Japanese women at premenstruation and on day 2 of menstruation. Vaginal swabs were also obtained from 3 out of the 10 women. No significant difference was found in the average bacterial cell count between the menstruation and premenstruation samples. Molecular analysis using a 16S rRNA gene-based clone library method detected 22 genera from the labia minora swabs (total 20), with the genus Lactobacillus being predominant at both premenstruation and during menstruation in 7 out of the 10 women. Of the other 3 women, 2 showed various kinds of bacterial species, including oral and fecal bacteria, with Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis predominating in the remaining woman's vulva in both conditions. In total, 6 out of 10 cases (60%) showed significantly different microbiota of the labia minora between the two conditions. These results imply that menstruation may promote a distortion of the bacterial flora around the vulva, although it causes no significant increase of the bacterial count.

  9. 16S rRNA and omp31 gene based molecular characterization of field strains of B. melitensis from aborted foetus of goats in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Vikas Kumar; Nayakwadi, Shivasharanappa

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a reemerging infectious zoonotic disease of worldwide importance. In human, it is mainly caused by Brucella melitensis, a natural pathogen for goats. In India, a large number of goats are reared in semi-intensive to intensive system within the close vicinity of human being. At present, there is no vaccination and control strategy for caprine brucellosis in the country. Thus, to formulate an effective control strategy, the status of etiological agent is essential. To cope up with these, the present study was conducted to isolate and identify the prevalent Brucella species in caprine brucellosis in India. The 30 samples (fetal membrane, fetal stomach content and vaginal swabs) collected throughout India from the aborted fetus of goats revealed the isolation of 05 isolates all belonging to Brucella melitensis biovars 3. All the isolates produced amplification products of 1412 and 720 bp in polymerase chain reaction with genus and species specific 16S rRNA and omp31 gene based primers, respectively. Moreover, the amplification of omp31 gene in all the isolates confirmed the presence of immuno dominant outer membrane protein (31 kDa omp) in all the field isolates of B. melitensis in aborted foetus of goats in India. These findings can support the development of omp31 based specific serodiagnostic test as well as vaccine for the control of caprine brucellosis in India.

  10. 16S rRNA gene-based characterization of bacteria potentially associated with phosphate and carbonate precipitation from a granular autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Rivadeneyra, María Angustias; Rivadeneyra, Almudena; Martin-Ramos, Daniel; Vahala, Riku; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    A bench-scale granular autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactor (completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) system) used for the treatment of synthetic wastewater was analyzed for the identification of microbiota with potential capacity for carbonate and phosphate biomineral formation. 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based studies revealed that different bacterial species found in the granular biomass could trigger the formation of phosphate and calcite minerals in the CANON bioreactor. iTag analysis of the microbial community in the granular biomass with potential ability to precipitate calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite constituted around 0.79-1.32 % of total bacteria. Specifically, the possible hydroxyapatite-producing Candidatus Accumulibacter had a relative abundance of 0.36-0.38 % and was the highest phosphate-precipitating bacteria in the granular CANON system. With respect to calcite precipitation, the major potential producer was thought to be Stenotrophomonas with a 0.38-0.50 % relative abundance. In conclusion, our study showed evidences that the formation of hydroxyapatite and calcite crystals inside of the granular biomass of a CANON system for the treatment wastewater with high ammonium concentration was a biological process. Therefore, it could be suggested that microorganisms play an important role as a precipitation core and also modified the environment due to their metabolic activities.

  11. 16S rRNA gene-based identification of bacteria in postoperative endophthalmitis by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Zenteno, Juan C.; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Cancino-Díaz, Mario E.; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Cancino-Díaz, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional microbiological culture techniques are frequently insufficient to confirm endophthalmitis clinical cases which could require urgent medical attention because it could lead to permanent vision loss. We are proposing PCR-DGGE and 16S rRNA gene libraries as an alternative to improve the detection and identification rate of bacterial species from endophthalmitis cases. PMID:24031830

  12. The Effect of Primer Choice and Short Read Sequences on the Outcome of 16S rRNA Gene Based Diversity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Kim; Sessitsch, Angela; De Vos, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Different regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene evolve at different evolutionary rates. The scientific outcome of short read sequencing studies therefore alters with the gene region sequenced. We wanted to gain insight in the impact of primer choice on the outcome of short read sequencing efforts. All the unknowns associated with sequencing data, i.e. primer coverage rate, phylogeny, OTU-richness and taxonomic assignment, were therefore implemented in one study for ten well established universal primers (338f/r, 518f/r, 799f/r, 926f/r and 1062f/r) targeting dispersed regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All analyses were performed on nearly full length and in silico generated short read sequence libraries containing 1175 sequences that were carefully chosen as to present a representative substitute of the SILVA SSU database. The 518f and 799r primers, targeting the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene, were found to be particularly suited for short read sequencing studies, while the primer 1062r, targeting V6, seemed to be least reliable. Our results will assist scientists in considering whether the best option for their study is to select the most informative primer, or the primer that excludes interferences by host-organelle DNA. The methodology followed can be extrapolated to other primers, allowing their evaluation prior to the experiment. PMID:23977026

  13. Monitoring Bacterial Communities in Raw Milk and Cheese by Culture-Dependent and -Independent 16S rRNA Gene-Based Analyses▿

    PubMed Central

    Delbès, Céline; Ali-Mandjee, Leila; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2007-01-01

    The diversity and dynamics of bacterial populations in Saint-Nectaire, a raw-milk, semihard cheese, were investigated using a dual culture-dependent and direct molecular approach combining single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprinting and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The dominant clones, among 125 16S rRNA genes isolated from milk, belonged to members of the Firmicutes (58% of the total clones) affiliated mainly with the orders Clostridiales and the Lactobacillales, followed by the phyla Proteobacteria (21.6%), Actinobacteria (16.8%), and Bacteroidetes (4%). Sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of 126 milk isolates collected from four culture media revealed the presence of 36 different species showing a wider diversity in the Gammaproteobacteria phylum and Staphylococcus genus than that found among clones. In cheese, a total of 21 species were obtained from 170 isolates, with dominant species belonging to the Lactobacillales and subdominant species affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes (Chryseobacterium sp.), or Gammaproteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas sp.). Fingerprinting DNA isolated from milk by SSCP analysis yielded complex patterns, whereas analyzing DNA isolated from cheese resulted in patterns composed of a single peak which corresponded to that of lactic acid bacteria. SSCP fingerprinting of mixtures of all colonies harvested from plate count agar supplemented with crystal violet and vancomycin showed good potential for monitoring the subdominant Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria) organisms in milk and cheese. Likewise, analyzing culturable subcommunities from cheese-ripening bacterial medium permitted assessment of the diversity of halotolerant Actinobacteria and Staphylococcus organisms. Direct and culture-dependent approaches produced complementary information, thus generating a more accurate view of milk and cheese microbial ecology. PMID:17259356

  14. High abundance of heterotrophic prokaryotes in hydrothermal springs of the Azores as revealed by a network of 16S rRNA gene-based methods.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Kerstin; John, Patrick; Nacke, Heiko; Wemheuer, Bernd; Grote, Ralf; Daniel, Rolf; Antranikian, Garabed

    2013-07-01

    Two hydrothermal springs (AI: 51 °C, pH 3; AIV: 92 °C, pH 8) were analysed to determine prokaryotic community composition. Using pyrosequencing, 93,576 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified with V2/V3-specific primers for Bacteria and Archaea were investigated and compared to 16S rRNA gene sequences from direct metagenome sequencing without prior amplification. The results were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While in site AIV Bacteria and Archaea were detected in similar relative abundances (Bacteria 40 %, Archaea 35 %), the acidic spring AI was dominated by Bacteria (68 %). In spring AIV the combination of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and FISH revealed high abundance (>50 %) of heterotrophic bacterial genera like Caldicellulosiruptor, Dictyoglomus, and Fervidobacterium. In addition, chemolithoautotrophic Aquificales were detected in the bacterial community with Sulfurihydrogenibium being the dominant genus. Regarding Archaea, only Crenarchaeota, were detected, dominated by the family Desulfurococcaceae (>50 %). In addition, Thermoproteaceae made up almost 25 %. In the acidic spring (AI) prokaryotic diversity was lower than in the hot, slightly alkaline spring AIV. The bacterial community of site AI was dominated by organisms related to the chemolithoautotrophic genus Acidithiobacillus (43 %), to the heterotrophic Acidicaldus (38 %) and to Anoxybacillus (7.8 %). This study reveals differences in the relative abundance of heterotrophic versus autotrophic microorganisms as compared to other hydrothermal habitats. Furthermore, it shows how different methods to analyse prokaryotic communities in complex ecosystems can complement each other to obtain an in-depth picture of the taxonomic composition and diversity within these hydrothermal springs.

  15. Comparative analysis of two 16S rRNA gene-based PCR primer sets provides insight into the diversity distribution patterns of anammox bacteria in different environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuailong; Hong, Yiguo; Wu, Jiapeng; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Bin, Liying; Pan, Yueping; Guan, Fengjie; Wen, Jiali

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high divergence among 16S rRNA genes of anammox bacteria, different diversity pattern of the community could be resulted from using different primer set. In this study, the efficiencies and specificities of two commonly used sets, Amx368F/Amx820R and Brod541F/Amx820R, were evaluated by exploring the diversity characteristics of anammox bacteria in sediments from marine, estuary, and freshwater wetland. Statistical analysis indicated that the base mispairing rate between bases on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved by Amx368F/Amx820R and their corresponding ones on primer Brod541F was quite high, suggesting the different efficiency and specificity of Amx368F/Amx820R and Brod541F/Amx820R. Further experimental results demonstrated that multiple genera of anammox bacteria, including Ca. Scalindua, Ca. Brocadia, and Ca. Kuenenia, were able to be detected by Amx368F/Amx820R, but only Ca. Scalindua could be retrieved by Brod541F/Amx820R. Moreover, the phylogenetic clusters of Ca. Scalindua by Amx368F/Amx820R were different completely from those by Brod541F/Amx820R, presenting a significant complementary effect. By joint application of these two primer sets, the diversity distribution patterns of anammox bacteria in different environments were analyzed. Almost all retrieved sequences from marine sediments belonged to Ca. Scalindua. Sequences from freshwater wetland were affiliated to Ca. Brocadia and two new clusters, while high diversity of anammox bacteria was found in estuary, including Ca. Scalindua, Ca. Brocadia, and Ca. Kuenenia, corresponding to the river-sea intersection environmental feature. In total, these two prime sets have different characteristic for anammox bacteria detecting from environmental samples, and their combined application could achieve better diversity display of anammox community.

  16. 16S rRNA gene-based metagenomic analysis reveals differences in bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles in the urine of pregnant and non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae Young; Rho, Mina; You, Young-Ah; Kwon, Eun Jin; Kim, Min-Hye; Kym, Sungmin; Jee, Young-Koo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Young Ju

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important for host–microbe communication. The aims of the present study were to evaluate whether bacteria-derived EVs are excreted via the urinary tract and to compare the composition of bacteria-derived EVs in the urine of pregnant and non-pregnant women. Seventy-three non-pregnant and seventy-four pregnant women were enrolled from Dankook University and Ewha Womans University hospitals. DNA was extracted from urine EVs after EV isolation using the differential centrifugation method. 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequencing was performed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing after amplification of the V1–V3 region of the 16S rDNA. The composition of 13 taxa differed significantly between the pregnant and non-pregnant women. At the genus level, Bacillus spp. EVs were more significantly enriched in the urine of the pregnant women than in that of the non-pregnant women (45.61% vs 0.12%, respectively). However, Pseudomonas spp. EVs were more dominant in non-pregnant women than in pregnant women (13.2% vs 4.09%, respectively). Regarding the compositional difference between pregnant women with normal and preterm delivery, EVs derived from Ureaplasma spp. and the family Veillonellaceae (including Megasphaera spp.) were more abundant in the urine of preterm-delivered women than in that of women with normal deliveries. Taken together, these data showed that Bacillus spp. EVs predominate in the urine of pregnant women, whereas Pseudomonas spp. EVs predominate in the urine of non-pregnant women; this suggests that Bacillus spp. EVs might have an important role in the maintenance of pregnancy. PMID:26846451

  17. 16S rRNA gene-based metagenomic analysis reveals differences in bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles in the urine of pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Young; Rho, Mina; You, Young-Ah; Kwon, Eun Jin; Kim, Min-Hye; Kym, Sungmin; Jee, Young-Koo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Young Ju

    2016-02-05

    Recent evidence has indicated that bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important for host-microbe communication. The aims of the present study were to evaluate whether bacteria-derived EVs are excreted via the urinary tract and to compare the composition of bacteria-derived EVs in the urine of pregnant and non-pregnant women. Seventy-three non-pregnant and seventy-four pregnant women were enrolled from Dankook University and Ewha Womans University hospitals. DNA was extracted from urine EVs after EV isolation using the differential centrifugation method. 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequencing was performed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing after amplification of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. The composition of 13 taxa differed significantly between the pregnant and non-pregnant women. At the genus level, Bacillus spp. EVs were more significantly enriched in the urine of the pregnant women than in that of the non-pregnant women (45.61% vs 0.12%, respectively). However, Pseudomonas spp. EVs were more dominant in non-pregnant women than in pregnant women (13.2% vs 4.09%, respectively). Regarding the compositional difference between pregnant women with normal and preterm delivery, EVs derived from Ureaplasma spp. and the family Veillonellaceae (including Megasphaera spp.) were more abundant in the urine of preterm-delivered women than in that of women with normal deliveries. Taken together, these data showed that Bacillus spp. EVs predominate in the urine of pregnant women, whereas Pseudomonas spp. EVs predominate in the urine of non-pregnant women; this suggests that Bacillus spp. EVs might have an important role in the maintenance of pregnancy.

  18. 16S rRNA gene-based association study identified microbial taxa associated with pork intramuscular fat content in feces and cecum lumen.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shaoming; Xiong, Xingwei; Su, Ying; Huang, Lusheng; Chen, Congying

    2017-07-19

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) that deposits among muscle fibers or within muscle cells is an important meat quality trait in pigs. Previous studies observed the effects of dietary nutrients and additives on improving the pork IMF. Gut microbiome plays an important role in host metabolism and energy harvest. Whether gut microbiota exerts effect on IMF remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the microbial community structure of 500 samples from porcine cecum and feces using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We found that phylogenetic composition and potential function capacity of microbiome varied between two types of samples. Bacteria wide association study identified 119 OTUs significantly associated with IMF in the two types of samples (FDR < 0.1). Most of the IMF-associated OTUs belong to the bacteria related to polysaccharide degradation and amino acid metabolism (such as Prevotella, Treponema, Bacteroides and Clostridium). Potential function capacities related to metabolisms of carbohydrate, energy and amino acids, cell motility, and membrane transport were significantly associated with IMF content. FishTaco analysis suggested that the shifts of potential function capacities of microbiome associated with IMF might be caused by the IMF-associated microbial taxa. This study firstly evaluated the contribution of gut microbiome to porcine IMF content. The results presented a potential capacity for improving IMF through modulating gut microbiota.

  19. An interlaboratory comparison of 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing methods for assessing microbial diversity of seafloor basalts

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Beth; Bailey, Brad; Staudigel, Hubert; Tebo, Bradley M; Edwards, Katrina J

    2009-01-01

    We present an interlaboratory comparison between full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) for microbial communities hosted on seafloor basaltic lavas, with the goal of evaluating how similarly these two different DNA-based methods used in two independent labs would estimate the microbial diversity of the same basalt samples. Two samples were selected for these analyses based on differences detected in the overall levels of microbial diversity between them. Richness estimators indicate that TRFLP analysis significantly underestimates the richness of the relatively high-diversity seafloor basalt microbial community: at least 50% of species from the high-diversity site are missed by TRFLP. However, both methods reveal similar dominant species from the samples, and they predict similar levels of relative diversity between the two samples. Importantly, these results suggest that DNA-extraction or PCR-related bias between the two laboratories is minimal. We conclude that TRFLP may be useful for relative comparisons of diversity between basalt samples, for identifying dominant species, and for estimating the richness and evenness of low-diversity, skewed populations of seafloor basalt microbial communities, but that TRFLP may miss a majority of species in relatively highly diverse samples. PMID:19508561

  20. Use of 16S rRNA gene based clone libraries to assess microbial communities potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation in a Mediterranean cold seep.

    PubMed

    Heijs, Sander K; Haese, Ralf R; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Forney, Larry J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2007-04-01

    This study provides data on the diversities of bacterial and archaeal communities in an active methane seep at the Kazan mud volcano in the deep Eastern Mediterranean sea. Layers of varying depths in the Kazan sediments were investigated in terms of (1) chemical parameters and (2) DNA-based microbial population structures. The latter was accomplished by analyzing the sequences of directly amplified 16S rRNA genes, resulting in the phylogenetic analysis of the prokaryotic communities. Sequences of organisms potentially associated with processes such as anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction were thus identified. Overall, the sediment layers revealed the presence of sequences of quite diverse bacterial and archaeal communities, which varied considerably with depth. Dominant types revealed in these communities are known as key organisms involved in the following processes: (1) anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction, (2) sulfide oxidation, and (3) a range of (aerobic) heterotrophic processes. In the communities in the lowest sediment layer sampled (22-34 cm), sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea of the ANME-2 cluster (likely involved in anaerobic methane oxidation) were prevalent, whereas heterotrophic organisms abounded in the top sediment layer (0-6 cm). Communities in the middle layer (6-22 cm) contained organisms that could be linked to either of the aforementioned processes. We discuss how these phylogeny (sequence)-based findings can support the ongoing molecular work aimed at unraveling both the functioning and the functional diversities of the communities under study.

  1. Bacterial fauna associating with chironomid larvae from lakes of Bengaluru city, India - A 16s rRNA gene based identification.

    PubMed

    Kuncham, Ramprasad; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan; Puneeth Kumar, R; Sreenath, P; Nayak, Ravi; Thayumanavan, Tha; Subba Reddy, Gopireddy V

    2017-06-01

    Chironomid larvae that inhabit in aquatic sediments play an important role as vector for bacterial pathogens. Its life cycle consists of four stages i.e. eggs, larvae, pupae and adult. In the present study we identified bacterial species associated with whole larvae of chironomids from 11 lake sediments of Bangalore region using 16s rRNA gene Sanger sequencing. We found that larvae from all lake sediments associated with bacterial species which include key pathogens. Totally we identified 65 bacterial isolates and obtained GenBank accession numbers (KX980423 - KX980487). Phylogenetic tree constructed using MEGA 7 software and tree analysis highlight the predominant bacterial community associated with larvae which include Enterobacteriaceae (43.08%; 28 isolates) and Aeromonas (24.62%; 16 isolates), Shewanella, Delftia, Bacillus (6.15%; 4 isolates each), Pseudomonas (4.62%; 3 isolates) and Exiguobacterium (3.08%; 2 isolates). Current findings state that among bacterial population Aeromonas, Enterobacter and Escherichia with serotypes are commonly associated with larvae in maximum lake points. In other hand Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Shigella, Bacillus, and other bacterial species were identified moderately in all lakes. Interestingly, we identified first time Shigella Gram negative, rod shaped pathogenic organism of Enterobacteriaceae and Rheinheimera Gram negative, rod shaped organism associating chironomid larvae.

  2. Use of 16S rRNA Gene Based Clone Libraries to Assess Microbial Communities Potentially Involved in Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Mediterranean Cold Seep

    PubMed Central

    Haese, Ralf R.; van der Wielen, Paul W. J. J.; Forney, Larry J.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2007-01-01

    This study provides data on the diversities of bacterial and archaeal communities in an active methane seep at the Kazan mud volcano in the deep Eastern Mediterranean sea. Layers of varying depths in the Kazan sediments were investigated in terms of (1) chemical parameters and (2) DNA-based microbial population structures. The latter was accomplished by analyzing the sequences of directly amplified 16S rRNA genes, resulting in the phylogenetic analysis of the prokaryotic communities. Sequences of organisms potentially associated with processes such as anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction were thus identified. Overall, the sediment layers revealed the presence of sequences of quite diverse bacterial and archaeal communities, which varied considerably with depth. Dominant types revealed in these communities are known as key organisms involved in the following processes: (1) anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction, (2) sulfide oxidation, and (3) a range of (aerobic) heterotrophic processes. In the communities in the lowest sediment layer sampled (22–34 cm), sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea of the ANME-2 cluster (likely involved in anaerobic methane oxidation) were prevalent, whereas heterotrophic organisms abounded in the top sediment layer (0–6 cm). Communities in the middle layer (6–22 cm) contained organisms that could be linked to either of the aforementioned processes. We discuss how these phylogeny (sequence)-based findings can support the ongoing molecular work aimed at unraveling both the functioning and the functional diversities of the communities under study. PMID:17431711

  3. Diagnosis of bacteremia in whole-blood samples by use of a commercial universal 16S rRNA gene-based PCR and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Kochem, Anna-Julia; Disqué, Claudia; Mühl, Helge; Gebert, Susanne; Winter, Juliane; Matten, Jens; Sakka, Samir G

    2009-09-01

    In a prospective, multicenter study of 342 blood samples from 187 patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, or neutropenic fever, a new commercial PCR test (SepsiTest; Molzym) was evaluated for rapid diagnosis of bacteremia. The test comprises a universal PCR from the 16S rRNA gene, with subsequent identification of bacteria from positive samples by sequence analysis of amplicons. Compared to blood culture (BC), the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the PCR were 87.0 and 85.8%, respectively. Considering the 34 BC-positive patients, 28 were also PCR positive in at least one of the samples, resulting in a patient-related sensitivity of 82.4%. The concordance of PCR and BC for both positive and negative samples was (47 + 247)/342, i.e., 86.0%. In total, 31 patients were PCR/sequencing positive and BC negative, in whom the PCR result was judged as possible or probable to true bacteremia in 25. In conclusion, the PCR approach facilitates the detection of bacteremia in blood samples within a few hours. Despite the indispensability of BC diagnostics, the rapid detection of bacteria by SepsiTest appears to be a valuable tool, allowing earlier pathogen-adapted antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients.

  4. Reconstructing 16S rRNA genes in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cheng; Lei, Jikai; Cole, James; Sun, Yanni

    2015-06-15

    Metagenomic data, which contains sequenced DNA reads of uncultured microbial species from environmental samples, provide a unique opportunity to thoroughly analyze microbial species that have never been identified before. Reconstructing 16S ribosomal RNA, a phylogenetic marker gene, is usually required to analyze the composition of the metagenomic data. However, massive volume of dataset, high sequence similarity between related species, skewed microbial abundance and lack of reference genes make 16S rRNA reconstruction difficult. Generic de novo assembly tools are not optimized for assembling 16S rRNA genes. In this work, we introduce a targeted rRNA assembly tool, REAGO (REconstruct 16S ribosomal RNA Genes from metagenOmic data). It addresses the above challenges by combining secondary structure-aware homology search, zproperties of rRNA genes and de novo assembly. Our experimental results show that our tool can correctly recover more rRNA genes than several popular generic metagenomic assembly tools and specially designed rRNA construction tools. The source code of REAGO is freely available at https://github.com/chengyuan/reago. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes causes overestimation of prokaryotic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Lei; Jiang, Xuan; Wu, Qinglong L; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2013-10-01

    Ever since Carl Woese introduced the use of 16S rRNA genes for determining the phylogenetic relationships of prokaryotes, this method has been regarded as the "gold standard" in both microbial phylogeny and ecology studies. However, intragenomic heterogeneity within 16S rRNA genes has been reported in many investigations and is believed to bias the estimation of prokaryotic diversity. In the current study, 2,013 completely sequenced genomes of bacteria and archaea were analyzed and intragenomic heterogeneity was found in 952 genomes (585 species), with 87.5% of the divergence detected being below the 1% level. In particular, some extremophiles (thermophiles and halophiles) were found to harbor highly divergent 16S rRNA genes. Overestimation caused by 16S rRNA gene intragenomic heterogeneity was evaluated at different levels using the full-length and partial 16S rRNA genes usually chosen as targets for pyrosequencing. The result indicates that, at the unique level, full-length 16S rRNA genes can produce an overestimation of as much as 123.7%, while at the 3% level, an overestimation of 12.9% for the V6 region may be introduced. Further analysis showed that intragenomic heterogeneity tends to concentrate in specific positions, with the V1 and V6 regions suffering the most intragenomic heterogeneity and the V4 and V5 regions suffering the least intragenomic heterogeneity in bacteria. This is the most up-to-date overview of the diversity of 16S rRNA genes within prokaryotic genomes. It not only provides general guidance on how much overestimation can be introduced when applying 16S rRNA gene-based methods, due to its intragenomic heterogeneity, but also recommends that, for bacteria, this overestimation be minimized using primers targeting the V4 and V5 regions.

  6. 16S rRNA Gene-Based Identification of Midgut Bacteria from Field-Caught Anopheles gambiae Sensu Lato and A. funestus Mosquitoes Reveals New Species Related to Known Insect Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Jenny M.; Terenius, Olle; Faye, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Field-collected mosquitoes of the two main malaria vectors in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and Anopheles funestus, were screened for their midgut bacterial contents. The midgut from each blood-fed mosquito was screened with two different detection pathways, one culture independent and one culture dependent. Bacterial species determination was achieved by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Altogether, 16 species from 14 genera were identified, 8 by each method. Interestingly, several of the bacteria identified are related to bacteria known to be symbionts in other insects. One isolate, Nocardia corynebacterioides, is a relative of the symbiont found in the vector for Chagas' disease that has been proven useful as a paratransgenic bacterium. Another isolate is a novel species within the γ-proteobacteria that could not be phylogenetically placed within any of the known orders in the class but is close to a group of insect symbionts. Bacteria representing three intracellular genera were identified, among them the first identifications of Anaplasma species from mosquitoes and a new mosquito-Spiroplasma association. The isolates will be further investigated for their suitability for a paratransgenic Anopheles mosquito. PMID:16269761

  7. 16S rRNA gene-based identification of midgut bacteria from field-caught Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and A. funestus mosquitoes reveals new species related to known insect symbionts.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Jenny M; Terenius, Olle; Faye, Ingrid

    2005-11-01

    Field-collected mosquitoes of the two main malaria vectors in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and Anopheles funestus, were screened for their midgut bacterial contents. The midgut from each blood-fed mosquito was screened with two different detection pathways, one culture independent and one culture dependent. Bacterial species determination was achieved by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Altogether, 16 species from 14 genera were identified, 8 by each method. Interestingly, several of the bacteria identified are related to bacteria known to be symbionts in other insects. One isolate, Nocardia corynebacterioides, is a relative of the symbiont found in the vector for Chagas' disease that has been proven useful as a paratransgenic bacterium. Another isolate is a novel species within the gamma-proteobacteria that could not be phylogenetically placed within any of the known orders in the class but is close to a group of insect symbionts. Bacteria representing three intracellular genera were identified, among them the first identifications of Anaplasma species from mosquitoes and a new mosquito-Spiroplasma association. The isolates will be further investigated for their suitability for a paratransgenic Anopheles mosquito.

  8. Intraspecific 16S rRNA gene diversity among clinical isolates of Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, nearly the entire 16S rRNA gene sequences of 46 clinical samples of Neisseria spp. were determined, and the aligned sequences were analyzed to investigate the diversity of 16S rRNA genes in each commensal Neisseria species. Two 16S rRNA types were identified in two Neisseria sicca strains, three 16S rRNA types in five Neisseria macacae strains, fourteen 16S rRNA types in twenty Neisseria flavescens isolates, and fourteen 16S rRNA types in nineteen Neisseria mucosa isolates. The number of nucleotides that were different between 16S rRNA sequences within specie ranged from 1 to 15. We found high intraspecific sequence variation in 16S rRNA genes of Neisseria spp. strains. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  10. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  11. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    McGill, T J; Jurka, J; Sobieski, J M; Pickett, M H; Woese, C R; Fox, G E

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  12. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese’s complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity <98.0%), and further analysis revealed HGT events and potential donors of the heterogeneous copies (such as HGT from Chlamydia suis to Chlamydia trachomatis) and mutation events of some heterogeneous copies (such as Streptococcus suis JS14). Interestingly, HGT of the 16S rRNA gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes. PMID:26220935

  13. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  14. Sequencing of 16S rRNA Gene: A Rapid Tool for Identification of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Anne M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Morey, Roger; Steigerwalt, Arnold; Boras, Ariana; Weyant, Robin S.; Popovic, Tanja

    2002-01-01

    In a bioterrorism event, a tool is needed to rapidly differentiate Bacillus anthracis from other closely related spore-forming Bacillus species. During the recent outbreak of bioterrorism-associated anthrax, we sequenced the 16S rRNA generom these species to evaluate the potential of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a diagnostic tool. We found eight distinct 16S types among all 107 16S rRNA gene seqs fuences that differed from each other at 1 to 8 positions (0.06% to 0.5%). All 86 B. anthracis had an identical 16S gene sequence, designated type 6; 16S type 10 was seen in all B. thuringiensis strains; six other 16S types were found among the 10 B. cereus strains. This report describes the first demonstration of an exclusive association of a distinct 16S sequence with B. anthracis. Consequently, we were able to rapidly identify suspected isolates and to detect the B. anthracis 16S rRNA gene directly from culture-negative clinical specimens from seven patients with laboratory-confirmed anthrax. PMID:12396926

  15. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  16. Diversity of 16S rRNA Genes within Individual Prokaryotic Genomes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Anna Y.; Oberdorf, William E.; Nossa, Carlos W.; Agarwal, Ankush; Chokshi, Pooja; Gerz, Erika A.; Jin, Zhida; Lee, Peng; Yang, Liying; Poles, Michael; Brown, Stuart M.; Sotero, Steven; DeSantis, Todd; Brodie, Eoin; Nelson, Karen; Pei, Zhiheng

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of intragenomic variation of 16S rRNA genes is a unique approach to examining the concept of ribosomal constraints on rRNA genes; the degree of variation is an important parameter to consider for estimation of the diversity of a complex microbiome in the recently initiated Human Microbiome Project (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp). The current GenBank database has a collection of 883 prokaryotic genomes representing 568 unique species, of which 425 species contained 2 to 15 copies of 16S rRNA genes per genome (2.22 ± 0.81). Sequence diversity among the 16S rRNA genes in a genome was found in 235 species (from 0.06% to 20.38%; 0.55% ± 1.46%). Compared with the 16S rRNA-based threshold for operational definition of species (1 to 1.3% diversity), the diversity was borderline (between 1% and 1.3%) in 10 species and >1.3% in 14 species. The diversified 16S rRNA genes in Haloarcula marismortui (diversity, 5.63%) and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (6.70%) were highly conserved at the 2° structure level, while the diversified gene in B. afzelii (20.38%) appears to be a pseudogene. The diversified genes in the remaining 21 species were also conserved, except for a truncated 16S rRNA gene in “Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila.” Thus, this survey of intragenomic diversity of 16S rRNA genes provides strong evidence supporting the theory of ribosomal constraint. Taxonomic classification using the 16S rRNA-based operational threshold could misclassify a number of species into more than one species, leading to an overestimation of the diversity of a complex microbiome. This phenomenon is especially seen in 7 bacterial species associated with the human microbiome or diseases. PMID:20418441

  17. Diversity of 16S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Anna Y; Oberdorf, William E; Nossa, Carlos W; Agarwal, Ankush; Chokshi, Pooja; Gerz, Erika A; Jin, Zhida; Lee, Peng; Yang, Liying; Poles, Michael; Brown, Stuart M; Sotero, Steven; Desantis, Todd; Brodie, Eoin; Nelson, Karen; Pei, Zhiheng

    2010-06-01

    Analysis of intragenomic variation of 16S rRNA genes is a unique approach to examining the concept of ribosomal constraints on rRNA genes; the degree of variation is an important parameter to consider for estimation of the diversity of a complex microbiome in the recently initiated Human Microbiome Project (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp). The current GenBank database has a collection of 883 prokaryotic genomes representing 568 unique species, of which 425 species contained 2 to 15 copies of 16S rRNA genes per genome (2.22 +/- 0.81). Sequence diversity among the 16S rRNA genes in a genome was found in 235 species (from 0.06% to 20.38%; 0.55% +/- 1.46%). Compared with the 16S rRNA-based threshold for operational definition of species (1 to 1.3% diversity), the diversity was borderline (between 1% and 1.3%) in 10 species and >1.3% in 14 species. The diversified 16S rRNA genes in Haloarcula marismortui (diversity, 5.63%) and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (6.70%) were highly conserved at the 2 degrees structure level, while the diversified gene in B. afzelii (20.38%) appears to be a pseudogene. The diversified genes in the remaining 21 species were also conserved, except for a truncated 16S rRNA gene in "Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila." Thus, this survey of intragenomic diversity of 16S rRNA genes provides strong evidence supporting the theory of ribosomal constraint. Taxonomic classification using the 16S rRNA-based operational threshold could misclassify a number of species into more than one species, leading to an overestimation of the diversity of a complex microbiome. This phenomenon is especially seen in 7 bacterial species associated with the human microbiome or diseases.

  18. Utility of 16S rRNA PCR performed on clinical specimens in patient management.

    PubMed

    Akram, A; Maley, M; Gosbell, I; Nguyen, T; Chavada, R

    2017-04-01

    Broad-range 16S rRNA PCR can be used for the detection and identification of bacteria from clinical specimens in patients for whom there is a high suspicion of infection and cultures are negative. The aims of this study were (1) to compare 16S rRNA PCR results with microbiological culture results, (2) to assess the utility of 16S rRNA PCR with regard to antimicrobial therapy, and (3) to compare the yield of 16S rRNA PCR for different types of clinical specimen and to perform a cost analysis of the test. A retrospective study was performed on different clinical specimens which had 16S performed over 3 years (2012-2015). Standard microbiological cultures were performed on appropriate media, as per the laboratory protocol. Patient clinical and microbiological data were obtained from the electronic medical records and laboratory information system, respectively. 16S rRNA PCR was performed in a reference laboratory using a validated method for amplification and sequencing. The outcomes assessed were the performance of 16S rRNA PCR, change of antimicrobials (rationalization, cessation, or addition), and duration of therapy. Concordance of 16S rRNA PCR with bacterial cultures was also determined for tissue specimens. Thirty-two patients were included in the study, for whom an equal number of specimens (n=32) were sent for 16S rRNA PCR. 16S rRNA PCR could identify an organism in 10 of 32 cases (31.2%), of which seven were culture-positive and three were culture-negative. The sensitivity was 58% (confidence interval (CI) 28.59-83.5%) and specificity was 85% (CI 61.13-96%), with a positive predictive value of 70% (CI 35.3-91.9%) and negative predictive value of 77.2% (CI 54.17-91.3%). Antimicrobial therapy was rationalized after 16S rRNA PCR results in five patients (15.6%) and was ceased in four based on negative results (12.5%). Overall the 16S rRNA PCR result had an impact on antimicrobial therapy in 28% of patients (9/32). The highest concordance of 16S rRNA PCR with

  19. Differential assembly of 16S rRNA domains during 30S subunit formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Culver, Gloria M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid and accurate assembly of the ribosomal subunits, which are responsible for protein synthesis, is required to sustain cell growth. Our best understanding of the interaction of 30S ribosomal subunit components (16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] and 20 ribosomal proteins [r-proteins]) comes from in vitro work using Escherichia coli ribosomal components. However, detailed information regarding the essential elements involved in the assembly of 30S subunits still remains elusive. Here, we defined a set of rRNA nucleotides that are critical for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit in E. coli. Using an RNA modification interference approach, we identified 54 nucleotides in 16S rRNA whose modification prevents the formation of a functional small ribosomal subunit. The majority of these nucleotides are located in the head and interdomain junction of the 30S subunit, suggesting that these regions are critical for small subunit assembly. In vivo analysis of specific identified sites, using engineered mutations in 16S rRNA, revealed defective protein synthesis capability, aberrant polysome profiles, and abnormal 16S rRNA processing, indicating the importance of these residues in vivo. These studies reveal that specific segments of 16S rRNA are more critical for small subunit assembly than others, and suggest a hierarchy of importance.

