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Sample records for 16s rrna-encoding reca

  1. Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Malaysian plants as revealed by 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence based method of bacterial identification☆

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Chye Ying; Tan, Yin Yin; Rohani, Rahim; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endophytes do have several potential applications in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotech industry. The main objective of this study was to understand types of bacterial endophytes associated with dicotyledonous (dicot) and monocotyledonous (monocot) plant species. Isolation of the endophytic bacteria was performed using surface-sterilized various tissue samples, and identification of the endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) was completed using 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence similarity based method. In total, 996 EBIs were isolated and identified from 1055 samples of 31 monocot and 65 dicot plant species from Peninsular Malaysia. The 996 EBIs represented 71 different types of bacterial species. Twelve (12) out of 71 species are reported as endophytes for the first time. We conclude that diverse types of bacterial endophytes are associated with dicot and monocot plants, and could be useful in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotechnology for various potential applications. PMID:24396249

  2. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  5. Characterization of RecA424 and RecA670 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    RecA protein is considered to be the most important participant in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. However, it is still unclear how RecA contributes to the resistance. In this study, we identified a new recA mutation (recA424) in the DNA-repair deficient mutant strain KI696, the phenotype of which is remarkably different from mutant strain rec30 carrying recA670. The properties of the gene products from the recA mutants were compared. recA424 could not complement the deficiency in Escherichia coli RecA, as found for recA670. In vitro, neither RecA424 nor RecA670 could promote DNA strand exchange under conditions in which wild-type RecA promoted the reaction, indicating that both RecA424 and Rec670 are defective in recombination activity. RecA424 promoted the autocleavage reaction of LexA in vitro, whereas RecA670 did not. The intracellular LexA level in KI696 was decreased following gamma-irradiation. However, the LexA level in strain rec30 was constant irrespective of irradiation. These results indicate that RecA424 retains co-protease activity, whereas RecA670 does not. While strain rec30 is extremely radiation sensitive, strain KI696 is only slightly sensitive. Together, these observations suggest that the co-protease activity rather than the recombination activity of RecA contributes to radiation resistance in D. radiodurans.

  6. Identification of Dietzia spp. from Cardiac Tissue by 16S rRNA PCR in a Patient with Culture-Negative Device-Associated Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiqing; Nadelman, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Dietzia was recently distinguished from other actinomycetes such as Rhodococcus. While these organisms are known to be distributed widely in the environment, over the past decade several novel species have been described and isolated from human clinical specimens. Here we describe the identification of Dietzia natronolimnaea/D. cercidiphylli by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene from cardiac tissue in a patient with culture-negative device-associated endocarditis. PMID:28101387

  7. RECA: A network by students, for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remolina Gutierrez, M. C.; Velasco Moreno, S.; Hoyos Restrepo, P.; Jimenez Nieto, J. D.; Ramos, A. F.; Buitrago-Casas, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    RECA (Red de Estudiantes Colombianos de Astronomía) is a national network created by Colombian students that needed to be connected by their love for astronomy and astrophysics. It compiles most of the university groups and individuals that are willing to make part of a bigger community that gives benefits such as outreach activities, student links, and resources. This work is divided in 3 main parts. The first one is a quick review of the history of RECA since it was proposed in the III Colombian Astronomy Congress until today. After that, we review all the achievements and activities that the network has made and the people that collaborated to make it possible. Finally, we emphasize the vision that RECA has for the next years and what it can give to the development of astronomy in Latin America regarding to students flux, training and research.

  8. Sequences of the recA gene and protein.

    PubMed

    Sancar, A; Stachelek, C; Konigsberg, W; Rupp, W D

    1980-05-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the recA gene of Escherichia coli; this permits the formulation of the primary structure for the recA protein. This structure is consistent with the amino acid composition of the tryptic peptides obtained from the recA protein. The coding region of the recA gene has 1059 base pairs, which specify 352 amino acids. The recA protein has alanine and phenylalanine as its NH2- and COOH-terminal amino acids, respectively, and has the following amino acid composition: Cys3 Asp20 Asn15 Met9 Thr17 Ser20 Glu30 Gln13 Pro10 Gly35 Ala38 Val22 Ile27 Leu31 Tyr7 Phe10 His2Lys27 Trp2 Arg14. Of the three cysteine residues, only two can be alkylated under reducing and denaturing conditions. The molecular weight of the recA polypeptide is 37,842.

  9. recA730-dependent suppression of recombination deficiency in RecA loading mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlašić, Ignacija; Simatović, Ana; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2011-04-01

    Homologous recombination is an essential process in double-strand break repair. The main requirement for recombination is formation of a RecA filament. Double-strand breaks can be processed into a RecA filament by the action of three enzymatic activities: helicase, 5'-3' exonuclease and RecA loading onto ssDNA. These activities are provided by the RecBCD enzyme in wild type cells or by the RecF pathway gene products in recBC sbcBC(D) cells. In the recBD1080A mutant (recB∗ mutant), the recombination machineries of RecBCD and RecF pathways are interchangeable and include RecB∗CD enzyme (helicase), RecJ (5'-3' exonuclease) and RecFOR (RecA loading). The mutant RecA730 protein is able to produce a RecA filament without the help of RecFOR mediators, since it more efficiently competes with SSB protein for ssDNA than the normal RecA protein. It was previously shown that the recA730 mutation suppresses UV sensitivity in a uvrA recFOR genetic background. We tested whether the recA730 mutation can suppress recombination and DNA repair deficiency in a recB∗ mutant and its derivatives. We show that the recA730 mutation suppresses recombination deficiency in a recB∗ recFOR background, where the defect is at the level of RecA loading, but not in the recB∗ recJ background where the defect is at the level of nuclease activity.

  10. Construction and physiological analysis of a Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae recA mutant.

    PubMed

    Mongkolsuk, S; Rabibhadana, S; Sukchavalit, R; Vaughn, G

    1998-12-15

    A Xoo recA insertion inactivation mutant was constructed. The mutant, lacking RecA, showed increased sensitivity towards mutagen killing. This phenotype could be complemented by a cloned, functional recA. Unlike other bacteria, both the recA mutant and the parental strain had similar level of resistance to H2O2 killing and peroxide-induced mutagenesis.

  11. Control of UV induction of recA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Salles, B; Paoletti, C

    1983-01-01

    The basal level of recA protein in Escherichia coli K-12 was estimated by an immunoradiometric assay; it is approximately equal to 1,200 molecules per wild-type bacteria in midexponential phase of growth, slightly more in an excision-deficient (uvrA) strain, and markedly more in recF mutants. Kinetics of induction after UV irradiation showed a rapid increase of recA protein content, which reached a peak level after 60-90 min (20- to 55-fold amplification) and then decreased by dilution of the protein in the growing population. In order to obtain an identical extent of induction of recA protein, a 10-fold higher UV dose was necessary in a wild-type strain compared to the uvrA mutant strain. In the uvrA strain, the presence of one or only very few pyrimidine dimers on DNA was accompanied by a measurable increase of the constitutive level of recA protein; however, the unexcised dimers were unable to permanently induce the formation of recA protein. The derepressed promoter of recA gene is one of the strongest in E. coli. Its sequence displays many similarities with that of the strongest early promoters of T5 phage. Mutants (umuC uvrB and recF uvrB) unable to carry out W-reactivation produced high levels of recA protein after UV irradiation. The data suggested that the recF and umuC genes negatively control the regulation of recA protein level. PMID:6337375

  12. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  13. Collection of small subunit (16S- and 16S-like) ribosomal RNA structures: 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R

    1994-01-01

    A collection of diverse 16S and 16S-like rRNA secondary structure diagrams are available. This set of rRNAs contains representative structures from all of the major phylogenetic groupings--Archaea, (eu)Bacteria, and the nucleus, mitochondrion, and chloroplast of Eucarya. Within this broad phylogenetic sampling are examples of the major forms of structural diversity currently known for this class of rRNAs. These structure diagrams are available online through our computer-network WWW server and anonymous ftp, as well as from the author in hardcopy format. PMID:7524024

  14. Mycobacterium leprae RecA is structurally analogous but functionally distinct from Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA protein.

    PubMed

    Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Singh, Pawan; Harsha, Sri; Muniyappa, K

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, yet causes a very different illness. Detailed genomic comparison between these two species of mycobacteria reveals that the decaying M. leprae genome contains less than half of the M. tuberculosis functional genes. The reduction of genome size and accumulation of pseudogenes in the M. leprae genome is thought to result from multiple recombination events between related repetitive sequences, which provided the impetus to investigate the recombination-like activities of RecA protein. In this study, we have cloned, over-expressed and purified M. leprae RecA and compared its activities with that of M. tuberculosis RecA. Both proteins, despite being 91% identical at the amino acid level, exhibit strikingly different binding profiles for single-stranded DNA with varying GC contents, in the ability to catalyze the formation of D-loops and to promote DNA strand exchange. The kinetics and the extent of single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and coprotease activities were nearly equivalent between these two recombinases. However, the degree of inhibition exerted by a range of ATP:ADP ratios was greater on strand exchange promoted by M. leprae RecA compared to its M. tuberculosis counterpart. Taken together, our results provide insights into the mechanistic aspects of homologous recombination and coprotease activity promoted by M. lepare RecA, and further suggests that it differs from the M. tuberculosis counterpart. These results are consistent with an emerging concept of DNA-sequence influenced structural differences in RecA nucleoprotein filaments and how these differences reflect on the multiple activities associated with RecA protein.

  15. Phylogeny of Vibrio cholerae Based on recA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Stine, O. Colin; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Gou, Qing; Zheng, Siqen; Morris, J. Glenn; Johnson, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    We sequenced a 705-bp fragment of the recA gene from 113 Vibrio cholerae strains and closely related species. One hundred eighty-seven nucleotides were phylogenetically informative, 55 were phylogenetically uninformative, and 463 were invariant. Not unexpectedly, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus strains formed out-groups; we also identified isolates which resembled V. cholerae biochemically but which did not cluster with V. cholerae. In many instances, V. cholerae serogroup designations did not correlate with phylogeny, as reflected by recA sequence divergence. This observation is consistent with the idea that there is horizontal transfer of O-antigen biosynthesis genes among V. cholerae strains. PMID:11083852

  16. Aminoglycoside antibiotics: A-site specific binding to 16S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2009-06-01

    The A-site of 16S rRNA, which is a part of the 30S ribosomal subunit involved in prokaryotic translation, is a well known aminoglycoside binding site. Full characterization of the conformational changes undergone at the A-site upon aminoglycoside binding is essential for development of future RNA/drug complexes; however, the massiveness of 16S makes this very difficult. Recently, studies have found that a 27 base RNA construct (16S27) that comprises the A-site subdomain of 16S behaves similarly to the whole A-site domain. ESI-MS, ion mobility and molecular dynamics methods were utilized in this study to analyze the A-site of 16S27 before and after the addition of ribostamycin (R), paromomycin (P) and lividomycin (L). The ESI mass spectrum for 16S27 alone illustrated both single-stranded 16S27 and double-stranded (16S27)2 complexes. Upon aminoglycoside addition, the mass spectra showed that only one aminoglycoside binds to 16S27, while either one or two bind to (16S27)2. Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics calculations were utilized in determining the solvent-free structures of the 16S27 and (16S27)2 complexes. These studies found 16S27 in a hairpin conformation while (16S27)2 existed as a cruciform. Only one aminoglycoside binds to the single A-site of the 16S27 hairpin and this attachment compresses the hairpin. Since two A-sites exist for the (16S27)2 cruciform, either one or two aminoglycosides may bind. The aminoglycosides compress the A-sites causing the cruciform with just one aminoglycoside bound to be larger than the cruciform with two bound. Non-specific binding was not observed in any of the aminoglycoside/16S27 complexes.