  20. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  1. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  2. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  3. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  4. Development of a dual-internal-reference technique to improve accuracy when determining bacterial 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio with application to Escherichia coli liquid and aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Krumins, Valdis; Fennell, Donna E; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate enumeration of rRNA content in microbial cells, e.g. by using the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio, is critical to properly understand its relationship to microbial activities. However, few studies have considered possible methodological artifacts that may contribute to the variability of rRNA analysis results. In this study, a technique utilizing genomic DNA and 16S rRNA from an exogenous species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) as dual internal references was developed to improve accuracy when determining the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of a target organism, Escherichia coli. This technique was able to adequately control the variability in sample processing and analysis procedures due to nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) losses, inefficient reverse transcription of RNA, and inefficient PCR amplification. The measured 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased by 2-3 fold when E. coli 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA quantities were normalized to the sample-specific fractional recoveries of reference (P. fluorescens) 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA, respectively. In addition, the intra-sample variation of this ratio, represented by coefficients of variation from replicate samples, decreased significantly after normalization. This technique was applied to investigate the temporal variation of 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli during its non-steady-state growth in a complex liquid medium, and to E. coli aerosols when exposed to particle-free air after their collection on a filter. The 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased significantly during its early exponential phase of growth; when E. coli aerosols were exposed to extended filtration stress after sample collection, the ratio also increased. In contrast, no significant temporal trend in E. coli 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio was observed when the determined ratios were not normalized based on the recoveries of dual references. The developed technique could be widely applied in studies of relationship between

  5. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  6. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  7. Novel essential gene Involved in 16S rRNA processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-27

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is a complex process mediated by many factors. While its transcription proceeds, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) folds itself into a characteristic three-dimensional structure through interaction with ribosomal proteins, during which its ends are processed. Here, we show that the essential protein YqgF, a RuvC family protein with an RNase-H-like motif, is involved in the processing of pre-16S rRNA during ribosome maturation. Indeed, pre-16S rRNA accumulated in cells of a temperature-sensitive yqgF mutant (yqgF(ts)) cultured at a non-permissive temperature. In addition, purified YqgF was shown to process the 5' end of pre-16S rRNA within 70S ribosomes in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis of the total proteins in the yqgF(ts) mutant cells showed that the expression of genes containing multiple Shine-Dalgarno-like sequences was observed to be lower than in wild type. These results are interpreted to indicate that YqgF is involved in a novel enzymic activity necessary for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, thereby affecting elongation of translation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  9. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  10. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  11. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  12. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  13. Sensitivity and correlation of hypervariable regions in 16S rRNA genes in phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-03-22

    Prokaryotic 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences are widely used in environmental microbiology and molecular evolution as reliable markers for the taxonomic classification and phylogenetic analysis of microbes. Restricted by current sequencing techniques, the massive sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons encompassing the full length of genes is not yet feasible. Thus, the selection of the most efficient hypervariable regions for phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic classification is still debated. In the present study, several bioinformatics tools were integrated to build an in silico pipeline to evaluate the phylogenetic sensitivity of the hypervariable regions compared with the corresponding full-length sequences. The correlation of seven sub-regions was inferred from the geodesic distance, a parameter that is applied to quantitatively compare the topology of different phylogenetic trees constructed using the sequences from different sub-regions. The relationship between different sub-regions based on the geodesic distance indicated that V4-V6 were the most reliable regions for representing the full-length 16S rRNA sequences in the phylogenetic analysis of most bacterial phyla, while V2 and V8 were the least reliable regions. Our results suggest that V4-V6 might be optimal sub-regions for the design of universal primers with superior phylogenetic resolution for bacterial phyla. A potential relationship between function and the evolution of 16S rRNA is also discussed.

  14. The Human Microbiome and Understanding the 16S rRNA Gene in Translational Nursing Science.

    PubMed

    Ames, Nancy J; Ranucci, Alexandra; Moriyama, Brad; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    As more is understood regarding the human microbiome, it is increasingly important for nurse scientists and healthcare practitioners to analyze these microbial communities and their role in health and disease. 16S rRNA sequencing is a key methodology in identifying these bacterial populations that has recently transitioned from use primarily in research to having increased utility in clinical settings. The objectives of this review are to (a) describe 16S rRNA sequencing and its role in answering research questions important to nursing science; (b) provide an overview of the oral, lung, and gut microbiomes and relevant research; and (c) identify future implications for microbiome research and 16S sequencing in translational nursing science. Sequencing using the 16S rRNA gene has revolutionized research and allowed scientists to easily and reliably characterize complex bacterial communities. This type of research has recently entered the clinical setting, one of the best examples involving the use of 16S sequencing to identify resistant pathogens, thereby improving the accuracy of bacterial identification in infection control. Clinical microbiota research and related requisite methods are of particular relevance to nurse scientists-individuals uniquely positioned to utilize these techniques in future studies in clinical settings.

  15. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  16. Riboprinting and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Brewery Pediococcus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Michael; Volgyi, Antonia; Navarro, Alfonso; Ryder, David

    2001-01-01

    A total of 46 brewery and 15 ATCC Pediococcus isolates were ribotyped using a Qualicon RiboPrinter. Of these, 41 isolates were identified as Pediococcus damnosus using EcoRI digestion. Three ATCC reference strains had patterns similar to each other and matched 17 of the brewery isolates. Six other brewing isolates were similar to ATCC 25249. The other 18 P. damnosus brewery isolates had unique patterns. Of the remaining brewing isolates, one was identified as P. parvulus, two were identified as P. acidilactici, and two were identified as unique Pediococcus species. The use of alternate restriction endonucleases indicated that PstI and PvuII could further differentiate some strains having identical EcoRI profiles. An acid-resistant P. damnosus isolate could be distinguished from non-acid-resistant varieties of the same species using PstI instead of EcoRI. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was compared to riboprinting for identifying pediococci. The complete 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced from seven brewery isolates and three ATCC references with distinctive riboprint patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences from six different brewery P. damnosus isolates were homologous with a high degree of similarity to the GenBank reference strain but were identical to each other and one ATCC strain with the exception of 1 bp in one strain. A slime-producing, beer spoilage isolate had 16S rRNA gene sequence homology to the P. acidilactici reference strain, in agreement with the riboprint data. Although 16S rRNA gene sequencing correctly identified the genus and species of the test Pediococcus isolates, riboprinting proved to be a better method for subspecies differentiation. PMID:11157216

  17. Phylogenetic relatedness determined between antibiotic resistance and 16S rRNA genes in actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Ulanova, Dana; Sanderova, Petra; Omelka, Marek; Kamenik, Zdenek; Olsovska, Jana; Kopecky, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Distribution and evolutionary history of resistance genes in environmental actinobacteria provide information on intensity of antibiosis and evolution of specific secondary metabolic pathways at a given site. To this day, actinobacteria producing biologically active compounds were isolated mostly from soil but only a limited range of soil environments were commonly sampled. Consequently, soil remains an unexplored environment in search for novel producers and related evolutionary questions. Ninety actinobacteria strains isolated at contrasting soil sites were characterized phylogenetically by 16S rRNA gene, for presence of erm and ABC transporter resistance genes and antibiotic production. An analogous analysis was performed in silico with 246 and 31 strains from Integrated Microbial Genomes (JGI_IMG) database selected by the presence of ABC transporter genes and erm genes, respectively. In the isolates, distances of erm gene sequences were significantly correlated to phylogenetic distances based on 16S rRNA genes, while ABC transporter gene distances were not. The phylogenetic distance of isolates was significantly correlated to soil pH and organic matter content of isolation sites. In the analysis of JGI_IMG datasets the correlation between phylogeny of resistance genes and the strain phylogeny based on 16S rRNA genes or five housekeeping genes was observed for both the erm genes and ABC transporter genes in both actinobacteria and streptomycetes. However, in the analysis of sequences from genomes where both resistance genes occurred together the correlation was observed for both ABC transporter and erm genes in actinobacteria but in streptomycetes only in the erm gene. The type of erm resistance gene sequences was influenced by linkage to 16S rRNA gene sequences and site characteristics. The phylogeny of ABC transporter gene was correlated to 16S rRNA genes mainly above the genus level. The results support the concept of new specific secondary metabolite

  18. 16S Classifier: A Tool for Fast and Accurate Taxonomic Classification of 16S rRNA Hypervariable Regions in Metagenomic Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Nikhil; Sharma, Ashok K.; Agarwal, Piyush; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of microbial species in a metagenomic study is commonly assessed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. With the rapid developments in genome sequencing technologies, the focus has shifted towards the sequencing of hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene instead of full length gene sequencing. Therefore, 16S Classifier is developed using a machine learning method, Random Forest, for faster and accurate taxonomic classification of short hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA sequence. It displayed precision values of up to 0.91 on training datasets and the precision values of up to 0.98 on the test dataset. On real metagenomic datasets, it showed up to 99.7% accuracy at the phylum level and up to 99.0% accuracy at the genus level. 16S Classifier is available freely at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/16Sclassifier and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/16Sclassifier. PMID:25646627

  19. The distribution, diversity, and importance of 16S rRNA gene introns in the order Thermoproteales.

    PubMed

    Jay, Zackary J; Inskeep, William P

    2015-07-09

    Intron sequences are common in 16S rRNA genes of specific thermophilic lineages of Archaea, specifically the Thermoproteales (phylum Crenarchaeota). Environmental sequencing (16S rRNA gene and metagenome) from geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has expanded the available datasets for investigating 16S rRNA gene introns. The objectives of this study were to characterize and curate archaeal 16S rRNA gene introns from high-temperature habitats, evaluate the conservation and distribution of archaeal 16S rRNA introns in geothermal systems, and determine which "universal" archaeal 16S rRNA gene primers are impacted by the presence of intron sequences. Several new introns were identified and their insertion loci were constrained to thirteen locations across the 16S rRNA gene. Many of these introns encode homing endonucleases, although some introns were short or partial sequences. Pyrobaculum, Thermoproteus, and Caldivirga 16S rRNA genes contained the most abundant and diverse intron sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of introns revealed that sequences within the same locus are distributed biogeographically. The most diverse set of introns were observed in a high-temperature, circumneutral (pH 6) sulfur sediment environment, which also contained the greatest diversity of different Thermoproteales phylotypes. The widespread presence of introns in the Thermoproteales indicates a high probability of misalignments using different "universal" 16S rRNA primers employed in environmental microbial community analysis.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  1. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  2. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  3. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  4. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  5. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  6. Effect of Field Inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti L33 on the Composition of Bacterial Communities in Rhizospheres of a Target Plant (Medicago sativa) and a Non-Target Plant (Chenopodium album)—Linking of 16S rRNA Gene-Based Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Community Profiles to the Diversity of Cultivated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen weeks after field release of luciferase gene-tagged Sinorhizobium meliloti L33 in field plots seeded with Medicago sativa, we found that the inoculant also occurred in bulk soil from noninoculated control plots. In rhizospheres of M. sativa plants, S. meliloti L33 could be detected in noninoculated plots 12 weeks after inoculation, indicating that growth in the rhizosphere preceded spread into bulk soil. To determine whether inoculation affected bacterial diversity, 1,119 bacteria were isolated from the rhizospheres of M. sativa and Chenopodium album, which was the dominant weed in the field plots. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) revealed plant-specific fragment size frequencies. Dominant ARDRA groups were identified by 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequencing. Database comparisons indicated that the rhizospheres contained members of the Proteobacteria (α, β, and γ subgroups), members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group, and gram-positive bacteria with high G+C DNA contents. The levels of many groups were affected by the plant species and, in the case of M. sativa, by inoculation. The most abundant isolates were related to Variovorax sp., Arthrobacter ramosus, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. In the rhizosphere of M. sativa, inoculation reduced the numbers of cells of A. calcoaceticus and members of the genus Pseudomonas and increased the number of rhizobia. Cultivation-independent PCR–single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) profiles of a 16S rRNA gene region confirmed the existence of plant-specific rhizosphere communities and the effect of the inoculant. All dominant ARDRA groups except Variovorax species could be detected. On the other hand, the SSCP profiles revealed products which could not be assigned to the dominant cultured isolates, indicating that the bacterial diversity was greater than the diversity suggested by cultivation. PMID:10919821

  7. Effect of field inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti L33 on the composition of bacterial communities in rhizospheres of a target plant (Medicago sativa) and a non-target plant (Chenopodium album)-linking of 16S rRNA gene-based single-strand conformation polymorphism community profiles to the diversity of cultivated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, F; Tebbe, C C

    2000-08-01

    Fourteen weeks after field release of luciferase gene-tagged Sinorhizobium meliloti L33 in field plots seeded with Medicago sativa, we found that the inoculant also occurred in bulk soil from noninoculated control plots. In rhizospheres of M. sativa plants, S. meliloti L33 could be detected in noninoculated plots 12 weeks after inoculation, indicating that growth in the rhizosphere preceded spread into bulk soil. To determine whether inoculation affected bacterial diversity, 1,119 bacteria were isolated from the rhizospheres of M. sativa and Chenopodium album, which was the dominant weed in the field plots. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) revealed plant-specific fragment size frequencies. Dominant ARDRA groups were identified by 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequencing. Database comparisons indicated that the rhizospheres contained members of the Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, and gamma subgroups), members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group, and gram-positive bacteria with high G+C DNA contents. The levels of many groups were affected by the plant species and, in the case of M. sativa, by inoculation. The most abundant isolates were related to Variovorax sp., Arthrobacter ramosus, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. In the rhizosphere of M. sativa, inoculation reduced the numbers of cells of A. calcoaceticus and members of the genus Pseudomonas and increased the number of rhizobia. Cultivation-independent PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) profiles of a 16S rRNA gene region confirmed the existence of plant-specific rhizosphere communities and the effect of the inoculant. All dominant ARDRA groups except Variovorax species could be detected. On the other hand, the SSCP profiles revealed products which could not be assigned to the dominant cultured isolates, indicating that the bacterial diversity was greater than the diversity suggested by cultivation.

  8. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  9. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  10. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  11. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  12. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  13. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  14. C16S - a Hidden Markov Model based algorithm for taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gajjalla, Purnachander; Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Mande, Sharmila S

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and concurrent refinements in 16S rDNA isolation techniques have facilitated the rapid extraction and sequencing of 16S rDNA content of microbial communities. The taxonomic affiliation of these 16S rDNA fragments is subsequently obtained using either BLAST-based or word frequency based approaches. However, the classification accuracy of such methods is observed to be limited in typical metagenomic scenarios, wherein a majority of organisms are hitherto unknown. In this study, we present a 16S rDNA classification algorithm, called C16S, that uses genus-specific Hidden Markov Models for taxonomic classification of 16S rDNA sequences. Results obtained using C16S have been compared with the widely used RDP classifier. The performance of C16S algorithm was observed to be consistently higher than the RDP classifier. In some scenarios, this increase in accuracy is as high as 34%. A web-server for the C16S algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/C16S/.

  15. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; ...

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n =more » 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.« less

  16. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  17. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  18. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  19. Unsuitability of quantitative Bacteroidales 16S rRNA gene assays for discerning fecal contamination of drinking water.

    PubMed

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Medema, Gertjan

    2010-07-01

    Bacteroidales species were detected in (tap) water samples from treatment plants with three different PCR assays. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the sequences had an environmental rather than fecal origin. We conclude that assays for Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes are not specific enough to discern fecal contamination of drinking water in the Netherlands.

  20. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined Analyses of the ITS Loci and the Corresponding 16S rRNA Genes Reveal High Micro- and Macrodiversity of SAR11 Populations in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Stingl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24°C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (∼22°C) and salinity (∼41 psu) from the mixed layer (∼200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea’s water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium. PMID:23185592

  2. Combined analyses of the ITS loci and the corresponding 16S rRNA genes reveal high micro- and macrodiversity of SAR11 populations in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Stingl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24 °C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (~22 °C) and salinity (~41 psu) from the mixed layer (~200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea's water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium.

  3. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  4. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  5. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  6. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-03-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  7. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  8. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  9. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  10. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  11. [Phylogenetic comparison between Spirulina and Arthrospira based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuemei; Wang, Suying; Dong, Shirui

    2016-02-04

    Based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the phylogenetic relationship between Spirulina and Arthrospira were studied and compared. We amplified, sequenced and analyzed 16S rRNA and rpoC1 of 84 strains. Then the phylogenetic trees were constructed and compared. The conserved sites percentage, average G+C content and sequence identity of rpoC1 were 49.7%, 47.7%, 76%-100% respectively, significantly lower than 79.4%, 55.6% and 91%-100% of 16S rRNA, and the heterogeneity degree was higher. The trees generated with two different genes showed similar topologies and thus inferred consistent phylogenetic relationships. Eighty-four experimental strains were divided into 3 groups belonging to 2 genera: F-35 1, F-904-2, F-1070 and TJBC14 were Spirulina and the rest were Arthrospira. Although morphospecies and geographical species could not be distinguished based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the bootstrap value of rpoC1 (100%) was higher than that of 16S rRNA (99%). Moreover, clustering effect of rpoC1 for Spirulina and Arthrospirai was better than 16S rRNA. Spirulina and Arthrospira were different genera, rpoC1 gene has more advantage to distinguish the strains in the same genus than that of 16S rRNA gene.

  12. Improved identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella species by 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon; Xiao, Meng; Sorrell, Tania; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuo; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    The identification of fastidious aerobic Actinomycetes such as Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella has remained a challenge leading to clinically significant misclassifications. This study is intended to examine the feasibility of partial 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella, and defined potential reference sequences for species from each of these genera. The 16S rRNA gene sequence based identification algorithm for species identification was used and enhanced by aligning test sequences with reference sequences from the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Conventional PCR based 16S rRNA gene sequencing and the alignment of the isolate 16S rRNA gene sequence with reference sequences accurately identified 100% of clinical strains of aerobic Actinomycetes. While partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of reference type strains matched with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 19 isolates in our data set, another 13 strains demonstrated a degree of polymorphism with a 1-4 bp difference in the regions of difference. 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing, coupled with the assignment of well defined reference sequences to clinically relevant species of bacteria, can be a useful strategy for improving the identification of clinically relevant aerobic Actinomycetes.

  13. Contamination and sensitivity issues with a real-time universal 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Corless, C E; Guiver, M; Borrow, R; Edwards-Jones, V; Kaczmarski, E B; Fox, A J

    2000-05-01

    A set of universal oligonucleotide primers specific for the conserved regions of the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene was designed for use with the real-time PCR Applied Biosystems 7700 (TaqMan) system. During the development of this PCR, problems were noted with the use of this gene as an amplification target. Contamination of reagents with bacterial DNA was a major problem exacerbated by the highly sensitive nature of the real-time PCR chemistry. This was compounded by the use of a small amplicon of approximately 100 bases, as is necessary with TaqMan chemistry. In an attempt to overcome this problem, several methodologies were applied. Certain treatments were more effective than others in eliminating the contaminating DNA; however, to achieve this there was a decrease in sensitivity. With UV irradiation there was a 4-log reduction in PCR sensitivity, with 8-methoxypsoralen activity facilitated by UV there was between a 5- and a 7-log reduction, and with DNase alone and in combination with restriction digestion there was a 1.66-log reduction. Restriction endonuclease treatment singly and together did not reduce the level of contaminating DNA. Without the development of ultrapure Taq DNA polymerase, ultrapure reagents, and plasticware guaranteed to be free of DNA, the implementation of a PCR for detection of eubacterial 16S rRNA with the TaqMan system will continue to be problematical.

  14. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  15. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  16. Cryptic anuran biodiversity in Bangladesh revealed by mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mahmudul; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Khan, Mukhlesur Rahman; Alam, Mohammad Shafiqul; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Igawa, Takeshi; Kuramoto, Mitsuru; Sumida, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    To survey the diversity of anuran species in Bangladesh, we compared mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences (approximately 1.4 kbp) from 107 Bangladesh frog specimens. The results of genetic divergence and phylogenetic analyses incorporating data from related species revealed the occurrence of at least eight cryptic species. Hoplobatrachus tigerinus from two districts diverged considerably, indicating the involvement of a cryptic species. Two Fejervarya sp. (large and medium types) and Hylarana cf. taipehensis formed lineages distinct from related species and are probably new species. Microhyla cf. ornata differed from M. ornata with respect to type locality area and involved two distinct species. In addition, we found that Hylarana sp. and Microhyla sp. did not match congeners examined to date in either morphology or 16S rRNA sequence. The occurrence of M. fissipes was tentatively suggested. Consequently, at least, 19 species were found from Bangladesh in this study. These findings revealed a rich anuran biodiversity in Bangladesh, which is unexpected considering the rather simple topographic features of the country.

  17. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  18. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  19. [Identification of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus thermophilus by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinping; Cui, Shenghui; Li, Fengqin; Yu, Hongxia

    2010-07-01

    To develop a PCR method for identifying the 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus thermophilus at the species level. Optimizing the method for DNA extraction and the conditions for PCR amplification. Joining the PCR amplification products from 16S rRNA to plasmid puc18-T and detecting the sequence. All 50 isolates recovered from yoghourt products were characterized by 16S rRNA sequence analysis and 7 groups were identified as L. bulgaricus (24 strains), S. thermophilus (12 strains), L. acidophilus (7 strains), L. casei (3 strains), L. delbrueckii (2 strains), L. fermentum (1 strain) and S. lutetiensis (1 strain). 16S rRNA PCR method developed in this research is a sensitive and reliable method for the identification of both Lactobacillus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

  20. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  1. Evaluation of PacBio sequencing for full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene classification.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Josef; Coupland, Paul; Browne, Hilary P; Lawley, Trevor D; Francis, Suzanna C; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-11-14

    Currently, bacterial 16S rRNA gene analyses are based on sequencing of individual variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (Kozich, et al Appl Environ Microbiol 79:5112-5120, 2013).This short read approach can introduce biases. Thus, full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing is needed to reduced biases. A new alternative for full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing is offered by PacBio single molecule, real-time (SMRT) technology. The aim of our study was to validate PacBio P6 sequencing chemistry using three approaches: 1) sequencing the full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene from a single bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus to analyze error modes and to optimize the bioinformatics pipeline; 2) sequencing the full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene from a pool of 50 different bacterial colonies from human stool samples to compare with full-length bacterial 16S rRNA capillary sequence; and 3) sequencing the full-length bacterial 16S rRNA genes from 11 vaginal microbiome samples and compare with in silico selected bacterial 16S rRNA V1V2 gene region and with bacterial 16S rRNA V1V2 gene regions sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq. Our optimized bioinformatics pipeline for PacBio sequence analysis was able to achieve an error rate of 0.007% on the Staphylococcus aureus full-length 16S rRNA gene. Capillary sequencing of the full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene from the pool of 50 colonies from stool identified 40 bacterial species of which up to 80% could be identified by PacBio full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Analysis of the human vaginal microbiome using the bacterial 16S rRNA V1V2 gene region on MiSeq generated 129 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from which 70 species could be identified. For the PacBio, 36,000 sequences from over 58,000 raw reads could be assigned to a barcode, and the in silico selected bacterial 16S rRNA V1V2 gene region generated 154 OTUs grouped into 63 species, of which 62% were shared with the MiSeq dataset. The Pac

  2. Genotyping of commensal Neisseria spp strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Ben Hassen, Assia

    2017-04-04

    We investigated the diversity of the primary sequences of the 16S rRNA genes among 46 commensal Neisseria strains and evaluated the use of this approach as a molecular typing tool in comparison with PFGE analysis. Identification to the genus was done using conventional methods and API NH (bio-Mérieux(®) ). Identification to species level was based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PFGE analysis was done using SpeI. Fourteen, two, three and fourteen 16S rRNA sequence types were found among twenty Neisseria flavescens, two Neisseria sicca, five Neisseria macacae and nineteen Neisseria mucosa clinical isolates. Forty-three different PFGE patterns were found among the tested strains. We demonstrated a high diversity among 16S rRNA genes which was reflected by PFGE analysis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  4. Comparative analysis of bacteria associated with different mosses by 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yang; Li, Yan Hong

    2017-01-01

    To understand the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses, a phylogenetic study of bacterial communities in three mosses was carried out based on 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. The mosses used were Hygroamblystegium noterophilum, Entodon compressus and Grimmia montana, representing hygrophyte, shady plant and xerophyte, respectively. In total, the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), richness and diversity were different regardless of the moss species and the library level. All the examined 1183 clones were assigned to 248 OTUs, 56 genera were assigned in rDNA libraries and 23 genera were determined at the rRNA level. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were considered as the most dominant phyla in all the libraries, whereas abundant Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria were detected in the rDNA library of Entodon compressus and approximately 24.7% clones were assigned to Candidate division TM7 in Grimmia montana at rRNA level. The heatmap showed the bacterial profiles derived from rRNA and rDNA were partly overlapping. However, the principle component analysis of all the profiles derived from rDNA showed sharper differences between the different mosses than that of rRNA-based profiles. This suggests that the metabolically active bacterial compositions in different mosses were more phylogenetically similar and the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses were mainly detected at the rDNA level. Obtained results clearly demonstrate that combination of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing is preferred approach to have a good understanding on the constitution of the microbial communities in mosses. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Impact of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for identification of bacteria on clinical microbiology and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Clarridge, Jill E

    2004-10-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. Comparison of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence has emerged as a preferred genetic technique. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, can be routinely used for identification of mycobacteria, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. Problems remain in that the sequences in some databases are not accurate, there is no consensus quantitative definition of genus or species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data, the proliferation of species names based on minimal genetic and phenotypic differences raises communication difficulties, and microheterogeneity in 16S rRNA gene sequence within a species is common. Despite its accuracy, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis lacks widespread use beyond the large and reference laboratories because of technical and cost considerations. Thus, a future challenge is to translate information from 16S rRNA gene sequencing into convenient biochemical testing schemes, making the accuracy of the genotypic identification available to the smaller and routine clinical microbiology laboratories.

  6. Design of 16S rRNA gene primers for 454 pyrosequencing of the human foregut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Nossa, Carlos W; Oberdorf, William E; Yang, Liying; Aas, Jørn A; Paster, Bruce J; Desantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Malamud, Daniel; Poles, Michael A; Pei, Zhiheng

    2010-09-07

    To design and validate broad-range 16S rRNA primers for use in high throughput sequencing to classify bacteria isolated from the human foregut microbiome. A foregut microbiome dataset was constructed using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from oral, esophageal, and gastric microbiomes produced by Sanger sequencing in previous studies represented by 219 bacterial species. Candidate primers evaluated were from the European rRNA database. To assess the effect of sequence length on accuracy of classification, 16S rRNA genes of various lengths were created by trimming the full length sequences. Sequences spanning various hypervariable regions were selected to simulate the amplicons that would be obtained using possible primer pairs. The sequences were compared with full length 16S rRNA genes for accuracy in taxonomic classification using online software at the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP). The universality of the primer set was evaluated using the RDP 16S rRNA database which is comprised of 433 306 16S rRNA genes, represented by 36 phyla. Truncation to 100 nucleotides (nt) downstream from the position corresponding to base 28 in the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene caused misclassification of 87 (39.7%) of the 219 sequences, compared with misclassification of only 29 (13.2%) sequences with truncation to 350 nt. Among 350-nt sequence reads within various regions of the 16S rRNA gene, the reverse read of an amplicon generated using the 343F/798R primers had the least (8.2%) effect on classification. In comparison, truncation to 900 nt mimicking single pass Sanger reads misclassified 5.0% of the 219 sequences. The 343F/798R amplicon accurately assigned 91.8% of the 219 sequences at the species level. Weighted by abundance of the species in the esophageal dataset, the 343F/798R amplicon yielded similar classification accuracy without a significant loss in species coverage (92%). Modification of the 343F/798R primers to 347F/803R increased their universality among foregut

  7. Design of 16S rRNA gene primers for 454 pyrosequencing of the human foregut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nossa, Carlos W; Oberdorf, William E; Yang, Liying; Aas, Jørn A; Paster, Bruce J; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Malamud, Daniel; Poles, Michael A; Pei, Zhiheng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To design and validate broad-range 16S rRNA primers for use in high throughput sequencing to classify bacteria isolated from the human foregut microbiome. METHODS: A foregut microbiome dataset was constructed using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from oral, esophageal, and gastric microbiomes produced by Sanger sequencing in previous studies represented by 219 bacterial species. Candidate primers evaluated were from the European rRNA database. To assess the effect of sequence length on accuracy of classification, 16S rRNA genes of various lengths were created by trimming the full length sequences. Sequences spanning various hypervariable regions were selected to simulate the amplicons that would be obtained using possible primer pairs. The sequences were compared with full length 16S rRNA genes for accuracy in taxonomic classification using online software at the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP). The universality of the primer set was evaluated using the RDP 16S rRNA database which is comprised of 433 306 16S rRNA genes, represented by 36 phyla. RESULTS: Truncation to 100 nucleotides (nt) downstream from the position corresponding to base 28 in the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene caused misclassification of 87 (39.7%) of the 219 sequences, compared with misclassification of only 29 (13.2%) sequences with truncation to 350 nt. Among 350-nt sequence reads within various regions of the 16S rRNA gene, the reverse read of an amplicon generated using the 343F/798R primers had the least (8.2%) effect on classification. In comparison, truncation to 900 nt mimicking single pass Sanger reads misclassified 5.0% of the 219 sequences. The 343F/798R amplicon accurately assigned 91.8% of the 219 sequences at the species level. Weighted by abundance of the species in the esophageal dataset, the 343F/798R amplicon yielded similar classification accuracy without a significant loss in species coverage (92%). Modification of the 343F/798R primers to 347F/803R increased their

  8. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  9. A ribosomal ambiguity mutation in the 530 loop of E. coli 16S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M; Göringer, H U; Dahlberg, A E

    1992-01-01

    A series of base substitution and deletion mutations were constructed in the highly conserved 530 stem and loop region of E. coli 16S rRNA involved in binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A site. Base substitution and deletion of G517 produced significant effects on cell growth rate and translational fidelity, permitting readthrough of UGA, UAG and UAA stop codons as well as stimulating +1 and -1 frameshifting in vivo. By contrast, mutations at position 534 had little or no effect on growth rate or translational fidelity. The results demonstrate the importance of G517 in maintaining translational fidelity but do not support a base pairing interaction between G517 and U534. PMID:1380697

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  11. Identification of the Microbiota in Carious Dentin Lesions Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4–76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  12. Identification of the microbiota in carious dentin lesions using 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4-76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating.

  13. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  14. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  15. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  16. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  17. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  18. Technologically important extremophile 16S rRNA sequence Shannon entropy and fractal property comparison with long term dormant microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Gadura, N.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Tuffour, M.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    Technologically important extremophiles including oil eating microbes, uranium and rocket fuel perchlorate reduction microbes, electron producing microbes and electrode electrons feeding microbes were compared in terms of their 16S rRNA sequences, a standard targeted sequence in comparative phylogeny studies. Microbes that were reported to have survived a prolonged dormant duration were also studied. Examples included the recently discovered microbe that survives after 34,000 years in a salty environment while feeding off organic compounds from other trapped dead microbes. Shannon entropy of the 16S rRNA nucleotide composition and fractal dimension of the nucleotide sequence in terms of its atomic number fluctuation analyses suggest a selected range for these extremophiles as compared to other microbes; consistent with the experience of relatively mild evolutionary pressure. However, most of the microbes that have been reported to survive in prolonged dormant duration carry sequences with fractal dimension between 1.995 and 2.005 (N = 10 out of 13). Similar results are observed for halophiles, red-shifted chlorophyll and radiation resistant microbes. The results suggest that prolonged dormant duration, in analogous to high salty or radiation environment, would select high fractal 16S rRNA sequences. Path analysis in structural equation modeling supports a causal relation between entropy and fractal dimension for the studied 16S rRNA sequences (N = 7). Candidate choices for high fractal 16S rRNA microbes could offer protection for prolonged spaceflights. BioBrick gene network manipulation could include extremophile 16S rRNA sequences in synthetic biology and shed more light on exobiology and future colonization in shielded spaceflights. Whether the high fractal 16S rRNA sequences contain an asteroidlike extra-terrestrial source could be speculative but interesting.

  19. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  20. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  1. Molecular Evolution of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strains, Based on Polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Bertil; Bölske, Göran; Thiaucourt, François; Uhlén, Mathias; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae belongs to the so-called Mycoplasma mycoides cluster and is the causal agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP). All members of the M. mycoides cluster have two rRNA operons. The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of both rRNA operons from 20 strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae of different geographical origins in Africa and Asia were determined. Nucleotide differences which were present in only one of the two operons (polymorphisms) were detected in 24 positions. The polymorphisms were not randomly distributed in the 16S rRNA genes, and some of them were found in regions of low evolutionary variability. Interestingly, 11 polymorphisms were found in all the M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains, thus defining a putative ancestor. A sequence length difference between the 16S rRNA genes in a poly(A) region and 12 additional polymorphisms were found in only one or some of the strains. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by comparative analysis of the polymorphisms, and this tree revealed two distinct lines of descent. The nucleotide substitution rate of strains within line II was up to 50% higher than within line I. A tree was also constructed from individual operonal 16S rRNA sequences, and the sequences of the two operons were found to form two distinct clades. The topologies of both clades were strikingly similar, which supports the use of 16S rRNA sequence data from homologous operons for phylogenetic studies. The strain-specific polymorphism patterns of the 16S rRNA genes of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae may be used as epidemiological markers for CCPP. PMID:9573185

  2. 16S rRNA sequences of uncultivated hot spring cyanobacterial mat inhabitants retrieved as randomly primed cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.; Ward, D.M. ); Weller, J.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Cloning and analysis of cDNAs synthesized from rRNAs is one approach to assess the species composition of natural microbial communities. In some earlier attempts to synthesize cDNA from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat, a dominance of short 16S rcDNAs was observed, which appear to have originated only from certain organisms. Priming of cDNA synthesis from small ribosomal subunit RNA with random deoxyhexanucleotides can retrieve longer sequences, more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. Here we report the retrieval of 16S rRNA sequences form three formerly uncultured community members. One sequence type, which was retrieved three times from a total of five sequences analyzed, can be placed in the cyanobacterial phylum. A second sequence type is related to 16S rRNAs from green nonsulfur bacteria. The third sequence type may represent a novel phylogenetic type.

  3. Empirical testing of 16S rRNA gene PCR primer pairs reveals variance in target specificity and efficacy not suggested by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic and "fingerprinting" analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of prokaryotes have been a mainstay of microbial ecology during the last two decades. However, many methods and results from studies that rely on the 16S rRNA gene for detection and quantification of specific microbial taxa have seemingly received only cursory or even no validation. To directly examine the efficacy and specificity of 16S rRNA gene-based primers for phylum-, class-, and operational taxonomic unit-specific target amplification in quantitative PCR, we created a collection of primers based solely on an extensive soil bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library containing approximately 5,000 sequences from a single soil sample (i.e., a closed site-specific library was used to create PCR primers for use at this site). These primers were initially tested in silico prior to empirical testing by PCR amplification of known target sequences and of controls based on disparate phylogenetic groups. Although all primers were highly specific according to the in silico analysis, the empirical analyses clearly exhibited a high degree of nonspecificity for many of the phyla or classes, while other primers proved to be highly specific. These findings suggest that significant care must be taken when interpreting studies whose results were obtained with target specific primers that were not adequately validated, especially where population densities or dynamics have been inferred from the data. Further, we suggest that the reliability of quantification of specific target abundance using 16S rRNA-based quantitative PCR is case specific and must be determined through rigorous empirical testing rather than solely in silico.

  4. [Value of detecting bacterial 16S and 23S rRNA in interface membrane in diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection].

    PubMed

    An, Sen-Bo; Cai, Peng-de; Wang, Long; Hu, Yi-He

    2016-02-01

    To explore the value of detecting bacterial 16S rRNA with 23S rRNA in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). A prospective study was conducted among 67 patients with previous total hip arthroplasty (THA) undergoing a reoperation for infection (23 patients) or aseptic loosening (44 patients). Bacterial 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA in the interface membrane were detected by real-time PCR and their value in diagnosis of PJI was assessed. The 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA showed no significant difference in their power in the diagnosis of PJI. The detection of 16S rRNA/23S rRNA showed a higher sensitivity and a greater negative predictive value in PJI diagnosis than the detection of 16S rRNA+23S rRNA (95.7% vs 52.2%, P<0.01; 97.6% vs 79.6%, P=0.01). The specificity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of the 4 diagnostic strategies were not significantly different. The diagnostic power of 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA was similar in detecting PJI. Compared with the diagnostic strategy with 16S rRNA+23S rRNA, 16S rRNA/23S rRNA is more sensitive in detecting PJI.

  5. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  6. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing for Epidemiological Surveys of Bacteria in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Bard, Emilie; Bernard, Maria; Brouat, Carine; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Dehne-Garcia, Alexandre; Loiseau, Anne; Tatard, Caroline; Tamisier, Lucie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vignes, Helene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission posed by urban rodents in West Africa. In addition to listing pathogenic bacteria in wild populations, as in other high-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies, our approach can estimate essential parameters for studies of zoonotic risk, such as prevalence and patterns of coinfection within individual hosts. However, the estimation of these parameters requires cleaning of the raw data to mitigate the biases generated by HTS methods. We present here an extensive review of these biases and of their consequences, and we propose a comprehensive trimming strategy for managing these biases. We demonstrated the application of this strategy using 711 commensal rodents, including 208 Mus musculus domesticus, 189 Rattus rattus, 93 Mastomys natalensis, and 221 Mastomys erythroleucus, collected from 24 villages in Senegal. Seven major genera of pathogenic bacteria were detected in their spleens: Borrelia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia. Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia have never before been detected in West African rodents. Bacterial prevalence ranged from 0% to 90% of individuals per site, depending on the bacterial taxon, rodent species, and site considered, and 26% of rodents displayed coinfection. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing strategy presented here has the advantage over other molecular surveillance tools of dealing with a large spectrum of bacterial

  7. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  9. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nathan D; Lund, Steven P; Zook, Justin M; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing(®), or Ion Torrent PGM(®). The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies.

  10. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  11. Variable Copy Number, Intra-Genomic Heterogeneities and Lateral Transfers of the 16S rRNA Gene in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Bodilis, Josselin; Nsigue-Meilo, Sandrine; Besaury, Ludovic; Quillet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Even though the 16S rRNA gene is the most commonly used taxonomic marker in microbial ecology, its poor resolution is still not fully understood at the intra-genus level. In this work, the number of rRNA gene operons, intra-genomic heterogeneities and lateral transfers were investigated at a fine-scale resolution, throughout the Pseudomonas genus. In addition to nineteen sequenced Pseudomonas strains, we determined the 16S rRNA copy number in four other Pseudomonas strains by Southern hybridization and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and studied the intra-genomic heterogeneities by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and sequencing. Although the variable copy number (from four to seven) seems to be correlated with the evolutionary distance, some close strains in the P. fluorescens lineage showed a different number of 16S rRNA genes, whereas all the strains in the P. aeruginosa lineage displayed the same number of genes (four copies). Further study of the intra-genomic heterogeneities revealed that most of the Pseudomonas strains (15 out of 19 strains) had at least two different 16S rRNA alleles. A great difference (5 or 19 nucleotides, essentially grouped near the V1 hypervariable region) was observed only in two sequenced strains. In one of our strains studied (MFY30 strain), we found a difference of 12 nucleotides (grouped in the V3 hypervariable region) between copies of the 16S rRNA gene. Finally, occurrence of partial lateral transfers of the 16S rRNA gene was further investigated in 1803 full-length sequences of Pseudomonas available in the databases. Remarkably, we found that the two most variable regions (the V1 and V3 hypervariable regions) had probably been laterally transferred from another evolutionary distant Pseudomonas strain for at least 48.3 and 41.6% of the 16S rRNA sequences, respectively. In conclusion, we strongly recommend removing these regions of the 16S rRNA gene during the intra-genus diversity studies. PMID:22545126

  12. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; Kirton, Edward S.; He, Shaomei; Woyke, Tanja; Lee, Janey; Chen, Feng; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as well as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.

  13. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; ...

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as wellmore » as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.« less

  14. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further.

  15. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association

    PubMed Central

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ülo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts. PMID:16556933

  16. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association.

    PubMed

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ulo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-05-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts.

  17. [Using high-density universal 16S rRNA microarray in microbial molecular ecology research].

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Xia, Si-qing; Song, Yong-hui; Piceno, Yvette M; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2009-12-01

    High-density universal 16S rRNA Microarray was used to detect the microbial community in membrane bioreactor (MBR). The results showed MBR had high microbial diversity. 1019 bacteria were detected by Microarray in MBR. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum. It had 657 OTUs, occupying 64.5% of the total bacteria, gamma Proteobacteria was the main class of Proteobacteria, which occupied 35.8% of Proteobacteria, but the average fluorescence intensity of was not very high. Despite the bacteria diversity of beta Proteobacteria was lower than gamma Proteobacteria. However, it occupied 40% and 36% in the 25 and 50 dominant bacteria according to relative average fluorescence intensity. Clostridia had a relative high concentration when compare the average fluorescence intensity of the whole bacteria in MBR. Some common nitrify bacteria such as Nitrosomonadaceae and Nitrospiraceae were also detected and had high fluorescence intensity in the system. Microarray is a newer molecular method and has some advantages such as real time, high efficiency and exact results. It's very suitable for investigation of microbial diversity in wastewater treatment.

  18. 16S rRNA gene sequencing on a benchtop sequencer: accuracy for identification of clinically important bacteria.

    PubMed

    Watts, George S; Youens-Clark, Ken; Slepian, Marvin J; Wolk, Donna M; Oshiro, Marc M; Metzger, Gregory S; Dhingra, Dalia; Cranmer, Lee D; Hurwitz, Bonnie L

    2017-09-20

    Test the choice of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and data analysis method on the accuracy of identification of clinically important bacteria utilizing a benchtop sequencer. Nine 16S rRNA amplicons were tested on an Ion Torrent PGM to identify 41 strains of clinical importance. The V1-V2 region identified 40 of 41 isolates to the species level. Three data analysis methods were tested, finding that the Ribosomal Database Project's SequenceMatch outperformed BLAST and the Ion Reporter Metagenomics analysis pipeline. Lastly, 16S rRNA gene sequencing mixtures of four species through a six log range of dilution showed species were identifiable even when present as 0. 1% of the mixture. Sequencing the V1-V2 16S rRNA gene region, made possible by the increased read length Ion Torrent PGM sequencer's 400 base pair chemistry, may be a better choice over other commonly used regions for identifying clinically important bacteria. In addition, the SequenceMatch algorithm, freely available from the Ribosomal Database Project, is a good choice for matching filtered reads to organisms. Lastly, 16S rRNA gene sequencing's sensitivity to the presence of a bacterial species at 0.1% of a mixture, suggests it has sufficient sensitivity for samples in which important bacteria may be rare. We have validated 16S rRNA gene sequencing on a benchtop sequencer including simple mixtures of organisms; however, our results highlight deficits for clinical application in place of current identification methods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of Aeromonas clinical isolates by restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, N; Acinas, S G; Figueras, M J; Martínez-Murcia, A J

    1997-01-01

    Identification of Aeromonas species, emergent pathogens for humans, has long been controversial due to their phenotypic and genomic heterogeneities. Computer analysis of the published 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene is a good and rapid way of assessing the identities of all known species of Aeromonas. The method was evaluated with the reference strains of all species (or DNA homology groups) and 76 clinical isolates of diverse origin. Most results from the two approaches were in agreement, but some discrepancies were discerned. Advantages over previous phenotypic and genetic methods are discussed. PMID:9196171

  20. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Insights into the phylogenetic positions of photosynthetic bacteria obtained from 5S rRNA and 16S rRNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of complete 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences established that the secondary structure of these molecules is highly conserved. Earlier work with 5S rRNA secondary structure revealed that when structural conservation exists the alignment of sequences is straightforward. The constancy of structure implies minimal functional change. Under these conditions a uniform evolutionary rate can be expected so that conditions are favorable for phylogenetic tree construction.

  2. DECIPHER, a search-based approach to chimera identification for 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Noguera, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    DECIPHER is a new method for finding 16S rRNA chimeric sequences by the use of a search-based approach. The method is based upon detecting short fragments that are uncommon in the phylogenetic group where a query sequence is classified but frequently found in another phylogenetic group. The algorithm was calibrated for full sequences (fs_DECIPHER) and short sequences (ss_DECIPHER) and benchmarked against WigeoN (Pintail), ChimeraSlayer, and Uchime using artificially generated chimeras. Overall, ss_DECIPHER and Uchime provided the highest chimera detection for sequences 100 to 600 nucleotides long (79% and 81%, respectively), but Uchime's performance deteriorated for longer sequences, while ss_DECIPHER maintained a high detection rate (89%). Both methods had low false-positive rates (1.3% and 1.6%). The more conservative fs_DECIPHER, benchmarked only for sequences longer than 600 nucleotides, had an overall detection rate lower than that of ss_DECIPHER (75%) but higher than those of the other programs. In addition, fs_DECIPHER had the lowest false-positive rate among all the benchmarked programs (<0.20%). DECIPHER was outperformed only by ChimeraSlayer and Uchime when chimeras were formed from closely related parents (less than 10% divergence). Given the differences in the programs, it was possible to detect over 89% of all chimeras with just the combination of ss_DECIPHER and Uchime. Using fs_DECIPHER, we detected between 1% and 2% additional chimeras in the RDP, SILVA, and Greengenes databases from which chimeras had already been removed with Pintail or Bellerophon. DECIPHER was implemented in the R programming language and is directly accessible through a webpage or by downloading the program as an R package (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  3. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M.; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities. PMID:27708630

  4. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  5. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  7. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  8. 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis and quantification of Korarchaeota indigenous to the hot springs of Kamchatka, Russia.

    PubMed

    Auchtung, Thomas A; Shyndriayeva, Galina; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2011-01-01

    The candidate archaeal division Korarchaeota is known primarily from deeply branching sequences of 16S rRNA genes PCR-amplified from hydrothermal springs. Parallels between the phylogeny of these genes and the geographic locations where they were identified suggested that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemism. In this study, the influence of geographic isolation and select environmental factors on the diversification of the Korarchaeota was investigated. Fourteen hot springs from three different regions of Kamchatka, Russia were screened by PCR using Korarchaeota-specific and general Archaea 16S rRNA gene-targeting primers, cloning, and sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences with Korarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences previously identified from around the world suggested that all Kamchatka sequences cluster together in a unique clade that subdivides by region within the peninsula. Consistent with endemism, 16S rRNA gene group-specific quantitative PCR of all Kamchatka samples detected only the single clade of Korarchaeota that was found by the non-quantitative PCR screening. In addition, their genes were measured in only low numbers; small Korarchaeota populations would present fewer chances for dispersal to and colonization of other sites. Across the entire division of Korarchaeota, common geographic locations, temperatures, or salinities of identification sites united sequence clusters at different phylogenetic levels, suggesting varied roles of these factors in the diversification of Korarchaeota.

  9. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  10. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  11. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  12. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease which severely impacts channel catfish production in the USA and may be emerging as an important pathogen in the rainbow trout industry. The 16S rRNA gene is a housekeeping gene commonly used for bacterial taxonomy and genotyping...

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  14. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  15. Improving the microbial community reconstruction at the genus level by multiple 16S rRNA regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Sun, Beili; Tu, Jing; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-06-07

    16S rRNA genes have been widely used for phylogenetic reconstruction and the quantification of microbial diversity through the application of next-generation sequencing technology. However, long-read sequencing is still costly, while short-read sequencing carries less information for complex microbial community profiling; therefore, the applications of high throughput sequencing platforms still remain challenging in microbial community reconstruction analysis. Here, we developed a method to investigate the profile of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences and to measure the proper region for microbial community reconstruction, as a step in creating a more efficient way to detect microorganism at the genus level. Finally, we found that each genus has its own preferential genus-specific amplicons for a genus assignment, which are not always located in hyper variable regions (HVRs). It was also noted that the rare genera should contribute less than dominant ones to the common profile of the aligned 16S rRNA sequences and have lower affinity to the common universal primer. Therefore, using multiple 16S rRNA regions rather than one "universal" region can significantly improve the ability of microbial community reconstruction. In addition, we found that a short fragment is suitable for most genera identifications, and the proper conserved regions used for primer design are larger than before. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  17. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    PubMed

    Ong, Swee Hoe; Kukkillaya, Vinutha Uppoor; Wilm, Andreas; Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  19. Exploring internal features of 16S rRNA gene for identification of clinically relevant species of the genus Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus is an economically important genus as a number of species belonging to this genus are human and animal pathogens. The genus has been divided into different groups based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The variability observed among the members of these groups is low and it is difficult to distinguish them. The present study was taken up to explore 16S rRNA gene sequence to develop methods that can be used for preliminary identification and can supplement the existing methods for identification of clinically-relevant isolates of the genus Streptococcus. Methods 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the isolates of S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. pneumoniae, S. thermophilus and S. anginosus were analyzed with the purpose to define genetic variability within each species to generate a phylogenetic framework, to identify species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. Results The framework based analysis was used to segregate Streptococcus spp. previously identified upto genus level. This segregation was validated using species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. 43 uncharacterized Streptococcus spp. could be identified using this approach. Conclusions The markers generated exploring 16S rRNA gene sequences provided useful tool that can be further used for identification of different species of the genus Streptococcus. PMID:21702978

  20. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  1. Molecular Diagnosis of Kingella kingae Pericarditis by Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. PMID:17634294

  2. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  3. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  4. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  5. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  6. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Results Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Conclusion Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3–100%. However, the

  7. Prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase genes among β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Sheikh, Yazeed A; Marie, Mohammed Ali M; John, James; Krishnappa, Lakshmana Gowda; Dabwab, Khaled Homoud M

    2014-01-01

    Co production of 16S rRNA methylases gene and β-Lactamase gene among Enterobacteriaceae isolates conferring resistance to both therapeutic options has serious implications for clinicians worldwide. To study co existence of 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, and npmA) and β-Lactamase (blaTEM-1, blaSHV-12, blaCTX-M-14) genes, we screened all phenotypic positive β-Lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting above genes. A total of 330 enterobacteriaceae strains were collected during study period out of that 218 isolates were identified phenotypically as β-Lactamase producers, which include 50 (22.9%) Escherichia coli; 92 (42.2%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, 44 (20.2%), Citrobactor freundii and 32 (14.7%) Enterobacter spp. Among this 218, only 188 isolates harbored the resistant gene for β-Lactamase production. Major β-Lactamase producing isolates were blaTEM-1 type. 122 (56 %) isolates were found to produce any one of the 16S rRNA methylase genes. A total of 116 isolates co produced b-Lactamase and at least one 16S rRNA methylases gene Co production of armA gene was found in 26 isolates with rmtB and in 4 isolates with rmtC. The rmtA and rmtD genes were not detected in any of the tested isolates. Six isolates were positive for a 16S rRNA methylase gene alone. β-Lactamase producing isolates appears to coexist with 16S rRNA methylase predominantly armA and rmtB genes in the same isolate. We conclude the major β-Lactamase and 16S rRNA methylases co-producer was K. pneumoniae followed by E. coli. We suggest further work on evaluating other β-lactamases types and novel antibiotic resistance mechanisms among Enterobacteriaceae.

  8. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3-100%. However, the inter-species similarities were

  9. Prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase genes among β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Sheikh, Yazeed A; Marie, Mohammed Ali M; John, James; Krishnappa, Lakshmana Gowda; Dabwab, Khaled Homoud M

    2014-01-01

    Background Co production of 16S rRNA methylases gene and β-Lactamase gene among Enterobacteriaceae isolates conferring resistance to both therapeutic options has serious implications for clinicians worldwide. Methods To study co existence of 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, and npmA) and β-Lactamase (blaTEM-1, blaSHV-12, blaCTX-M-14) genes, we screened all phenotypic positive β-Lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting above genes. A total of 330 enterobacteriaceae strains were collected during study period out of that 218 isolates were identified phenotypically as β-Lactamase producers, which include 50 (22.9%) Escherichia coli; 92 (42.2%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, 44 (20.2%), Citrobactor freundii and 32 (14.7%) Enterobacter spp. Results Among this 218, only 188 isolates harbored the resistant gene for β-Lactamase production. Major β-Lactamase producing isolates were blaTEM-1 type. 122 (56 %) isolates were found to produce any one of the 16S rRNA methylase genes. A total of 116 isolates co produced β-Lactamase and at least one 16S rRNA methylases gene Co production of armA gene was found in 26 isolates with rmtB and in 4 isolates with rmtC. The rmtA and rmtD genes were not detected in any of the tested isolates. Six isolates were positive for a 16S rRNA methylase gene alone. Conclusion β-Lactamase producing isolates appears to coexist with 16S rRNA methylase predominantly armA and rmtB genes in the same isolate. We conclude the major β-Lactamase and 16S rRNA methylases co-producer was K. pneumoniae followed by E. coli. We suggest further work on evaluating other β-lactamases types and novel antibiotic resistance mechanisms among Enterobacteriaceae.

  10. Taxonomic classification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes using short sequencing reads: evaluation of effective study designs.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Davenport, Emily R; Gilad, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Massively parallel high throughput sequencing technologies allow us to interrogate the microbial composition of biological samples at unprecedented resolution. The typical approach is to perform high-throughout sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, which are then taxonomically classified based on similarity to known sequences in existing databases. Current technologies cause a predicament though, because although they enable deep coverage of samples, they are limited in the length of sequence they can produce. As a result, high-throughout studies of microbial communities often do not sequence the entire 16S rRNA gene. The challenge is to obtain reliable representation of bacterial communities through taxonomic classification of short 16S rRNA gene sequences. In this study we explored properties of different study designs and developed specific recommendations for effective use of short-read sequencing technologies for the purpose of interrogating bacterial communities, with a focus on classification using naïve Bayesian classifiers. To assess precision and coverage of each design, we used a collection of ∼8,500 manually curated 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured bacteria and a set of over one million bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from environmental samples, respectively. We also tested different configurations of taxonomic classification approaches using short read sequencing data, and provide recommendations for optimal choice of the relevant parameters. We conclude that with a judicious selection of the sequenced region and the corresponding choice of a suitable training set for taxonomic classification, it is possible to explore bacterial communities at great depth using current technologies, with only a minimal loss of taxonomic resolution.

  11. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  12. Identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria using multilocous sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, hsp65, and rpoB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyun; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2017-02-23

    The isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from clinical specimens has increased, and they now are considered significant opportunistic pathogens. The aims of this study were to develop a database and interpretive criteria for identifying individual species. In addition, using clinical isolates, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of 16S rRNA, hsp65, and rpoB as target genes for this method. The sequences of NTM for 16S rRNA, hsp65, and rpoB were collected from GenBank and checked by manual inspection. Clinical isolates collected between 2005 and 2010 were used for DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and sequencing of these three genes. We constructed a database for the genes and evaluated the clinical utility of multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) using 109 clinical isolates. A total 131, 130, and 122 sequences were collected from GenBank for 16S rRNA, hsp65, and rpoB, respectively. The percent similarities of the three genes ranged from 96.57% to 100% for the 16S rRNA gene, 89.27% to 100% for hsp65, and 92.71% to 100% for rpoB. When we compared the sequences of 109 clinical strains with those of the database, the rates of species-level identification were 71.3%, 86.79%, and 81.55% with 16S rRNA, hsp65, and rpoB, respectively. We could identify 97.25% of the isolates to the species level when we used MLSA. There were significant differences among the utilities of the three genes for species identification. The MLSA technique would be helpful for identification of NTM. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparative analysis of vaginal microbiota sampling using 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Seppo; Kalliala, Ilkka; Nieminen, Pekka; Salonen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Molecular methods such as next-generation sequencing are actively being employed to characterize the vaginal microbiota in health and disease. Previous studies have focused on characterizing the biological variation in the microbiota, and less is known about how factors related to sampling contribute to the results. Our aim was to investigate the impact of a sampling device and anatomical sampling site on the quantitative and qualitative outcomes relevant for vaginal microbiota research. We sampled 10 Finnish women representing diverse clinical characteristics with flocked swabs, the Evalyn® self-sampling device, sterile plastic spatulas and a cervical brush that were used to collect samples from fornix, vaginal wall and cervix. Samples were compared on DNA and protein yield, bacterial load, and microbiota diversity and species composition based on Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We quantified the relative contributions of sampling variables versus intrinsic variables in the overall microbiota variation, and evaluated the microbiota profiles using several commonly employed metrics such as alpha and beta diversity as well as abundance of major bacterial genera and species. The total DNA yield was strongly dependent on the sampling device and to a lesser extent on the anatomical site of sampling. The sampling strategy did not affect the protein yield or the bacterial load. All tested sampling methods produced highly comparable microbiota profiles based on MiSeq sequencing. The sampling method explained only 2% (p-value = 0.89) of the overall microbiota variation, markedly surpassed by intrinsic factors such as clinical status (microscopy for bacterial vaginosis 53%, p = 0.0001), bleeding (19%, p = 0.0001), and the variation between subjects (11%, p-value 0.0001). The results indicate that different sampling strategies yield comparable vaginal microbiota composition and diversity. Hence, past and future vaginal microbiota studies employing different

  14. Comparative analysis of vaginal microbiota sampling using 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kalliala, Ilkka; Nieminen, Pekka; Salonen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Molecular methods such as next-generation sequencing are actively being employed to characterize the vaginal microbiota in health and disease. Previous studies have focused on characterizing the biological variation in the microbiota, and less is known about how factors related to sampling contribute to the results. Our aim was to investigate the impact of a sampling device and anatomical sampling site on the quantitative and qualitative outcomes relevant for vaginal microbiota research. We sampled 10 Finnish women representing diverse clinical characteristics with flocked swabs, the Evalyn® self-sampling device, sterile plastic spatulas and a cervical brush that were used to collect samples from fornix, vaginal wall and cervix. Samples were compared on DNA and protein yield, bacterial load, and microbiota diversity and species composition based on Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We quantified the relative contributions of sampling variables versus intrinsic variables in the overall microbiota variation, and evaluated the microbiota profiles using several commonly employed metrics such as alpha and beta diversity as well as abundance of major bacterial genera and species. Results The total DNA yield was strongly dependent on the sampling device and to a lesser extent on the anatomical site of sampling. The sampling strategy did not affect the protein yield or the bacterial load. All tested sampling methods produced highly comparable microbiota profiles based on MiSeq sequencing. The sampling method explained only 2% (p-value = 0.89) of the overall microbiota variation, markedly surpassed by intrinsic factors such as clinical status (microscopy for bacterial vaginosis 53%, p = 0.0001), bleeding (19%, p = 0.0001), and the variation between subjects (11%, p-value 0.0001). Conclusions The results indicate that different sampling strategies yield comparable vaginal microbiota composition and diversity. Hence, past and future vaginal

  15. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  16. Decontamination of 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequence datasets based on bacterial load assessment by qPCR.

    PubMed

    Lazarevic, Vladimir; Gaïa, Nadia; Girard, Myriam; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2016-04-23

    Identification of unexpected taxa in 16S rRNA surveys of low-density microbiota, diluted mock communities and cultures demonstrated that a variable fraction of sequence reads originated from exogenous DNA. The sources of these contaminants are reagents used in DNA extraction, PCR, and next-generation sequencing library preparation, and human (skin, oral and respiratory) microbiota from the investigators. For in silico removal of reagent contaminants, a pipeline was used which combines the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in V3-4 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets with bacterial DNA quantification based on qPCR targeting of the V3 segment of the 16S rRNA gene. Serially diluted cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were used for 16S rDNA profiling, and DNA from each of these species was used as a qPCR standard. OTUs assigned to Escherichia or Staphylococcus were virtually unaffected by the decontamination procedure, whereas OTUs from Pseudomonas, which is a major reagent contaminant, were completely or nearly completely removed. The decontamination procedure also attenuated the trend of increase in OTU richness in serially diluted cultures. Removal of contaminant sequences derived from reagents based on use of qPCR data may improve taxonomic representation in samples with low DNA concentration. Using the described pipeline, OTUs derived from cross-contamination of negative extraction controls were not recognized as contaminants and not removed from the sample dataset.

  17. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  18. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  19. Specific multiplex analysis of pathogens using a direct 16S rRNA hybridization in microarray system.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byeong Hee; Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-06-05

    For the rapid multiplex analysis of pathogens, 16S rRNAs from cell lysates were directly applied onto a DNA microarray at room temperature (RT) for RNA-DNA hybridization. To eliminate the labeling step, seven fluorescent-labeled detector probes were cohybridized with 16S rRNA targets and adjacent specific capture probes. We found that eight pathogens were successfully discriminated by the 16S rRNA-based direct method, which showed greater specificity than the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-labeled method due to chaperone and distance effects. A new specificity criterion for a perfect match between RNA and DNA was suggested to be 21-41% dissimilarity using correlation analysis between the mismatch and the sequence according to the guanine-cytosine (GC) percentage or the distribution of mismatches. Six categories of food matrix (egg, meat, milk, rice, vegetable, and mixed) were also tested, and the target pathogen was successfully discriminated within statistically significant levels. Finally, we found that the intrinsic abundance of 16S rRNA molecules successfully substituted PCR-based amplification with a low limit of detection of 10-10(3) cells mL(-1) and a high quantitative linear correlation. Collectively, our suggested 16S rRNA-based direct method enables the highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative analysis of selected pathogens at RT within 2 h, even in food samples.

  20. Sequence Analysis and Comparison of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and 16S/23S Intergenic Spacer Region of Greening Bacterium Associated with Yellowing Disease (Huanglongbing) of Kinnow Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K N; Baranwal, V K; Haq, Q M R

    2012-03-01

    High incidence (up to 40%) of symptoms of yellowing and yellow mottling was observed in 5-8 years old orchards of kinnow mandarin {Citrus reticulate Balanco ('King' × 'Willow mandarin')} in the Punjab state of India during a survey in January 2007. These symptoms are often confused with nutrient deficiency and other stress related disorders. However, a greening bacterium has been attributed to cause the disease. The disease was graft transmissible and sequencing of 16S rRNA, 16S/23S intergenic spacer region and 23S rRNA of the greening bacterium associated with yellowing disease in kinnow mandarin confirmed it to be Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ('Ca L. asiaticus') showing maximum identity of 95.9% with 'Ca L. asiaticus' from USA and Brazil in 16S rRNA. The study indicates definite association of 'Ca L. asiaticus' with yellowing/chlorotic mottling symptoms of greening disease of kinnow mandarin in Punjab state of India.

  1. Rapid Identification of Rhizobia by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of PCR-Amplified 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Allard, Marie-Reine; Revoy, Françoise; Amarger, Noelle

    1994-01-01

    Forty-eight strains representing the eight recognized Rhizobium species, two new Phaseolus bean Rhizobium genomic species, Bradyrhizobium spp., Agrobacterium spp., and unclassified rhizobia from various host plants were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-one composite genotypes were obtained from the combined data of the RFLP analysis with nine endonucleases. Species assignments were in full agreement with the established taxonomic classification. Estimation from these data of genetic relationships between and within genera and species correlated well with previously published data based on DNA-rRNA hybridizations and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. This PCR-RFLP method provides a rapid tool for the identification of root nodule isolates and the detection of new taxa. Images PMID:16349165

  2. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  3. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  4. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G. L.

    2006-01-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria. PMID:16820507

  5. Use of 16S rRNA Sequencing for Identification of Actinobacillus ureae Isolated from a Cerebrospinal Fluid Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A. C.; Shankland, I. M.; Elisha, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus ureae, previously Pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of DNA sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:11825992

  6. RmtC and RmtF 16S rRNA Methyltransferase in NDM-1-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohibur; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Pathak, Ashutosh; Pati, Binod Kumar; Singh, Avinash; Ovejero, Cristina M; Ahmad, Saheem; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA methyltransferases in 38 blaNDM-1-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and found RmtC in 3 isolates, 1 of which also harbored RmtF. The isolates were clonally unrelated; rmtC and rmtF genes were located on a chromosome with the blaNDM-1 gene. Strategies are needed to limit the spread of such isolates.

  7. A comprehensive evaluation of the sl1p pipeline for 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Fiona J; Surette, Michael G

    2017-08-14

    Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed for detailed, molecular-based studies of microbial communities such as the human gut, soil, and ocean waters. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, specific to prokaryotes, using universal PCR primers has become a common approach to studying the composition of these microbiota. However, the bioinformatic processing of the resulting millions of DNA sequences can be challenging, and a standardized protocol would aid in reproducible analyses. The short-read library 16S rRNA gene sequencing pipeline (sl1p, pronounced "slip") was designed with the purpose of mitigating this lack of reproducibility by combining pre-existing tools into a computational pipeline. This pipeline automates the processing of raw 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to create human-readable tables, graphs, and figures to make the collected data more readily accessible. Data generated from mock communities were compared using eight OTU clustering algorithms, two taxon assignment approaches, and three 16S rRNA gene reference databases. While all of these algorithms and options are available to sl1p users, through testing with human-associated mock communities, AbundantOTU+, the RDP Classifier, and the Greengenes 2011 reference database were chosen as sl1p's defaults based on their ability to best represent the known input communities. sl1p promotes reproducible research by providing a comprehensive log file, and reduces the computational knowledge needed by the user to process next-generation sequencing data. sl1p is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/fwhelan/sl1p .

  8. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds.

  9. Identification of culturable stream water bacteria from urban, agricultural, and forested watersheds using 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    Treesearch

    Kenneth T. Belt; Christina Hohn; Aiah Gbakima; James A. Higgins

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria present in water samples taken on a weekly basis, from June 2004 through June 2005, from three streams, were cultured on Coliscan® Easygel® agar plates. Colonies representative of a variety of colors and morphologies were subjected to amplification and sequencing of a 1000-1100 nt portion of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 528 colonies were...

  10. New screening software shows that most recent large 16S rRNA gene clone libraries contain chimeras.

    PubMed

    Ashelford, Kevin E; Chuzhanova, Nadia A; Fry, John C; Jones, Antonia J; Weightman, Andrew J

    2006-09-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/.

  11. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences. PMID:26943621

  12. Quantifying Microbial Diversity: Morphotypes, 16S rRNA Genes, and Carotenoids of Oxygenic Phototrophs in Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kühl, Michael; Muyzer, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    We quantified the diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms present in eight hypersaline microbial mats on the basis of three cultivation-independent approaches. Morphological diversity was studied by microscopy. The diversity of carotenoids was examined by extraction from mat samples and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The diversity of 16S rRNA genes from oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms was investigated by extraction of total DNA from mat samples, amplification of 16S rRNA gene segments from cyanobacteria and plastids of eukaryotic algae by phylum-specific PCR, and sequence-dependent separation of amplification products by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. A numerical approach was introduced to correct for crowding the results of chromatographic and electrophoretic analyses. Diversity estimates typically varied up to twofold among mats. The congruence of richness estimates and Shannon-Weaver indices based on numbers and proportional abundances of unique morphotypes, 16S rRNA genes, and carotenoids unveiled the underlying diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms in the eight mat communities studied. PMID:9925563

  13. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  14. New Screening Software Shows that Most Recent Large 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries Contain Chimeras†

    PubMed Central

    Ashelford, Kevin E.; Chuzhanova, Nadia A.; Fry, John C.; Jones, Antonia J.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/. PMID:16957188

  15. Microbial community of salt crystals processed from Mediterranean seawater based on 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Baati, Houda; Guermazi, Sonda; Gharsallah, Neji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was used to investigate for the first time the structure of the microbial community that inhabits salt crystals retrieved from the bottom of a solar saltern, located in the coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea (Sfax, Tunisia). This community lives in an extremely salty environment of 250-310 g/L total dissolved salt. A total of 78 bacterial 16S rRNA clone sequences making up to 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), determined by the DOTUR program to 97% sequence similarity, was analyzed. These OTUs were affiliated to Bacteroidetes (71.4% of OTUs), and gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria (equally represented by 14.2% of the OTUs observed). The archaeal community composition appeared more diverse with 68 clones, resulting in 44 OTUs, all affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Of the bacterial and archaeal clones showing <97% 16S rRNA sequence identity with sequences in public databases, 47.6% and 84.1% respectively were novel clones. Both rarefaction curves and diversity measurements (Simpson, Shannon-Weaver, Chao) showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the Tunisian solar saltern pond. The analysis of an increasing clone's number may reveal additional local diversity.

  16. Testing evolutionary models to explain the process of nucleotide substitution in gut bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F

    2013-09-01

    The 16S rRNA gene has been widely used as a marker of gut bacterial diversity and phylogeny, yet we do not know the model of evolution that best explains the differences in its nucleotide composition within and among taxa. Over 46 000 good-quality near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from five bacterial phyla were obtained from the ribosomal database project (RDP) by study and, when possible, by within-study characteristics (e.g. anatomical region). Using alignments (RDPX and MUSCLE) of unique sequences, the FINDMODEL tool available at http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ was utilized to find the model of character evolution (28 models were available) that best describes the input sequence data, based on the Akaike information criterion. The results showed variable levels of agreement (from 33% to 100%) in the chosen models between the RDP-based and the MUSCLE-based alignments among the taxa. Moreover, subgroups of sequences (using either alignment method) from the same study were often explained by different models. Nonetheless, the different representatives of the gut microbiota were explained by different proportions of the available models. This is the first report using evolutionary models to explain the process of nucleotide substitution in gut bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies

    PubMed Central

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users’ own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org. PMID:27659943

  18. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-09-23

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users' own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org.