  17. Molecular cloning of the recA analog from the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, J.T. )

    1989-11-01

    The recA analog from Vibrio anguillarum 775 was isolated by complementation of recA mutations in Escherichia coli, and its protein product was identified. The recA analog promoted recombination between two partially deleted lactose operons, stimulated both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced phage production in RecA- lambda lysogens, and restored near wild-type levels of resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate.

  18. recA gene product is responsible for inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Trgovcević, Z; Petranović, D; Petranović, M; Salaj-Smic, E

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation was studied in wild-type, uvrA, recB, recA recB, and recA Escherichia coli strains. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, which occurs almost immediately after exposing the cells to ultraviolet radiation, depends on the functional gene recA. PMID:6997276

  19. Anionic Phospholipids Stabilize RecA Filament Bundles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rajendram, Manohary; Zhang, Leili; Reynolds, Bradley J; Auer, George K; Tuson, Hannah H; Ngo, Khanh V; Cox, Michael M; Yethiraj, Arun; Cui, Qiang; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-11-05

    We characterize the interaction of RecA with membranes in vivo and in vitro and demonstrate that RecA binds tightly to the anionic phospholipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Using computational models, we identify two regions of RecA that interact with PG and CL: (1) the N-terminal helix and (2) loop L2. Mutating these regions decreased the affinity of RecA to PG and CL in vitro. Using 3D super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that depleting Escherichia coli PG and CL altered the localization of RecA foci and hindered the formation of RecA filament bundles. Consequently, E. coli cells lacking aPLs fail to initiate a robust SOS response after DNA damage, indicating that the membrane acts as a scaffold for nucleating the formation of RecA filament bundles and plays an important role in the SOS response.

  20. C16S - a Hidden Markov Model based algorithm for taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gajjalla, Purnachander; Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Mande, Sharmila S

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and concurrent refinements in 16S rDNA isolation techniques have facilitated the rapid extraction and sequencing of 16S rDNA content of microbial communities. The taxonomic affiliation of these 16S rDNA fragments is subsequently obtained using either BLAST-based or word frequency based approaches. However, the classification accuracy of such methods is observed to be limited in typical metagenomic scenarios, wherein a majority of organisms are hitherto unknown. In this study, we present a 16S rDNA classification algorithm, called C16S, that uses genus-specific Hidden Markov Models for taxonomic classification of 16S rDNA sequences. Results obtained using C16S have been compared with the widely used RDP classifier. The performance of C16S algorithm was observed to be consistently higher than the RDP classifier. In some scenarios, this increase in accuracy is as high as 34%. A web-server for the C16S algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/C16S/.

  1. recA mutations that reduce the constitutive coprotease activity of the RecA1202(Prtc) protein: possible involvement of interfilament association in proteolytic and recombination activities.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S K; Eisen, J A; Hanawalt, P C; Tessman, I

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-eight recA mutants, isolated after spontaneous mutagenesis generated by the combined action of RecA1202(Prtc) and UmuDC proteins, were characterized and sequenced. The mutations are intragenic suppressors of the recA1202 allele and were detected by the reduced coprotease activity of the gene product. Twenty distinct mutation sites were found, among which two mutations, recA1620 (V-275-->D) and recA1631 (I-284-->N), were mapped in the C-terminal portion of the interfilament contact region (IFCR) in the RecA crystal. An interaction of this region with the part of the IFCR in which the recA1202 mutation (Q-184-->K) is mapped could occur only intermolecularly. Thus, altered IFCR and the likely resulting change in interfilament association appear to be important aspects of the formation of a constitutively active RecA coprotease. This observation is consistent with the filament-bundle theory (R. M. Story, I. T. Weber, and T. A. Steitz, Nature (London) 335:318-325, 1992). Furthermore, we found that among the 20 suppressor mutations, 3 missense mutations that lead to recombination-defective (Rec-) phenotypes also mapped in the IFCR, suggesting that the IFCR, with its putative function in interfilament association, is required for the recombinase activity of RecA. We propose that RecA-DNA complexes may form bundles analogous to the RecA bundles (lacking DNA) described by Story et al. and that these RecA-DNA bundles play a role in homologous recombination. Images PMID:8407828

  2. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, Wellington C.; Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.; Spies, Maria

    2016-07-22

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. In conclusion, our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  5. Location of functional regions of the Escherichia coli RecA protein by DNA sequence analysis of RecA protease-constitutive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W B; Tessman, E S

    1986-01-01

    In previous work (E. S. Tessman and P. K. Peterson, J. Bacteriol. 163:677-687 and 688-695, 1985), we isolated many novel protease-constitutive (Prtc) recA mutants, i.e., mutants in which the RecA protein was always in the protease state without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Most Prtc mutants were recombinase positive and were designated Prtc Rec+; only a few Prtc mutants were recombinase negative, and those were designated Prtc Rec-. We report changes in DNA sequence of the recA gene for several of these mutants. The mutational changes clustered at three regions on the linear RecA polypeptide. Region 1 includes amino acid residues 25 through 39, region 2 includes amino acid residues 157 through 184, and region 3 includes amino acid residues 298 through 301. The in vivo response of these Prtc mutants to different effectors suggests that the RecA effector-binding sites have been altered. In particular we propose that the mutations may define single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains of RecA, that polypeptide regions 1 and 3 comprise part of the single-stranded DNA-binding domain, and that polypeptide regions 2 and 3 comprise part of the nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain. The overlapping of single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains in region 3 can explain previously known complex allosteric effects. Each of four Prtc Rec- mutants sequenced was found to contain a single amino acid change, showing that the change of just one amino acid can affect both the protease and recombinase activities and indicating that the functional domains for these two activities of RecA overlap. A recA promoter-down mutation was isolated by its ability to suppress the RecA protease activity of one of our strong Prtc mutants. PMID:3536864

  6. Directed Evolution of RecA Variants with Enhanced Capacity for Conjugational Recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taejin; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Benjamin L; Wood, Elizabeth A; Sandler, Steven J; Cox, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    The recombination activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RecA protein reflects an evolutionary balance between the positive and potentially deleterious effects of recombination. We have perturbed that balance, generating RecA variants exhibiting improved recombination functionality via random mutagenesis followed by directed evolution for enhanced function in conjugation. A recA gene segment encoding a 59 residue segment of the protein (Val79-Ala137), encompassing an extensive subunit-subunit interface region, was subjected to degenerate oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. An iterative selection process generated at least 18 recA gene variants capable of producing a higher yield of transconjugants. Three of the variant proteins, RecA I102L, RecA V79L and RecA E86G/C90G were characterized based on their prominence. Relative to wild type RecA, the selected RecA variants exhibited faster rates of ATP hydrolysis, more rapid displacement of SSB, decreased inhibition by the RecX regulator protein, and in general displayed a greater persistence on DNA. The enhancement in conjugational function comes at the price of a measurable RecA-mediated cellular growth deficiency. Persistent DNA binding represents a barrier to other processes of DNA metabolism in vivo. The growth deficiency is alleviated by expression of the functionally robust RecX protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RecA filaments can be a barrier to processes like replication and transcription. RecA regulation by RecX protein is important in maintaining an optimal balance between recombination and other aspects of DNA metabolism.

  7. RECA plays a dual role in the maintenance of chloroplast genome stability in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Odahara, Masaki; Inouye, Takayuki; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) encodes essential genes for chloroplast functions, including photosynthesis. Homologous recombination occurs frequently in cpDNA; however, its significance and underlying mechanism remain poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the role of a nuclear-encoded chloroplast-localized homolog of RecA recombinase, which is a key factor in homologous recombination in bacteria, in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Complete knockout (KO) of the P. patens chloroplast RecA homolog RECA2 caused a modest growth defect and conferred sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate and UV. The KO mutant exhibited low recovery of cpDNA from methyl methanesulfonate damage, suggesting that RECA2 knockout impairs repair of damaged cpDNA. The RECA2 KO mutant also exhibited reduced cpDNA copy number and an elevated level of cpDNA molecule resulting from aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats (13-63 bp), indicating that the RECA2 KO chloroplast genome was destabilized. Taken together, these data suggest a dual role for RECA2 in the maintenance of chloroplast genome stability: RECA2 suppresses aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats and promotes repair of damaged DNA.

  8. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. Methodology/Principal Findings The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3–V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination. PMID:26927306

  9. Genetic requirements for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlašić, Ignacija; Šimatović, Ana; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2011-09-01

    The RecA protein in its functional state is in complex with single-stranded DNA, i.e., in the form of a RecA filament. In SOS induction, the RecA filament functions as a coprotease, enabling the autodigestion of the LexA repressor. The RecA filament can be formed by different mechanisms, but all of them require three enzymatic activities essential for the processing of DNA double-stranded ends. These are helicase, 5'-3' exonuclease, and RecA loading onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). In some mutants, the SOS response can be expressed constitutively during the process of normal DNA metabolism. The RecA730 mutant protein is able to form the RecA filament without the help of RecBCD and RecFOR mediators since it better competes with the single-strand binding (SSB) protein for ssDNA. As a consequence, the recA730 mutants show high constitutive SOS expression. In the study described in this paper, we studied the genetic requirements for constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants. Using a β-galactosidase assay, we showed that the constitutive SOS response in recA730 mutants exhibits different requirements in different backgrounds. In a wild-type background, the constitutive SOS response is partially dependent on RecBCD function. In a recB1080 background (the recB1080 mutation retains only helicase), constitutive SOS expression is partially dependent on RecBCD helicase function and is strongly dependent on RecJ nuclease. Finally, in a recB-null background, the constitutive SOS expression of the recA730 mutant is dependent on the RecJ nuclease. Our results emphasize the importance of the 5'-3' exonuclease for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants and show that RecBCD function can further enhance the excellent intrinsic abilities of the RecA730 protein in vivo.

  10. ATP hydrolysis Promotes Duplex DNA Release by the RecA Presynaptic Complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-10-14

    Homologous recombination is an important DNA repair pathway that plays key roles in maintaining genome stability. Escherichia coli RecA is an ATP-dependent DNA-binding protein that catalyzes the DNA strand exchange reactions in homologous recombination. RecA assembles into long helical filaments on single-stranded DNA, and these presynaptic complexes are responsible for locating and pairing with a homologous duplex DNA. Recent single molecule studies have provided new insights into RecA behavior, but the potential influence of ATP in the reactions remains poorly understood. Here we examine how ATP influences the ability of the RecA presynaptic complex to interact with homologous dsDNA. We demonstrate that over short time regimes, RecA presynaptic complexes sample heterologous dsDNA similarly in the presence of either ATP or ATPγS, suggesting that initial interactions do not depend on ATP hydrolysis. In addition, RecA stabilizes pairing intermediates in three-base steps, and stepping energetics is seemingly unaltered in the presence of ATP. However, the overall dissociation rate of these paired intermediates with ATP is ∼4-fold higher than with ATPγS. These experiments suggest that ATP plays an unanticipated role in promoting the turnover of captured duplex DNA intermediates as RecA attempts to align homologous sequences during the early stages of recombination.

  11. Evidence that the phr+ gene enhances the ultraviolet resistance of Escherichia coli recA strains in the dark.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Fujiwara, Y; Shinagawa, H

    1983-01-01

    An Escherichia coli recA phr+ purA strain was more resistant to ultraviolet radiation than its isogenic derivative recA phr+ purA+ in the absence of photoreactivating light, whereas their nearly isogenic derivative recA phr showed most UV-induced lethality. The amounts of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) per cell in the recA phr+ purA was higher than in the recA phr+ purA+. The recA phr is defective for photoreactivation. Thus, in the recA strain, UV resistance in the dark increased in proportion to the amounts of PRE per cell, suggesting that PRE participates in the process of dark repair of UV-damaged DNA.

  12. Dissecting the dissociation process of RecA monomer from a nucleoprotein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Joo, Chirlmin; Park, Jeehae; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-03-01

    RecA protein is a DNA-dependent ATPase and plays a key role in DNA repair mechanisms. RecA proteins form a helical filament on a single-strand DNA mediating homologous recombination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of RecA-DNA interaction is crucial for further investigation on its biochemical properties. Using a single-molecule fluorescence technique, we dissected the dissociation process with single-monomer resolution. We could resolve the existence of an intermediate state after ATP hydrolysis in the dissociation process. In the nucleotide cofactor free environment, RecA did not dissociate indicating that the bound ADP is required for the monomer dissociation. Based on our observation, we suggest a model for the RecA dissociation process coupled with ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  13. RecA: Regulation and Mechanism of a Molecular Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Homologous recombination maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken chromosomes. The broken chromosome is partially resected to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is used to search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This homology driven 'search and rescue' is catalyzed by a class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are defined in relation to Escherichia coli RecA, which forms a filament on ssDNA. Here, we review the regulation of RecA filament assembly and the mechanism by which RecA quickly and efficiently searches for and identifies a unique homologous sequence among a vast excess of heterologous DNA. Given that RecA is the prototypic DNA strand exchange protein, its behavior affords insight into the actions of eukaryotic RAD51 orthologs and their regulators, BRCA2 and other tumor suppressors.

  14. RecA stimulates AlkB-mediated direct repair of DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Monisha, Mohan; Nigam, Richa; Kodipelli, Naveena; Anindya, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is a 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent demethylase that repairs alkylated single stranded and double stranded DNA. Immunoaffinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry identified RecA, a key factor in homologous recombination, as an AlkB-associated protein. The interaction between AlkB and RecA was validated by yeast two-hybrid assay; size-exclusion chromatography and standard pull down experiment and was shown to be direct and mediated by the N-terminal domain of RecA. RecA binding results AlkB–RecA heterodimer formation and RecA–AlkB repairs alkylated DNA with higher efficiency than AlkB alone. PMID:27378775

  15. Biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins for DNA on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oura, Shusuke; Ito, Masahiro; Nii, Daisuke; Homma, Yoshikazu; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We examined the biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) wrapped with a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule as a mimic for the usual ssDNA molecules. The ssDNA-SWNT hybrids showed larger diameters compared to those of the usual ssDNA molecules. As a result, RecA molecules bound to the ssDNA-SWNTs, as observed using atomic force microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, when carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used rather than ssDNA, the RecA molecules did not bind to the CMC-SWNT hybrids. Our results indicate that RecA molecules recognize ssDNA on SWNT surfaces as DNA molecules through their biomolecular recognition ability.

  16. Unfinished business: Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) for post-1971 U.S. uranium underground miners.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Gary E; Dawson, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Congress enacted the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) in 1990 and amended it in 2000. Included for compensation were underground uranium miners who developed health problems related to radiation exposures. Neither the 1990 Act nor the 2000 Amendments covered post-1971 workers. In this article, we will examine regulatory history and scientific evidence used for the passage of RECA for the pre-1972 miners and will present evidence supporting the inclusion of the post-1971 workers.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of the RecA Gene of Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    complementation studies with the RecA proteins of Proteus vulgaris , Shigella flexneri, Erwinia carotovara, and E. coli B/r (West et al. 1983; Keener et al...Cloning and characterization of recA genes from Proteus vulgaris , Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r. J Bacteriol 160...Cloning and Characterization of the re A Gene of (Aquaspirililun iagnetotacticum N N I Amy E. Berson, Debra V. Hudson, and Nahid S. Waleh++ Molecular

  18. Campylobacter fetus sap inversion occurs in the absence of RecA function.

    PubMed

    Ray, K C; Tu, Z C; Grogono-Thomas, R; Newell, D G; Thompson, S A; Blaser, M J

    2000-10-01

    Phase variation of Campylobacter fetus surface layer proteins (SLPs) occurs by inversion of a 6.2-kb DNA segment containing the unique sap promoter, permitting expression of a single SLP-encoding gene. Previous work has shown that the C. fetus sap inversion system is RecA dependent. When we challenged a pregnant ewe with a recA mutant of wild-type C. fetus (strain 97-211) that expressed the 97-kDa SLP, 15 of the 16 ovine-passaged isolates expressed the 97-kDa protein. However, one strain (97-209) expressed a 127-kDa SLP, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangement may have occurred to enable SLP switching. Lack of RecA function in strains 97-211 and 97-209 was confirmed by their sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. Southern hybridization and PCR of these strains indicated that the aphA insertion into recA was stably present. However, Southern hybridizations demonstrated that in strain 97-209 inversion had occurred in the sap locus. PCR data confirmed inversion of the 6.2-kb DNA element and indicated that in these recA mutants the sap inversion frequency is reduced by 2 to 3 log(10) units compared to that in the wild type. Thus, although the major sap inversion pathway in C. fetus is RecA dependent, alternative lower-frequency, RecA-independent inversion mechanisms exist.

  19. High-Throughput Screening for RecA Inhibitors Using a Transcreener Adenosine 5′-O-Diphosphate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eliza J.R.; Janzen, William P.; Kireev, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5′-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener® adenosine 5′-O-diphosphate [ADP]2 fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z′=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC50 values ≤10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays. PMID:22192312

  20. High-throughput screening for RecA inhibitors using a transcreener adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eliza J R; Janzen, William P; Kireev, Dmitri; Singleton, Scott F

    2012-06-01

    The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5'-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener(®) adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate [ADP](2) fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC(50) values ≤ 10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays.

  1. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains. PMID:24889424

  2. Biochemical characterization of RecA variants that contribute to extreme resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Piechura, Joseph R.; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Byrne, Rose T.; Windgassen, Tricia A.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Battista, John R.; Li, Hung-Wen; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Among strains of Escherichia coli that have evolved to survive extreme exposure to ionizing radiation, mutations in the recA gene are prominent and contribute substantially to the acquired phenotype. Changes at amino acid residue 276, D276A and D276N, occur repeatedly and in separate evolved populations. RecA D276A and RecA D276N exhibit unique adaptations to an environment that can require the repair of hundreds of double strand breaks. These two RecA protein variants (a) exhibit a faster rate of filament nucleation on DNA, as well as a slower extension under at least some conditions, leading potentially to a distribution of the protein among a higher number of shorter filaments, (b) promote DNA strand exchange more efficiently in the context of a shorter filament, and (c) are markedly less inhibited by ADP. These adaptations potentially allow RecA protein to address larger numbers of double strand DNA breaks in an environment where ADP concentrations are higher due to a compromised cellular metabolism. PMID:25559557

  3. An integrative approach to the study of filamentous oligomeric assemblies, with application to RecA.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called "extended" and "compressed" forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general.

  4. An Integrative Approach to the Study of Filamentous Oligomeric Assemblies, with Application to RecA

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H.; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called “extended” and “compressed” forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general. PMID:25785454

  5. RecA Expression in Response to Solar UVR in the Marine Bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Booth, M.G.; Jeffrey, W.H.; Miller, R.V.

    2001-12-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation may produce daily stress on marine and estuarine communities as cells are damaged and repair that damage. Reduction in the earth's stratospheric ozone layer has increased awareness of the potential effects that ultraviolet radiation may have in the environment, including how marine bacteria respond to changes in solar radiation. We examined the use of the bacterial RecA protein as an indicator of the potential of bacteria to repair DNA damage caused by solar UV irradiation using the marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens as a model. RecA is universally present in bacteria and is a regulator protein for the so-called Dark Repair Systems, which include excision repair, postreplication recombinational repair, and mutagenic or SOS repair. Solar UVB and UVA both reduced V. natriegens viability in seawater microcosms. After exposure to unfiltered solar radiation or radiation in which UVB was blocked, survival dropped below 1%, whereas visible light from which UVA and UVB had been filtered had no effect on survival. Using a RecA-specific antibody for detection, RecA protein was induced by solar radiation in a diel pattern in marine microcosms conducted in the Gulf of Mexico. Peak induction was observed at dusk each day. Although RecA expression was correlated with the formation of UVB-induced cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, longer wavelength UVA radiation also induced recA gene expression. Our results demonstrate that RecA-regulated, light-independent repair is an important component in the ability of marine bacteria to survive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and that RecA expression is a useful monitor of bacterial repair after exposure to solar UVR.

  6. The Role of recA Protein in the Multiplicity Reactivation Pathway of Phage T4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    time to leave. Lysogenic phage X then initiates its lytic life cycle by having its repressor cleaved by acti- vated recA protease. In non- lysogenic ...50,000 molecules per cell or approximately 6% of the total cell protein. In cells lysogenic for phage X , the repres- sor which maintains the... lysogenic state has apparently evolved a sensitivity to the activation of the recA protease as its signal that all is not well with its host, and that it is

  7. Development and Characterization of recA Mutants of Campylobacter jejuni for Inclusion in Attenuated Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    PCR . The C.jejuni recA÷ gene encodes a predicted protein with an Mr of 37,012 with high sequence similarity to other RecA proteins. The termination...amplified from VC83 recA by PCR , and the product was used to transfer the mutation b: .iatural transformation into C.jejuni 81-176 and 81-116...Mailing address: Enterics Program, Naval and used a combination of PCR and natural transformation to Medical Research Institute. 12300 Washington Ave

  8. A multicopy phr-plasmid increases the ultraviolet resistance of a recA strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Satake, M; Shinagawa, H

    1984-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the ultraviolet sensitivity of recA strains of Escherichia coli in the dark is suppressed by a plasmid pKY1 which carries the phr gene, suggesting that this is due to a novel effect of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) of E. coli in the dark (Yamamoto et al., 1983a). In this work, we observed that an increase of UV-resistance by pKY1 in the dark is not apparent in strains with a mutation in either uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, lexA, recBC or recF. The sensitivity of recA lexA and recA recBC multiple mutants to UV is suppressed by the plasmid but that of recA uvrA, recA uvrB and recA uvrC is not. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage is slightly more efficient in the recA/pKY1 strain compared with the parental recA strain. On the other hand, the recA and recA/pKY1 strains do not differ significantly in the following properties: Hfr recombination, induction of lambda by UV, and mutagenesis. We suggest that dark repair of PRE is correlated with its capacity of excision repair.