  19. Diversity of thermophiles in a Malaysian hot spring determined using 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chia Sing; Chan, Kok-Gan; Tay, Yea-Ling; Chua, Yi-Heng; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-01-01

    The Sungai Klah (SK) hot spring is the second hottest geothermal spring in Malaysia. This hot spring is a shallow, 150-m-long, fast-flowing stream, with temperatures varying from 50 to 110°C and a pH range of 7.0-9.0. Hidden within a wooded area, the SK hot spring is continually fed by plant litter, resulting in a relatively high degree of total organic content (TOC). In this study, a sample taken from the middle of the stream was analyzed at the 16S rRNA V3-V4 region by amplicon metagenome sequencing. Over 35 phyla were detected by analyzing the 16S rRNA data. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented approximately 57% of the microbiome. Approximately 70% of the detected thermophiles were strict anaerobes; however, Hydrogenobacter spp., obligate chemolithotrophic thermophiles, represented one of the major taxa. Several thermophilic photosynthetic microorganisms and acidothermophiles were also detected. Most of the phyla identified by 16S rRNA were also found using the shotgun metagenome approaches. The carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism within the SK hot spring community were evaluated by shotgun metagenome sequencing, and the data revealed diversity in terms of metabolic activity and dynamics. This hot spring has a rich diversified phylogenetic community partly due to its natural environment (plant litter, high TOC, and a shallow stream) and geochemical parameters (broad temperature and pH range). It is speculated that symbiotic relationships occur between the members of the community.

  20. Escherichia coli 16S rRNA 3'-end formation requires a distal transfer RNA sequence at a proper distance.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    The 16S rRNA species in bacterial precursor rRNAs is followed by two evolutionarily conserved features: (i) a double-stranded stem formed by complementary sequences adjacent to the 5' and 3' ends of the 16S rRNA; and (ii) a 3'-transfer RNA sequence. To assess the possible role of these features, plasmid constructs with precursor-specific features deleted were tested for their capacity to form mature rRNA. Stem-forming sequences were dispensable for both 5' and 3' terminus formation; whereas an intact spacer tRNA positioned greater than 24 nucleotides downstream of the 16S RNA sequence was required for correct 3'-end maturation. These results suggest that spacer tRNA at an appropriate location helps form a conformation obligate for pre-rRNA processing, perhaps by binding to a nascent binding site in preribosomes. Thus, spacer tRNAs may be an obligate participant in ribosome formation. Images PMID:2684637

  1. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  2. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  3. COI is better than 16S rRNA for DNA barcoding Asiatic salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata: Hynobiidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun; Gu, Hai-Feng; Peng, Rui; Chen, Qin; Zheng, Yu-Chi; Murphy, Robert W; Zeng, Xiao-Mao

    2012-01-01

    The 5' region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is the standard marker for DNA barcoding. However, because COI tends to be highly variable in amphibians, sequencing is often challenging. Consequently, another mtDNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, is often advocated for amphibian barcoding. Herein, we directly compare the usefulness of COI and 16S in discriminating species of hynobiid salamanders using 130 individuals. Species identification and classification of these animals, which are endemic to Asia, are often based on morphology only. Analysis of Kimura 2-parameter genetic distances (K2P) documents the mean intraspecific variation for COI and 16S rRNA genes to be 1.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Whereas COI can always identify species, sometimes 16S cannot. Intra- and interspecific genetic divergences occasionally overlap in both markers, thus reducing the value of a barcoding gap to identify genera. Regardless, COI is the better DNA barcoding marker for hynobiids. In addition to the comparison of two potential markers, high levels of intraspecific divergence in COI (>5%) suggest that both Onychodactylus fischeri and Salamandrella keyserlingii might be composites of cryptic species.

  4. High or low correlation between co-occuring gene clusters and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Sekelja, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are universal for all living organisms. Yet, the correspondence between genome composition and rRNA phylogeny remains poorly known. The aim of this study was to use the information from genome sequence databases to address the correlation between rRNA gene phylogeny and total gene composition in bacteria. This was done by analysing 327 genomes with TIGRFAM functional gene annotations. Our approach consisted of two steps. First, we searched for discriminatory clusters of co-occurring genes. Using a multivariate statistical approach, we identified 11 such clusters which contain genes that were co-occurring only in a subset of genomes and contributed to explain the gene content differences between genome subsets. Second, we mapped the discovered clusters to 16S rRNA-based phylogeny and calculated the correlation between co-occuring genes and phylogeny. Six of the 11 clusters exhibited significant correlation with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The most distinct phylogenetic finding was a high correlation between iron-sulfur oxidoreductases in combination with carbon nitrogen ligases and Chlorobium. The other correlations identified covered relatively large phylogroups: Actinobacteria were positively associated with kinases, while Gammaproteobacteria were positively associated with methylases and acyltransferases. The suggested functional differences between higher phylogroups, however, need experimental verification.

  5. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  6. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  7. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  8. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  9. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  10. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  11. RmtC introduces G1405 methylation in 16S rRNA and confers high-level aminoglycoside resistance on Gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Kimura, Kouji; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Satowa; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2010-10-01

    Seven plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methyltransferases (MTases), RmtA, RmtB, RmtC, RmtD, RmtE, ArmA, and NpmA, conferring aminoglycoside resistance have so far been found in Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, by performing an RNase protection assay, primer extension, and HPLC, we confirmed that RmtC indeed methylates at the N7 position of nucleotide G1405 in 16S rRNA as found in ArmA and RmtB. RmtC has an MTase activity specific for the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit consisting of 16S rRNA and several ribosomal proteins, but not for the naked 16S rRNA, as seen in ArmA, RmtB, and NpmA. All seven 16S rRNA MTases have been found exclusively in Gram-negative bacilli to date, and no plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA MTase has been reported in Gram-positive pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, we checked whether or not the RmtC could function in Gram-positive bacilli, and found that RmtC could indeed confer high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. 16S rRNA MTases seemed to be functional to some extent in any bacterial species, regardless of the provenance of the 16S rRNA MTase gene responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

  12. Chimeric 16S rRNA sequence formation and detection in Sanger and 454-pyrosequenced PCR amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Brian J.; Gevers, Dirk; Earl, Ashlee M.; Feldgarden, Mike; Ward, Doyle V.; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Highlander, Sarah K.; Sodergren, Erica; Methé, Barbara; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Knight, Rob; Birren, Bruce W.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversity among environmental samples is commonly assessed with PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene (16S) sequences. Perceived diversity, however, can be influenced by sample preparation, primer selection, and formation of chimeric 16S amplification products. Chimeras are hybrid products between multiple parent sequences that can be falsely interpreted as novel organisms, thus inflating apparent diversity. We developed a new chimera detection tool called Chimera Slayer (CS). CS detects chimeras with greater sensitivity than previous methods, performs well on short sequences such as those produced by the 454 Life Sciences (Roche) Genome Sequencer, and can scale to large data sets. By benchmarking CS performance against sequences derived from a controlled DNA mixture of known organisms and a simulated chimera set, we provide insights into the factors that affect chimera formation such as sequence abundance, the extent of similarity between 16S genes, and PCR conditions. Chimeras were found to reproducibly form among independent amplifications and contributed to false perceptions of sample diversity and the false identification of novel taxa, with less-abundant species exhibiting chimera rates exceeding 70%. Shotgun metagenomic sequences of our mock community appear to be devoid of 16S chimeras, supporting a role for shotgun metagenomics in validating novel organisms discovered in targeted sequence surveys. PMID:21212162

  13. Sequence arrangement of the 16S and 26S rRNA genes in the pathogenic haemoflagellate Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Leon, W; Fouts, D L; Manning, J

    1978-01-01

    Kinetic and chemical analysis show that the haploid genome of Leishmania donovani has between 4.6 and 6.5 X 10(7) Kb pairs of DNA. Cot analysis shows that the genome contains 12% rapidly reassociating DNA, U3% middle repetitive DNA with an average reiteration frequency of 77 and 62% single copy DNA. Saturation hybridization experiments show that 0.82% of the nuclear DNA is occupied by rRNA coding sequences. The average repetition frequency of these sequences is determined to be 166. Sedimentation velocity studies indicate the two major rRNA species have sedimentation values of 26S and 16S, respectively. The arrangement of the rRNA genes and their spacer sequences on long strands of purified rDNA has been determined by the examination of the structure of rRNA:DNA hybrids prepared for electron microscopy by the gene 32-ethidium bromide technique. Long DNA strands are observed to contain several gene sets (16S + 26S). One repeat unit contains the following sequences in the order given: (a) A 16S gene of length 2.12 Kb, (b) An internal transcribed spacer (Spl) of length 1.23 Kb, which contains a short sequence that may code for a 5.8S rRNA, (C) 26S gene with a length of 4.31 Kb which contains an internal gap region of length 0.581 Ib, (d) An external spacer of average length 5.85 Kb. Images PMID:634795

  14. Development of an Analysis Pipeline Characterizing Multiple Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Using Mock Samples

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Jennifer J.; Oler, Andrew J.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Chalmers, Natalia; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Cashion, Ann; Munson, Peter J.; Ames, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is much speculation on which hypervariable region provides the highest bacterial specificity in 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimum solution to prevent bias and to obtain a comprehensive view of complex bacterial communities would be to sequence the entire 16S rRNA gene; however, this is not possible with second generation standard library design and short-read next-generation sequencing technology. Methods This paper examines a new process using seven hypervariable or V regions of the 16S rRNA (six amplicons: V2, V3, V4, V6-7, V8, and V9) processed simultaneously on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Four mock samples were amplified using the 16S Ion Metagenomics Kit™ (Life Technologies) and their sequencing data is subjected to a novel analytical pipeline. Results Results are presented at family and genus level. The Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL), a measure of the departure of the computed from the nominal bacterial distribution in the mock samples, was used to infer which region performed best at the family and genus levels. Three different hypervariable regions, V2, V4, and V6-7, produced the lowest divergence compared to the known mock sample. The V9 region gave the highest (worst) average DKL while the V4 gave the lowest (best) average DKL. In addition to having a high DKL, the V9 region in both the forward and reverse directions performed the worst finding only 17% and 53% of the known family level and 12% and 47% of the genus level bacteria, while results from the forward and reverse V4 region identified all 17 family level bacteria. Conclusions The results of our analysis have shown that our sequencing methods using 6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA and subsequent analysis is valid. This method also allowed for the assessment of how well each of the variable regions might perform simultaneously. Our findings will provide the basis for future work intended to assess microbial abundance at

  15. Correlation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Detection with Clinical/Immunoinflammatory Profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Using a 16S rRNA Microarray Method: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia F.; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Huang, Hong; Paster, Bruce J.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M.; Shaddox, Luciana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether the detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) correlates with the clinical and immunoinflammatory profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP), as determined by by 16S rRNA gene-based microarray. Subjects and Methods Subgingival plaque samples from the deepest diseased site of 30 LAP patients [PD ≥ 5 mm, BoP and bone loss] were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based microarrays. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed for 14 cyto/chemokines. Peripheral blood was obtained and stimulated in vitro with P.gingivalis and E.coli to evaluate inflammatory response profiles. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were also measured. Results Aa was detected in 56% of LAP patients and was shown to be an indicator for different bacterial community structures (p<0.01). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cyto/chemokines were detected in LPS-stimulated blood samples in both Aa-detected and Aa-non-detected groups (p>0.05). Clinical parameters and serum LPS levels were similar between groups. However, Aa-non-detected GCF contained higher concentration of IL-8 than Aa-detected sites (p<0.05). TNFα and IL1β were elevated upon E.coli LPS stimulation of peripheral blood cells derived from patients with Aa-detected sites. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the detection of Aa in LAP affected sites, did not correlate with clinical severity of the disease at the time of sampling in this cross-sectional study, although it did associate with lower local levels of IL-8, a different subgingival bacterial profile and elevated LPS-induced levels of TNFα and IL1β. PMID:24376864

  16. RAP, the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein in Arabidopsis, Is Required for Chloroplast 16S rRNA Maturation[W

    PubMed Central

    Kleinknecht, Laura; Wang, Fei; Stübe, Roland; Philippar, Katrin; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis and activity of chloroplasts in both vascular plants and algae depends on an intracellular network of nucleus-encoded, trans-acting factors that control almost all aspects of organellar gene expression. Most of these regulatory factors belong to the helical repeat protein superfamily, which includes tetratricopeptide repeat, pentatricopeptide repeat, and the recently identified octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins. Whereas green algae express many different OPR proteins, only a single orthologous OPR protein is encoded in the genomes of most land plants. Here, we report the characterization of the only OPR protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, RAP, which has previously been implicated in plant pathogen defense. Loss of RAP led to a severe defect in processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA resulting in impaired chloroplast translation and photosynthesis. In vitro RNA binding and RNase protection assays revealed that RAP has an intrinsic and specific RNA binding capacity, and the RAP binding site was mapped to the 5′ region of the 16S rRNA precursor. Nucleoid localization of RAP was shown by transient green fluorescent protein import assays, implicating the nucleoid as the site of chloroplast rRNA processing. Taken together, our data indicate that the single OPR protein in Arabidopsis is important for a basic process of chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:24585838

  17. RAP, the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein in Arabidopsis, is required for chloroplast 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, Laura; Wang, Fei; Stübe, Roland; Philippar, Katrin; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2014-02-01

    The biogenesis and activity of chloroplasts in both vascular plants and algae depends on an intracellular network of nucleus-encoded, trans-acting factors that control almost all aspects of organellar gene expression. Most of these regulatory factors belong to the helical repeat protein superfamily, which includes tetratricopeptide repeat, pentatricopeptide repeat, and the recently identified octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins. Whereas green algae express many different OPR proteins, only a single orthologous OPR protein is encoded in the genomes of most land plants. Here, we report the characterization of the only OPR protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, RAP, which has previously been implicated in plant pathogen defense. Loss of RAP led to a severe defect in processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA resulting in impaired chloroplast translation and photosynthesis. In vitro RNA binding and RNase protection assays revealed that RAP has an intrinsic and specific RNA binding capacity, and the RAP binding site was mapped to the 5' region of the 16S rRNA precursor. Nucleoid localization of RAP was shown by transient green fluorescent protein import assays, implicating the nucleoid as the site of chloroplast rRNA processing. Taken together, our data indicate that the single OPR protein in Arabidopsis is important for a basic process of chloroplast biogenesis.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in human blood.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kosei; Ando, Chie; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Okamura, Seiichi; Nakano, Shuji; Takagi, Yasumitsu; Miki, Takeyoshi; Nakashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) were detected in blood samples from two healthy individuals by PCR under conditions involving 30 cycles that did not produce any visible products from negative control saline. Even from control samples, PCR involving 35-40 cycles yielded visible bands. Major clones detected in the blood samples, but not in control, were the Aquabacterium subgroup, Stenotrophomonas subgroup, Budvicia subgroup, Serratia subgroup, Bacillus subgroup and Flavobacteria subgroup. No clone was located within the bacteroides-clostridium-lactobacillus cluster, which is indigenous to gastrointestinal flora.

  19. Using DGGE and 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis to Evaluate Changes in Oral Bacterial Composition

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Zhou; TRIVEDI, Harsh M.; CHHUN, Nok; BARNES, Virginia M.; SAXENA, Deepak; XU, Tao; LI, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a standard dental prophylaxis followed by tooth brushing with an antibacterial dentifrice will affect the oral bacterial community, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults were instructed to brush their teeth using commercial dentifrice for 1 week during a washout period. An initial set of pooled supragingival plaque samples was collected from each participant at baseline (0 h) before prophylaxis treatment. The subjects were given a clinical examination and dental prophylaxis and asked to brush for 1 min with a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). On the following day, a second set of pooled supragingival plaque samples (24 h) was collected. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from the samples. Differences in the microbial composition before and after the prophylactic procedure and tooth brushing were assessed by comparing the DGGE profiles of PCR-amplified and 16S rRNA gene segments sequence analysis. Results Two distinct clusters of DGGE profiles were found, suggesting that a shift in the microbial composition had occurred 24 h after the prophylaxis and brushing. A detailed sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene segments further identified six phyla and 29 genera, including known and unknown bacterial species. Importantly, an increase in bacterial diversity was observed after 24 h, including members of the Streptococcaceae family, Prevotella, Corynebacterium, TM7 and other commensal bacteria. Conclusion The results suggest that the use of a standard prophylaxis followed by the use of the dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride may promote a healthier composition within the oral bacterial community. PMID:22319750

  20. Cilantro microbiome before and after nonselective pre-enrichment for Salmonella using 16S rRNA and metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karen G; White, James R; Grim, Christopher J; Ewing, Laura; Ottesen, Andrea R; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Pettengill, James B; Brown, Eric; Hanes, Darcy E

    2015-08-12

    Salmonella enterica is a common cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in the United States and is associated with outbreaks in fresh produce such as cilantro. Salmonella culture-based detection methods are complex and time consuming, and improvments to increase detection sensitivity will benefit consumers. In this study, we used 16S rRNA sequencing to determine the microbiome of cilantro. We also investigated changes to the microbial community prior to and after a 24-hour nonselective pre-enrichment culture step commonly used by laboratory analysts to resuscitate microorganisms in foods suspected of contamination with pathogens. Cilantro samples were processed for Salmonella detection according to the method in the United States Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Genomic DNA was extracted from culture supernatants prior to and after a 24-hour nonselective pre-enrichment step and 454 pyrosequencing was performed on 16S rRNA amplicon libraries. A database of Enterobacteriaceae 16S rRNA sequences was created, and used to screen the libraries for Salmonella, as some samples were known to be culture positive. Additionally, culture positive cilantro samples were examined for the presence of Salmonella using shotgun metagenomics on the Illumina MiSeq. Time zero uncultured samples had an abundance of Proteobacteria while the 24-hour enriched samples were composed mostly of Gram-positive Firmicutes. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing of Salmonella culture positive cilantro samples revealed variable degrees of Salmonella contamination among the sequenced samples. Our cilantro study demonstrates the use of high-throughput sequencing to reveal the microbiome of cilantro, and how the microbiome changes during the culture-based protocols employed by food safety laboratories to detect foodborne pathogens. Finding that culturing the cilantro shifts the microbiome to a predominance of Firmicutes suggests that changing our culture-based methods will improve

  1. High-density universal 16S rRNA microarray analysis revealsbroader diversity than typical clone library when sampling theenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Moberg, Jordan P.; Zubieta,Ingrid X.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-06-15

    Molecular approaches aimed at detection of a broad-range ofprokaryotes in the environment routinely rely upon classifyingheterogeneous 16S rRNA genes amplified by PCR using primers with broadspecificity. The general method of sampling and categorizing DNA has beento clone then sequence the PCR products. However, the number of clonesrequired to adequately catalogue the majority of taxa in a sample isunwieldy. Alternatively, hybridizing target sequences to a universal 16SrRNA gene microarray may provide a more rapid and comprehensive view ofprokaryotic community composition. This study investigated the breadthand accuracy of a microarray in detecting diverse 16S rRNA gene sequencetypes compared to clone-and-sequencing using three environmental samples:urban aerosol, subsurface soil and subsurface water. PCR productsgenerated from universal 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers were classifiedusing either the clone-and-sequence method or by hybridization to a novelhigh-density microarray of 297,851 probes complementary to 842prokaryotic sub-families. The three clone libraries comprised 1,391high-quality sequences. Approximately 8 percent of the clones could notbe placed into a known sub-family and were considered novel. Themicroarray results confirmed the majority of clone-detected sub-familiesand additionally demonstrated greater amplicon diversity extending intophyla not observed by the cloning method. Sequences matching OTUs withinthe phyla Nitrospira, Planctomycetes, and TM7, which were uniquelydetected by the array, were verified with specific primers and subsequentamplicon sequencing. Sub-family richness detected by the arraycorresponded well with non-parametric richness predictions extrapolatedfrom clone libraries except in the water community where clone-basedrichness predictions were greatly exceeded. It was concluded thatalthough the microarray is unreliable inidentifying novel prokaryotictaxa, it reveals greater diversity in environmental samples thansequencing a

  2. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  3. Diversity of thermophiles in a Malaysian hot spring determined using 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia Sing; Chan, Kok-Gan; Tay, Yea-Ling; Chua, Yi-Heng; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-01-01

    The Sungai Klah (SK) hot spring is the second hottest geothermal spring in Malaysia. This hot spring is a shallow, 150-m-long, fast-flowing stream, with temperatures varying from 50 to 110°C and a pH range of 7.0–9.0. Hidden within a wooded area, the SK hot spring is continually fed by plant litter, resulting in a relatively high degree of total organic content (TOC). In this study, a sample taken from the middle of the stream was analyzed at the 16S rRNA V3-V4 region by amplicon metagenome sequencing. Over 35 phyla were detected by analyzing the 16S rRNA data. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented approximately 57% of the microbiome. Approximately 70% of the detected thermophiles were strict anaerobes; however, Hydrogenobacter spp., obligate chemolithotrophic thermophiles, represented one of the major taxa. Several thermophilic photosynthetic microorganisms and acidothermophiles were also detected. Most of the phyla identified by 16S rRNA were also found using the shotgun metagenome approaches. The carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism within the SK hot spring community were evaluated by shotgun metagenome sequencing, and the data revealed diversity in terms of metabolic activity and dynamics. This hot spring has a rich diversified phylogenetic community partly due to its natural environment (plant litter, high TOC, and a shallow stream) and geochemical parameters (broad temperature and pH range). It is speculated that symbiotic relationships occur between the members of the community. PMID:25798135

  4. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  5. Using DGGE and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to evaluate changes in oral bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhou; Trivedi, Harsh M; Chhun, Nok; Barnes, Virginia M; Saxena, Deepak; Xu, Tao; Li, Yihong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether a standard dental prophylaxis followed by tooth brushing with an antibacterial dentifrice will affect the oral bacterial community, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Twenty-four healthy adults were instructed to brush their teeth using commercial dentifrice for 1 week during a washout period. An initial set of pooled supragingival plaque samples was collected from each participant at baseline (0 h) before prophylaxis treatment. The subjects were given a clinical examination and dental prophylaxis and asked to brush for 1 min with a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan, 2.0% PVM/MA copolymer and 0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). On the following day, a second set of pooled supragingival plaque samples (24 h) was collected. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from the samples. Differences in the microbial composition before and after the prophylactic procedure and tooth brushing were assessed by comparing the DGGE profiles and 16S rRNA gene segments sequence analysis. Two distinct clusters of DGGE profiles were found, suggesting that a shift in the microbial composition had occurred 24 h after the prophylaxis and brushing. A detailed sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene segments further identified 6 phyla and 29 genera, including known and unknown bacterial species. Importantly, an increase in bacterial diversity was observed after 24 h, including members of the Streptococcaceae family, Prevotella, Corynebacterium, TM7 and other commensal bacteria. The results suggest that the use of a standard prophylaxis followed by the use of the dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan, 2.0% PVM/MA copolymer and 0.243% sodium fluoride may promote a healthier composition within the oral bacterial community.

  6. CLUSTOM: A Novel Method for Clustering 16S rRNA Next Generation Sequences by Overlap Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Kwon; Yu, Dong Su; Hou, Bo Kyeng; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2013-01-01

    The recent nucleic acid sequencing revolution driven by shotgun and high-throughput technologies has led to a rapid increase in the number of sequences for microbial communities. The availability of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from a multitude of natural environments now offers a unique opportunity to study microbial diversity and community structure. The large volume of sequencing data however makes it time consuming to assign individual sequences to phylotypes by searching them against public databases. Since ribosomal sequences have diverged across prokaryotic species, they can be grouped into clusters that represent operational taxonomic units. However, available clustering programs suffer from overlap of sequence spaces in adjacent clusters. In natural environments, gene sequences are homogenous within species but divergent between species. This evolutionary constraint results in an uneven distribution of genetic distances of genes in sequence space. To cluster 16S rRNA sequences more accurately, it is therefore essential to select core sequences that are located at the centers of the distributions represented by the genetic distance of sequences in taxonomic units. Based on this idea, we here describe a novel sequence clustering algorithm named CLUSTOM that minimizes the overlaps between adjacent clusters. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated in a comparative exercise with existing programs, using the reference sequences of the SILVA database as well as published pyrosequencing datasets. The test revealed that our algorithm achieves higher accuracy than ESPRIT-Tree and mothur, few of the best clustering algorithms. Results indicate that the concept of an uneven distribution of sequence distances can effectively and successfully cluster 16S rRNA gene sequences. The algorithm of CLUSTOM has been implemented both as a web and as a standalone command line application, which are available at http://clustom.kribb.re.kr. PMID:23650520

  7. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  8. A Bayesian taxonomic classification method for 16S rRNA gene sequences with improved species-level accuracy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lin, Huaiying; Revanna, Kashi; Dong, Qunfeng

    2017-05-10

    Species-level classification for 16S rRNA gene sequences remains a serious challenge for microbiome researchers, because existing taxonomic classification tools for 16S rRNA gene sequences either do not provide species-level classification, or their classification results are unreliable. The unreliable results are due to the limitations in the existing methods which either lack solid probabilistic-based criteria to evaluate the confidence of their taxonomic assignments, or use nucleotide k-mer frequency as the proxy for sequence similarity measurement. We have developed a method that shows significantly improved species-level classification results over existing methods. Our method calculates true sequence similarity between query sequences and database hits using pairwise sequence alignment. Taxonomic classifications are assigned from the species to the phylum levels based on the lowest common ancestors of multiple database hits for each query sequence, and further classification reliabilities are evaluated by bootstrap confidence scores. The novelty of our method is that the contribution of each database hit to the taxonomic assignment of the query sequence is weighted by a Bayesian posterior probability based upon the degree of sequence similarity of the database hit to the query sequence. Our method does not need any training datasets specific for different taxonomic groups. Instead only a reference database is required for aligning to the query sequences, making our method easily applicable for different regions of the 16S rRNA gene or other phylogenetic marker genes. Reliable species-level classification for 16S rRNA or other phylogenetic marker genes is critical for microbiome research. Our software shows significantly higher classification accuracy than the existing tools and we provide probabilistic-based confidence scores to evaluate the reliability of our taxonomic classification assignments based on multiple database matches to query sequences. Despite

  9. Linear programming model to construct phylogenetic network for 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Rinku; Adlakha, Neeru

    2014-06-01

    Phylogenetic trees give the information about the vertical relationships of ancestors and descendants but phylogenetic networks are used to visualize the horizontal relationships among the different organisms. In order to predict reticulate events there is a need to construct phylogenetic networks. Here, a Linear Programming (LP) model has been developed for the construction of phylogenetic network. The model is validated by using data sets of chloroplast of 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and Influenza A/H5N1 viruses. Results obtained are in agreement with those obtained by earlier researchers.

  10. Structural changes in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA in mutants with impaired translational fidelity.

    PubMed

    Van Ryk, D I; Dahlberg, A E

    1995-09-11

    The higher order structure of the functionally important 530 loop in Escherichia coli 16S rRNA was studied in mutants with single base changes at position 517, which significantly impair translational fidelity. The 530 loop has been proposed to interact with the EF-Tu-GTP-aatRNA ternary complex during decoding. The reactivity at G530, U531 and A532 to the chemical probes kethoxal, CMCT and DMS respectively was increased in the mutant 16S rRNA compared with the wild-type, suggesting a more open 530 loop structure in the mutant ribosomes. This was supported by oligonucleotide binding experiments in which probes complementary to positions 520-526 and 527-533, but not control probes, showed increased binding to the 517C mutant 70S ribosomes compared with the non-mutant control. Furthermore, enzymatic digestion of 70S ribosomes with RNase T1, specific for single-stranded RNA, substantially cleaved both wild-type and mutant rRNAs between G524 and C525, two of the nucleotides involved in the 530 loop pseudoknot. This site was also cleaved in the 517C mutant, but not wild-type rRNA, by RNase V1. Such a result is still consistent with a more open 530 loop structure in the mutant ribosomes, since RNase V1 can cut at appropriately stacked single-stranded regions of RNA. Together these data indicate that the 517C mutant rRNA has a rather extensively unfolded 530 loop structure. Less extensive structural changes were found in mutants 517A and 517U, which caused less misreading. A correlation between the structural changes in the 530 loop and impaired translational accuracy is proposed.

  11. Application of 16S rRNA metagenomics to analyze bacterial communities at a respiratory care centre in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuan Yi; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Kuo, Han-Yueh; Tan, Te-Sheng; Liao, Ki-Hok; Liu, Chih-Chin; Hon, Wing-Kai; Liou, Ming-Li

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we applied a 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) metagenomics approach to survey inanimate hospital environments (IHEs) in a respiratory care center (RCC). A total of 16 samples, including 9 from medical devices and 7 from workstations, were analyzed. Besides, clinical isolates were retrospectively analyzed during the sampling period in the RCC. A high amount of microbial diversity was detected, with an average of 1,836 phylotypes per sample. In addition to Acinetobacter, more than 60 % of the bacterial communities present among the top 25 abundant genera were dominated by skin-associated bacteria. Differences in bacterial profiles were restricted to individual samples. Furthermore, compliance with hand hygiene guidelines may be unsatisfactory among hospital staff according to a principal coordinate analysis that indicated clustering of bacterial communities between devices and workstations for most of the sampling sites. Compared to the high incidence of clinical isolates in the RCC, only Staphylococcus and Acinetobacter were highly abundant in the IHEs. Despite Acinetobacter was the most abundant genus present in IHEs of the RCC, potential pathogens, e.g., Acinetobacter baumannii, might remain susceptible to carbapenem. This study is the first in Taiwan to demonstrate a high diversity of human-associated bacteria in the RCC via 16S rRNA metagenomics, which allows for new assessment of potential health risks in RCCs, aids in the evaluation of existing sanitation protocols, and furthers our understanding of the development of healthcare-associated infections.

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of the Thermus Thermophilus 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmG

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, S.; Demirci, H; Belardinelli, R; Monshupanee, T; Gualerzi, C; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2009-01-01

    The RsmG methyltransferase is responsible for N7 methylation of G527 of 16S rRNA in bacteria. Here, we report the identification of the Thermus thermophilus rsmG gene, the isolation of rsmG mutants, and the solution of RsmG X-ray crystal structures at up to 1.5 A resolution. Like their counterparts in other species, T. thermophilus rsmG mutants are weakly resistant to the aminoglycoside antibiotic streptomycin. Growth competition experiments indicate a physiological cost to loss of RsmG activity, consistent with the conservation of the modification site in the decoding region of the ribosome. In contrast to Escherichia coli RsmG, which has been reported to recognize only intact 30S subunits, T. thermophilus RsmG shows no in vitro methylation activity against native 30S subunits, only low activity with 30S subunits at low magnesium concentration, and maximum activity with deproteinized 16S rRNA. Cofactor-bound crystal structures of RsmG reveal a positively charged surface area remote from the active site that binds an adenosine monophosphate molecule. We conclude that an early assembly intermediate is the most likely candidate for the biological substrate of RsmG.

  13. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species. PMID:25313278

  14. 16S rRNA gene probe quantitates residual host cell DNA in pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Yu; Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Shi, Ke; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Kai-Hui; Yi-Zhang; Chen, Zu-Huan

    2006-03-24

    The development and widespread use of DNA-based vaccination against infectious pathogens have been a great triumph of medical science. Quality control of DNA vaccines as biopharmaceutical productions is a problem to solve. Residual genomic DNA of engineering bacteria has been identified as a potential risk factor, so whose level must be controlled under the regulatory standards. We report a dot-blot hybridization method to detect residual host cell DNA in purified DNA vaccines. The assay utilizes PCR amplified and digoxigenin-labeled Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene as probe. The sensitivity of the dot-blot hybridization assay with E. coli 16S rRNA gene probe was evaluated in comparison with single copy UidR gene probe. The optimized dot-blot hybridization assay had both low background and a suitable sensitivity, detecting 10 pg of residual E. coli DNA. The method is suitable in the routine use of measuring the levels of residual E. coli DNA in the pharmaceutical-grade DNA vaccine.

  15. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea. PMID:28097056

  16. Assessment of microbial dynamics in the Pearl River Estuary by 16S rRNA terminal restriction fragment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Madeline; Song, Liansheng; Ren, Jianping; Kan, Jianjun; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2004-10-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) pattern of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 16S rRNA sequences to track the changes of the free-living bacterial community for the Pearl River Estuary surface waters. The suitability of specific PCR primers, PCR bias induced by thermal cycles, and field-sampling volumes were critically evaluated in laboratory tests. We established a workable protocol and obtained TRF patterns that reflected the changes in the bacterial population. The temporal dynamics over a 24 h period were examined at one anchored station, as well as the spatial distribution pattern of the bacterial community at several stations, covering the transects along the river discharge direction and across the river plume. The TRF pattern revealed 9 dominant bacterial groups. Changes in their relative abundance reflecting the changes in the bacterial community composition were documented. Many culturable species were isolated from each field sample and a portion of the 16S rRNA gene for each species was sequenced. The species was identified based on sequence data comparison. In this region, the dominant species belong to the γ-subdivision of proteobacteria and the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Firmicutes. We also detected the wide spread distribution of Acinetobacter spp.; many of these species are known nosocomial pathogen for humans.

  17. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj; Clavel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea.

  18. 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of culturable predominant bacteria from diseased Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea, Echinodermata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyan; Jiang, Guoliang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-01

    Cultured Apostichopus japonicus in China suffers from a kind of skin ulceration disease that has caused severe economic loss in recent years. The disease, pathogens of which are supposed to be bacteria by most researchers, is highly infectious and can often cause all individuals in the same culture pool to die in a very short time. The 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of the culturable bacteria from the lesions of diseased individuals was conducted to study the biodiversity of the bacterial communities in the lesions and to identify probable pathogen(s) associated with this kind of disease. S. japonica samples were selected from a hatchery located in the eastern part of Qingdao, China. Bacterial universal primers GM5F and DS907R were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria colonies, and touchdown PCR was performed to amplify the target sequences. The results suggest that γ- proteobacteria (Alteromonadales and Vibrionales) of CFB group, many strains of which have been also determined as pathogens in other marine species, are the predominant bacterial genera of the diseased Apostichopus japonicus individuals.