  9. Optimal conditions for decorating outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes with RecA proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the optimal reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with RecA proteins by comparison with hybrids of RecA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To react SWNTs with RecA proteins, we first prepared ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The heights of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids increased as the amount of RecA used in the reaction increased, as determined from atomic force microscopy images. We further confirmed the increasing adsorption of RecA proteins onto ssDNA on SWNT surfaces by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the combination of RecA proteins and ssDNA-SWNT hybrids forms RecA-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. We also successfully controlled the amount of RecA adsorbed on the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. Our results thus indicate the optimized reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of SWNTs with RecA proteins, which is the key to the development of novel biosensors and nanomaterial-based bioelectronics.

  10. Differentiation of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. pentosus, and L. paraplantarum by recA Gene Sequence Analysis and Multiplex PCR Assay with recA Gene-Derived Primers

    PubMed Central

    Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E.; Dellaglio, Franco

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we succeeded in differentiating Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum by means of recA gene sequence comparison. Short homologous regions of about 360 bp were amplified by PCR with degenerate consensus primers, sequenced, and analyzed, and 322 bp were considered for the inference of phylogenetic trees. Phylograms, obtained by parsimony, maximum likelihood, and analysis of data matrices with the neighbor-joining model, were coherent and clearly separated the three species. The validity of the recA gene and RecA protein as phylogenetic markers is discussed. Based on the same sequences, species-specific primers were designed, and a multiplex PCR protocol for the simultaneous distinction of these bacteria was optimized. The sizes of the amplicons were 318 bp for L. plantarum, 218 bp for L. pentosus, and 107 bp for L. paraplantarum. This strategy permitted the unambiguous identification of strains belonging to L. plantarum, L. pentosus, and L. paraplantarum in a single reaction, indicating its applicability to the speciation of isolates of the L. plantarum group. PMID:11472918

  11. RecA Protein Plays a Role in the Chemotactic Response and Chemoreceptor Clustering of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Mayola, Albert; Irazoki, Oihane; Martínez, Ignacio A.; Petrov, Dmitri; Menolascina, Filippo; Stocker, Roman; Reyes-Darias, José A.; Krell, Tino; Barbé, Jordi; Campoy, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The RecA protein is the main bacterial recombinase and the activator of the SOS system. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium, RecA is also essential for swarming, a flagellar-driven surface translocation mechanism widespread among bacteria. In this work, the direct interaction between RecA and the CheW coupling protein was confirmed, and the motility and chemotactic phenotype of a S. Typhimurium ΔrecA mutant was characterized through microfluidics, optical trapping, and quantitative capillary assays. The results demonstrate the tight association of RecA with the chemotaxis pathway and also its involvement in polar chemoreceptor cluster formation. RecA is therefore necessary for standard flagellar rotation switching, implying its essential role not only in swarming motility but also in the normal chemotactic response of S. Typhimurium. PMID:25147953

  12. Transoceanic spreading of pathogenic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with distinctive genetic signatures in the recA gene.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Brown, Eric W; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. Consistent multilocus sequence typing for V. parahaemolyticus has shown difficulties in the amplification of the recA gene by PCR associated with a lack of amplification or a larger PCR product than expected. In one strain (090-96, Peru, 1996), the produced PCR product was determined to be composed of two recA fragments derived from different Vibrio species. To better understand this phenomenon, we sequenced the whole genome of this strain. The hybrid recA gene was found to be the result of a fragmentation of the original lineage-specific recA gene resulting from a DNA insertion of approximately 30 kb in length. This insert had a G+C content of 38.8%, lower than that of the average G+C content of V. parahaemolyticus (45.2%), and contained 19 ORFs, including a complete recA gene. This new acquired recA gene deviated 24% in sequence from the original recA and was distantly related to recA genes from bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. The reconstruction of the original recA gene (recA3) identified the precursor as belonging to ST189, a sequence type reported previously only in Asian countries. The identification of this singular genetic feature in strains from Asia reveals new evidence for genetic connectivity between V. parahaemolyticus populations at both sides of the Pacific Ocean that, in addition to the previously described pandemic clone, supports the existence of a recurrent transoceanic spreading of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with the corresponding potential risk of pandemic expansion.

  13. Transoceanic Spreading of Pathogenic Strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with Distinctive Genetic Signatures in the recA Gene

    PubMed Central

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Brown, Eric W.; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. Consistent multilocus sequence typing for V. parahaemolyticus has shown difficulties in the amplification of the recA gene by PCR associated with a lack of amplification or a larger PCR product than expected. In one strain (090–96, Peru, 1996), the produced PCR product was determined to be composed of two recA fragments derived from different Vibrio species. To better understand this phenomenon, we sequenced the whole genome of this strain. The hybrid recA gene was found to be the result of a fragmentation of the original lineage-specific recA gene resulting from a DNA insertion of approximately 30 kb in length. This insert had a G+C content of 38.8%, lower than that of the average G+C content of V. parahaemolyticus (45.2%), and contained 19 ORFs, including a complete recA gene. This new acquired recA gene deviated 24% in sequence from the original recA and was distantly related to recA genes from bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. The reconstruction of the original recA gene (recA3) identified the precursor as belonging to ST189, a sequence type reported previously only in Asian countries. The identification of this singular genetic feature in strains from Asia reveals new evidence for genetic connectivity between V. parahaemolyticus populations at both sides of the Pacific Ocean that, in addition to the previously described pandemic clone, supports the existence of a recurrent transoceanic spreading of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with the corresponding potential risk of pandemic expansion. PMID:25679989

  14. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  15. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii RecA Protein in Repair of DNA Damage, Antimicrobial Resistance, General Stress Response, and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Jesús; Bardina, Carlota; Beceiro, Alejandro; Rumbo, Soraya; Cabral, Maria P.; Barbé, Jordi; Bou, Germán

    2011-01-01

    RecA is the major enzyme involved in homologous recombination and plays a central role in SOS mutagenesis. In Acinetobacter spp., including Acinetobacter baumannii , a multidrug-resistant bacterium responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide, DNA repair responses differ in many ways from those of other bacterial species. In this work, the function of A. baumannii RecA was examined by constructing a recA mutant. Alteration of this single gene had a pleiotropic effect, showing the involvement of RecA in DNA damage repair and consequently in cellular protection against stresses induced by DNA damaging agents, several classes of antibiotics, and oxidative agents. In addition, the absence of RecA decreased survival in response to both heat shock and desiccation. Virulence assays in vitro (with macrophages) and in vivo (using a mouse model) similarly implicated RecA in the pathogenicity of A. baumannii . Thus, the data strongly suggest a protective role for RecA in the bacterium and indicate that inactivation of the protein can contribute to a combined therapeutic approach to controlling A. baumannii infections. PMID:21642465

  17. Contraception for the under 16s: better safe than sorry.

    PubMed

    Cook, A

    1981-09-16

    acceptible if the couple was engaged, and 5.4% were totally against it, 9) 62% felt abortion was the right of every woman and 31.1% felt it was acceptible if the physical or mental well being of the mother was at risk, 10) 40.9% agreed with the British Medical Association policy on teenage contraception which advises doctors to encourage under 16's to tell their parents, but if they refuse, the doctor can still prescribe the pill, 11) 22.7% wanted contraception unconditionally available, 18.2% felt it should be dependent on parental knowledge, and 17% said it should not be available, 12) there was a trend for opinions to become less liberal as age increased, and 13) young girls appear to be less conscientious in using contraception than older women.

  18. Cloning of the recA gene from a free-living leptospire and distribution of RecA-like protein among spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Parrish, E A; Gherardini, F C

    1991-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the recA gene of Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was isolated from a cosmid library of genomic DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutation. The cloned serovar patoc recA gene efficiently restored resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate. Recombination proficiency was also restored, as measured by the formation of Lac+ recombinants from duplicated mutant lacZ genes. Additionally, the cloned recA gene increased the spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced production of lambda phage in lysogens of an E. coli recA mutant. The product of the cloned recA gene was identified in maxicells as a polypeptide with an Mr of 43,000. Antibodies prepared against the E. coli RecA protein cross-reacted with the serovar patoc RecA protein, indicating structural conservation. Southern hybridization data showed that the serovar patoc recA gene has diverged from the recA gene of L. interrogans, Leptonema illini, and E. coli. With the exception of the RecA protein of L. interrogans serovar hardjo, the RecA protein of the Leptospira serovars and L. illini were synthesized at elevated levels following treatment of cells with nalidixic acid. The level of detectable RecA correlated with previous studies demonstrating that free-living cells of L. biflexa serovars and L. illini were considerably more resistant to DNA-damaging agents than were those of parasitic L. interrogans serovars. RecA protein was not detected in cells of virulent Treponema pallidum or Borrelia burgdorferi. Images PMID:2036006

  19. E. coli recA protein possesses a strand separating activity on short duplex DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, M; Riboli, B; Magni, G

    1985-01-01

    RecA protein was found to catalyze the dissociation of the strands of a DNA substrate consisting of a 20-nucleotide primer annealed to circular single-stranded M13mp DNA. The strand separation reaction requires ATP hydrolysis and the presence of single-stranded DNA flanking the duplex DNA region to be unwound. RecA-catalyzed strand separation is effective only for very short duplexes, not exceeding 30 bp, and is not stimulated by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. These results are consistent with the ability of recA protein to disrupt regions of secondary structure in single-stranded DNA and to incorporate large non-homologies into heteroduplex DNA. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 3. PMID:3905387

  20. Amplified UvrA protein can ameliorate the ultraviolet sensitivity of an Escherichia coli recA mutant.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsunaga, T; Nikaido, O; Yamamoto, K

    2001-12-19

    When a recA strain of Escherichia coli was transformed with the multicopy plasmid pSF11 carrying the uvrA gene of E. coli, its extreme ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity was decreased. The sensitivity of the lexA1 (Ind(-)) strain to UV was also decreased by pSF11. The recA cells expressing Neurospora crassa UV damage endonuclease (UVDE), encoding UV-endonuclease, show UV resistance. On the other hand, only partial amelioration of UV sensitivity of the recA strain was observed in the presence of the plasmid pNP10 carrying the uvrB gene. Host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage in recA cells with pSF11 was as efficient as that in wild-type cells. Using an antibody to detect cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, we found that UV-irradiated recA cells removed dimers from their DNA more rapidly if they carried pSF11 than if they carried a vacant control plasmid. Using anti-UvrA antibody, we observed that the expression level of UvrA protein was about 20-fold higher in the recA strain with pSF11 than in the recA strain without pSF11. Our results were consistent with the idea that constitutive level of UvrA protein in the recA cells results in constitutive levels of active UvrABC nuclease which is not enough to operate full nucleotide excision repair (NER), thus leading to extreme UV sensitivity.