  19. Collagenase production and hemolytic activity related to 16S rRNA variability among Parvimonas micra oral isolates.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, Claudia; Alves Mayer, Marcia Pinto

    2010-02-01

    Parvimonas micra are gram positive anaerobic cocci isolated from the oral cavity and frequently related to polymicrobial infections in humans. Despite reports about phenotypic differences, the genotypic variation of P. micra and its role in virulence are still not elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypic diversity of P. micra isolates obtained from the subgingival biofilm of subjects with different periodontal conditions and to correlate these findings with phenotypic traits. Three reference strains and 35 isolates of P. micra were genotyped by 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP and phenotypic traits such as collagenase production, elastolytic and hemolytic activities were evaluated. 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP showed that P. micra could be grouped into two main clusters: C1 and C2; cluster C1 harbored three genotypes (HG1259-like, HG1467-like and ICBMO583-like) while cluster C2 harbored two genotypes (ATCC33270-like and ICBMO36). A wide variability in collagenolytic activity intensities was observed among all isolates, while elastolytic activity was detected in only two isolates. There was an association between hemolytic activity in rabbit erythrocytes and cluster C2. There was an association between hemolytic activity in rabbit erythrocytes and cluster C1. Although these data suggest a possible association between P. micra genetic diversity and their pathogenic potential, further investigations are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  20. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  1. Burden of emerging anaerobes in the MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA gene sequencing era.

    PubMed

    La Scola, Bernard; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2011-06-01

    The isolation of anaerobes from patients has declined in recent years, whereas their detection by molecular techniques has increased. In the present work, we analyzed the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to routine identification of anaerobes in clinical microbiology laboratory. We identified 544 isolates of 79 species by routine culture from deep samples in our hospital. MALDI-TOF MS allowed identification of 332 isolates (61%). The remaining 212 (39%) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, allowing identification of 202 at the species level. The most common anaerobes were Propionibacterium spp. (12%), Finegoldia magna (4%), Fusobacterium spp. (6%) and Bacteroides spp. (6%). However, among the 79 identified species, seven were new species or genera, including two Prevotella conceptionensis, a species previously detected by our team by amplification and sequencing, five Anaerococcus sp. and one Prevotella sp. Beyond the identification of these new species, we also identified several uncommon or previously not described associations between species and specific pathologic conditions. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification, which will become more effective with future spectra database improvement, will be likely responsible of a burden of emerging anaerobes in clinical microbiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates of Elizabethkingia Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Mi-Soon; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myungsook; Ku, Nam Su; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2017-01-01

    Some of the previously reported clinical isolates of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica may be later named species of Elizabethkingia We determined the accuracy of species identification (with two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry [MALDI-TOF MS] systems and the Vitek 2 GN card), relative prevalence of three Elizabethkingia spp. in clinical specimens, and antimicrobial susceptibility of the species identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Specimens for culture were collected from patients in a university hospital in Seoul, South Korea, between 2009 and 2015. All 3 Elizabethkingia spp. were detected in patients; among the 86 isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 17 (19.8%) were E. meningoseptica, 18 (20.9%) were Elizabethkingia miricola, and 51 (59.3%) were Elizabethkingia anophelis Only the MALDI-TOF Vitek MS system with an amended database correctly identified all of the isolates. The majority (76.7%) of the isolates were from the lower respiratory tract, and 8 (9.3%) were from blood. Over 90% of E. meningoseptica and E. anophelis isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and rifampin. In contrast, all E. miricola isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones except ciprofloxacin. Further studies are urgently needed to determine the optimal antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infections due to each individual Elizabethkingia species.

  3. Bases in 16S rRNA Important for Subunit Association, tRNA binding, and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinying; Chiu, Katie; Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomes are the cellular machinery responsible for protein synthesis. A well-orchestrated step in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis is the precise translocation of the tRNA-mRNA complex within the ribosome. Here we report the application of a new in vitro modification-interference method for the identification of bases in 16S rRNA that are essential for translocation. Our results suggest that conserved bases U56, U723, A1306, A1319, and A1468 in 16S rRNA are important for translocation. These five bases were deleted or mutated in order to study their role in translation. Depending on the type of mutation, we observed inhibition of growth rate, subunit association, tRNA binding and/or translocation. Interestingly, deletion of U56 or A1319 or mutation of A1319 to C showed a lethal phenotype and were defective in protein synthesis in vitro. Further analysis showed that deletion of U56 or A1319 caused defects in 30S subunit assembly, subunit association and tRNA binding. In contrast, A1319C mutation showed no defects in subunit association; however, the extent of tRNA binding and translocation was significantly reduced. These results show that conserved bases located as far away as 100 Å from the tRNA binding sites can be important for translation. PMID:19545171

  4. Analysis of the Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota via Serial Illumina Sequencing of Bacterial 16S rRNA Hypervariable Regions

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Caballero, Julio; Fung, Pauline; Gong, Yunchen; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Yuan, Lijie; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zhang, Yu; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Tullis, D. Elizabeth; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of bacterial communities using DNA sequencing has revolutionized our ability to study microbes in nature and discover the ways in which microbial communities affect ecosystem functioning and human health. Here we describe Serial Illumina Sequencing (SI-Seq): a method for deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using next-generation sequencing technology. SI-Seq serially sequences portions of the V5, V6 and V7 hypervariable regions from barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons using an Illumina short-read genome analyzer. SI-Seq obtains taxonomic resolution similar to 454 pyrosequencing for a fraction of the cost, and can produce hundreds of thousands of reads per sample even with very high multiplexing. We validated SI-Seq using single species and mock community controls, and via a comparison to cystic fibrosis lung microbiota sequenced using 454 FLX Titanium. Our control runs show that SI-Seq has a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude, can classify >96% of sequences to the genus level, and performs just as well as 454 and paired-end Illumina methods in estimation of standard microbial ecology diversity measurements. We illustrate the utility of SI-Seq in a pilot sample of central airway secretion samples from cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23056217

  5. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species.

  6. Analysis of conformational changes in 16 S rRNA during the course of 30 S subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kristi L; Culver, Gloria M

    2005-11-25

    Ribosome biogenesis involves an integrated series of binding events coupled with conformational changes that ultimately result in the formation of a functional macromolecular complex. In vitro, Escherichia coli 30 S subunit assembly occurs in a cooperative manner with the ordered addition of 20 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with 16 S rRNA. The assembly pathway for 30 S subunits has been dissected in vitro into three steps, where specific r-proteins associate with 16 S rRNA early in 30 S subunit assembly, followed by a mid-assembly conformational rearrangement of the complex that then enables the remaining r-proteins to associate in the final step. Although the three steps of 30 S subunit assembly have been known for some time, few details have been elucidated about changes that occur as a result of these three specific stages. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the concerted early and late stages of small ribosomal subunit assembly. Conformational changes, roles for base-pairing and r-proteins at specific stages of assembly, and a polar nature to the assembly process have been revealed. This work has allowed a more comprehensive and global view of E.coli 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly to be obtained.

  7. 16S rRNA Gene Mutations Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Tetracycline in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Amram, E.; Mikula, I.; Schnee, C.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.; Rosales, R. S.; Harrus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis isolates with decreased susceptibilities to tetracyclines are increasingly reported worldwide. The acquired molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon were investigated in 70 clinical isolates of M. bovis. Sequence analysis of the two 16S rRNA-encoding genes (rrs3 and rrs4 alleles) containing the primary binding pocket for tetracycline (Tet-1 site) was performed on isolates with tetracycline hydrochloride MICs of 0.125 to 16 μg/ml. Mutations at positions A965T, A967T/C (Escherichia coli numbering) of helix 31, U1199C of helix 34, and G1058A/C were identified. Decreased susceptibilities to tetracycline (MICs, ≥2 μg/ml) were associated with mutations present at two (A965 and A967) or three positions (A965, A967, and G1058) of the two rrs alleles. No tet(M), tet(O), or tet(L) determinants were found in the genome of any of the 70 M. bovis isolates. The data presented correlate (P < 0.0001) the mutations identified in the Tet-1 site of clinical isolates of M. bovis with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline. PMID:25403668

  8. ESPRIT: estimating species richness using large collections of 16S rRNA pyrosequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yijun; Cai, Yunpeng; Liu, Li; Yu, Fahong; Farrell, Michael L.; McKendree, William; Farmerie, William

    2009-01-01

    Recent metagenomics studies of environmental samples suggested that microbial communities are much more diverse than previously reported, and deep sequencing will significantly increase the estimate of total species diversity. Massively parallel pyrosequencing technology enables ultra-deep sequencing of complex microbial populations rapidly and inexpensively. However, computational methods for analyzing large collections of 16S ribosomal sequences are limited. We proposed a new algorithm, referred to as ESPRIT, which addresses several computational issues with prior methods. We developed two versions of ESPRIT, one for personal computers (PCs) and one for computer clusters (CCs). The PC version is used for small- and medium-scale data sets and can process several tens of thousands of sequences within a few minutes, while the CC version is for large-scale problems and is able to analyze several hundreds of thousands of reads within one day. Large-scale experiments are presented that clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly proposed algorithm. The source code and user guide are freely available at http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/people/sun/esprit.html. PMID:19417062

  9. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

  10. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

  11. Cyanobacterial endobionts within a major marine planktonic calcifier (Globigerina bulloides, Foraminifera) revealed by 16S rRNA metabarcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Clare; Darling, Kate F.; Russell, Ann D.; Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Free, Andrew; Wyman, Michael; Ngwenya, Bryne T.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of bacterial symbiosis in Globigerina bulloides, a palaeoceanographically important, planktonic foraminifer. This marine protist is commonly used in micropalaeontological investigations of climatically sensitive subpolar and temperate water masses as well as wind-driven upwelling regions of the world's oceans. G. bulloides is unusual because it lacks the protist algal symbionts that are often found in other spinose species. In addition, it has a large offset in its stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions compared to other planktonic foraminifer species, and also that predicted from seawater equilibrium. This is suggestive of novel differences in ecology and life history of G. bulloides, making it a good candidate for investigating the potential for bacterial symbiosis as a contributory factor influencing shell calcification. Such information is essential to evaluate fully the potential response of G. bulloides to ocean acidification and climate change. To investigate possible ecological interactions between G. bulloides and marine bacteria, 18S rRNA gene sequencing, fluorescence microscopy, 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed on individual specimens of G. bulloides (type IId) collected from two locations in the California Current. Intracellular DNA extracted from five G. bulloides specimens was subjected to 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and, remarkably, 37-87 % of all 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered were assigned to operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus. This finding was supported by TEM observations of intact Synechococcus cells in both the cytoplasm and vacuoles of G. bulloides. Their concentrations were up to 4 orders of magnitude greater inside the foraminifera than those reported for the California Current water column and approximately 5 % of the intracellular Synechococcus cells observed were undergoing cell division. This suggests

  12. Temperature Sensitivity Caused by Mutant Release Factor 1 Is Suppressed by Mutations That Affect 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of slow termination on the protein synthesizing machinery, we isolated suppressors to a temperature-sensitive release factor 1 (RF1). Of 26 independent clones, five complementation groups have been identified, two of which are presented here. The first mutation disrupts a base pair in the transcription terminator stem for the rplM-rpsI operon, which encodes ribosomal proteins L13 and S9. We have found that this leads to readthrough of the terminator and that lower levels of transcript (compared to the results seen with the wild type) are found in the cell. This probably leads to decreased expression of the two proteins. The second mutation is a small deletion of the yrdC open reading frame start site, and it is not likely that the protein is expressed. Both mutant strains show an increased accumulation of 17S rRNA (immature 16S rRNA). Maturation of 16S rRNA is dependent on proper assembly of the ribosomal proteins, a process that is disturbed when proteins are missing. The function of the YrdC protein is not known, but it is able to bind to double-stranded RNA; therefore, we suggest that it is an assembly factor important for 30S subunit biogenesis. On the basis of our findings, we propose that lesser amounts of S9 or a lack of YrdC causes the maturation defect. We have shown that as a consequence of the maturation defect, fewer 70S ribosomes and polysomes are formed. This and other results suggest that it is the lowered concentration of functional ribosomes that suppresses the temperature sensitivity caused by the mutant RF1. PMID:15126466

  13. The truth about metagenomics: quantifying and counteracting bias in 16S rRNA studies.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J Paul; Edwards, David J; Harwich, Michael D; Rivera, Maria C; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Reris, Robert A; Sheth, Nihar U; Huang, Bernice; Girerd, Philippe; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2015-03-21

    compositions. Bias in 16S studies due to DNA extraction and PCR amplification will continue to require attention despite further advances in sequencing technology. Analysis of mock communities can help assess bias and facilitate the interpretation of results from environmental samples.

  14. Recognition of Potentially Novel Human Disease-Associated Pathogens by Implementation of Systematic 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in the Diagnostic Laboratory▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Peter M.; Rampini, Silvana K.; Büchler, Andrea C.; Eich, Gerhard; Wanner, Roger M.; Speck, Roberto F.; Böttger, Erik C.; Bloemberg, Guido V.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical isolates that are difficult to identify by conventional means form a valuable source of novel human pathogens. We report on a 5-year study based on systematic 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We found 60 previously unknown 16S rRNA sequences corresponding to potentially novel bacterial taxa. For 30 of 60 isolates, clinical relevance was evaluated; 18 of the 30 isolates analyzed were considered to be associated with human disease. PMID:20631113

  15. Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of enterococcus species in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water.

  16. Development of Quantitative PCR Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Enterococcus spp. and Their Application to the Identification of Enterococcus Species in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water. PMID:23087032

  17. Identification and Analysis of Informative Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in 16S rRNA Gene Sequences of the Bacillus cereus Group

    PubMed Central

    Hakovirta, Janetta R.; Prezioso, Samantha; Hodge, David; Pillai, Segaran P.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA genes is important for phylogenetic classification of known and novel bacterial genera and species and for detection of uncultivable bacteria. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with universal primers produces a mixture of amplicons from all rRNA operons in the genome, and the sequence data generally yield a consensus sequence. Here we describe valuable data that are missing from consensus sequences, variable effects on sequence data generated from nonidentical 16S rRNA amplicons, and the appearance of data displayed by different software programs. These effects are illustrated by analysis of 16S rRNA genes from 50 strains of the Bacillus cereus group, i.e., Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, and Bacillus thuringiensis. These species have 11 to 14 rRNA operons, and sequence variability occurs among the multiple 16S rRNA genes. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) previously reported to be specific to B. anthracis was detected in some B. cereus strains. However, a different SNP, at position 1139, was identified as being specific to B. anthracis, which is a biothreat agent with high mortality rates. Compared with visual analysis of the electropherograms, basecaller software frequently missed gene sequence variations or could not identify variant bases due to overlapping basecalls. Accurate detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences that include intragenomic variations can improve discrimination among closely related species, improve the utility of 16S rRNA databases, and facilitate rapid bacterial identification by targeted DNA sequence analysis or by whole-genome sequencing performed by clinical or reference laboratories. PMID:27582514

  18. Identification and Analysis of Informative Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in 16S rRNA Gene Sequences of the Bacillus cereus Group.

    PubMed

    Hakovirta, Janetta R; Prezioso, Samantha; Hodge, David; Pillai, Segaran P; Weigel, Linda M

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA genes is important for phylogenetic classification of known and novel bacterial genera and species and for detection of uncultivable bacteria. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with universal primers produces a mixture of amplicons from all rRNA operons in the genome, and the sequence data generally yield a consensus sequence. Here we describe valuable data that are missing from consensus sequences, variable effects on sequence data generated from nonidentical 16S rRNA amplicons, and the appearance of data displayed by different software programs. These effects are illustrated by analysis of 16S rRNA genes from 50 strains of the Bacillus cereus group, i.e., Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, and Bacillus thuringiensis These species have 11 to 14 rRNA operons, and sequence variability occurs among the multiple 16S rRNA genes. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) previously reported to be specific to B. anthracis was detected in some B. cereus strains. However, a different SNP, at position 1139, was identified as being specific to B. anthracis, which is a biothreat agent with high mortality rates. Compared with visual analysis of the electropherograms, basecaller software frequently missed gene sequence variations or could not identify variant bases due to overlapping basecalls. Accurate detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences that include intragenomic variations can improve discrimination among closely related species, improve the utility of 16S rRNA databases, and facilitate rapid bacterial identification by targeted DNA sequence analysis or by whole-genome sequencing performed by clinical or reference laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Microbiological and 16S rRNA analysis of sulphite-reducing clostridia from river sediments in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Marcheggiani, Stefania; Iaconelli, Marcello; D'angelo, Annamaria; Pierdominici, Elio; La Rosa, Giuseppina; Muscillo, Michele; Equestre, Michele; Mancini, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background Microbiological indicators are commonly used in the assessment of public health risks associated with fecal contamination of freshwater ecosystems. Sediments are a reservoir of microorganisms, and can thus provide information on past pollution events, not obtainable through the testing of surface water. Moreover, pathogens present in sediment may represent future threats to human health. Clostridium perfringens, a typical colonizer of sediments, has been suggested as an alternative indicator of fecal pollution. In order to be suitable for such purpose, the microorganism should be widely distributed in contaminated environments. The objective of this study was thus to determine the composition of the anaerobic community in sediment samples of the lower Tiber basin, in central Italy, through a combined approach involving granulometric analysis of sediment samples, as well as a microbiological and molecular (16S rRNA) analysis of strains. Results Granulometry showed a similar, clayey sediment composition, in most sampling sites. The microbiological method, employing, an adaptation of the standard method, proved to be effective in isolating anaerobic bacteria from the environmental matrix for the purpose of genetic analysis. Eighty-three strains of bacteria were isolated and the partial 16S rRNA gene sequenced. While biochemical analysis detected only C. perfringens strains, phylogenetic analysis indicated the presence of three clusters: C. perfringens, C. bifermentans and B. cereus, comprising eight taxa. C. perfringens, the commonest in almost all sediment sampling sites, was present in all sites, and in both seasons (seasonal sampling was carried out only along the Tiber and Aniene rivers). None of the described genetic profiles showed complete similarity with GenBank sequences. Conclusion The study underlines the value of C. perfringens as an alternative microbial indicator of fecal contamination in river sediments. This is supported by the bacterium

  20. Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods: integration of both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods (GNR) by conventional phenotypic characteristics is a challenge for diagnostic microbiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular methods, e.g., 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Results A total of 158 clinical isolates covering 20 genera and 50 species isolated from 1993 to 2010 were analyzed by comparing biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based identification. 16S rRNA gene homology analysis identified 148/158 (94%) of the isolates to species level, 9/158 (5%) to genus and 1/158 (1%) to family level. Compared to 16S rRNA gene sequencing as reference method, phenotypic identification correctly identified 64/158 (40%) isolates to species level, mainly Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Pasteurella multocida, and 21/158 (13%) isolates correctly to genus level, notably Capnocytophaga sp.; 73/158 (47%) of the isolates were not identified or misidentified. Conclusions We herein propose an efficient strategy for accurate identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory by integrating both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We conclude that 16S rRNA gene sequencing is an effective means for identification of fastidious GNR, which are not readily identified by conventional phenotypic methods. PMID:23855986

  1. Description of an Unusual Neisseria meningitidis Isolate Containing and Expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Specific 16S rRNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Skvoretz, Rhonda; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Jonas, Vivian; Brentano, Steve

    2013-01-01

    An apparently rare Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing one copy of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA gene is described herein. This isolate was identified as N. meningitidis by biochemical identification methods but generated a positive signal with Gen-Probe Aptima assays for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the purified isolate revealed mixed bases in signature regions that allow for discrimination between N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. The mixed bases were resolved by sequencing individually PCR-amplified single copies of the genomic 16S rRNA gene. A total of 121 discrete sequences were obtained; 92 (76%) were N. meningitidis sequences, and 29 (24%) were N. gonorrhoeae sequences. Based on the ratio of species-specific sequences, the N. meningitidis strain seems to have replaced one of its four intrinsic 16S rRNA genes with the gonococcal gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes specific for meningococcal and gonococcal rRNA were used to demonstrate the expression of the rRNA genes. Interestingly, the clinical isolate described here expresses both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA genes, as shown by positive FISH signals with both probes. This explains why the probes for N. gonorrhoeae in the Gen-Probe Aptima assays cross-react with this N. meningitidis isolate. The N. meningitidis isolate described must have obtained N. gonorrhoeae-specific DNA through interspecies recombination. PMID:23863567

  2. Metagenomic and near full-length 16S rRNA sequence data in support of the phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  3. Evaluation of 16S Rrna amplicon sequencing using two next-generation sequencing technologies for phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  4. Evaluation of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using two next-generation sequencing technologies for phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  5. [Composition of the oil-slime microbial community determined by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, T V; Laĭkov, A V; Rizvanov, A A; Il'inskaia, O N; Naumova, R P

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of the cultured microorganisms of industrial oil-slime revealed predominance (-85-90%) of the Gammaproteobacteria in the community of aerobic heterotrophs and specific oil-slime degraders. Relation of the isolated strains with members of the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Enterobacter was established. Analysis of the same gene in the total DNA from the oil-slime revealed greater microbial diversity (-20 operative taxonomic units determined by T-RFLP) than in the cultured part of the community, which included -12 different colony types. Three major restriction fragments were found, with their total area -50%. These results demonstrated the low morphological and phylogenetic diversity of the oil-slime bacterial community.

  6. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing of the Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene for Forensic Soil Comparison: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Jesmok, Ellen M; Hopkins, James M; Foran, David R

    2016-05-01

    Soil has the potential to be valuable forensic evidence linking a person or item to a crime scene; however, there is no established soil individualization technique. In this study, the utility of soil bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was examined for associating soils with their place of origin. Soil samples were collected from ten diverse and nine similar habitats over time, and within three habitats at various horizontal and vertical distances. Bacterial profiles were analyzed using four methods: abundance charts and nonmetric multidimensional scaling provided simplification and visualization of the massive datasets, potentially aiding in expert testimony, while analysis of similarities and k-nearest neighbor offered objective statistical comparisons. The vast majority of soil bacterial profiles (95.4%) were classified to their location of origin, highlighting the potential of bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing for the forensic analysis of soil samples.

  8. Bacterial Population Dynamics in a Laboratory Activated Sludge Reactor Monitored by Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Hiroyasu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Ranasinghe, Purnika; Li, Ning; Gunawardana, Egodaha Gedara Wasana; Hattori, Masahira; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The microbial population in a laboratory activated sludge reactor was monitored for 245 d at 75 time points by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA. Synthetic wastewater was used as the influent, and the reactor was operated under the same conditions throughout the experiment. The behaviors of different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed. Multiple OTUs showed periodic propagation and recession. One of the OTUs showed sharp recession, which suggests that cells in the OTU were selectively killed. The behaviors of different phylogenetic lineages of Candidatus ‘Accumulibacter phosphatis’ were also visualized. It was clearly demonstrated that pyrosequencing with barcoded primers is a very effective tool to clarify the dynamics of the bacterial population in activated sludge. PMID:23100021

  9. Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia Species to Genus Level by 16S rRNA Gene PCR

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frederic J.; Provost, Frederique; Boiron, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Two regions of the gene coding for 16S rRNA in Nocardia species were selected as genus-specific primer sequences for a PCR assay. The PCR protocol was tested with 60 strains of clinically relevant Nocardia isolates and type strains. It gave positive results for all strains tested. Conversely, the PCR assay was negative for all tested species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Dietzia, Gordona, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella. Besides, unlike the latter group of isolates, all Nocardia strains exhibited one MlnI recognition site but no SacI restriction site. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to chemotaxonomic methods for the identification of Nocardia spp. isolated from pathogenic samples. PMID:9854071

  10. MSClust: A Multi-Seeds Based Clustering Algorithm for microbiome profiling using 16S rRNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Cheng, Yongmei; Zhang, Clarence; Zhang, Shaowu; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments of next generation sequencing technologies have led to rapid accumulation of 16s rRNA sequences for microbiome profiling. One key step in data processing is to cluster short sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Although many methods have been proposed for OTU inferences, a major challenge is the balance between inference accuracy and computational efficiency, where inference accuracy is often sacrificed to accommodate the need to analyze large numbers of sequences. Inspired by the hierarchical clustering method and a modified greedy network clustering algorithm, we propose a novel multi-seeds based heuristic clustering method, named MSClust, for OTU inference. MSClust first adaptively selects multi-seeds instead of one seed for each candidate cluster, and the reads are then processed using a greedy clustering strategy. Through many numerical examples, we demonstrate that MSClust enjoys less memory usage, and better biological accuracy compared to existing heuristic clustering methods while preserving efficiency and scalability. PMID:23899776

  11. Differentiation of Acinetobacter baumannii biotypes by amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Montoya, R; Bello, H; Gonzalez, G; Dominguez, M; Zemelman, R

    1996-01-01

    Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (32 strains) from blood samples obtained from patients in five Chilean hospitals were identified and biotyped according to their phenotypic properties. They were also submitted to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using eight randomly designed 10-mers and the core sequence of M13 phage (15-mers) as well as amplification of the spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. With some primers, RAPD discriminated between biotypes, whereas with others each isolate showed a particular profile. When amplification of spacer regions was performed, a clear correlation between patterns and biotypes was found. This last technique allowed correct biotyping of clinical isolates. Both genetic methods might be used for the identification of A. baumannii biotypes.

  12. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  13. [Comparison of MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA methods in identification of viridans group streptococci].

    PubMed

    Süzük Yıldız, Serap; Kaşkatepe, Banu; Altınok, Salih; Çetin, Mustafa; Karagöz, Alper; Savaş, Sümeyra

    2017-01-01

    Accurate identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) frequently encountered as a causative agent of infective endocarditis is always a challenge for the clinical microbiology laboratory. Clinical microbiology laboratories generally use semi automatic/full automatic systems, molecular methods and also conventional methods for the identification of these bacteria. There are recent published studies that have used MALDI-TOF (Matrix Assisted Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry-Time of Flight) systems in the identification of VGS. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of the conventional methods, semi automatic and MALDI-TOF MS system used in identification of VGS in oral microbiota of persons under the risk of infective endocarditis, with the gold standard method 16S rRNA sequence analysis and to create a diagnosis algorithm for the identification of VGS in clinical microbiology laboratories according to the obtained data.The study was conducted with 51 VGS strains isolated from oral microbiota of the patients with rheumatologic cardiac, valve and/or prosthetic valve diseases, under the risk of development of infective endocarditis, who have admitted to Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Department of Cardiology, between February-June 2015. Standard microbiology procedures, optochin susceptibility and bile solubility tests were done for the isolation of bacteria. Bacteria were also identified with APISTREP (bioMérieux, France) and MALDI-TOF MS Bruker Microflex (Bruker Biotyper; Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany) methods. BSF-8 (5´-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG-3´) and BSR-534(5´-ATTACCGCGGCTGCTGGC-3´) primers were used in the 16S rRNA sequence analysis of bacteria. ABI PRISM 3100 Avan t Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biossytems, Foster City, CA, USA) were used for the sequence analysis. Electropherograms were analyzed in SeqScape Software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) and compared with the reference sequences in GenBank with BLASTN

  14. Detection and identification of Legionella species in hospital water supplies through Polymerase Chain Reaction (16S rRNA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens that are normally transmitted through aerosols. The present work was conducted to investigate the presence of Legionella spp. and its common species in hospital water supplies. Considering the limitations of culture method, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed to detect the gene 16S rRNA irrespective of the bacterial serotype. Four well-established DNA extraction protocols (freeze & thaw and phenol-chloroform as two manual protocols and two commercial kits) were tested and evaluated to release DNA from bacterial cells. A total of 45 samples were collected from seven distinct hospitals’ sites during a period of 10 months. The PCR assay was used to amplify a 654-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Legionella were detected in 13 samples (28.9%) by all of the methods applied for DNA extraction. Significant differences were noted in the yield of extracted nucleic acids. Legionella were not detected in any of the samples when DNA extraction by freeze & thaw was used. Excluding this method and comparing manual protocol with commercial kits, Kappa coefficient was calculated as 0.619 with p < 0.05. Although no meaningful differences were found between the kits, DNA extraction with Bioneer kit exhibited a higher sensitivity than classical Qiagen. Showerheads and cold-water taps were the most and least contaminated sources with 55.5 and 9 percent positive samples, respectively. Moreover two positive samples were identified for species by DNA sequencing and submitted to the Gene Bank database with accession Nos. FJ480932 and FJ480933. The results obtained showed that despite the advantages of molecular assays in Legionella tracing in environmental sources, the use of optimised DNA extraction methods is critical. PMID:24860661

  15. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  16. Phylotype-level 16S rRNA analysis reveals new bacterial indicators of health state in acute murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Schwab, Clarissa; Milinovich, Gabriel; Reichert, Jochen; Ben Mahfoudh, Karim; Decker, Thomas; Engel, Marion; Hai, Brigitte; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Rauch, Isabella; Strobl, Birgit; Wagner, Michael; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim; Loy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Human inflammatory bowel disease and experimental colitis models in mice are associated with shifts in intestinal microbiota composition, but it is unclear at what taxonomic/phylogenetic level such microbiota dynamics can be indicative for health or disease. Here, we report that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is accompanied by major shifts in the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota of STAT1−/− and wild-type mice, as determined by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA (gene) amplicons, metatranscriptomics and quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization of selected phylotypes. The bacterial families Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Deferribacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae increased in relative abundance in DSS-treated mice. Comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis at maximum possible phylogenetic resolution identified several indicator phylotypes for DSS treatment, including the putative mucin degraders Akkermansia and Mucispirillum. The analysis additionally revealed strongly contrasting abundance changes among phylotypes of the same family, particularly within the Lachnospiraceae. These extensive phylotype-level dynamics were hidden when reads were grouped at higher taxonomic levels. Metatranscriptomic analysis provided insights into functional shifts in the murine intestinal microbiota, with increased transcription of genes associated with regulation and cell signaling, carbohydrate metabolism and respiration and decreased transcription of flagellin genes during inflammation. These findings (i) establish the first in-depth inventory of the mouse gut microbiota and its metatranscriptome in the DSS colitis model, (ii) reveal that family-level microbial community analyses are insufficient to reveal important colitis-associated microbiota shifts and (iii) support a scenario of shifting intra-family structure and function in the phylotype-rich and phylogenetically diverse Lachnospiraceae in DSS-treated mice

  17. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA and identification of four clinically important bacteria by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert J; Milillo, Michael; Prestwood, Jackson; Quintero, Reyes; Zurawski, Daniel V; Kwak, Yoon I; Waterman, Paige E; Lesho, Emil P; Mc Gann, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Within the paradigm of clinical infectious disease research, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa represent the four most clinically relevant, and hence most extensively studied bacteria. Current culture-based methods for identifying these organisms are slow and cumbersome, and there is increasing need for more rapid and accurate molecular detection methods. Using bioinformatic tools, 962,279 bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were aligned, and regions of homology were selected to generate a set of real-time PCR primers that target 93.6% of all bacterial 16S rRNA sequences published to date. A set of four species-specific real-time PCR primer pairs were also designed, capable of detecting less than 100 genome copies of A. baumannii, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa. All primers were tested for specificity in vitro against 50 species of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Additionally, the species-specific primers were tested against a panel of 200 clinical isolates of each species, randomly selected from a large repository of clinical isolates from diverse areas and sources. A comparison of culture and real-time PCR demonstrated 100% concordance. The primers were incorporated into a rapid assay capable of positive identification from plate or broth cultures in less than 90 minutes. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that current targets, such as the uidA gene in E.coli, are not suitable as species-specific genes due to sequence variation. The assay described herein is rapid, cost-effective and accurate, and can be easily incorporated into any research laboratory capable of real-time PCR.

  18. Structural Insights into the Methylation of C1402 in 16S rRNA by Methyltransferase RsmI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangfeng; Wang, Li; Wang, Jian; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Zhang, Linbo; Gong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    RsmI and RsmH are conserved S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) that are responsible for the 2′-O-methylation and N4-methylation of C1402 in bacterial 16S rRNA, respectively. Methylation of m4Cm1402 plays a role in fine-tuning the shape and functions of the P-site to increase the decoding fidelity, and was recently found to contribute to the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus in host animals. Here we report the 2.20-Å crystal structure of homodimeric RsmI from Escherichia coli in complex with the cofactor AdoMet. RsmI consists of an N-terminal putative RNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain (CTD) with a Rossmann-like fold, and belongs to the class III MTase family. AdoMet is specifically bound into a negatively charged deep pocket formed by both domains by making extensive contacts. Structure-based mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays revealed Asp100 and Ala124 are vital for AdoMet-binding. Although the overall fold of RsmI shows remarkable similarities to the characterized MTases involved in vitamin B12 biosynthesis, it exhibits a distinct charge distribution especially around the AdoMet-binding pocket because of different substrate specificity. The docking model of RsmI-AdoMet-RNA ternary complex suggested a possible base-flipping mechanism of the substrate RNA that has been observed in several known RNA MTases. Our structural and biochemical studies provide novel insights into the catalytic mechanism of C1402 methylation in 16S rRNA. PMID:27711192

  19. Analysis of microbiota associated with peri-implantitis using 16S rRNA gene clone library

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease which leads to the destruction of soft and hard tissues around osseointegrated implants. The subgingival microbiota appears to be responsible for peri-implant lesions and although the complexity of the microbiota has been reported in PI, the microbiota responsible for PI has not been identified. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the microbiota in subjects who have PI, clinically healthy implants, and periodontitis-affected teeth using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis to clarify the microbial differences. Design Three subjects participated in this study. The conditions around the teeth and implants were evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations and diseased implants, clinically healthy implants, and periodontally diseased teeth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets using sterile paper points. Prevalence and identity of bacteria was analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library technique. Results A total of 112 different species were identified from 335 clones sequenced. Among the 112 species, 51 (46%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 22 were novel phylotypes. The numbers of bacterial species identified at the sites of PI, periodontitis, and periodontally healthy implants were 77, 57, and 12, respectively. Microbiota in PI mainly included Gram-negative species and the composition was more diverse when compared to that of the healthy implant and periodontitis. The phyla Chloroflexi, Tenericutes, and Synergistetes were only detected at PI sites, as were Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Solobacterium moorei. Low levels of periodontopathic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were seen in peri-implant lesions. Conclusions The biofilm in PI showed a more complex microbiota when compared to periodontitis and periodontally healthy teeth

  20. 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Dysbiosis in the Duodenum of Dogs with Idiopathic Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suchodolski, Jan S.; Dowd, Scot E.; Wilke, Vicky; Steiner, Jörg M.; Jergens, Albert E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is believed to be caused by a complex interaction of genetic, immunologic, and microbial factors. While mucosa-associated bacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of canine IBD, detailed studies investigating the enteric microbiota using deep sequencing techniques are lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate mucosa-adherent microbiota in the duodenum of dogs with spontaneous idiopathic IBD using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings Biopsy samples of small intestinal mucosa were collected endoscopically from healthy dogs (n = 6) and dogs with moderate IBD (n = 7) or severe IBD (n = 7) as assessed by a clinical disease activity index. Total RNA was extracted from biopsy specimens and 454-pyrosequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene was performed on aliquots of cDNA from each dog. Intestinal inflammation was associated with significant differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota when compared to healthy dogs. PCoA plots based on the unweighted UniFrac distance metric indicated clustering of samples between healthy dogs and dogs with IBD (ANOSIM, p<0.001). Proportions of Fusobacteria (p = 0.010), Bacteroidaceae (p = 0.015), Prevotellaceae (p = 0.022), and Clostridiales (p = 0.019) were significantly more abundant in healthy dogs. In contrast, specific bacterial genera within Proteobacteria, including Diaphorobacter (p = 0.044) and Acinetobacter (p = 0.040), were either more abundant or more frequently identified in IBD dogs. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, dogs with spontaneous IBD exhibit alterations in microbial groups, which bear resemblance to dysbiosis reported in humans with chronic intestinal inflammation. These bacterial groups may serve as useful targets for monitoring intestinal inflammation. PMID:22720094

  1. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Caamaño-Antelo, S; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp. that may be useful for typing purposes. These species include, among others, Bacillus cereus, an important pathogenic species involved in food poisoning, and Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, which are causative agents of food spoilage described as responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. With this purpose in mind, 52 Bacillus strains isolated from culture collections and fresh and processed food were considered. SNP type "Y" at sites 212 and 476 appeared in the majority of B. licheniformis studied strains. SNP type "R" at site 278 was detected in many strains of the B. subtilis/Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group, while polymorphism "Y" at site 173 was characteristic of the majority of strains of B. cereus/Bacillus thuringiensis group. The analysis of SNPs provided more intra-specific information than phylogenetic analysis in the cases of B. cereus and B. subtilis. Moreover, this study describes novel SNPs that should be considered when designing 16S rRNA-based primers and probes for multiplex-PCR, Real-Time PCR and microarray systems for foodborne Bacillus spp.

  2. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  3. Analysis of 525 Samples To Determine the Usefulness of PCR Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene for Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, Florence; Roux, Véronique; Stein, Andréas; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infections has not been systematically tested. Five hundred twenty-five bone and joint samples collected from 525 patients were cultured and submitted to 16S rRNA gene PCR detection of bacteria in parallel. The amplicons with mixed sequences were also cloned. When discordant results were observed, culture and PCR were performed once again. Bacteria were detected in 139 of 525 samples. Culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR yielded identical documentation in 475 samples. Discrepancies were linked to 13 false-positive culture results, 5 false-positive PCR results, 9 false-negative PCR results, 16 false-negative culture results, and 7 mixed infections. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in 6 of 8 patients with mixed infections identified 2 to 8 bacteria per sample. Rarely described human pathogens such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas terrigena, and 21 anaerobes were characterized. We also detected, by 16S rRNA gene PCR, four previously identified bacteria never reported in human infection, Alkanindiges illinoisensis, dehydroabietic acid-degrading bacterium DhA-73, unidentified Hailaer soda lake bacterium, and uncultured bacterium clone HuCa4. Seven organisms representing new potential species were also detected. PCR followed by cloning and sequencing may help to identify new pathogens involved in mixed bone infection. PMID:16517890

  4. Development of a novel long-range 16S rRNA universal primer set for metagenomic analysis of gastrointestinal microbiota in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hye-Jin; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2014-06-28

    Metagenomic analysis of the human intestinal microbiota has extended our understanding of the role of these bacteria in improving human intestinal health; however, a number of reports have shown that current total fecal DNA extraction methods and 16S rRNA universal primer sets could affect the species coverage and resolution of these analyses. Here, we improved the extraction method for total DNA from human fecal samples by optimization of the lysis buffer, boiling time (10 min), and bead-beating time (0 min). In addition, we developed a new longrange 16S rRNA universal PCR primer set targeting the V6 to V9 regions with a 580 bp DNA product length. This new 16S rRNA primer set was evaluated by comparison with two previously developed 16S rRNA universal primer sets and showed high species coverage and resolution. The optimized total fecal DNA extraction method and newly designed long-range 16S rRNA universal primer set will be useful for the highly accurate metagenomic analysis of adult and infant intestinal microbiota with minimization of any bias.

  5. Development and evaluation of immunochromatography to detect Gram-negative bacteria producing ArmA 16S rRNA methylase responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Satoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Kameoka, Yousuke; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohmagari, Norio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria is an important infection-control measure and a crucial aspect of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The enzyme 16S rRNA methylase has been shown to mediate aminoglycoside resistance in bacteria. This study describes a newly developed immunochromatographic assay using novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize ArmA 16S rRNA methylase. Epitope mapping showed that these mAbs recognized amino acids 1-93 of ArmA, which consists of 257 amino acids. Evaluation of the assay using ArmA producing and non-producing bacterial species, as well as bacteria producing other types of 16S rRNA methylases, indicated that immunochromatographic detection of the ArmA-type 16S rRNA methylase was fully consistent with PCR analysis for armA genes, with all immunochromatographically positive strains being resistant to aminoglycosides (MIC≥128μg/mL). The detection limit of the assay was 12ng ArmA. These findings indicate that this assay can be used for the rapid and reliable detection of the production of ArmA 16S rRNA methylase by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical impact of the use of 16S rRNA sequencing method for the identification of "difficult-to-identify" bacteria in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, R; Swaminathan, S; Salimnia, H; Fairfax, M; Frey, A; Chandrasekar, P H

    2012-04-01

    Molecular method of 16S rRNA sequencing is reported to be helpful in the accurate identification of organisms with ambiguous phenotypic profiles. We analyzed the use of 16S rRNA sequencing method to identify clinically significant, "difficult-to-identify" bacteria recovered from clinical specimens, and evaluated its role in patient management and consequent clinical outcome. Among the 172 "difficult-to-identify" bacteria recovered over a 4-year period, 140 were gram-positive cocci or gram-negative bacilli; identification by 16S rRNA did not play a role in the management of patients infected with these bacteria. From 32 patients, 33 "difficult-to-identify" gram-positive bacilli were identified; the organisms were mycobacteria, Nocardia, Tsukamurella, Rhodococcus, and Gordonia. In 24 patients for whom clinical data were available, results from the 16S rRNA sequencing method led to treatment change in 14 immunocompromised patients (including 7 hematopoietic stem cell recipients and 1 liver transplant recipient). Therapy was modified in 9 patients, initiated in 3 patients, and discontinued in 2 patients. Most patients' therapy was switched to oral antibiotics with discontinuation of intravascular catheters, facilitating early hospital discharge. All 14 patients were alive 30 days after infection onset. The present study demonstrates the clinical application of 16S rRNA sequencing method to identify "difficult-to-identify" mycobacteria and other gram-positive bacilli in clinical specimens, particularly in immunocompromised hosts.

  7. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  8. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  9. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  10. Structure and organization of the rrnD operon of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum': analysis of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Amador, E; Castro, J M; Correia, A; Martín, J F

    1999-04-01

    Five rRNA operons (rrn) were found by hybridization in the genome of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum' ATCC 13869 and Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. 'B. lactofermentum' DSM 20412 differed from the other corynebacteria tested in showing six hybridizing BamHI bands. Two of the rrn operons (rrnD and rrnE) were located in a single cosmid. Sequencing of the rrnD operon showed that it contains a complete 16S rRNA-23S RNA-5S rRNA gene cluster. Phylogenetic studies using the complete 16S rRNA sequence showed that 'B. lactofermentum' is closely related to several species of the genus Corynebacterium but only distantly related to the type species Brevibacterium linens and the authors suggest that it should be reclassified as Corynebacterium lactofermentum. The 5' end of mature 16S rRNA was identified by primer extension. Sequence elements similar to those of mycobacteria implicated in transcription antitermination (Boxes A, B, C) and in processing of the pre-rRNA to 16S rRNA were identified. An open reading frame encoding an rpoD-like sigma factor (named SigC) different from the previously reported SigA and SigB proteins was found upstream of rrnD in the opposite orientation. Both rpoD and sigC seem to be expressed from a bidirectional promoter region.

  11. Microbial methane turnover at Marmara Sea cold seeps: a combined 16S rRNA and lipid biomarker investigation.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Bouloubassi, I; Birgel, D; Taphanel, M-H; López-García, P

    2013-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon isotopic composition, as well as 16S rRNA gene sequences, were investigated in sediment cores from active seepage zones in the Sea of Marmara (Turkey) located on the active North Anatolian Fault, to assess processes associated with methane turnover by indigenous microbial communities. Diagnostic (13) C-depleted archaeal lipids of anaerobic methane oxidizers were only found in one core from the South of Çinarcik Basin and consist mainly of archaeol, sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol and various unsaturated pentamethylicosenes. Concurrently, abundant fatty acids (FAs) and a substantial amount of monoalkylglycerolethers (MAGEs), assigned to sulphate-reducing bacteria, were detected with strong (13) C-depletions. Both microbial lipids and their δ(13) C values suggest that anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulphate reduction (AOM/SR) occurs, specially in the 10- to 12-cm depth interval. Lipid biomarker results accompanied by 16S rRNA-based microbial diversity analyses showed that ANME-2 (ANME-2a and -2c) archaea and Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus and Desulfobulbus deltaproteobacterial clades are the major AOM assemblages, which indicate a shallow AOM community at high methane flux. Apart from the typical AOM lipid biomarker pattern, a (13) C-depleted diunsaturated hydrocarbon, identified as 7,14-tricosadiene, occurred in the inferred maximum AOM interval at 10-12 cm depth. Its isotopic fingerprint implies that its microbial precursor occurs in close association with the AOM communities. Interestingly, the presence of 7,14-tricosadiene coincides with the presence of the so-far uncultured bacterial Candidate Division JS1, often detected in AOM areas. We propose the hypothesis that the JS1 bacterial group could be the potential source of (13) C-depleted tricosadiene. Future testing of this hypothesis is essential to fully determine the role of this bacterial group in AOM. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Variation in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions in Photobacterium damselae: a mosaic-like structure.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Carlos R; Collins, Matthew D; Romalde, Jesús L; Toranzo, Alicia E

    2005-02-01

    Phenotypically, Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and P. damselae subsp. damselae are easily distinguished. However, their 16S rRNA gene sequences are identical, and attempts to discriminate these two subspecies by molecular tools are hampered by their high level of DNA-DNA similarity. The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) were sequenced in two strains of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and two strains of P. damselae subsp. damselae to determine the level of molecular diversity in this DNA region. A total of 17 different ITS variants, ranging from 803 to 296 bp were found, some of which were subspecies or strain specific. The largest ITS contained four tRNA genes (tDNAs) coding for tRNA(Glu(UUC)), tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), and tRNA(Ala(GGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) combined with two additional tRNA genes, including tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), or tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Ile(GAU)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two different isoacceptor tRNA(Ala) genes (GGC and UGC anticodons) were found. The five smallest amplicons contained no tRNA genes. The tRNA-gene combinations tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Val(UAC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) and tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) have not been previously reported in bacterial ITS regions. The number of copies of the ribosomal operon (rrn) in the P. damselae chromosome ranged from at least 9 to 12. For ITS variants coexisting in two strains of different subspecies or in strains of the same subspecies, nucleotide substitution percentages ranged from 0 to 2%. The main source of variation between ITS variants was due to different combinations of DNA sequence blocks, constituting a mosaic-like structure.

  13. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  14. Methanosarcina acetivorans 16S rRNA and transcription factor nucleotide fluctuation with implications in exobiology and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P.; Flamholz, A.; Marchese, P.; Hiciano, O.; Yao, H.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2008-08-01

    Cultures of the methane-producing archaea Methanosarcina, have recently been isolated from Alaskan sediments. It has been proposed that methanogens are strong candidates for exobiological life in extreme conditions. The spatial environmental gradients, such as those associated with the polygons on Mars' surface, could have been produced by past methanogenesis activity. The 16S rRNA gene has been used routinely to classify phenotypes. Using the fractal dimension of nucleotide fluctuation, a comparative study of the 16S rRNA nucleotide fluctuation in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A, Deinococcus radiodurans, and E. coli was conducted. The results suggest that Methanosarcina acetivorans has the lowest fractal dimension, consistent with its ancestral position in evolution. Variation in fluctuation complexity was also detected in the transcription factors. The transcription factor B (TFB) was found to have a higher fractal dimension as compared to transcription factor E (TFE), consistent with the fact that a single TFB in Methanosarcina acetivorans can code three different TATA box proteins. The average nucleotide pair-wise free energy of the DNA repair genes was found to be highest for Methanosarcina acetivorans, suggesting a relatively weak bonding, which is consistent with its low prevalence in pathology. Multitasking capacity comparison of type-I and type-II topoisomerases has been shown to correlate with fractal dimension using the methicillin-resistant strain MRSA 252. The analysis suggests that gene adaptation in a changing chemical environment can be measured in terms of bioinformatics. Given that the radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans is a strong candidate for an extraterrestrial origin and that the cold temperature Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 can function in Siberian permafrost, the fractal dimension comparison in this study suggests that a chemical resistant methanogen could exist in extremely cold conditions (such as that which existed on early

  15. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  16. Identification of polybacterial communities in patients with postoperative, posttraumatic, and endogenous endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane

    2014-05-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P=0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P=0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n=19), Streptococcus spp. (n=18), Staphylococcus spp. (n=6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n=3), Gemella spp. (n=2), Enterococcus spp. (n=2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n=1), a Clostridium sp. (n=1), and a Nocardia sp. (n=1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n=18), Pseudomonas spp. (n=10), Enterobacter spp. (n=8), Acinetobacter spp. (n=3), Pantoea spp. (n=3), a Haemophilus sp. (n=1), and a Massilia sp. (n=1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is recommended that, in addition to the

  17. [Detection of bacterial signal of 16S rRNA gene in prostate tissues obtained by perineal approach from patient with chronic pelvic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Feng; Xie, Hui; Weng, Zhi-Liang; Yang, Yi-Rong; Chen, Bi-Cheng

    2009-03-31

    To explore the role of bacteria in etiology of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), i.e., chronic prostatitis and the correlation between presence of bacterial signal of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene and the response to antibiotics. Samples of prostatic and subcutaneous tissues were obtained by biopsy via perineal approach from 112 CPPS patients, aged 20 - 48. Polymerase chain reaction was conducted to detect the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria. The patients were treated with gatifloxacin 0.4 g once a day for 4 weeks and then 4 weeks later the effects of treatment were assessed by the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). PCR was completed in 94 of the 112 patients, and 18 were excluded because their subcutaneous biopsies were positive for 16S rRNA, showing the possible contamination of their prostatic tissues. The total positive rate of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was 63.8% (60/94). The positive rate of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in the patients with IIIa CPPS and IIIb CPPS were 68.3% and 60.3% respectively. The total gatifloxacin effective rate of positive bacterial signal group after the was 55.0%, significantly higher than that of the negative bacterial signal group (14.7%, P < 0.001). The gatifloxacin effective rate of the 16S rRNA positive IIIa CPPS patients was 75%, significantly higher than that of the 6S rRNA negative IIIa CPPS patients (23.1%, P < 0.001), and the gatifloxacin effective rate of the 16S rRNA positive IIIb CPPS patients was 37.5%, significantly higher than that of the 6S rRNA negative IIIb CPPS patients (9.5%, P < 0.05). Bacterial infection is related to CPPS in part of the patients. Bacterial signal detection helps predict the effect of antimicrobial therapy.

  18. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems.

  19. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, J.; Savio, D.; Ley, R. E.; Mach, R. L.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multicompartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  20. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B.; Chae, Jong Pyo; Balolong, Marilen P.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level). Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs. PMID:25656184

  1. Identification of culturable stream water bacteria from urban, agricultural, and forested watersheds using 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Belt, Kenneth T; Hohn, Christina; Gbakima, Aiah; Higgins, James A

    2007-09-01

    Bacteria present in water samples taken on a weekly basis, from June 2004 through June 2005, from three streams, were cultured on Coliscan Easygel agar plates. Colonies representative of a variety of colors and morphologies were subjected to amplification and sequencing of a 1000-1100 nt portion of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 528 colonies were sequenced; these categorized into 26 genera and 78 species. Of 175 dark blue/purple colonies presumed to be E. coli, sequence analysis indicated that 45 (25%) were actually other genera. For the urban stream Gwynns Falls Gwynns Run, E. coli was the most common genus/species encountered, followed by Klebsiella and Aeromonas. For Pond Branch, a stream located in a forested watershed, it was Serratia, followed by Yersinia and Aeromonas. For McDonogh (MCDN), a stream associated with Zea mays (corn) row crop agriculture, E. coli was the most frequently isolated genus/species, followed by Aeromonas and Enterobacter. ERIC-PCR genotyping of isolates from the most prevalent genera/species, indicated a high degree of diversity within-stream for E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Conversely, genotyping of Y. enterocolitica isolates indicated that some were shared between different streams.

  2. High-resolution microbial community reconstruction by integrating short reads from multiple 16S rRNA regions

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Amnon; Zeisel, Amit; Zuk, Or; Elgart, Michael; Stern, Shay; Shamir, Ohad; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Soen, Yoav; Shental, Noam

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of massively parallel sequencing technology has revolutionized microbial profiling, allowing the unprecedented comparison of microbial diversity across time and space in a wide range of host-associated and environmental ecosystems. Although the high-throughput nature of such methods enables the detection of low-frequency bacteria, these advances come at the cost of sequencing read length, limiting the phylogenetic resolution possible by current methods. Here, we present a generic approach for integrating short reads from large genomic regions, thus enabling phylogenetic resolution far exceeding current methods. The approach is based on a mapping to a statistical model that is later solved as a constrained optimization problem. We demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing human saliva and Drosophila samples, using Illumina single-end sequencing of a 750 bp amplicon of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic resolution is significantly extended while reducing the number of falsely detected bacteria, as compared with standard single-region Roche 454 Pyrosequencing. Our approach can be seamlessly applied to simultaneous sequencing of multiple genes providing a higher resolution view of the composition and activity of complex microbial communities. PMID:24214960

  3. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  4. Deciphering bacterial community changes in zucker diabetic fatty rats based on 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunyan; Yang, Ye; Xiang, Hong; Li, Shu; Liang, Lina; Sui, Hua; Zhan, Libin; Lu, Xiaoguang

    2016-08-02

    The aim of the present pilot study was deciphering bacterial community changes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF rats), a model of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies unmasked that the status of gastrointestinal tract microbiota has a marked impact on nutrition-related syndromes such as obesity and type-2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, samples taken from the gastrointestinal tracts (GI tracts) of ZDF and their lean littermates (ZL rats) were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities, including those located in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and feces. Results revealed that the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased and greater numbers of Lactobacillus were detected along GI tracts in ZDF rats compared to ZL rats. In conclusion, this work is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities along ZDF rat GI tract and provides substantial evidence supporting a prospective strategy to alter the GI microbial communities improving obesity and T2D.

  5. 16S rRNA survey revealed complex bacterial communities and evidence of bacterial interference on human adenoids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tiantian; Glatt, Dominique Ulrike; Nguyen, Tam Nhu; Allen, Emma Kaitlynn; Early, Stephen V; Sale, Michele; Winther, Birgit; Wu, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Adenoid microbiota plays an important role in the development of various infectious and non-infectious diseases of the upper airways, such as otitis media, adenotonsillitis, rhinosinusitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Studies have suggested that adenoids could act as a potential reservoir of opportunistic pathogens. However, previous bacterial surveys of adenoids were mainly culture based and therefore might only provide an incomplete and potentially biased assessment of the microbial diversity. To develop an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the adenoid microbial communities and test the 'pathogen reservoir hypothesis', we carried out a 16S rRNA based, culture-independent survey of bacterial communities on 67 human adenoids removed by surgery. Our survey revealed highly diverse adenoid bacterial communities distinct from those of other body habitats. Despite large interpersonal variations, adenoid microbiota shared a core set of taxa and can be classified into at least five major types based on its bacterial species composition. Our results support the 'pathogen reservoir hypothesis' as we found common pathogens of otitis media to be both prevalent and abundant. Co-occurrence analyses revealed evidence consistent with the bacterial interference theory in that multiple common pathogens showed 'non-coexistence' relationships with non-pathogenic members of the commensal microflora. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Four Bacteria-Specific Primer Pairs for 16S rRNA Gene Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Sofie; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Beckers, Bram; Truyens, Sascha; Stevens, Vincent; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomic community analyses using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and high-throughput sequencing has become a cornerstone in microbiology research. To reliably detect the members, or operational taxonomic units (OTUs), that make up bacterial communities, taxonomic surveys rely on the use of the most informative PCR primers to amplify the broad range of phylotypes present in up-to-date reference databases. However, primers specific for the domain Bacteria were often developed some time ago against database versions that are now out of date. Here we evaluated the performance of four bacterial primers for characterizing complex microbial communities in explosives contaminated and non-contaminated forest soil and by in silico evaluation against the current SILVA123 database. Primer pair 341f/785r produced the highest number of bacterial OTUs, phylogenetic richness, Shannon diversity, low non-specificity and most reproducible results, followed by 967f/1391r and 799f/1193r. Primer pair 68f/518r showed overall low coverage and a bias toward Alphaproteobacteria. In silico, primer pair 341f/785r showed the highest coverage of the domain Bacteria (96.1%) with no obvious bias toward the majority of bacterial species. This suggests the high utility of primer pair 341f/785r for soil and plant-associated bacterial microbiome studies. PMID:28400755

  7. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  8. Deciphering bacterial community changes in zucker diabetic fatty rats based on 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hong; Li, Shu; Liang, Lina; Sui, Hua; Zhan, Libin; Lu, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was deciphering bacterial community changes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF rats), a model of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies unmasked that the status of gastrointestinal tract microbiota has a marked impact on nutrition-related syndromes such as obesity and type-2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, samples taken from the gastrointestinal tracts (GI tracts) of ZDF and their lean littermates (ZL rats) were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities, including those located in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and feces. Results revealed that the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased and greater numbers of Lactobacillus were detected along GI tracts in ZDF rats compared to ZL rats. In conclusion, this work is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities along ZDF rat GI tract and provides substantial evidence supporting a prospective strategy to alter the GI microbial communities improving obesity and T2D. PMID:27418144

  9. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Zhang, Fengying; Chen, Xuezhong; Zhao, Ming; Ma, Lingbo

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics.

  10. Diversity and phylogeny of bacteria on Zimbabwe tobacco leaves estimated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Can; Gu, Wen; Zhe, Wei; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Duan, Yanqing; Yang, Jinkui

    2011-12-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in the tobacco aging process. However, microbial communities on flue-cured tobacco leaves (FCTL) remain largely unknown. In this study, the total microbial genomic DNA of unaged and aging FCTL from Zimbabwe were isolated using a culture-independent method, and the bacterial communities were investigated through analyzing two 16S rRNA gene libraries. Eighty-four and 65 operational taxonomic units were obtained from the libraries of the unaged and aging FCTL, respectively. The following genera were represented more than 4% in both libraries (aging and unaged library): Sphingomonas (4.84%, 4.18%), Stenotrophomonas (4.84%, 5.23%), Erwinia (5.81%, 4.88%), Pantoea (19.35%, 18.47%), and Pseudomonas (21.29%, 24.04%). The dominant species varied between the two libraries. Specifically, several dominant species in unaged FCTL including Pseudomonas fulva, Pseudomonas sp. (AM909658), Klebsiella sp. (HM584796), and Pantoea sp. (AY501386) were not identified in aging FCTL, while several dominant species in aging FCTL such as Pantoea sp. (GU566350), Pseudomonas sp. (EF157292), and Buttiauxella izardii were not found in unaged FCTL. The phylogenetic analysis showed that bacteria from unaged and aging FCTL were divided into two clades, and two unique subclades were identified in aging FCTL. Our results revealed for the first time the bacterial diversities on Zimbabwe tobacco, and provided a basis for clarifying the roles of bacteria in aging process of FCTL.

  11. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Chen, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics. PMID:27957494

  12. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  13. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future. PMID:26404329

  14. 16S rRNA gene-targeted TTGE in determining diversity of gut microbiota during acute diarrhoea and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Cravioto, Alejandro; Alam, Munirul

    2012-09-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean ± standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery.

  15. 16S rRNA Gene-targeted TTGE in Determining Diversity of Gut Microbiota during Acute Diarrhoea and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean±standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery. PMID:23082626

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-01-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria. Images PMID:1577710

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-05-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria.

  18. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m)with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  19. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.

  20. Combined Use of 16S Ribosomal DNA and 16S rRNA To Study the Bacterial Community of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Balbina; Moore, Edward R. B.; Llobet-Brossa, Enrique; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Amann, Rudolf; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial diversity assessed from clone libraries prepared from rRNA (two libraries) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (one library) from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-polluted soil has been analyzed. A good correspondence of the community composition found in the two types of library was observed. Nearly 29% of the cloned sequences in the rDNA library were identical to sequences in the rRNA libraries. More than 60% of the total cloned sequence types analyzed were grouped in phylogenetic groups (a clone group with sequence similarity higher than 97% [98% for Burkholderia and Pseudomonas-type clones]) represented in both types of libraries. Some of those phylogenetic groups, mostly represented by a single (or pair) of cloned sequence type(s), were observed in only one of the types of library. An important difference between the libraries was the lack of clones representative of the Actinobacteria in the rDNA library. The PCB-polluted soil exhibited a high bacterial diversity which included representatives of two novel lineages. The apparent abundance of bacteria affiliated to the beta-subclass of the Proteobacteria, and to the genus Burkholderia in particular, was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The possible influence on apparent diversity of low template concentrations was assessed by dilution of the RNA template prior to amplification by reverse transcription-PCR. Although differences in the composition of the two rRNA libraries obtained from high and low RNA concentrations were observed, the main components of the bacterial community were represented in both libraries, and therefore their detection was not compromised by the lower concentrations of template used in this study. PMID:11282645

  1. Composition of fecal microbiota of laboratory mice derived from Japanese commercial breeders using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries

    PubMed Central

    NOZU, Ryoko; UENO, Masami; HAYASHIMOTO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    The fecal microbiota of six mice derived from three Japanese commercial breeders was analyzed by using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries to construct a database for analyzing the gut microbiota of laboratory mice. The 566 clones were obtained from the clone libraries generated from the fecal DNA samples derived from BALB/c, C57BL/6N, DBA/2 and ICR mice. Among these 566 clones, there were 446 unique 16S rRNA gene sequences. When grouped at the 98% similarity level, the 446 unique sequences consisted of 103 Clostridiales, 43 Bacteroidales, 5 Lactobacillus and 3 Erysipelotricaceae, as well as sequences from 11 other phyla. PMID:26902692

  2. [Bacteria closely related to Phyllobacterium trifolii according to their 16S rRNA gene are discovered in the nodules of Hungarian sainfoin].

    PubMed

    Baĭmiev, Al Kh; Baĭmiev, An Kh; Gubaĭdullin, I I; Kulikova, O L; Chemeris, A V

    2007-05-01

    The population genetic diversity and phylogeny of the bacteria entering the symbiosis with sainfoin that grows on the Chesnokovskaya Mountain, Ufa region, Republic of Bashkortostan, have been studied. RAPD analysis of DNA polymorphism of the microbial strains grown from the nodules of 20 plants using several random primers detected a high degree of genetic homogeneity in their population as compared with the populations of rhizobia of other leguminous plants growing at the same site. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of the three most different samples have demonstrated that these genes were identical and display 99.9% homology with the sequence of Phyllobacterium trifolii 16S rRNA gene.

  3. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, A. C.; Karanth, P. N.; Lajoie, C. A.; Meyers, A. J.; Gregory, I. R.; Stapleton, R. D.; Taylor, D. E.; Sayler, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial wastewater treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of these clones were members of the beta subdivision, and their sequences showed high homology to sequences of known bacterial species as well as published 16S rDNA sequences from other activated sludge sources. Sixteen clones belonged to the alpha subdivision, 7 of which showed similarity to Hyphomicrobium species. This cluster was chosen for further studies due to earlier work on Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 isolated from this treatment plant. A nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 was 99% similar to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans DSM 1869T in Hyphomicrobium cluster II. Three of the cloned sequences from the activated sludge samples also grouped with those of Hyphomicrobium cluster II, with a 96% sequence similarity to that of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. The other four cloned sequences from the activated sludge sample were more closely related to those of the Hyphomicrobium cluster I organisms (95 to 97% similarity). Whole-cell fluorescence hybridization of microorganisms in the activated sludge with genus-specific Hyphomicrobium probe S-G-Hypho-1241-a-A-19 enhanced the visualization of Hyphomicrobium and revealed that Hyphomicrobium appears to be abundant both on the outside of flocs and within the floc structure. Dot blot hybridization of activated sludge samples from 1995 with probes designed for Hyphomicrobium cluster I and Hyphomicrobium cluster II indicated that Hyphomicrobium cluster II-positive 16S rRNA dominated over Hyphomicrobium cluster I

  4. PCR-Independent Detection of Bacterial Species-Specific 16S rRNA at 10 fM by a Pore-Blockage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Leyla; Wang, Siqing; Wang, Siqi; Banda, Anisha; Lorenzini, Michael; Kocharyan, Gayane; Monbouquette, Harold G.; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    A PCR-free, optics-free device is used for the detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) 16S rRNA at 10 fM, which corresponds to ~100–1000 colony forming units/mL (CFU/mL) depending on cellular rRNA levels. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is sought for the detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids. Since 16S rRNA sequences are species specific and are present at high copy number in viable cells, these nucleic acids offer an attractive target for microbial pathogen detection schemes. Here, target 16S rRNA of E. coli at 10 fM concentration was detected against a total RNA background using a conceptually simple approach based on electromechanical signal transduction, whereby a step change reduction in ionic current through a pore indicates blockage by an electrophoretically mobilized bead-peptide nucleic acid probe conjugate hybridized to target nucleic acid. We investigated the concentration detection limit for bacterial species-specific 16S rRNA at 1 pM to 1 fM and found a limit of detection of 10 fM for our device, which is consistent with our previous finding with single-stranded DNA of similar length. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with control RNA and no false negatives with target 16S rRNA present down to the limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM. Thus, this detection scheme shows promise for integration into portable, low-cost systems for rapid detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids. PMID:27455337

  5. PCR-Independent Detection of Bacterial Species-Specific 16S rRNA at 10 fM by a Pore-Blockage Sensor.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Leyla; Wang, Siqing; Wang, Siqi; Banda, Anisha; Lorenzini, Michael; Kocharyan, Gayane; Monbouquette, Harold G; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2016-07-22

    A PCR-free, optics-free device is used for the detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) 16S rRNA at 10 fM, which corresponds to ~100-1000 colony forming units/mL (CFU/mL) depending on cellular rRNA levels. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is sought for the detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids. Since 16S rRNA sequences are species specific and are present at high copy number in viable cells, these nucleic acids offer an attractive target for microbial pathogen detection schemes. Here, target 16S rRNA of E. coli at 10 fM concentration was detected against a total RNA background using a conceptually simple approach based on electromechanical signal transduction, whereby a step change reduction in ionic current through a pore indicates blockage by an electrophoretically mobilized bead-peptide nucleic acid probe conjugate hybridized to target nucleic acid. We investigated the concentration detection limit for bacterial species-specific 16S rRNA at 1 pM to 1 fM and found a limit of detection of 10 fM for our device, which is consistent with our previous finding with single-stranded DNA of similar length. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with control RNA and no false negatives with target 16S rRNA present down to the limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM. Thus, this detection scheme shows promise for integration into portable, low-cost systems for rapid detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids.

  6. Evidence against an Interaction between the mRNA downstream box and 16S rRNA in translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Moll, I; Huber, M; Grill, S; Sairafi, P; Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R; Londei, P; Bläsi, U

    2001-06-01

    Based on the complementarity of the initial coding region (downstream box [db]) of several bacterial and phage mRNAs to bases 1469 to 1483 in helix 44 of 16S rRNA (anti-downstream box [adb]), it has been proposed that db-adb base pairing enhances translation in a way that is similar to that of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD)/anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) interaction. Computer modeling of helix 44 on the 30S subunit shows that the topography of the 30S ribosome does not allow a simultaneous db-adb interaction and placement of the initiation codon in the ribosomal P site. Thus, the db-adb interaction cannot substitute for the SD-aSD interaction in translation initiation. We have always argued that any contribution of the db-adb interaction should be most apparent on mRNAs devoid of an SD sequence. Here, we show that 30S ribosomes do not bind to leaderless mRNA in the absence of initiator tRNA, even when the initial coding region shows a 15-nucleotide complementarity (optimal fit) with the putative adb. In addition, an optimized db did not affect the translational efficiency of a leaderless lambda cI-lacZ reporter construct. Thus, the db-adb interaction can hardly serve as an initial recruitment signal for ribosomes. Moreover, we show that different leaderless mRNAs are translated in heterologous systems although the sequence of the putative adb's within helix 44 of the 30S subunits of the corresponding bacteria differ largely. Taken our data together with those of others (M. O'Connor, T. Asai, C. L. Squires, and A. E. Dahlberg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:8973-8978, 1999; A. La Teana, A. Brandi, M. O'Connor, S. Freddi, and C. L. Pon, RNA 6:1393-1402, 2000), we conclude that the db does not base pair with the adb.