  1. On the Mechanism of Homology Search by RecA Protein Filaments.

    PubMed

    Kochugaeva, Maria P; Shvets, Alexey A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2017-03-14

    Genetic stability is a key factor in maintaining, survival, and reproduction of biological cells. It relies on many processes, but one of the most important is a homologous recombination, in which the repair of breaks in double-stranded DNA molecules is taking place with a help of several specific proteins. In bacteria, this task is accomplished by RecA proteins that are active as nucleoprotein filaments formed on single-stranded segments of DNA. A critical step in the homologous recombination is a search for a corresponding homologous region on DNA, which is called a homology search. Recent single-molecule experiments clarified some aspects of this process, but its molecular mechanisms remain not well understood. We developed a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the homology search. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the homology search is presented. It is found that the search dynamics depends on the degree of extension of DNA molecules and on the size of RecA nucleoprotein filaments, in agreement with experimental single-molecule measurements of DNA pairing by RecA proteins. Our theoretical calculations, supported by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations, provide a molecular description of the mechanisms of the homology search.

  2. Use of RecA fusion proteins to induce genomic modifications in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hsin-Kai; Essner, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleic acid-protein filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA during the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that efficiently undergoes a homology search and engages in pairing with the complementary DNA sequence. We utilized the pairing activity of RecA–DNA filaments to tether biochemical activities to specific chromosomal sites. Different filaments with chimeric RecA proteins were tested for the ability to induce loss of heterozygosity at the golden locus in zebrafish after injection at the one-cell stage. A fusion protein between RecA containing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the DNA-binding domain of Gal4 (NLS-RecA-Gal4) displayed the most activity. Our results demonstrate that complementary ssDNA filaments as short as 60 nucleotides coated with NLS-RecA-Gal4 protein are able to cause loss of heterozygosity in ∼3% of the injected embryos. We demonstrate that lesions in ∼9% of the F0 zebrafish are transmitted to subsequent generations as large chromosomal deletions. Co-injection of linear DNA with the NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments promotes the insertion of the DNA into targeted genomic locations. Our data support a model whereby NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments bind to complementary target sites on chromatin and stall DNA replication forks, resulting in a DNA DSB. PMID:21266475

  3. An improved recombineering approach by adding RecA to lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Sarov, Mihail; Rientjes, Jeanette; Fu, Jun; Hollak, Heike; Kranz, Harald; Xie, Wei; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2006-01-01

    Recombineering is the use of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli for DNA engineering. Of several approaches, use of the lambda phage Red operon is emerging as the most reliable and flexible. The Red operon includes three components: Redalpha, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, Redbeta, an annealing protein, and Redgamma, an inhibitor of the major E. coli exonuclease and recombination complex, RecBCD. Most E. coli cloning hosts are recA deficient to eliminate recombination and therefore enhance the stability of cloned DNAs. However, loss of RecA also impairs general cellular integrity. Here we report that transient RecA co-expression enhances the total number of successful recombinations in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), mostly because the E. coli host is more able to survive the stresses of DNA transformation procedures. We combined this practical improvement with the advantages of a temperature-sensitive version of the low copy pSC101 plasmid to develop a protocol that is convenient and more efficient than any recombineering procedure, for use of either double- or single-stranded DNA, published to date.

  4. Use of RecA fusion proteins to induce genomic modifications in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsin-Kai; Essner, Jeffrey J

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleic acid-protein filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA during the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that efficiently undergoes a homology search and engages in pairing with the complementary DNA sequence. We utilized the pairing activity of RecA-DNA filaments to tether biochemical activities to specific chromosomal sites. Different filaments with chimeric RecA proteins were tested for the ability to induce loss of heterozygosity at the golden locus in zebrafish after injection at the one-cell stage. A fusion protein between RecA containing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the DNA-binding domain of Gal4 (NLS-RecA-Gal4) displayed the most activity. Our results demonstrate that complementary ssDNA filaments as short as 60 nucleotides coated with NLS-RecA-Gal4 protein are able to cause loss of heterozygosity in ∼3% of the injected embryos. We demonstrate that lesions in ∼9% of the F0 zebrafish are transmitted to subsequent generations as large chromosomal deletions. Co-injection of linear DNA with the NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments promotes the insertion of the DNA into targeted genomic locations. Our data support a model whereby NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments bind to complementary target sites on chromatin and stall DNA replication forks, resulting in a DNA DSB.

  5. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life.

  6. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR. PMID:28101376

  7. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  8. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-03-16

    During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

  9. A Structure-Function Study of RecA: The Structural Basis for ATP Specificity in the Strand Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegner, Julie; Spruill, Natalie; Plesniak, Leigh A.

    1999-11-01

    The terms "structure" and "function" can assume a variety of meanings. In biochemistry, the "structure" of a protein can refer to its sequence of amino acids, the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a subunit, or the arrangement of subunits into a larger oligomeric or filamentous state. Likewise, the function of biological macromolecules can be examined at many levels. The function of a protein can be described by its role in an organism's survival or by a chemical reaction that it promotes. We have designed a three-part biochemical laboratory experiment that characterizes the structure and function of the Escherichia coli RecA protein. The first part examines the importance of RecA in the survival of bacteria that have been exposed to UV light. This is the broadest view of function of the enzyme. Second, the students use an in vitro assay of RecA whereby the protein promotes homologous recombination. Because RecA functions not catalytically, but rather stoichiometrically, in this recombination reaction, the oligomeric state of RecA in complex with DNA must also be discussed. Finally, through molecular modeling of X-ray crystallographic structures, students identify functionally important features of the ATP cofactor binding site of RecA.

  10. Mechanical force antagonizes the inhibitory effects of RecX on RecA filament formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Le, Shimin; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Xinghua; Chen, Jin; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Muniyappa, Kalappa; Yan, Jie

    2014-10-29

    Efficient bacterial recombinational DNA repair involves rapid cycles of RecA filament assembly and disassembly. The RecX protein plays a crucial inhibitory role in RecA filament formation and stability. As the broken ends of DNA are tethered during homologous search, RecA filaments assembled at the ends are likely subject to force. In this work, we investigated the interplay between RecX and force on RecA filament formation and stability. Using magnetic tweezers, at single molecular level, we found that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) RecX could catalyze stepwise de-polymerization of preformed MtRecA filament in the presence of ATP hydrolysis at low forces (<7 pN). However, applying larger forces antagonized the inhibitory effects of MtRecX, and a partially de-polymerized MtRecA filament could re-polymerize in the presence of MtRecX, which cannot be explained by previous models. Theoretical analysis of force-dependent conformational free energies of naked ssDNA and RecA nucleoprotein filament suggests that mechanical force stabilizes RecA filament, which provides a possible mechanism for the observation. As the antagonizing effect of force on the inhibitory function of RecX takes place in a physiological range; these findings broadly suggest a potential mechanosensitive regulation during homologous recombination.

  11. The use of 16S and 16S-23S rDNA to easily detect and differentiate common Gram-negative orchard epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Jeng, R S; Svircev, A M; Myers, A L; Beliaeva, L; Hunter, D M; Hubbes, M

    2001-02-01

    The identification of Gram-negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria commonly isolated from an orchard phylloplane may result in a time consuming and tedious process for the plant pathologist. The paper provides a simple "one-step" protocol that uses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify intergenic spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes and a portion of 16S gene in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. Amplified 16S rDNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) following EcoRI digestion produced band patterns that readily distinguished between the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora (causal agent of fire blight in pear and apple) and the orchard epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans (formerly E. herbicola). The amplified DNA patterns of 16S-23S spacer regions may be used to differentiate E. amylovora at the intraspecies level. Isolates of E. amylovora obtained from raspberries exhibited two major fragments while those obtained from apples showed three distinct amplified DNA bands. In addition, the size of the 16S-23S spacer region differs between Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The RFLP pattern generated by HaeIII digestion may be used to provide a rapid and accurate identification of these two common orchard epiphytes.

  12. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  13. Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs of Acinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oerther, Daniel B.; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schramm, Andreas; Amann, Rudolf; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Cangelosi and Brabant used oligonucleotide probes targeting the precursor 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli to demonstrate that the levels of precursor rRNA were more sensitive to changes in growth phase than the levels of total rRNA (G. A. Cangelosi and W. H. Brabant, J. Bacteriol. 179:4457–4463, 1997). In order to measure changes in the levels of precursor rRNA in activated sludge systems, we designed oligonucleotide probes targeting the 3′ region of the precursor 16S rRNA of Acinetobacter spp. We used these probes to monitor changes in the level of precursor 16S rRNA during batch growth of Acinetobacter spp. in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, filtered wastewater, and in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. Consistent with the previous reports for E. coli, results obtained with membrane hybridizations and fluorescence in situ hybridizations with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus grown in LB medium showed a more substantial and faster increase in precursor 16S rRNA levels compared to the increase in total 16S rRNA levels during exponential growth. Diluting an overnight culture of A. calcoaceticus grown in LB medium with filtered wastewater resulted in a pattern of precursor 16S rRNA levels that appeared to follow diauxic growth. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes targeting total 16S rRNA and precursor 16S rRNA showed that individual cells of A. calcoaceticus expressed highly variable levels of precursor 16S rRNA when adapting from LB medium to filtered sewage. Precursor 16S rRNA levels of Acinetobacter spp. transiently increased when activated sludge was mixed with influent wastewater in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. These results suggest that Acinetobacter spp. experience a change in growth activity within wastewater treatment systems. PMID:10788395

  14. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

    PubMed

    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  15. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  16. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  17. Incorporating 16S gene copy number information improves estimates of microbial diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Green, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA ("16S") gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly - from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data.

  18. Structure/function relationships in RecA protein-mediated homology recognition and strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Prentiss, Mara; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins include RecA, Rad51, and Dmc1. These recombinases are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. Homology search and strand exchange occur during double-strand break repair and in eukaryotes during meiotic recombination. In bacteria, homology search begins when RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site to form the presynaptic filament. The filament is a right-handed helix, where the initiating strand is bound deep within the filament. Once the presynaptic filament is formed, it interrogates nearby double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to find a homologous sequence; therefore, we provide a detailed discussion of structural features of the presynaptic filament that play important functional roles. The discussion includes many diagrams showing multiple filament turns. These diagrams illustrate interactions that are not evident in single turn structures. The first dsDNA interactions with the presynaptic filament are insensitive to mismatches. The mismatch insensitive interactions lead to dsDNA deformation that triggers a homology testing process governed by kinetics. The first homology test involves ∼8 bases. Almost all interactions are rejected by this initial rapid test, leading to a new cycle of homology testing. Interactions that pass the initial rapid test proceed to a slower testing stage. That slower stage induces nonhomologous dsDNA to reverse strand exchange and begin a new cycle of homology testing. In contrast, homologous dsDNA continues to extend the heteroduplex strand-exchange product until ATP hydrolysis makes strand exchange irreversible.

  19. Polarity of heteroduplex formation promoted by Escherichia coli recA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, R; Cunningham, R P; DasGupta, C; Radding, C M

    1981-01-01

    When recA protein pairs circular single strands with linear duplex DNA, the circular strand displaces its homolog from only one end of the duplex molecule and rapidly creates heteroduplex joints that are thousands of base pairs long [DasGupta, C., Shibata, T., Cunningham, R. P. & Radding, C. M. (1980) Cell 22, 437-446]. To examine this apparently polar reaction, we prepared chimeric duplex fragments of DNA that had M13 nucleotide sequences at one end and G4 sequences at the other. Circular single strands homologous to M13 DNA paired with a chimeric fragment when M13 sequences were located at the 3' end of the complementary strand but did not pair when the M13 sequences were located at the 5' end. Likewise circular single-stranded G4 DNA paired with chimeric fragments only when G4 sequences were located at the 3' end of the complementary strand. To confirm these observations, we prepared fd DNA labeled only at the 5' or 3' end of the plus strand, and we examined the susceptibility of these labeled ends to digestion by exonucleases when joint molecules were formed. Eighty percent of the 5' label in joint molecules became sensitive to exonuclease VII. Displacement of that 5' end by recA protein was concerted because it did not occur in the absence of single-stranded DNA or in the presence of heterologous single strands. By contrast, only a small fraction of the 3' label became sensitive to exonuclease VII or exonuclease I. These observations show that recA protein forms heteroduplex joints in a concerted and polarized way. Images PMID:6272272

  20. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, C.W.; Souza, E.M.; Etto, R.M.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.; Steffens, M.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecXHs) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecAHs) and that RecAHs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecXHs inhibited 90% of the RecAHs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecAHs. RecAHs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecXHs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecXHs protein negatively modulates the RecAHs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions. PMID:23044625

  1. Equilibrium binding of single-stranded DNA to the secondary DNA binding site of the bacterial recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Gourves, A S; Defais, M; Johnson, N P

    2001-03-30

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleoprotein filament in vitro with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at its primary DNA binding site, site I. This filament has a second site, site II, which binds ssDNA and double-stranded DNA. We have investigated the binding of ssDNA to the RecA protein in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) cofactor using fluorescence anisotropy. The RecA protein carried out DNA strand exchange with a 5'-fluorescein-labeled 32-mer oligonucleotide. The anisotropy signal was shown to measure oligonucleotide binding to RecA, and the relationship between signal and binding density was determined. Binding of ssDNA to site I of RecA was stable at high NaCl concentrations. Binding to site II could be described by a simple two-state equilibrium, K = 4.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(5) m(-1) (37 degrees C, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4). The reaction was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed. It depended on salt concentration and was sensitive to the type of monovalent anion, suggesting that anion-dependent protein conformations contribute to ssDNA binding at site II.

  2. Recombination in recA cells between direct repeats of insertion element IS1.

    PubMed Central

    Braedt, G

    1985-01-01

    The IS1 sequences that flank the Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene as direct repeats recombine after transformation into an Escherichia coli recA strain. The recombination requires the lambda pL promoter on the plasmid. A plasmid that contains mutant IS1 elements does not recombine. These results indicate that this recombination requires an IS1-specific gene product. The recombinational activity of IS1 may resolve transient cointegrates formed during the transposition of IS1. I discuss a possible role for the lambda pL promoter. Images PMID:2985536

  3. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  4. Use of 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequences to Infer Relationships among Archaebacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-16

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Archaebacteria; Eubacteria ; Eukaryotes; 16S Ribosomal RNA; 08 I Phylogeny; rRNA; RNA Sequencing; Molecular Clock; Urkingdoms; r...16S rRNA data were used to infer the relat onships among the archaebacteria, and of the archaebacteria to the eubacteria and eukaryotes. ur programs for...been published (1, 2, 16, 18). The analyses render untenable the suggestions of Lake and colleagues (Lake et al., 1985) that the eubacteria derive from

  5. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  6. Modeling the early stage of DNA sequence recognition within RecA nucleoprotein filaments.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Adrien; Amourda, Christopher; Poulain, Pierre; Férey, Nicolas; Baaden, Marc; Zacharias, Martin; Delalande, Olivier; Prévost, Chantal

    2010-10-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental process enabling the repair of double-strand breaks with a high degree of fidelity. In prokaryotes, it is carried out by RecA nucleofilaments formed on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These filaments incorporate genomic sequences that are homologous to the ssDNA and exchange the homologous strands. Due to the highly dynamic character of this process and its rapid propagation along the filament, the sequence recognition and strand exchange mechanism remains unknown at the structural level. The recently published structure of the RecA/DNA filament active for recombination (Chen et al., Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure, Nature 2008, 453, 489) provides a starting point for new exploration of the system. Here, we investigate the possible geometries of association of the early encounter complex between RecA/ssDNA filament and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Due to the huge size of the system and its dense packing, we use a reduced representation for protein and DNA together with state-of-the-art molecular modeling methods, including systematic docking and virtual reality simulations. The results indicate that it is possible for the double-stranded DNA to access the RecA-bound ssDNA while initially retaining its Watson-Crick pairing. They emphasize the importance of RecA L2 loop mobility for both recognition and strand exchange.

  7. Comparative analysis of bacteria associated with different mosses by 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yang; Li, Yan Hong

    2017-01-01

    To understand the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses, a phylogenetic study of bacterial communities in three mosses was carried out based on 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. The mosses used were Hygroamblystegium noterophilum, Entodon compressus and Grimmia montana, representing hygrophyte, shady plant and xerophyte, respectively. In total, the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), richness and diversity were different regardless of the moss species and the library level. All the examined 1183 clones were assigned to 248 OTUs, 56 genera were assigned in rDNA libraries and 23 genera were determined at the rRNA level. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were considered as the most dominant phyla in all the libraries, whereas abundant Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria were detected in the rDNA library of Entodon compressus and approximately 24.7% clones were assigned to Candidate division TM7 in Grimmia montana at rRNA level. The heatmap showed the bacterial profiles derived from rRNA and rDNA were partly overlapping. However, the principle component analysis of all the profiles derived from rDNA showed sharper differences between the different mosses than that of rRNA-based profiles. This suggests that the metabolically active bacterial compositions in different mosses were more phylogenetically similar and the differences of the bacteria associated with different mosses were mainly detected at the rDNA level. Obtained results clearly demonstrate that combination of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing is preferred approach to have a good understanding on the constitution of the microbial communities in mosses.

  8. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  9. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  10. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    PubMed

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species.

  11. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  12. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development.

  13. Routine Molecular Identification of Enterococci by Gene-Specific PCR and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lorino, Giulia; Gherardi, Giovanni; Battistoni, Fabrizio; De Cesaris, Marina; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2001-01-01

    For 279 clinically isolated specimens identified by commercial kits as enterococci, genotypic identification was performed by two multiplex PCRs, one with ddlE. faecalis and ddlE. faecium primers and another with vanC-1 and vanC-2/3 primers, and by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. For 253 strains, phenotypic and genotypic results were the same. Multiplex PCR allowed for the identification of 13 discordant results. Six strains were not enterococci and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. For 5 discordant and 10 concordant enterococcal strains, 16S rDNA sequencing was needed. Because many supplementary tests are frequently necessary for phenotypic identification, the molecular approach is a good alternative. PMID:11158155

  14. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  15. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  16. RecBCD-Dependent Joint Molecule Formation Promoted by the Escherichia coli RecA and SSB Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Linda J.; Dixon, Dan A.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    1991-04-01

    We describe the formation of homologously paired joint molecules in an in vitro reaction that is dependent on the concerted actions of purified RecA and RecBCD proteins and is stimulated by single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), RecBCD enzyme initiates the process by unwinding the linear double-stranded DNA to produce single-stranded DNA, which is trapped by SSB and RecA. RecA uses this single-stranded DNA to catalyze the invasion of a supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule, forming a homologously paired joint molecule. At low RecBCD enzyme concentrations, the rate-limiting step is the unwinding of duplex DNA by RecBCD, whereas at higher RecBCD concentrations, the rate-limiting step is RecA-catalyzed strand invasion. The behavior of mutant RecA proteins in this in vitro reaction parallels their in vivo phenotypes, suggesting that this reaction may define biochemical steps that occur during homologous recombination by the RecBCD pathway in vivo.

  17. Non-covalent interactions between ATP and RecA DNA-repairing proteins: DFT and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The role of Bacterial RecA in the structural maintenance of genomes and the genetic information they carry has been established. In particular, the RecA DNA-repairing protein from D. Radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria, is crucial for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). We have performed semi-empirical free-energy calculations and QM/MM calculations to study their non-covalent interactions with ATP and ADP. Such studies provide insight into the mechanisms of ATP/ADP --> RecA energy transfer and, therefore, about specific functional uses of incoming energy for DNA repairing mechanisms. We present a detailed analysis of the non-covalent interactions which minimize the interaction Gibbs free energies leading to the most stable non-covalent binding sites. Van der Waal, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions has been quantified which provides a detailed insight into the mechanisms of ATP-RecA interaction. Further, possible chemical interactions and functional roles of RecA proteins are explored based on the previously mentioned studies. Acknowledgements: Funded, in part, by DTRA award 106339 (JHR). Dr. Mark C. Palenik and Mrs. Lora Beard are gratefully acknowledged Supported in part by DTRA Award 106339.

  18. recA protein-catalyzed strand assimilation: stimulation by Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, K; Weinstock, G M; Lehman, I R

    1980-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli significantly alters the strand assimilation reaction catalyzed by recA protein [McEntee, K., Weinstock, G. M. & Lehman, I. R. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 2615--2619]. The binding protein (i) increases the rate and extent of strand assimilation into homologous duplex DNA, (ii) enhances the formation of a complex between recA protein and duplex DNA in the presence of homologous or heterologous single-stranded DNA, (iii) reduces the rate and extent of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by recA protein in the presence of single-stranded DNA, (iv) reduces the high concentration of recA protein required for strand assimilation, and (v) permits detection of strand assimilation in the presence of the ATP analog, adenosine 5'-O-(O-thiotriphosphate). Single-stranded DNA-binding protein purified from a binding protein mutant (lexC) is considerably less effective than wild-type binding protein in stimulating strand assimilation, a result which suggests that single-stranded DNA-binding protein participates in general recombination in vivo. PMID:6244589

  19. Structural data suggest that the active and inactive forms of the RecA filament are not simply interconvertible.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1992-09-05

    We have used electron microscopy to examine the two major conformational states of the helical filament formed by the RecA protein of Escherichia coli. The compressed filament, formed in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor either as a self-polymer or on a single-stranded DNA molecule, is characterized in solution by about 6.1 subunits per turn of a 76 A pitch helix, and appears to be inactive with respect to all RecA activity. The active state of the filament, formed with ATP or an ATP analog on either a single or double-stranded DNA substrate, has about 6.2 subunits per turn of a 94 A pitch helix. Measurements of the contour length of RecA-covered single-stranded DNA circles in ice, formed in the absence of nucleotide cofactor, indicate that each RecA subunit binds five bases, in contrast to the three bases or base-pairs per subunit in the active state. The different stoichiometries of DNA binding suggests that the two polymeric forms are not interconvertible, as has been suggested on biochemical grounds. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the inactive state shows the same general features as the 83 A pitch filament present in the RecA crystal. This structural similarity and the fact that the crystal does not contain ATP or DNA suggests that the crystal structure is more similar to the compressed filament than the active, extended filament.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  1. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  2. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  3. Effect of gemini (alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide)) (16-s-16, s=4, 5, 6) surfactants on the interaction of ninhydrin with chromium-glycylphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dileep; Rub, Malik Abdul; Akram, Mohd; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-11-11

    The effect of gemini (alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide)) (16-s-16, s=4, 5, 6) surfactants on the interaction of ninhydrin with chromium(III) complex of glycylphenylalanine ([Cr(III)-Gly-Phe]2+) has been investigated using UV-visible spectrophotometer at different temperatures. The order of reaction with respect to [Cr(III)-Gly-Phe]2+ is unity while it is fractional with respect to ninhydrin. Whereas, the values of rate constant (kψ) increase and leveling-off regions, like conventional single chain cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, were observed with geminis, later produces a third region of increasing kψ at higher gemini surfactant concentrations. This unusual third-region effect of the gemini micelles is assigned to changes in their micellar morphologies. The results obtained in micellar media were treated in terms of pseudo-phase model. The values of thermodynamic parameters (Ea, ΔH# and ΔS#) and binding constants (KA and KNin) have been evaluated.