  7. Comparison of 16S rRNA Gene PCR and BACTEC 9240 for Detection of Neonatal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, J. A.; Durso, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Ten percent of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU) annually. Approximately one-half of these admissions are from term infants (>34 weeks of gestation) at risk for systemic infection. Most of the term infants are not infected but rather have symptoms consistent with other medical conditions that mimic sepsis. The current standard of care for evaluating bacterial sepsis in the newborn is performing blood culturing and providing antibiotic therapy while awaiting the 48-h preliminary result of culture. Implementing a more rapid means of ruling out sepsis in term newborns could result in shorter NICU stays and less antibiotic usage. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the utility of PCR to that of conventional culture. To this end, a total of 548 paired blood samples collected from infants admitted to the NICU for suspected sepsis were analyzed for bacterial growth using the BACTEC 9240 instrument and for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a PCR assay which included a 5-h preamplification culturing step. The positivity rates by culture and PCR were 25 (4.6%) and 27 (4.9%) positive specimens out of a total of 548 specimens, respectively. The comparison revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 96.0, 99.4, 88.9, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR. In summary, this PCR-based approach, requiring as little as 9 h of turnaround time and blood volumes as small as 200 μl, correlated well with conventional blood culture results obtained for neonates suspected of having bacterial sepsis. PMID:10878046

  8. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: Dental Caries Onset Linked to Multiple Species by 16S rRNA Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Erin L.; Beall, Clifford J.; Kutsch, Stacey R.; Firestone, Noah D.; Leys, Eugene J.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have

  9. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: dental caries onset linked to multiple species by 16S rRNA community analysis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Erin L; Beall, Clifford J; Kutsch, Stacey R; Firestone, Noah D; Leys, Eugene J; Griffen, Ann L

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have

  10. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  11. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  12. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing identifies microbiota associated with oral cancer, human papilloma virus infection and surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Jedlicka, Anne; Rodríguez-Hilario, Arnold; González, Herminio; Bondy, Jessica; Lawson, Fahcina; Folawiyo, Oluwasina; Michailidi, Christina; Dziedzic, Amanda; Thangavel, Rajagowthamee; Hadar, Tal; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Westra, William; Koch, Wayne; Sidransky, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory events and localized disease, mediated by the microbiome, may be measured in saliva as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) diagnostic and prognostic biomonitors. We used a 16S rRNA V3-V5 marker gene approach to compare the saliva microbiome in DNA isolated from Oropharyngeal (OPSCC), Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OCSCC) patients and normal epithelium controls, to characterize the HNSCC saliva microbiota and examine their abundance before and after surgical resection. The analyses identified a predominance of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, with less frequent presence of Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria before surgery. At lower taxonomic levels, the most abundant genera were Streptococcus, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Lactobacillus and Veillonella, with lower numbers of Citrobacter and Neisseraceae genus Kingella. HNSCC patients had a significant loss in richness and diversity of microbiota species (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Overall, the Operational Taxonomic Units network shows that the relative abundance of OTU's within genus Streptococcus, Dialister, and Veillonella can be used to discriminate tumor from control samples (p<0.05). Tumor samples lost Neisseria, Aggregatibacter (Proteobacteria), Haemophillus (Firmicutes) and Leptotrichia (Fusobacteria). Paired taxa within family Enterobacteriaceae, together with genus Oribacterium, distinguish OCSCC samples from OPSCC and normal samples (p<0.05). Similarly, only HPV positive samples have an abundance of genus Gemellaceae and Leuconostoc (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses of samples taken before and after surgery, revealed a reduction in the alpha diversity measure after surgery, together with an increase of this measure in patients that recurred (p<0.05). These results suggest that microbiota may be used as HNSCC diagnostic and prognostic biomonitors. PMID:27259999

  13. Improved pipeline for reducing erroneous identification by 16S rRNA sequences using the Illumina MiSeq platform.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Cheol; Lim, Jeongmin; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The cost of DNA sequencing has decreased due to advancements in Next Generation Sequencing. The number of sequences obtained from the Illumina platform is large, use of this platform can reduce costs more than the 454 pyrosequencer. However, the Illumina platform has other challenges, including bioinformatics analysis of large numbers of sequences and the need to reduce erroneous nucleotides generated at the 3'-ends of the sequences. These erroneous sequences can lead to errors in analysis of microbial communities. Therefore, correction of these erroneous sequences is necessary for accurate taxonomic identification. Several studies that have used the Illumina platform to perform metagenomic analyses proposed curating pipelines to increase accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the likelihood of obtaining an erroneous microbial composition using the MiSeq 250 bp paired sequence platform and improved the pipeline to reduce erroneous identifications. We compared different sequencing conditions by varying the percentage of control phiX added, the concentration of the sequencing library, and the 16S rRNA gene target region using a mock community sample composed of known sequences. Our recommended method corrected erroneous nucleotides and improved identification accuracy. Overall, 99.5% of the total reads shared 95% similarity with the corresponding template sequences and 93.6% of the total reads shared over 97% similarity. This indicated that the MiSeq platform can be used to analyze microbial communities at the genus level with high accuracy. The improved analysis method recommended in this study can be applied to amplicon studies in various environments using high-throughput reads generated on the MiSeq platform.

  14. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Dubost, Audrey; Tran-Van, Van; Mavingui, Patrick; Moro, Claire Valiente

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated. Also some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimize the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 92,615 sequences obtained. As Ae. albopictus is known to harbor two Wolbachia strains (wAlbA and wAlbB), a quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, (i.e., the bacteria-to-host gene ratios) of each strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 10(0.01) and 5.47 × 10(0.1) for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 10(0.1) and 1.4 × 10(1) for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 31 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using different method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from this area.

  15. Phylogeny and divergence times of some racerunner lizards (Lacertidae: Eremias) inferred from mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene segments.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xianguang; Dai, Xin; Chen, Dali; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Ananjeva, Natalia B; Melnikov, Daniel A; Wang, Yuezhao

    2011-11-01

    Eremias, or racerunners, is a widespread lacertid genus occurring in China, Mongolia, Korea, Central Asia, Southwest Asia and Southeast Europe. It has been through a series of taxonomic revisions, but the phylogenetic relationships among the species and subgenera remain unclear. In this study, a frequently studied region of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA was used to (i) reassess the phylogenetic relationships of some Eremias species, (ii) test if the viviparous species form a monophyletic group, and (iii) estimate divergence time among lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular-clock approach. The resulting phylogeny supports monophyly of Eremias sensu Szczerbak and a clade comprising Eremias, Acanthodactylus and Latastia. An earlier finding demonstrating monophyly of the subgenus Pareremias is corroborated, with Eremias argus being the sister taxon to Eremias brenchleyi. We present the first evidence that viviparous species form a monophyletic group. In addition, Eremias przewalskii is nested within Eremias multiocellata, suggesting that the latter is likely a paraphyletic species or a species complex. Eremias acutirostris and Eremias persica form a clade that is closely related to the subgenus Pareremias. However, the subgenera Aspidorhinus, Scapteira, and Rhabderemias seem not to be monophyletic, respectively. The Bayesian divergence-time estimation suggests that Eremias originated at about 9.9 million years ago (with the 95% confidence interval ranging from 7.6 to 12 Ma), and diversified from Late Miocene to Pleistocene. Specifically, the divergence time of the subgenus Pareremias was dated to about 6.3 million years ago (with the 95% confidence interval ranging from 5.3 to 8.5 Ma), which suggests that the diversification of this subgenus might be correlated with the evolution of an East Asian monsoon climate triggered by the rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau approximately 8 Ma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Strategy for microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Karim, Aos S; Sendler, Edward D; Kato, Ikuko

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the identity and changes of organisms in the urogenital and other microbiomes of the human body may be key to discovering causes and new treatments of many ailments, such as vaginosis. High-throughput sequencing technologies have recently enabled discovery of the great diversity of the human microbiome. The cost per base of many of these sequencing platforms remains high (thousands of dollars per sample); however, the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA) is estimated to have a cost per base less than one-fifth of its nearest competitor. The main disadvantage of the IGA for sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes is that the maximum read-length of the IGA is only 100 bases; whereas, at least 300 bases are needed to obtain phylogenetically informative data down to the genus and species level. In this paper we describe and conduct a pilot test of a multiplex sequencing strategy suitable for achieving total reads of > 300 bases per extracted DNA molecule on the IGA. Results show that all proposed primers produce products of the expected size and that correct sequences can be obtained, with all proposed forward primers. Various bioinformatic optimization of the Illumina Bustard analysis pipeline proved necessary to extract the correct sequence from IGA image data, and these modifications of the data files indicate that further optimization of the analysis pipeline may improve the quality rankings of the data and enable more sequence to be correctly analyzed. The successful application of this method could result in an unprecedentedly deep description (800,000 taxonomic identifications per sample) of the urogenital and other microbiomes in a large number of samples at a reasonable cost per sample.

  17. Uncultured bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Eun; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Myeong, Jeong-In; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to understand the roles of bacterial communities in the system. The RAS was operated at nine different combinations of temperature (15°C, 20°C, and 25°C) and salinity (20‰, 25‰, and 32.5‰). Samples were collected from five or six RAS tanks (biofilters) for each condition. Fifty samples were analyzed. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were most common (sum of both phyla: 67.2% to 99.4%) and were inversely proportional to each other. Bacteria that were present at an average of ≥ 1% included Actinobacteria (2.9%) Planctomycetes (2.0%), Nitrospirae (1.5%), and Acidobacteria (1.0%); they were preferentially present in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. The three biofilters showed higher diversity than other RAS tanks (aerated biofilters, floating bed biofilters, and fish tanks) from phylum to operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level. Samples were clustered into several groups based on the bacterial communities. Major taxonomic groups related to family Rhodobacteraceae and Flavobacteriaceae were distributed widely in the samples. Several taxonomic groups like [Saprospiraceae], Cytophagaceae, Octadecabacter, and Marivita showed a cluster-oriented distribution. Phaeobacter and Sediminicola-related reads were detected frequently and abundantly at low temperature. Nitrifying bacteria were detected frequently and abundantly in the three biofilters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrifying bacteria showed several similar OTUs were observed widely through the biofilters. The diverse bacterial communities and the minor taxonomic groups, except for Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, seemed to play important roles and seemed necessary for nitrifying activity in the RAS, especially in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters.

  18. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  19. Evaluation of AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR using cppB nested PCR and 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Farrell, D J

    1999-02-01

    Certain strains of Neisseria subflava and Neisseria cinerea are known to produce false-positive results with the AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, N.J.). The analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity of three PCR tests were assessed with 3 geographically diverse N. gonorrhoeae strains and 30 non-N. gonorrhoeae Neisseria spp. The sensitivities of the in-house nested cppB gene and the 16S rRNA PCR methods were greater than that of the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR with purified DNA from all 3 N. gonorrhoeae strains. Six of 14 clinical strains of N. subflava (1 from a vaginal swab, 5 from respiratory sites) produced false-positive AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR results and were negative by the two other PCR methods. When applied to 207 clinical specimens selected from a population with a high prevalence ( approximately 9%) of infection, the results for 15 of 96 (15.6%) AMPLICOR-positive specimens and 14 of 17 (82.3%) AMPLICOR-equivocal specimens were not confirmed by the more sensitive nested cppB PCR method. Only 2 of 94 (2.1%) of AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR-negative specimens from the same population tested positive by the nested cppB method. These results suggest that for this population the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR test is suitable as a screening test only and all positive results should be confirmed by a PCR method that is more specific and at least as sensitive. This study also illustrates that caution should be used when introducing commercially available nucleic acid amplification-based diagnostic tests into the regimens of tests used for populations not previously tested with these products.

  20. Conservative fragments in bacterial 16S rRNA genes and primer design for 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons in metagenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-10-09

    Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplicons have been widely used in the classification of uncultured bacteria inhabiting environmental niches. Primers targeting conservative regions of the rDNAs are used to generate amplicons of variant regions that are informative in taxonomic assignment. One problem is that the percentage coverage and application scope of the primers used in previous studies are largely unknown. In this study, conservative fragments of available rDNA sequences were first mined and then used to search for candidate primers within the fragments by measuring the coverage rate defined as the percentage of bacterial sequences containing the target. Thirty predicted primers with a high coverage rate (>90%) were identified, which were basically located in the same conservative regions as known primers in previous reports, whereas 30% of the known primers were associated with a coverage rate of <90%. The application scope of the primers was also examined by calculating the percentages of failed detections in bacterial phyla. Primers A519-539, E969-983, E1063-1081, U515 and E517, are highly recommended because of their high coverage in almost all phyla. As expected, the three predominant phyla, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Proteobacteria, are best covered by the predicted primers. The primers recommended in this report shall facilitate a comprehensive and reliable survey of bacterial diversity in metagenomic studies.

  1. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  2. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  3. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  4. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  5. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  6. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien

    2012-06-01

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  7. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  8. Application of a 16S rRNA PCR-high-resolution melt analysis assay for rapid detection of Salmonella Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Alex; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-03-01

    Current culture and phenotypic protocols for diagnosing Salmonella infections can be time-consuming. Here, we describe the application of a 16S rRNA PCR coupled to high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) for species and serotype identification within 6 h of blood sample collection from a patient with Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis bacteremia.

  9. True microbiota involved in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients found by culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke B; Thomsen, Trine R; Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper N; Nielsen, Per H; Johansen, Ulla R; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infection. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in transplanted CF lungs (n = 5) by standard culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis. A correspondence between culturing and the molecular methods was observed. In conclusion, standard culturing seems reliable for the identification of the dominating pathogens.

  10. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  11. [Identification of Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Dietzia Bacteria from Petroleum Reservoirs Based on Phenotypic Properties and Analysis of the 16S rRNA and gyrB Genes].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Shumkova, E S; Sokolova, D Sh; Babich, T L; Zhurina, M V; Xue, Yan-Fen; Osipov, G A; Poltaraus, A B; Tourova, T P

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomic position of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterial strains 263 and 32d isolated from formation water of the Daqing petroleum reservoir (PRC) was determined by polyphasic taxonomy techniques, including analysis of the 16S rRNA and the gyrB genes. The major chemotaxonomic characteristics of both strains, including the IV type cell wall, composition of cell wall fatty acids, mycolic acids, and menaquinones, agreed with those typical of Dietzia strains. The DNA G+C content of strains 263 and 32d were 67.8 and 67.6 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of strain 32d revealed 99.7% similarity to the gene of D. maris, making it possible to identify strain 32d as belonging to this species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain 263 exhibited 99.7 and 99.9% similarity to those of D. natronolimnaea and D. cercidiphylli YIM65002(T), respectively. Analysis of the gyrB genes of the subterranean isolates and of a number of Dietzia type strains confirmed classiffication of strain 32d as a D. maris strain and of strain 263, as a D. natronolimnaea strain. A conclusion was made concerning higher resolving power of phylogenetic analysis of the gyrB gene compared to the 16S rRNA gene analysis in the case of determination of the species position of Dietzia isolates.

  12. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  13. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Plasmid-mediated ArmA and RmtB 16S rRNA methylases in Escherichia coli isolated from chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aminoglycosides are widely used antibiotics in China for the prevention and control of Escherichia coli infections in chickens. High-level aminoglycoside resistance mediated by the production of 16S rRNA methylase has been increasingly reported among various Gram-negative pathogens. Previously, onl...

  15. Avoidance and Potential Remedy Solutions of Chimeras in Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Aphids Using the 16S rRNA Gene of Buchnera: A Case in Lachninae (Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-08-25

    It is known that PCR amplification of highly homologous genes from complex DNA mixtures can generate a significant proportion of chimeric sequences. The 16S rRNA gene is not only widely used in estimating the species diversity of endosymbionts in aphids but also used to explore the co-diversification of aphids and their endosymbionts. Thus, chimeric sequences may lead to the discovery of non-existent endosymbiont species and mislead Buchnera-based phylogenetic analysis that lead to false conclusions. In this study, a high probability (6.49%) of chimeric sequence occurrence was found in the amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences of endosymbionts from aphid species in the subfamily Lachninae. These chimeras are hybrid products of multiple parent sequences from the dominant species of endosymbionts in each corresponding host. It is difficult to identify the chimeric sequences of a new or unidentified species due to the high variability of their main parent, Buchnera aphidicola, and because the chimeric sequences can confuse the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These chimeras present a challenge to Buchnera-based phylogenetic research in aphids. Thus, our study strongly suggests that using appropriate methods to detect chimeric 16S rRNA sequences may avoid some false conclusions in endosymbiont-based aphid research.

  16. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Burke, Catherine M; Darling, Aaron E

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution.

  17. [Archaeal diversity in permafrost deposits of Bunger Hills Oasis and King George Island (Antarctica) according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing].

    PubMed

    Karaevskaia, E S; Demchenko, L S; Demidov, N É; Rivkina, E M; Bulat, S A; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal communities of permafrost deposits of King George Island and Bunger Hills Oasis (Antarctica) differing in the content of biogenic methane were analyzed using clone libraries of two 16S rRNA gene regions. Phylotypes belonging to methanogenic archaea were identified in all horizons.

  18. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  19. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution. PMID:27688981

  20. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  1. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  2. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  3. Rapid Estimation of Numbers of Fecal Bacteroidetes by Use of a Quantitative PCR Assay for 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Linda K.; Field, Katharine G.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of health risk associated with fecal pollution requires a reliable fecal indicator and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of a Taq nuclease assay for enumeration of 16S rRNA genes of Bacteroidetes. Sensitivity and correlation with standard fecal indicators provide experimental evidence for application of the assay in monitoring fecal pollution. PMID:15345463

  4. Sequence-specific bacterial growth inhibition by peptide nucleic acid targeted to the mRNA binding site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Nakai, Kazufumi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted to the functional domains of 23S rRNA can inhibit translation and cell growth. However, effective inhibition of translation and cell growth using 16S rRNA-targeted PNA has still not been achieved. Here, we report that PNA targeted to the functional site of 16S rRNA could inhibit both gene expression in vitro and bacterial growth in pure culture with sequence specificity. We used 10-mer PNAs conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, which targeted the mRNA binding site at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. Using 0.6 microM of the peptide-PNAs, cell-free ss-galactosidase production decreased by 50%, whereas peptide-PNAs with one or two mismatches to the target sequence showed much weaker inhibition effects. To determine the growth inhibition and bactericidal effects of the peptide-PNA conjugate, we performed OD measurement and viable cell counting. We observed dose- and sequence-dependent inhibition of cell growth and bactericidal effects. These growth inhibitory effects are observed both in the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium efficiens, although inhibitory concentrations were different for each bacterial species. These results present possibilities for 16S rRNA sequence-based specific bacterial growth inhibition using a peptide-PNA conjugate.

  5. Prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase, modifying enzyme, and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenru; Ling, Baodong; Zhou, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a worldwide problem, and methylation of 16S rRNA has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance to aminoglycosides, which is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases. 16S rRNA methylase confers a high-level resistance to all 4,6-substituted deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides that are currently used in clinical practice. Some of the A. baumannii isolates have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), contributing to their multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to detect the determinants of the 16S rRNA methylase genes armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA, the modifying enzyme genes aac(6')-Ib, ant(3″)-Ia, aph(3')-I, and the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) among A. baumannii isolates in northeastern Sichuan, China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 different antimicrobial agents against the A. baumannii isolates were determined. The clinical isolates showed a high level of resistance (MIC≧256 μg/ml) to aminoglycosides, which ranged from 50·1 to 83·8%. The resistances to meropenem and imipenem, two of the beta-lactam antibiotics and the most active antibiotics against A. baumannii, were 9·1 and 8·2%, respectively. Among 60 amikacin-resistant isolates, only the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA was found to be prevalent (66·7%), but the other 16S rRNA methylase genes rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA were not detected. The prevalences of the modifying enzyme genes aac (6')-Ib, ant (3″)-Ia, and aph (3')-I were 51·7, 81·7, and 58·3%, respectively, which are different from a previous study in which the occurrences of these genes were 3, 64, and 72%, respectively. Among the 40 isolates that were armA-positive, the prevalences of bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) genes were detected for the first time in China, and their occurrences were 45, 65, and 52·5%, respectively. In all, A

  6. Ribosomal gene polymorphism in small genomes: analysis of different 16S rRNA sequences expressed in the honeybee parasite Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia).

    PubMed

    Sagastume, Soledad; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Henriques-Gil, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    To date, few organisms have been shown to possess variable ribosomal RNA, otherwise considered a classic example of uniformity by concerted evolution. The polymorphism for the 16S rRNA in Nosema ceranae analysed here is striking as Microsporidia are intracellular parasites which have suffered a strong reduction in their genomes and cellular organization. Moreover, N. ceranae infects the honeybee Apis mellifera, and has been associated with the colony-loss phenomenon during the last decade. The variants of 16S rRNA include single nucleotide substitutions, one base insertion-deletion, plus a tetranucleotide indel. We show that different gene variants are expressed. The polymorphic sites tend to be located in particular regions of the rRNA molecule, and the comparison to the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA secondary structure indicates that most variations probably do not preclude ribosomal activity. The fact that the polymorphisms in such a minimal organism as N. ceranae are maintained in samples collected worldwide suggest that the existence of differently expressed rRNA may play an adaptive role in the microsporidian. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  7. Identification of Lactobacillus isolates from the gastrointestinal tract, silage, and yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tannock, G W; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A; Rodtong, S; Ng, J; Munro, K; Alatossava, T

    1999-09-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

  8. Design and Experimental Application of a Novel Non-Degenerate Universal Primer Set that Amplifies Prokaryotic 16S rRNA Genes with a Low Possibility to Amplify Eukaryotic rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities. PMID:24277737

  9. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  10. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Mirzabekova, legal representative, Natalia V.; Mirzabekov, deceased, Andrei D.

    2007-12-04

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for using nucleotide sequence variations of 16S and 23S rRNA within the B. cereus group to discriminate a highly infectious bacterium B. anthracis from closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations and discriminate B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed samples, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  11. Binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A and P sites protects two distinct sets of nucleotides in 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Noller, H F

    1990-01-05

    Transfer RNA protects a characteristic set of bases in 16 S rRNA from chemical probes when it binds to ribosomes. We used several criteria, based on construction of well-characterized in vitro ribosome-tRNA complexes, to assign these proteins to A or P-site binding. All of these approaches lead to similar conclusions. In the A site, tRNA caused protection of G529, G530, A1492 and A1493 (strongly), and A1408 and G1494 (weakly). In the P site, the protected bases are G693, A794, C795, G926 and G1401 (strong), and A532, G966, G1338 and G1339 (weak). In contrast to what is observed for 23 S rRNA, blocking the release of EF-Tu.GDP from the ribosome by kirromycin has no detectable effect on the protection of bases in 16 S rRNA.

  12. Automated Identification of Medically Important Bacteria by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Using a Novel Comprehensive Database, 16SpathDB▿

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Yeung, Juilian M. Y.; Tse, Herman; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, interpretation of 16S rRNA gene sequence results is one of the most difficult problems faced by clinical microbiologists and technicians. To overcome the problems we encountered in the existing databases during 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation, we built a comprehensive database, 16SpathDB (http://147.8.74.24/16SpathDB) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of all medically important bacteria listed in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and evaluated its use for automated identification of these bacteria. Among 91 nonduplicated bacterial isolates collected in our clinical microbiology laboratory, 71 (78%) were reported by 16SpathDB as a single bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, 19 (20.9%) were reported as more than one bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, and 1 (1.1%) was reported as no match. For the 71 bacterial isolates reported as a single bacterial species, all results were identical to their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach. For the 19 bacterial isolates reported as more than one bacterial species, all results contained their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach and all of them had their true identities as the “best match in 16SpathDB.” For the isolate (Gordonibacter pamelaeae) reported as no match, the bacterium has never been reported to be associated with human disease and was not included in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology. 16SpathDB is an automated, user-friendly, efficient, accurate, and regularly updated database for 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:21389154

  13. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China--Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youhua; Wen, Yan; You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China.

  14. Microbial Contaminants of Cord Blood Units Identified by 16S rRNA Sequencing and by API Test System, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    França, Luís; Simões, Catarina; Taborda, Marco; Diogo, Catarina; da Costa, Milton S.

    2015-01-01

    Over a period of ten months a total of 5618 cord blood units (CBU) were screened for microbial contamination under routine conditions. The antibiotic resistance profile for all isolates was also examined using ATB strips. The detection rate for culture positive units was 7.5%, corresponding to 422 samples.16S rRNA sequence analysis and identification with API test system were used to identify the culturable aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic bacteria from CBUs. From these samples we recovered 485 isolates (84 operational taxonomic units, OTUs) assigned to the classes Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria and primarily to the Gammaproteobacteria. Sixty-nine OTUs, corresponding to 447 isolates, showed 16S rRNA sequence similarities above 99.0% with known cultured bacteria. However, 14 OTUs had 16S rRNA sequence similarities between 95 and 99% in support of genus level identification and one OTU with 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 90.3% supporting a family level identification only. The phenotypic identification formed 29 OTUs that could be identified to the species level and 9 OTUs that could be identified to the genus level by API test system. We failed to obtain identification for 14 OTUs, while 32 OTUs comprised organisms producing mixed identifications. Forty-two OTUs covered species not included in the API system databases. The API test system Rapid ID 32 Strep and Rapid ID 32 E showed the highest proportion of identifications to the species level, the lowest ratio of unidentified results and the highest agreement to the results of 16S rRNA assignments. Isolates affiliated to the Bacilli and Bacteroidia showed the highest antibiotic multi-resistance indices and microorganisms of the Clostridia displayed the most antibiotic sensitive phenotypes. PMID:26512991

  15. First report on the bacterial diversity in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) by using 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial community in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) based on the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Fecal samples were collected from five healthy unrelated dholes captured from Qilian Mountain in Gansu province of China. The diversity of the fecal bacteria community was investigated by constructing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene clone library. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified by using universal bacterial primers 27F and 1492R. A total of 275 chimera-free near full length 16S rRNA gene sequences were collected, and 78 non-redundant bacteria phylotypes (operational taxonomical units, OTUs) were identified according to the 97 % sequence similarity. Forty-two OTUs (53.8 %) showed less than 98 % sequence similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that dhole bacterial community comprised five different phyla, with the majority of sequences being classified within the phylum Bacteroidetes (64.7 %), followed by Firmicutes (29.8 %), Fusobacteria (4.7 %),Proteobacteria (0.4 %), and Actinobacteria (0.4 %). The only order Bacteroidales in phylum Bacteroidetes was the most abundant bacterial group in the intestinal bacterial community of dholes. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the two most diverse bacterial phyla with 46.2 and 44.9 % of OTUs contained, respectively. Bacteroidales and Clostridiales were the two most diverse bacterial orders that contained 44.9 and 39.7 % of OTUs, respectively.

  16. Distribution of 16S rRNA Methylases Among Different Species of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Poland.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Katarzyna; Zacharczuk, Katarzyna; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Bareja, Elżbieta; Olak, Monika; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a group of antimicrobial agents still the most commonly used in the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections in human and animals. The emergence and spread of 16S rRNA methylases, which confer high-level resistance to the majority of clinically relevant aminoglycosides, constitute a major public health concern. Our goal was to evaluate the distribution of 16S rRNA methylases among different species of Enterobacteriaceae during a five month-long survey in a tertiary hospital in Warszawa, Poland. In the survey, a total of 1770 non-duplicate clinical isolates were collected from all hospital wards in a tertiary hospital in Warszawa, Poland. The survey was conducted between 19 April and 19 September 2010. The ability to produce 16S rRNA methylase was examined by determining MICs for gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin by means of the agar dilution method. The isolates resistant to high concentration of aminoglycosides were PCR tested for genes: armA, rmtA, rmtB and rmtC. PCR products were subjected to DNA sequencing by the Sanger method. The genetic similarity of the ArmA-producing isolates was analysed by pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis (PFGE). ArmA was the only 16S rRNA methylase detected in 20 of 1770 tested isolates. The overall prevalence rate of ArmA was 1.13%. In K. pneumoniae (n = 742), P. mirabilis (n = 130), and E. cloacae (n = 253) collected in the survey, the prevalence of ArmA was 0.4%, 0.8% and 5.9%, respectively. The PFGE revealed both horizontal and clonal spread of the armA gene in the hospital. The prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase ArmA reported in this study is significantly higher than observed in other countries in Europe.

  17. Comparison of PCR-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry with 16S rRNA PCR and Amplicon Sequencing for Detection of Bacteria in Excised Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Bart; Herijgers, Paul; Beuselinck, Kurt; Peetermans, Willy E.; Herregods, Marie-Christin

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the causative pathogen of infective endocarditis (IE) is crucial for adequate management and therapy. A broad-range PCR-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI-MS) technique was compared with broad-spectrum 16S rRNA PCR and amplicon sequencing (16S rRNA PCR) for the detection of bacterial pathogens in 40 heart valves obtained from 34 definite infective endocarditis patients according to the modified Duke criteria and six nonendocarditis patients. Concordance between the two molecular techniques was 98% for being positive or negative, 97% for concordant identification up to the genus level, and 77% for concordant identification up to the species level. Sensitivity for detecting the causative pathogen (up to the genus level) in excised heart valves was 88% for 16S rRNA PCR and 85% for PCR-ESI-MS; the specificity was 83% for both methods. The two molecular techniques were significantly more sensitive than valve culture (18%) and accurately identified bacteria in excised heart valves. In eight patients with culture-negative IE, the following results were obtained: concordant detection of Coxiella burnetii (n = 2), Streptococcus gallolyticus (n = 1), Propionibacterium acnes (n = 1), and viridans group streptococci (n = 1) by both molecular tests, detection of P. acnes by PCR-ESI-MS whereas the 16S rRNA PCR was negative (n = 1), and a false-negative result by both molecular techniques (n = 2). In one case of IE caused by viridans streptococci, PCR-ESI-MS was positive for Enterococcus spp. The advantages of PCR-ESI-MS compared to 16S rRNA PCR are its automated workflow and shorter turnaround times. PMID:27629895

  18. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  19. Microbial Contaminants of Cord Blood Units Identified by 16S rRNA Sequencing and by API Test System, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiling.

    PubMed

    França, Luís; Simões, Catarina; Taborda, Marco; Diogo, Catarina; da Costa, Milton S

    2015-01-01

    Over a period of ten months a total of 5618 cord blood units (CBU) were screened for microbial contamination under routine conditions. The antibiotic resistance profile for all isolates was also examined using ATB strips. The detection rate for culture positive units was 7.5%, corresponding to 422 samples.16S rRNA sequence analysis and identification with API test system were used to identify the culturable aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic bacteria from CBUs. From these samples we recovered 485 isolates (84 operational taxonomic units, OTUs) assigned to the classes Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria and primarily to the Gammaproteobacteria. Sixty-nine OTUs, corresponding to 447 isolates, showed 16S rRNA sequence similarities above 99.0% with known cultured bacteria. However, 14 OTUs had 16S rRNA sequence similarities between 95 and 99% in support of genus level identification and one OTU with 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 90.3% supporting a family level identification only. The phenotypic identification formed 29 OTUs that could be identified to the species level and 9 OTUs that could be identified to the genus level by API test system. We failed to obtain identification for 14 OTUs, while 32 OTUs comprised organisms producing mixed identifications. Forty-two OTUs covered species not included in the API system databases. The API test system Rapid ID 32 Strep and Rapid ID 32 E showed the highest proportion of identifications to the species level, the lowest ratio of unidentified results and the highest agreement to the results of 16S rRNA assignments. Isolates affiliated to the Bacilli and Bacteroidia showed the highest antibiotic multi-resistance indices and microorganisms of the Clostridia displayed the most antibiotic sensitive phenotypes.

  20. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China—Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China. PMID:26196543

  1. Correlation of Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and Chloroethene-Reductive Dehalogenase Genes with Geochemical Conditions in Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van der Zaan, Bas; Hannes, Fredericke; Hoekstra, Nanne; Rijnaarts, Huub; de Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of genes that code for Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and chloroethene-reductive dehalogenases TceA, VcrA, and BvcA was done on groundwater sampled from 150 monitoring wells spread over 11 chlorinated ethene polluted European locations. Redundancy analysis was used to relate molecular data to geochemical conditions. Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA- and vinyl chloride (VC)-reductase genes were present at all tested locations in concentrations up to 106 gene copies per ml of groundwater. However, differences between and also within locations were observed. Variation in Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copy numbers were most strongly correlated to dissolved organic carbon concentration in groundwater and to conditions appropriate for biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency score). In contrast, vcrA gene copy numbers correlated most significantly to VC and chlorinated ethene concentrations. Interestingly, bvcA and especially tceA were more correlated with oxidizing conditions. In groundwater microcosms, dechlorination of 1 mM VC was correlated to an increase of vcrA and/or bvcA gene copies by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. Interestingly, in 34% of the monitoring wells and in 40% of the active microcosms, the amount of individual VC-reductase gene copies exceeded that of Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copies. It is concluded that the geographical distribution of the genes was not homogeneous, depending on the geochemical conditions, whereby tceA and bvcA correlated to more oxidized conditions than Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and vcrA. Because the variation in VC-reductase gene numbers was not directly correlated to variation in Dehalococcoides spp., VC-reductase genes are better monitoring parameters for VC dechlorination capacity than Dehalococcoides spp. PMID:20008170

  2. Correlation of Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and chloroethene-reductive dehalogenase genes with geochemical conditions in chloroethene-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    van der Zaan, Bas; Hannes, Fredericke; Hoekstra, Nanne; Rijnaarts, Huub; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2010-02-01

    Quantitative analysis of genes that code for Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and chloroethene-reductive dehalogenases TceA, VcrA, and BvcA was done on groundwater sampled from 150 monitoring wells spread over 11 chlorinated ethene polluted European locations. Redundancy analysis was used to relate molecular data to geochemical conditions. Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA- and vinyl chloride (VC)-reductase genes were present at all tested locations in concentrations up to 10(6) gene copies per ml of groundwater. However, differences between and also within locations were observed. Variation in Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copy numbers were most strongly correlated to dissolved organic carbon concentration in groundwater and to conditions appropriate for biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency score). In contrast, vcrA gene copy numbers correlated most significantly to VC and chlorinated ethene concentrations. Interestingly, bvcA and especially tceA were more correlated with oxidizing conditions. In groundwater microcosms, dechlorination of 1 mM VC was correlated to an increase of vcrA and/or bvcA gene copies by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. Interestingly, in 34% of the monitoring wells and in 40% of the active microcosms, the amount of individual VC-reductase gene copies exceeded that of Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copies. It is concluded that the geographical distribution of the genes was not homogeneous, depending on the geochemical conditions, whereby tceA and bvcA correlated to more oxidized conditions than Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA and vcrA. Because the variation in VC-reductase gene numbers was not directly correlated to variation in Dehalococcoides spp., VC-reductase genes are better monitoring parameters for VC dechlorination capacity than Dehalococcoides spp.

  3. [Complementary addressed alkylation of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with 2',3'-O-[4-N-methyl-N-(2-chloroethyl)aminobenzylidene]m derivatives of oligodeoxyribonucleotides. IV. Determination of binding sites of 16S rRNA with benzylidene derivatives of d(pACCTTGTT)rA, d(pTTACGACT)rU, d(TTTGCTCCCC)rA].

    PubMed

    Zenkova, M A; Karpova, G G; Levina, A S; Mamaev, S V; Solov'ev, V V

    1990-06-01

    By site-directed alkylation of 16S rRNA with benzylidene derivatives of d(pACCTTGTT)rA (II), d(pTTACGACT)rU (III), d(pTTTGCTCCCC)rA (IV) (reagents (II)--(IV] followed by the RNase H treatment a number of 16S rRNA fragments have been obtained. Hybridisation of these fragments with restriction fragments of plasmid pKK 3535, containing operon rrnB of E. coli rRNAs, led to the identification of all reagents' binding sites in 16S rRNA. Good correlation is found between estimated stability of non-perfect 16S rRNA.oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes and the level of modification of this site with alkylating derivative of the same oligodeoxyribonucleotide. With high concentration of the reagents (II)--(IV) ((2-5) x 10(-5) M) the site-directed alkylation proceeds not only at the desired site but also at other sites corresponding to non-perfect duplexes between 16S rRNA and the reagents. It should be noted that the modification mainly occurs in the non-perfect duplexes, carrying mismatched bases at the termini. Influence of the secondary structure of 16S rRNA on the site-directed modification is discussed.

  4. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  5. Evidence against an Interaction between the mRNA Downstream Box and 16S rRNA in Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Isabella; Huber, Michael; Grill, Sonja; Sairafi, Pooneh; Mueller, Florian; Brimacombe, Richard; Londei, Paola; Bläsi, Udo

    2001-01-01

    Based on the complementarity of the initial coding region (downstream box [db]) of several bacterial and phage mRNAs to bases 1469 to 1483 in helix 44 of 16S rRNA (anti-downstream box [adb]), it has been proposed that db-adb base pairing enhances translation in a way that is similar to that of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD)/anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) interaction. Computer modeling of helix 44 on the 30S subunit shows that the topography of the 30S ribosome does not allow a simultaneous db-adb interaction and placement of the initiation codon in the ribosomal P site. Thus, the db-adb interaction cannot substitute for the SD-aSD interaction in translation initiation. We have always argued that any contribution of the db-adb interaction should be most apparent on mRNAs devoid of an SD sequence. Here, we show that 30S ribosomes do not bind to leaderless mRNA in the absence of initiator tRNA, even when the initial coding region shows a 15-nucleotide complementarity (optimal fit) with the putative adb. In addition, an optimized db did not affect the translational efficiency of a leaderless λ cI-lacZ reporter construct. Thus, the db-adb interaction can hardly serve as an initial recruitment signal for ribosomes. Moreover, we show that different leaderless mRNAs are translated in heterologous systems although the sequence of the putative adb's within helix 44 of the 30S subunits of the corresponding bacteria differ largely. Taken our data together with those of others (M. O'Connor, T. Asai, C. L. Squires, and A. E. Dahlberg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:8973–8978, 1999; A. La Teana, A. Brandi, M. O'Connor, S. Freddi, and C. L. Pon, RNA 6:1393–1402, 2000), we conclude that the db does not base pair with the adb. PMID:11344158

  6. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA Gene Reveals Substantial Bacterial Diversity on the Municipal Dumpsite.