  4. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  5. Ovine pedomics: the first study of the ovine foot 16S rRNA-based microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first study of the bacterial microbiome of ovine interdigital skin based on 16S rRNA by pyrosequencing and conventional cloning with Sanger-sequencing. Ovine foot rot is an infectious, contagious disease of sheep that causes severe lameness and economic loss from decreased flock produc...

  6. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  7. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  8. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  9. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  10. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  11. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  12. Problem-Based Test: Functional Analysis of Mutant 16S rRNAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: ribosome, ribosomal subunits, antibiotics, point mutation, 16S, 5S, and 23S rRNA, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, mRNA, tRNA, palindrome, hairpin, restriction endonuclease, fMet-tRNA, peptidyl transferase, initiation, elongation, termination of translation, expression plasmid, transformation,…

  13. Molecular Interaction and Cellular Location of RecA and CheW Proteins in Salmonella enterica during SOS Response and Their Implication in Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Irazoki, Oihane; Aranda, Jesús; Zimmermann, Timo; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in DNA damage repair and recombination, the RecA protein, through its interaction with CheW, is involved in swarming motility, a form of flagella-dependent movement across surfaces. In order to better understand how SOS response modulates swarming, in this work the location of RecA and CheW proteins within the swarming cells has been studied by using super-resolution microscopy. Further, and after in silico docking studies, the specific RecA and CheW regions associated with the RecA-CheW interaction have also been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation techniques. Our results point out that the CheW distribution changes, from the cell poles to foci distributed in a helical pattern along the cell axis when SOS response is activated or RecA protein is overexpressed. In this situation, the CheW presents the same subcellular location as that of RecA, pointing out that the previously described RecA storage structures may be modulators of swarming motility. Data reported herein not only confirmed that the RecA-CheW pair is essential for swarming motility but it is directly involved in the CheW distribution change associated to SOS response activation. A model explaining not only the mechanism by which DNA damage modulates swarming but also how both the lack and the excess of RecA protein impair this motility is proposed. PMID:27766091

  14. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products.

  15. Enhanced generation of A:T-->T:A transversions in a recA730 lexA51(Def) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Akanuma, M; Woodgate, R; Ohta, T

    1997-01-03

    RecA730 belongs to a class of mutant RecA protein that is often referred to as RecA*, since it is constitutively activated for coprotease functions in the absence of exogenous DNA-damage. Escherichia coli strains carrying recA730 (or other recA* alleles) exhibit dramatic increases in SOS-dependent spontaneous mutator activity. We have analyzed the specificity of this mutator phenotype by employing F'-plasmids carrying a set of mutant lacZ genes that can individually detect two types of transitions, four types of transversions, and four kinds of specific frameshift events. Analysis revealed that most of the spontaneous mutagenesis in a recA730 lexA51(Def) strain (which expresses derepressed levels of all LexA-regulated proteins) can be attributed to a specific increase in A:T-->T:A, A:T-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions, with the A:T-->T:A transversions occurring most frequently. These transversion events were completely abolished in a delta umuDC strain, indicating that the functionally active UmuD'C proteins are normally required for their generation. The spectrum obtained was similar to that of strains with a defect in the epsilon (3'-->5' proofreading) subunit of DNA polymerase III. Such an observation raises the possibility that the wild-type epsilon protein is in activated in strains expressing the RecA730 and UmuD'C proteins.

  16. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  17. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  18. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  19. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  20. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I. Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The ‘p’ values are distinctly different from intraspecific ‘p’ distance (0–0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus – B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  1. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  2. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  3. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  4. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  5. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  6. How conserved are the conserved 16S-rRNA regions?

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz Suarez, Luis Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene has been used as master key for studying prokaryotic diversity in almost every environment. Despite the claim of several researchers to have the best universal primers, the reality is that no primer has been demonstrated to be truly universal. This suggests that conserved regions of the gene may not be as conserved as expected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the conservation degree of the so-called conserved regions flanking the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Data contained in SILVA database (release 123) were used for the study. Primers reported as matches of each conserved region were assembled to form contigs; sequences sizing 12 nucleotides (12-mers) were extracted from these contigs and searched into the entire set of SILVA sequences. Frequency analysis shown that extreme regions, 1 and 10, registered the lowest frequencies. 12-mer frequencies revealed segments of contigs that were not as conserved as expected (≤90%). Fragments corresponding to the primer contigs 3, 4, 5b and 6a were recovered from all sequences in SILVA database. Nucleotide frequency analysis in each consensus demonstrated that only a small fraction of these so-called conserved regions is truly conserved in non-redundant sequences. It could be concluded that conserved regions of the 16S rRNA gene exhibit considerable variation that has to be considered when using this gene as biomarker. PMID:28265511

  7. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S; Perkins, David L

    2016-01-22

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translational studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1 × 10(6) reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that whole genome shotgun sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection.

  8. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  9. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  10. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S.; Perkins, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translation studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using shotgun whole genome sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1×106 reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that shotgun whole genome sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection. PMID:26718401

  11. Simultaneous discrimination between 15 fish pathogens by using 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Warsen, Adelaide E; Krug, Melissa J; LaFrentz, Stacey; Stanek, Danielle R; Loge, Frank J; Call, Douglas R

    2004-07-01

    We developed a DNA microarray suitable for simultaneous detection and discrimination between multiple bacterial species based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphisms using glass slides. Microarray probes (22- to 31-mer oligonucleotides) were spotted onto Teflon-masked, epoxy-silane-derivatized glass slides using a robotic arrayer. PCR products (ca. 199 bp) were generated using biotinylated, universal primer sequences, and these products were hybridized overnight (55 degrees C) to the microarray. Targets that annealed to microarray probes were detected using a combination of Tyramide Signal Amplification and Alexa Fluor 546. This methodology permitted 100% specificity for detection of 18 microbes, 15 of which were fish pathogens. With universal 16S rDNA PCR (limited to 28 cycles), detection sensitivity for purified control DNA was equivalent to <150 genomes (675 fg), and this sensitivity was not adversely impacted either by the presence of competing bacterial DNA (1.1 x 10(6) genomes; 5 ng) or by the addition of up to 500 ng of fish DNA. Consequently, coupling 16S rDNA PCR with a microarray detector appears suitable for diagnostic detection and surveillance for commercially important fish pathogens.

  12. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  13. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  14. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  15. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, H.; Tuero, A. D.; Bacardí, D.; Palenzuela, D. O.; Aguilera, A.; Silva, J. A.; Estrada, R.; Gell, O.; Suárez, J.; Ancizar, J.; Brown, E.; Colarte, A. B.; Castro, J.; Novoa, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies. PMID:27382362

  16. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  17. Interpreting 16S metagenomic data without clustering to achieve sub-OTU resolution

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonov, Mikhail; Leach, Robert W; Wingreen, Ned S

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach to analyzing 16S tag sequence data, which relies on clustering reads by sequence similarity into Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), underexploits the accuracy of modern sequencing technology. We present a clustering-free approach to multi-sample Illumina data sets that can identify independent bacterial subpopulations regardless of the similarity of their 16S tag sequences. Using published data from a longitudinal time-series study of human tongue microbiota, we are able to resolve within standard 97% similarity OTUs up to 20 distinct subpopulations, all ecologically distinct but with 16S tags differing by as little as one nucleotide (99.2% similarity). A comparative analysis of oral communities of two cohabiting individuals reveals that most such subpopulations are shared between the two communities at 100% sequence identity, and that dynamical similarity between subpopulations in one host is strongly predictive of dynamical similarity between the same subpopulations in the other host. Our method can also be applied to samples collected in cross-sectional studies and can be used with the 454 sequencing platform. We discuss how the sub-OTU resolution of our approach can provide new insight into factors shaping community assembly. PMID:25012900

  18. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α

    PubMed Central

    Yassien, M.A.M.; Elfaky, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  19. recA and catalase in H sub 2 O sub 2 -mediated toxicity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Charniga, L.; Cohen, M.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells defective in the biosynthesis of the recA gene product are no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type cells. Although gonococci possess nearly 100-fold-greater catalase levels than Escherichia coli, they are more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than this organism. The natural niche of gonococci undoubtedly results in exposure to oxidant stress; however, they do not demonstrate particularly efficient antioxidant defense systems.

  20. Involvement of recA and exr genes in the in vivo inhibition of the recBC nuclease.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Pollard, E C; Ginoza, W; Randall, E P

    1974-05-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are gamma irradiated they degrade their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The DNA of previously gamma-irradiated T4 phage is also degraded in infected cells. The amount of degradation is not only dependent on the dose but also on the genotype of the cell. The amount of degradation is less in cells carrying a recB or a recC mutation, suggesting that most of the DNA degradation is due to the recB(+) and recC(+) gene product (exonuclease V). In some strains a previous dose of ultraviolet (UV) light followed by incubation renders the cells resistant to DNA degradation after gamma irradiation. We have shown this inhibition to take place for infecting T4 phage also. By using six strains of E. coli selected for mutations in the genes recA, exr (or lex), and uvrB, we have been able to show that the preliminary UV treatment produces no change in recA and exr cells for both endogenous DNA degradation and the degradation of infecting irradiated T4 phage DNA, i.e., inhibition was not detected in these strains. On the other hand, wild-type cells and strains carrying mutations of uvrB show inhibition in both types of experiments. Because the recA gene product and the exr(+) (lex(+)) gene product are necessary for the induction of prophage, it is possible that the phenomenon of inducible inhibition requires recA(+) and exr(+) presence. One interpretation of these results is that an inducible inhibitor may be controlled by the exr gene.