    PubMed

    Mwaikono, Kilaza Samson; Maina, Solomon; Sebastian, Aswathy; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek; Gwakisa, Paul

    2016-07-11

    Multiple types of solid waste in developing countries is disposed of together in dumpsites where there is interaction between humans, animals and the bacteria in the waste. To study the bacteria at the dumpsite and the associated risks, previous studies have focused on culturable, leaving behind a great number of unculturable bacteria. This study focuses on a more comprehensive approach to study bacteria at the dumpsite. Since the site comprised of unsorted wastes, a qualitative survey was first performed to identify the variety of solid waste as this has influence on the microbial composition. Thus, domestic (Dom), biomedical (Biom), river sludge (Riv), and fecal material of pigs scavenging on the dumpsite (FecD) were sampled. Total DNA was extracted from 78 samples and the v4-16S rRNA amplicons was characterized using an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 8,469,294 sequences passed quality control. Catchall analysis predicted a mean of 8243 species per sample. Diversity was high with an average InvSimpson index of 44.21 ± 1.44. A total of 35 phyla were detected and the predominant were Firmicutes (38 %), Proteobacteria (35 %), Bacteroidetes (13 %) and Actinobacteria (3 %). Overall 76,862 OTUs were detected, however, only 20 % were found more than 10 times. The predominant OTUs were Acinetobacter (12.1 %), Clostridium sensu stricto (4.8 %), Proteinclasticum and Lactobacillus both at (3.4 %), Enterococcus (2.9 %) and Escherichia/Shigella (1.7 %). Indicator analysis (P ≤ 0.05, indicator value ≥ 70) shows that Halomonas, Idiomarina, Tisierella and Proteiniclasticum were associated with Biom; Enterococcus, Bifidobacteria, and Clostridium sensu stricto with FecD and Flavobacteria, Lysobacter and Commamonas to Riv. Acinetobacter and Clostridium sensu stricto were found in 62 % and 49 % of all samples, respectively, at the relative abundance of 1 %. None of OTUs was found across all samples. This study provides a comprehensive report on the

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Methanogen Diversity in Horse and Pony by Using mcrA Gene and Archaeal 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Lwin, Khin-Ohnmar

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analysis of methanogen compositions in the feces of horse and pony was carried out by constructing the α-subunit of methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) gene and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) clone libraries. The mcrA clone library analysis indicated that Methanomicrobiales was predominant in both horse and pony. Furthermore, most of the clones of the 16S rRNA gene library showed that Methanomicrobiales was also predominant in horse and pony, but the LIBSHUFF analysis showed that the horse and pony libraries were significantly different (P < 0.05). Most of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed low similarity to the identified methanogens in both the mcrA and the 16S rRNA clone libraries. The results suggest that horse and pony harbor unidentified and novel methanogens in their hindgut. The methanogen population was higher in horse than in pony; however, the anaerobic fungal population was similar in horse and pony. The methanogen diversity was different between two breeds of Equus caballus. PMID:24678264

  8. Bacterial Diversity Studies Using the 16S rRNA Gene Provide a Powerful Research-Based Curriculum for Molecular Biology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    BOOMER, SARAH M.; LODGE, DANIEL P.; DUTTON, BRYAN E.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a ten-week curriculum for molecular biology that uses 16S ribosomal RNA genes to characterize and compare novel bacteria from hot spring communities in Yellowstone National Park. The 16S rRNA approach bypasses selective culture-based methods. Our molecular biology course offered the opportunity for students to learn broadly applicable methods while contributing to a long-term research project. Specifically, students isolated and characterized clones that contained novel 16S rRNA inserts using restriction enzyme, DNA sequencing, and computer-based phylogenetic methods. In both classes, students retrieved novel bacterial 16S rRNA genes, several of which were most similar to Green Nonsulfur bacterial isolates. During class, we evaluated student performance and mastery of skills and concepts using quizzes, formal lab notebooks, and a broad project assignment. For this report, we also assessed student performance alongside data quality and discussed the significance, our goal being to improve both research and teaching methods. PMID:23653546

  9. Expression and Function of Different Guanine-Plus-Cytosine Content 16S rRNA Genes in Haloarcula hispanica at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica harbors three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons (rrnA, rrnB, and rrnC) that contain the 16S rRNA genes rrsA, rrsB, and rrsC, respectively. Although rrsB and rrsC (rrsBC) have almost identical sequences, the rrsA and rrsBC sequences differ by 5.4%, and they differ by 2.5% with respect to guanine-plus-cytosine content (PGC). The strong correlation between the typical growth temperatures of archaea and PGC of their 16S rRNA genes suggests that H. hispanica may harbor different 16S rRNA genes having different PGC to maintain rapid growth in a wide range of temperatures. We therefore performed reverse transcription-coupled quantitative PCR to assess expression levels of rrsA (PGC, 58.9%) and rrsBC (PGC, 56.4–56.5%) at various temperatures. The expression ratio of rrsA to rrsBC increased with culture temperature. Mutants with complete deletions of one or two of the three rRNA operons were constructed and their growth rates at different temperatures compared to that of the wild-type. The growth characteristics of the rRNA operon single-mutant strains were indistinguishable from the wild-type. The rRNA operon double-mutant strains maintained the same temperature range as wild-type but displayed reduced growth rates. In particular, the double-mutant strains grew much slower than wild-type at low temperature related to minimum growth temperature of the wild-type. On the other hand, at physiologically high temperatures the wild-type and the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnA with high-PGC rrsA grew significantly faster than the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnC with low-PGC rrsC. These findings suggest the importance of 16S rRNAs transcribed from rrsA with high-PGC in maintaining rapid growth of this halophilic archaeon at raised growth temperatures. PMID:28400752

  10. Expression and Function of Different Guanine-Plus-Cytosine Content 16S rRNA Genes in Haloarcula hispanica at Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica harbors three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons (rrnA, rrnB, and rrnC) that contain the 16S rRNA genes rrsA, rrsB, and rrsC, respectively. Although rrsB and rrsC (rrsBC) have almost identical sequences, the rrsA and rrsBC sequences differ by 5.4%, and they differ by 2.5% with respect to guanine-plus-cytosine content (PGC). The strong correlation between the typical growth temperatures of archaea and PGC of their 16S rRNA genes suggests that H. hispanica may harbor different 16S rRNA genes having different PGC to maintain rapid growth in a wide range of temperatures. We therefore performed reverse transcription-coupled quantitative PCR to assess expression levels of rrsA (PGC, 58.9%) and rrsBC (PGC, 56.4-56.5%) at various temperatures. The expression ratio of rrsA to rrsBC increased with culture temperature. Mutants with complete deletions of one or two of the three rRNA operons were constructed and their growth rates at different temperatures compared to that of the wild-type. The growth characteristics of the rRNA operon single-mutant strains were indistinguishable from the wild-type. The rRNA operon double-mutant strains maintained the same temperature range as wild-type but displayed reduced growth rates. In particular, the double-mutant strains grew much slower than wild-type at low temperature related to minimum growth temperature of the wild-type. On the other hand, at physiologically high temperatures the wild-type and the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnA with high-PGCrrsA grew significantly faster than the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnC with low-PGCrrsC. These findings suggest the importance of 16S rRNAs transcribed from rrsA with high-PGC in maintaining rapid growth of this halophilic archaeon at raised growth temperatures.

  11. Intragenomic diversity of the V1 regions of 16S rRNA genes in high-alkaline protease-producing Bacillus clausii spp.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Nishi, Shinro; Nogi, Yuichi; Uchimura, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hitomi, Jun; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2007-07-01

    Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16, which produces high-alkaline M-protease, was characterized phenotypically, biochemically and genetically. This strain was identified as Bacillus clausii based on the results of taxonomic studies, including sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization. Seven rRNA operons in the genome were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes revealed two distinct types of variable region V1. Moreover, some cloned 16S rRNA genes in some of the reference strains of B. clausii had a V1 region of yet another type. The B. clausii strains could clearly be divided into at least two subgroups based on the frequencies of the types of cloned V1 sequence. Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16 was found to be in a different phylogenetic position from other high-alkaline protease-producing strains of B. clausii.

  12. Phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains based on 16S rRNA and nifD-K gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arun Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Satya Shila; Srivastava, Amrita; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Hridip Kumar

    2015-08-01

    16S rRNA and nifD-nifK sequences were used to study the molecular phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains isolated from Hippöphae salicifolia D. Don growing at different altitudes (ecologically classified as riverside and hillside isolates) of the Eastern Himalayan region of North Sikkim, India. Genetic information for the small subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) revealed that the riverside Frankia isolates markedly differed from the hillside isolates suggesting that the riverside isolates are genetically compact. Further, for enhanced resolutions, the partial sequence of nifD (3' end), nifK (5' end) and nifD-K IGS region have been investigated. The sequences obtained, failed to separate riverside isolates and hillside isolates, thus suggesting a possible role of genetic transfer events either from hillside to riverside or vice versa. The evolutionary genetic analyses using evogenomic extrapolations of gene sequence data obtained from 16S rRNA and nifD-K provided differing equations with the pace of evolution being more appropriately, intermediate. Values of recombination frequency (R), nucleotide diversity per site (Pi), and DNA divergence estimates supported the existence of an intermixed zone where spatial isolations occurred in sync with the temporal estimates. J. Basic Microbiol. 2015, 54, 1-9. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Microbial community profiling of fresh basil and pitfalls in taxonomic assignment of enterobacterial pathogenic species based upon 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ceuppens, Siele; De Coninck, Dieter; Bottledoorn, Nadine; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2017-09-18

    Application of 16S rRNA (gene) amplicon sequencing on food samples is increasingly applied for assessing microbial diversity but may as unintended advantage also enable simultaneous detection of any human pathogens without a priori definition. In the present study high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the V1-V2-V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene was applied to identify the bacteria present on fresh basil leaves. However, results were strongly impacted by variations in the bioinformatics analysis pipelines (MEGAN, SILVAngs, QIIME and MG-RAST), including the database choice (Greengenes, RDP and M5RNA) and the annotation algorithm (best hit, representative hit and lowest common ancestor). The use of pipelines with default parameters will lead to discrepancies. The estimate of microbial diversity of fresh basil using 16S rRNA (gene) amplicon sequencing is thus indicative but subject to biases. Salmonella enterica was detected at low frequencies, between 0.1% and 0.4% of bacterial sequences, corresponding with 37 to 166 reads. However, this result was dependent upon the pipeline used: Salmonella was detected by MEGAN, SILVAngs and MG-RAST, but not by QIIME. Confirmation of Salmonella sequences by real-time PCR was unsuccessful. It was shown that taxonomic resolution obtained from the short (500bp) sequence reads of the 16S rRNA gene containing the hypervariable regions V1-V3 cannot allow distinction of Salmonella with closely related enterobacterial species. In conclusion 16S amplicon sequencing, getting the status of standard method in microbial ecology studies of foods, needs expertise on both bioinformatics and microbiology for analysis of results. It is a powerful tool to estimate bacterial diversity but amenable to biases. Limitations concerning taxonomic resolution for some bacterial species or its inability to detect sub-dominant (pathogenic) species should be acknowledged in order to avoid overinterpretation of results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  14. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  15. Development and evaluation of two novel oligonucleotide probes based on 16S rRNA sequence for the identification of Salmonella in foods.

    PubMed

    Lin, C K; Tsen, H Y

    1995-05-01

    DNA sequence in the V3 to V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene of Salmonella enteritidis was determined. By comparison of this sequence with those of Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris obtained from GenBank/EMBL database, three oligonucleotides termed as 16S I, 16S II and 16S III were synthesized. Hybridization of these oligonucleotides with 325 Salmonella isolates and some non-Salmonella isolates including the Salmonella closely related species of the family of Enterobacteriaceae showed that 16S II could not be used as a Salmonella specific-probe. 16S I and 16S III hybridized with all the Salmonella isolates tested, the former also hybridizing with Citrobacter spp. and the latter hybridizing with Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as Serratia marcescens. Since enrichment of the target cells in food samples was usually required prior to the DNA hybridization assay, the interference from those non-Salmonella isolates could be prevented by enrichment by culturing in lactose-combined tetrathionate (CTET) broth followed by Gram-negative (GN) broth at 37 degrees C and/or 43 degrees C. Such a culture step could inhibit the growth of Klebsiella spp., Ser. marcescens and/or Citrobacter spp. and allowed the specific detection of Salmonella.

  16. Comparison of DNA-, PMA-, and RNA-based 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing for detection of live bacteria in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Ru; Tun, Hein Min; Jahan, Musarrat; Zhang, Zhengxiao; Kumar, Ayush; Fernando, Dilantha; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-07-18

    The limitation of 16S rRNA gene sequencing (DNA-based) for microbial community analyses in water is the inability to differentiate live (dormant cells as well as growing or non-growing metabolically active cells) and dead cells, which can lead to false positive results in the absence of live microbes. Propidium-monoazide (PMA) has been used to selectively remove DNA from dead cells during downstream sequencing process. In comparison, 16S rRNA sequencing (RNA-based) can target live microbial cells in water as both dormant and metabolically active cells produce rRNA. The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency and sensitivity of DNA-based, PMA-based and RNA-based 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing methodologies for live bacteria detection in water samples experimentally spiked with different combination of bacteria (2 gram-negative and 2 gram-positive/acid fast species either all live, all dead, or combinations of live and dead species) or obtained from different sources (First Nation community drinking water; city of Winnipeg tap water; water from Red River, Manitoba, Canada). The RNA-based method, while was superior for detection of live bacterial cells still identified a number of 16S rRNA targets in samples spiked with dead cells. In environmental water samples, the DNA- and PMA-based approaches perhaps overestimated the richness of microbial community compared to RNA-based method. Our results suggest that the RNA-based sequencing was superior to DNA- and PMA-based methods in detecting live bacterial cells in water.

  17. Extremely Acidophilic Protists from Acid Mine Drainage Host Rickettsiales-Lineage Endosymbionts That Have Intervening Sequences in Their 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brett J.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Dawson, Scott C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2003-01-01

    During a molecular phylogenetic survey of extremely acidic (pH < 1), metal-rich acid mine drainage habitats in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Calif., we detected 16S rRNA gene sequences of a novel bacterial group belonging to the order Rickettsiales in the Alphaproteobacteria. The closest known relatives of this group (92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) are endosymbionts of the protist Acanthamoeba. Oligonucleotide 16S rRNA probes were designed and used to observe members of this group within acidophilic protists. To improve visualization of eukaryotic populations in the acid mine drainage samples, broad-specificity probes for eukaryotes were redesigned and combined to highlight this component of the acid mine drainage community. Approximately 4% of protists in the acid mine drainage samples contained endosymbionts. Measurements of internal pH of the protists showed that their cytosol is close to neutral, indicating that the endosymbionts may be neutrophilic. The endosymbionts had a conserved 273-nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in variable region V1 of their 16S rRNA genes. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but the predicted secondary structure forms well-defined stem loops. IVSs are uncommon in rRNA genes and appear to be confined to bacteria living in close association with eukaryotes. Based on the phylogenetic novelty of the endosymbiont sequences and initial culture-independent characterization, we propose the name “Candidatus Captivus acidiprotistae.” To our knowledge, this is the first report of an endosymbiotic relationship in an extremely acidic habitat. PMID:12957940

  18. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that bacteria related to Arcobacter spp. constitute an abundant and common component of the oyster microbiota (Tiostrea chilensis).

    PubMed

    Romero, J; García-Varela, M; Laclette, J P; Espejo, R T

    2002-11-01

    To explore the bacterial microbiota in Chilean oyster (Tiostrea chilensis), a molecular approach that permits detection of different bacteria, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media, was used. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of both the 16S rDNA and the 16S-23S intergenic region, obtained by PCR amplifications of DNA extracted from depurated oysters. RFLP of the PCR amplified 16S rDNA showed a prevailing pattern in most of the individuals analyzed, indicating that a few bacterial species were relatively abundant and common in oysters. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rDNA with the prevailing RFLP pattern indicated that this rRNA was most closely related to Arcobacter spp. However, analysis by the size of the amplified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic regions revealed not Arcobacter spp. but Staphylococcus spp. related bacteria as a major and common component in oyster. These different results may be caused by the absence of target for one of the primers employed for amplification of the intergenic region. Neither of the two bacteria species found in large abundance was recovered after culturing under aerobic, anaerobic, or microaerophilic conditions. This result, however, is expected because the number of bacteria recovered after cultivation was less than 0.01% of the total. All together, these observations suggest that Arcobacter-related strains are probably abundant and common in the Chilean oyster bacterial microbiota.

  19. Application of 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and control region sequences for understanding the phylogenetic relationships in Oryx species.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Farhan, A H

    2008-12-16

    The present study reports the application of mitochondrial markers for the molecular phylogeny of Oryx species, including the Arabian oryx (AO), scimitar-horned oryx (SHO) and plains oryx (PO), using the Addax as an outgroup. Sequences of three molecular markers, 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and a control region, for the above four taxa were aligned and the topologies of respective phylogenetic trees were compared. All these markers clearly differentiated the genus Addax from Oryx. However, for species-level grouping, while 16S rRNA and cytochrome b produced similar phylogeny (SHO grouped with PO), the control region grouped SHO with AO. Further studies are warranted to generate more sequencing data, apply multiple bioinformatics tools and to include relevant nuclear markers for phylogenetic analysis of Oryx species.

  20. Phylogeny and Taxonomy of Archaea: A Comparison of the Whole-Genome-Based CVTree Approach with 16S rRNA Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Guanghong; Xu, Zhao; Hao, Bailin

    2015-01-01

    A tripartite comparison of Archaea phylogeny and taxonomy at and above the rank order is reported: (1) the whole-genome-based and alignment-free CVTree using 179 genomes; (2) the 16S rRNA analysis exemplified by the All-Species Living Tree with 366 archaeal sequences; and (3) the Second Edition of Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology complemented by some current literature. A high degree of agreement is reached at these ranks. From the newly proposed archaeal phyla, Korarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Nanoarchaeota and Aigarchaeota, to the recent suggestion to divide the class Halobacteria into three orders, all gain substantial support from CVTree. In addition, the CVTree helped to determine the taxonomic position of some newly sequenced genomes without proper lineage information. A few discrepancies between the CVTree and the 16S rRNA approaches call for further investigation. PMID:25789552

  1. Identification of Two Distinct Hybridization Groups in the Genus Hafnia by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing and Phenotypic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J. Michael; Abbott, Sharon L.; Bystrom, Sue; Probert, Will S.

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 52 strains belonging to the Hafnia alvei complex were subjected to molecular (16S rRNA gene sequencing) and biochemical analysis. Based upon 16S rRNA gene sequencing results, two genetic groups were identified which correspond with previously recognized DNA hybridization group 1 (ATCC 13337T and ATCC 29926; n = 23) and DNA hybridization group 2 (ATCC 29927; n = 29). Of 46 biochemical tests used to characterize hafniae, 19 reactions (41%) yielded variable results. Of these 19 tests, 6 were determined to have discriminatory value in the separation of DNA groups 1 and 2, with malonate utilization found to be the most differential test. Test results of malonate utilization alone correctly assigned 90% of Hafnia isolates to their correct DNA group. PMID:16000455

  2. Sequencing of variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the intestinal microbiota of healthy salmonids.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Vendrell, Daniel; Gironés, Olivia; Muzquiz, José Luis

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Thirteen LAB strains were isolated from the intestinal microbiota of healthy salmonids. A approximately 500-bp region of the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and following this, a portion of the amplicon (272-bp) including the V1 and V2 variable regions was sequenced. The sequence containing both the V1 and V2 region provided strong evidence for the identification of LAB. The LAB strains were identified as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The method described was found to be a very simple, rapid, specific, and low-cost tool for the identification of unknown strains of LAB.

  3. Community Structure and Diversity of Biofilms from a Beer Bottling Plant as Revealed Using 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries†

    PubMed Central

    Timke, Markus; Wang-Lieu, Ngoc Quynh; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2005-01-01

    The microbial composition of biofilms from a beer bottling plant was analyzed by a cultivation independent analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were differentiated by amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and representative clones from each group were sequenced. The diversity of the clone libraries was comparable with the diversity found for environmental samples. No evidences for the presence of strictly anaerobic taxa or important beer spoilers were found, indicating that biofilms developed for more than 6 months at the plant formed no appropriate habitat for those microorganisms. The genus Methylobacterium was one of the dominating groups of the clone libraries. The size of this population was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and fatty acid analysis. In addition, considerable numbers of clones were assigned to uncultivated organisms. PMID:16204578

  4. Broad-range 16S rRNA PCR with cerebrospinal fluid may be unreliable for management of postoperative aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zarrouk, Virginie; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Robineaux, Sébastien; Kalamarides, Michel; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Sterkers, Olivier; Fantin, Bruno

    2010-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that discontinuing presumptive antibiotic treatment in cases of negative conventional cultures is safe and effective for patients with postoperative aseptic meningitis (PAM). Here, we prospectively investigated 32 patients with postoperative meningitis. All 26 patients with PAM diagnosed on the basis of conventional cultures demonstrated negative 16S rRNA PCR results. Our results suggest that the PCR technique does not change PAM management.

  5. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence-Based Identification of Bacteria in Automatically Incubated Blood Culture Materials from Tropical Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Hahn, Andreas; Boahen, Kennedy; Sarpong, Nimako; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Halbgewachs, Eva; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Poppert, Sven; Loderstaedt, Ulrike; May, Jürgen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of microbiological diagnostic procedures depends on pre-analytic conditions. We compared the results of 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing from automatically incubated blood culture materials from tropical Ghana with the results of cultural growth after automated incubation. Methods Real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR and subsequent sequencing were applied to 1500 retained blood culture samples of Ghanaian patients admitted to a hospital with an unknown febrile illness after enrichment by automated culture. Results Out of all 1500 samples, 191 were culture-positive and 98 isolates were considered etiologically relevant. Out of the 191 culture-positive samples, 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing led to concordant results in 65 cases at species level and an additional 62 cases at genus level. PCR was positive in further 360 out of 1309 culture-negative samples, sequencing results of which suggested etiologically relevant pathogen detections in 62 instances, detections of uncertain relevance in 50 instances, and DNA contamination due to sample preparation in 248 instances. In two instances, PCR failed to detect contaminants from the skin flora that were culturally detectable. Pre-analytical errors caused many Enterobacteriaceae to be missed by culture. Conclusions Potentially correctable pre-analytical conditions and not the fastidious nature of the bacteria caused most of the discrepancies. Although 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing in addition to culture led to an increase in detections of presumably etiologically relevant blood culture pathogens, the application of this procedure to samples from the tropics was hampered by a high contamination rate. Careful interpretation of diagnostic results is required. PMID:26270631

  6. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg-1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  7. Use of universal 16S rRNA gene PCR as a diagnostic tool for venous access port-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Guembe, M; Marín, M; Martín-Rabadán, P; Echenagusia, A; Camúñez, F; Rodríguez-Rosales, G; Simó, G; Echenagusia, M; Bouza, E

    2013-03-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.

  8. CLUSTOM-CLOUD: In-Memory Data Grid-Based Software for Clustering 16S rRNA Sequence Data in the Cloud Environment.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeongsu; Choi, Chi-Hwan; Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Byung Kwon; Hwang, Kyuin; Lee, Sang-Heon; Hong, Soon Gyu; Nasir, Arshan; Cho, Wan-Sup; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing can produce hundreds of thousands of 16S rRNA sequence reads corresponding to different organisms present in the environmental samples. Typically, analysis of microbial diversity in bioinformatics starts from pre-processing followed by clustering 16S rRNA reads into relatively fewer operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The OTUs are reliable indicators of microbial diversity and greatly accelerate the downstream analysis time. However, existing hierarchical clustering algorithms that are generally more accurate than greedy heuristic algorithms struggle with large sequence datasets. To keep pace with the rapid rise in sequencing data, we present CLUSTOM-CLOUD, which is the first distributed sequence clustering program based on In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) technology-a distributed data structure to store all data in the main memory of multiple computing nodes. The IMDG technology helps CLUSTOM-CLOUD to enhance both its capability of handling larger datasets and its computational scalability better than its ancestor, CLUSTOM, while maintaining high accuracy. Clustering speed of CLUSTOM-CLOUD was evaluated on published 16S rRNA human microbiome sequence datasets using the small laboratory cluster (10 nodes) and under the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environments. Under the laboratory environment, it required only ~3 hours to process dataset of size 200 K reads regardless of the complexity of the human microbiome data. In turn, one million reads were processed in approximately 20, 14, and 11 hours when utilizing 20, 30, and 40 nodes on the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environment. The running time evaluation indicates that CLUSTOM-CLOUD can handle much larger sequence datasets than CLUSTOM and is also a scalable distributed processing system. The comparative accuracy test using 16S rRNA pyrosequences of a mock community shows that CLUSTOM-CLOUD achieves higher accuracy than DOTUR, mothur, ESPRIT-Tree, UCLUST and Swarm. CLUSTOM-CLOUD is written in JAVA

  9. Design and application of an internal amplification control to improve Dehalococcoides mccartyi 16S rRNA gene enumeration by qPCR.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Janet K; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Ogles, Dora M; Lebrón, Carmen A; Löffler, Frank E

    2013-10-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains are keystone bacteria for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes to nontoxic ethene in contaminated aquifers. Enumeration of Dhc biomarker genes using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in groundwater is a key component of site assessment and bioremediation monitoring. Unfortunately, standardized qPCR procedures that recognize impaired measurements due to PCR inhibition, low template DNA concentrations, or analytical error are not available, thus limiting confidence in qPCR data. To improve contemporary approaches for enumerating Dhc in environmental samples, multiplex qPCR assays were designed to quantify the Dhc 16S rRNA gene and one of two different internal amplification controls (IACs): a modified Dhc 16S rRNA gene fragment (Dhc*) and the firefly luciferase gene luc. The Dhc* IAC exhibited competitive inhibition in qPCR with the Dhc 16S rRNA gene template when the ratio of either target was 100-fold greater than the other target. A multiplex qPCR assay with the luc IAC avoided competitive inhibition and accurately quantified Dhc abundances ranging from ∼10 to 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies per reaction. The addition of ∼10(6) E. coli luc IAC to simulated groundwater amended with the Dhc-containing consortium KB-1 yielded reproducible luc counts after DNA extraction and multiplex qPCR enumeration. The application of the luc IAC assay improved Dhc biomarker gene quantification from simulated groundwater samples and is a valuable approach for "ground truthing" qPCR data obtained in different laboratories, thus reducing ambiguity associated with qPCR enumeration and reproducibility.

  10. [Characterizing Beijing's Airborne Bacterial Communities in PM2.5 and PM1 Samples During Haze Pollution Episodes Using 16S rRNA Gene Analysis Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu-ying; Lang, Ji-dong; Zhang, Li-na; Fang, Jian-huo; Cao, Chen; Hao, Ji-ming; Zhu, Ting; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jing-kun

    2015-08-01

    During 8th-14th Jan., 2013, severe particulate matter (PM) pollution episodes happened in Beijing. These air pollution events lead to high risks for public health. In addition to various PM chemical compositions, biological components in the air may also impose threaten. Little is known about airborne microbial community in such severe air pollution conditions. PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected during that 7-day pollution period. The 16S rRNA gene V3 amplification and the MiSeq sequencing were performed for analyzing these samples. It is found that there is no significant difference at phylum level for PM2.5 bacterial communities during that 7-day pollution period both at phylum and at genus level. At genus level, Arthrobacter and Frankia are the major airborne microbes presented in Beijing winter.samples. At genus level, there are 39 common genera (combined by first 50 genera bacterial of the two analysis) between the 16S rRNA gene analysis and those are found by Metagenomic analysis on the same PM samples. Frankia and Paracoccus are relatively more abundant in 16S rRNA gene data, while Kocuria and Geodermatophilus are relatively more abundant in Meta-data. PM10 bacterial communities are similar to those of PM2.5 with some noticeable differences, i.e., at phylum level, more Firmicutes and less Actinobacteria present in PM10 samples than in PM2.5 samples, while at genus level, more Clostridium presents in PM10 samples. The findings in Beijing were compared with three 16S rRNA gene studies in other countries. Although the sampling locations and times are different from each other, compositions of bacterial community are similar for those sampled at the ground atmosphere. Airborne microbial communities near the ground surface are different from those sampled in the upper troposphere.

  11. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene PCR sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection: a prospective multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥ 1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥ 2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  13. Variability in 3' end of 16S rRNA sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans is related to geographic origin of isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Portaels, F; Fonteyene, P A; de Beenhouwer, H; de Rijk, P; Guédénon, A; Hayman, J; Meyers, M W

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans causes extensive ulcers (Buruli ulcers) in the skin of humans. Analysis of the 3'-terminal region of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of 17 strains of M. ulcerans from Africa, the Americas, and Australia revealed three subgroups corresponding to the continent of origin, and some variable phenotypic characteristics. This sequence is useful for the rapid detection of M. ulcerans and discriminates M. marinum and M. shinshuense from M. ulcerans. PMID:8815117

  14. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene PCR Sensitivity and Specificity for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Prospective Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis. PMID:25056331

  15. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg−1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  16. Enumeration of bacteria from the Clostridium leptum subgroup in human faecal microbiota using Clep1156 16S rRNA probe in combination with helper and competitor oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Katiana; Rougé, Carole; Lay, Christophe; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Doré, Joël

    2005-07-01

    Target site inaccessibility represents a significant problem for fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) of 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. For this reason, the Clep1156 probe targeting 16S rRNA of the Clostridium leptum phylogenetic subgroup used for dot blot experiments could not be used until now for FISH. Considering that bacteria from the C. leptum subgroup are very abundant in the human faecal microbiota and may play a significant role in host health, we have used unlabelled helper and competitor oligonucleotides to improve the 16S rRNA in situ accessibility and specificity of the Clep1156 probe and applied this approach to enumerate C. leptum bacteria in this ecosystem. Nine C. leptum target strains and five non-target strains were selected to develop and validate the helper-competitor strategy. Depending on the target strains, the use of helpers enhanced the fluorescence intensity signal of Clep1156 from 0.4-fold to 8.4-fold with a mean value of 3.6-fold, switching this probe from the brightness class V-VI (masked sites) to III-IV (accessible sites). The simultaneous use of helper and competitor oligonucleotides with Clep1156 probe allowed the expected specificity without disturbing in situ accessibility. Quantified by FISH combined with flow cytometry, C. leptum bacteria in human faecal samples (n=22) represented 19 +/- 7% of bacteria on average [4.9-37.5]. We conclude that helper oligonucleotides are very useful to circumvent the problem of target site in situ accessibility, especially when probe design is limited to only one 16S rRNA area and that helpers and competitors may be efficiently combined.

  17. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-17

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg(-1) were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 10(3) to 2.28 × 10(6) and 4.17 × 10(2) to 1.99 × 10(5), respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  18. Composition of the bacterial population of refrigerated beef, identified with direct 16S rRNA gene analysis and pure culture technique.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, T C; Ahrné, S; Molin, G

    2007-09-30

    The composition of the dominating population of freshly cut beef, and beef stored at 4 degrees C for 8 d, was studied by direct analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing) and compared with pure culture technique where the isolates picked from the viable plate count were identified by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The composition of the bacterial population was recorded at two different time points, at the start when the viable plate count of the meat was 4 x 10(2) colony forming unit (cfu) per cm(2) and when it was 5 x 10(7) cfu per cm(2). Direct gene analysis by PCR amplification generated 30 clones, and 79 isolates were picked from the plate count, and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. At the low initial bacterial load of the beef, the two sampling strategies showed variations in the composition of species. Direct 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed a domination of Bacillus-like sequences while no such sequences were found in isolates from the viable plate count. Instead the population of the plate count was dominated by Chryseobacterium spp. In contrast, the two sampling strategies matched on the multiplying beef population, where both methods indicated Pseudomonas spp. as the dominating group (99% of the population-sequences), irrespectively of sampling strategy. Pseudomonas panacis/Pseudomons brennerii was the dominating taxon (99% similarity to type strain), but sequences with highest similarity to Pseudomonas lundensis (99%), Pseudomonas beteli (99%) and Pseudomonas koreensis (100%) were also found.

  19. Importance of Micromonospora spp. as Colonizers of Cellulose in Freshwater Lakes as Demonstrated by Quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes, Alexandre B.; McDonald, James E.; Allison, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    The relative abundance of micromonosporas in the bacterial communities inhabiting cellulose baits, water columns, and sediments of two freshwater lakes was determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) of reverse-transcribed 16S rRNA. Micromonospora spp. were shown to be significant members of the active bacterial population colonizing cellulosic substrates in the lake sediment, and their increased prevalence with greater depth was confirmed by enumeration of CFU. PMID:22389367

  20. Investigation of Microbial Diversity in Geothermal Hot Springs in Unkeshwar, India, Based on 16S rRNA Amplicon Metagenome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mehetre, Gajanan T.; Paranjpe, Aditi; Dastager, Syed G.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial diversity in geothermal waters of the Unkeshwar hot springs in Maharashtra, India, was studied using 16S rRNA amplicon metagenomic sequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed the presence of Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Archeae, and OD1 phyla. Metabolic function prediction analysis indicated a battery of biological information systems indicating rich and novel microbial diversity, with potential biotechnological applications in this niche. PMID:26950332

  1. Bacterial diversity in worker adults of Apis mellifera capensis and Apis mellifera scutellata (Insecta: Hymenoptera) assessed using 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jeyaprakash, Ayyamperumal; Hoy, Marjorie A; Allsopp, Michael H

    2003-10-01

    High-fidelity PCR of 16S rRNA sequences was used to identify bacteria associated with worker adults of the honeybee subspecies Apis mellifera capensis and Apis mellifera scutellata. An expected approximately 1.5-kb DNA band, representing almost the entire length of the 16S rRNA gene, was amplified from both subspecies and cloned. Ten unique sequences were obtained: one sequence each clustered with Bifidobacterium (Gram-positive eubacteria), Lactobacillus (Gram-positive eubacteria), and Gluconacetobacter (Gram-negative alpha-proteobacteria); two sequences each clustered with Simonsiella (beta-proteobacteria) and Serratia (gamma-proteobacteria); and three sequences each clustered with Bartonella (alpha-proteobacteria). Although the sequences relating to these six bacterial genera initially were obtained from either A. m. capensis or A. m. scutellata or both, newly designed honeybee-specific