  1. Fine-tuning recA expression in Staphylococcus aureus for antimicrobial photoinactivation: importance of photo-induced DNA damage in the photoinactivation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grinholc, Mariusz; Rodziewicz, Aleksandra; Forys, Katarzyna; Rapacka-Zdonczyk, Aleksandra; Kawiak, Anna; Domachowska, Anna; Golunski, Grzegorz; Wolz, Christiane; Mesak, Lili; Becker, Karsten; Bielawski, Krzysztof P

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial cell envelope is generally accepted as the primary target for a photo-induced oxidative stress. It is plausible that DNA damage occurs during the antimicrobial photoinactivation. Here we investigate the correlation between DNA damage and photoinactivation by evaluating the level of RecA-based DNA repair system in Staphylococcus aureus. By using exogenous photosensitizers (new methylene blue (NMB), toluidine blue O (TBO), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP), zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), Rose Bengal (RB)) and ALA-induced endogenous porphyrin-dependent blue light (405 nm), several outcomes were observed: (i) an increase of DNA damage (from gel electrophoresis in DNA damage assay), (ii) an increase of recA expression (luminescence assay in recA-lux strain), and (iii) an increase of RecA protein level (Western blotting). When recA expression was repressed by novobiocin, or abolished by deleting the gene, S. aureus susceptibility towards photoinactivation was increased at approximately a hundred-fold. The absence of RecA increases DNA damage to yield bactericidal effect. In novobiocin-resistant mutant (gyrB), as opposed to wild type, neither RecA protein level nor cell's susceptibility was affected by photoinactivation (when novobiocin is present). This is to suggest that GyrB-dependent inhibition mediated recA repression. Therefore, we have established the role of RecA in DNA damage during photoinactivation. With the use of rifampicin mutation frequency and Ames tests, we demonstrated that photoinactivation did not increase S. aureus mutagenesis and potentially is not mutagenic toward eukaryotic cells. The results suggest that the treatment is considered safe. In conclusion, we provide an evidence that recA inhibitor may serve as therapeutic adjuvant for antimicrobial photoinactivation. Clinical relevance of our findings warrants further investigations.

  2. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  3. A Sister-Strand Exchange Mechanism for Reca-Independent Deletion of Repeated DNA Sequences in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, S. T.; Drapkin, P. T.; Sutera-Jr., V. A.; Gluckman-Peskind, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    In the genomes of many organisms, deletions arise between tandemly repeated DNA sequences of lengths ranging from several kilobases to only a few nucleotides. Using a plasmid-based assay for deletion of a 787-bp tandem repeat, we have found that a recA-independent mechanism contributes substantially to the deletion process of even this large region of homology. No Escherichia coli recombination gene tested, including recA, had greater than a fivefold effect on deletion rates. The recA-independence of deletion formation is also observed with constructions present on the chromosome. RecA promotes synapsis and transfer of homologous DNA strands in vitro and is indispensable for intermolecular recombination events in vivo measured after conjugation. Because deletion formation in E. coli shows little or no dependence on recA, it has been assumed that homologous recombination contributes little to the deletion process. However, we have found recA-independent deletion products suggestive of reciprocal crossovers when branch migration in the cell is inhibited by a ruvA mutation. We propose a model for recA-independent crossovers between replicating sister strands, which can also explain deletion or amplification of repeated sequences. We suggest that this process may be initiated as post-replicational DNA repair; subsequent strand misalignment at repeated sequences leads to genetic rearrangements. PMID:8293969

  4. RecA Binding to a Single Double-Stranded DNA Molecule: A Possible Role of DNA Conformational Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  5. Rhodobacter sphaeroides LexA has dual activity: optimising and repressing recA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Fernández, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Barbé, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides recA promoter (PrecA) is induced upon DNA damage in a lexA-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that LexA protein represses and might also activate transcription of PrecA. Purified R.sphaeroides LexA protein specifically binds the SOS boxes located within the PrecA region. In vitro transcription analysis, using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), indicated that the presence of LexA may stimulate and repress transcription of PrecA. EMSA and DNase I footprinting experiments show that LexA and RNAP can bind simultaneously to PrecA. At low LexA concentrations it enhances RNAP binding to PrecA, stimulates open complex formation and strand separation beyond the transcription start site. At high LexA concentrations, however, RNAP-promoted strand separation is not observed beyond the +5 region. LexA might repress transcription by interfering with the clearance process instead of blocking the access of RNAP to the promoter region. Based on these findings we propose that the R.sphaeroides LexA protein performs fine tuning of the SOS response, which might provide a physiological advantage by enhancing transcription of SOS genes and delaying full activation of the response. PMID:11917014

  6. [Analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency in transgenic tomato hybrids expressing recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes].

    PubMed

    Komakhin, R A; Komakhina, V V; Miliukova, N A; Zhuchenko, A A

    2012-01-01

    To study and induce meiotic recombination in plants, we generated and analyzed transgenic tomato hybrids F1-RecA and F1-NLS-recA-LicBM3 expressing, respectively, the recA gene of Escherichia coli and the NLS-recA-licBM3 gene. It was found that the recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes are inherited through the maternal and paternal lineages, they have no selective influence on the pollen and are contained in tomato F1-RecA and F1-NLS-RecA-LicBM3 hybrids outside the second chromosome in the hemizygous state. The comparative analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency (rf) in the progenies of the transgenic and nontransgenic hybrids showed that only the expression of the recA gene of E. coli in cells of the F1-RecA plants produced a 1.2-1.5-fold increase in the frequency of recombination between some linked marker genes of the second chromosome of tomato.

  7. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among RecA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Hess, R M; McEntee, K

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N3ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the [alpha-32P]8N3ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T31 of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N3ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10(7) years.

  8. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  9. Uncovering the microscopic mechanism of strand exchange during RecA mediated homologous recombination using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-02-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key step during the repair process of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breakage. RecA is a protein that mediates HR in bacteria. RecA monomers polymerize on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) separated from the broken dsDNA to form a helical filament, thus allowing strand exchange to occur. Recent crystal structures depict each RecA monomer in contact with three contiguous nucleotides called DNA triplets. Surprisingly, the conformation of each triplet is similar to that of a triplet in B-form DNA. However, in the filament the neighboring triplets are separated by loops of the RecA proteins. Single molecule experiments demonstrated that strand exchange propagation occurs in 3 base-pair increments. However, the temporal resolution of the experiments was insufficient to determine the exact molecular mechanism of the triplet propagation. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effect of both the RecA protein and the conformation of the bound ssDNA fragment on the stability of the duplex DNA intermediate formed during the strand-exchange process. Specifically, we report simulations of force-induced unzipping of duplex DNA in the presence and absence of the RecA filament that explored the effect of the triplet ladder conformation.

  10. Universal bacterial identification by mass spectrometry of 16S ribosomal RNA cleavage products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, George W.; McNichols, Roger J.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2007-03-01

    The public availability of over 180,000 bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has facilitated microbial identification and classification using nucleic acid hybridization and other molecular approaches. Species-specific PCR, microarrays, and in situ hybridization are based on the presence of unique subsequences in the target sequence and therefore require prior knowledge of what organisms are likely to be present in a sample. Mass spectrometry is not limited by a pre-synthesized inventory of probe/primer sequences. It has already been demonstrated that organism identification can be recovered from mass spectra using various methods including base-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. The feasibility of broad bacterial identification by comparing such mass spectral patterns to predictive databases derived from virtually all previously sequenced strains has yet to be demonstrated, however. Herein, we present universal bacterial identification by base-specific cleavage, mass spectrometry, and an efficient coincidence function for rapid spectral scoring against a large database of predicted "mass catalogs". Using this approach in conjunction with universal PCR of the 16S rDNA gene, four bacterial isolates and an uncultured clone were successfully identified against a database of predicted cleavage products derived 6rom over 47,000 16S rRNA sequences representing all major bacterial taxaE At present, the conventional DNA isolation and PCR steps require approximately 2 h, while subsequent transcription, enzymatic cleavage, mass spectrometric analysis, and database comparison require less than 45 min. All steps are amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  11. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  12. Efficient repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage by Escherichia coli requires SOS induction of RecA and RuvA proteins.

    PubMed

    Konola, J T; Sargent, K E; Gow, J B

    2000-04-28

    The survival of Escherichia coli following treatment with a low dose (1-3 mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that causes extensive mode-one killing of DNA repair mutants is stimulated by the induction of the SOS regulon. Results for various mutants indicate that induction of recA and RecA protein-mediated recombination are critical factors contributing to the repair of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative DNA damage. However, because DNA damage activates RecA protein's coprotease activity essential to cleavage of LexA repressor protein and derepression of all SOS genes, it is unclear to what extent induction of RecA protein stimulates this repair. To make this determination, we examined mode-one killing of DeltarecA cells carrying plasmid-borne recA (P(tac)-recA(+)) and constitutively expressing a fully induced level of wild-type RecA protein when SOS genes other than recA are non-inducible in a lexA3 (Ind(-)) genetic background or inducible in a lexA(+) background. At a H(2)O(2) dose resulting in maximal killing, DeltarecA lexA3 (Ind(-)) cells with P(tac)-recA(+) show 40-fold greater survival than lexA3 (Ind(-)) cells with chromosomal recA having a low, non-induced level of RecA protein. However, they still show 10- to 15-fold lower survival than wild-type cells and DeltarecA lexA(+) cells with P(tac)-recA(+). To determine if the inducible RuvA protein stimulates survival, we examined a ruvA60 mutant that is defective for the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. This mutant also shows 10- to 15-fold lower survival than wild-type cells. We conclude that while induction of RecA protein has a pronounced stimulatory effect on the recombinational repair of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative DNA damage, the induction of other SOS proteins such as RuvA is essential for wild-type repair.

  13. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  14. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  15. Abiotrophia defectiva bleb-associated endophthalmitis confirmed with 16s ribosomal RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hugo Lee, Ming-Han; Lawlor, Mitchell; Lee, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    One recognized complication of trabeculectomy with visually devastating potential is blebitis. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with a culture and polymerase chain reaction-positive Abiotrophia defectiva bleb-associated endophthalmitis. Abiotrophia defectiva is a rare but possible cause of endophthalmitis secondary to blebitis and should be considered in culture-negative cases. Prompt identification, hence directed eradication, of the causative organism in such visually threatening cases may be facilitated by requesting polymerase chain reaction and 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing.

  16. Mitochondrial 16S rDNA analysis of Tunisian androctonus species (Scorpions, Buthidae): phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ben Othmen, A; Said, K; Ben Alp, Z; Chatti, N; Ready, P D

    2006-01-01

    Tunisian Androctonus species, for long time discussed, were recognized on the basis of mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Although the analysed nucleotide sequence is rather short (about 300 bp), the obtained phlogenetic trees revealed that A. amoreuxi and A. aeneas form two well-supported sister clades against A. australis haplotypes. Each specimen of the very rare species A. aeneas showed a specific haplotype, but together formed a well-defined clade. Some A. amoreuxi specimens highlighted unidirectional mitochondrial introgression from neighbouring A. australis population. Within A. australis, previously described, subspecies subdivision (A. a .hector and A. a. garzonii) was not supported.

  17. An unusual case of Streptococcus anginosus group pyomyositis diagnosed using direct 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walkty, Andrew; Embil, John M; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group (Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus anginosus) are capable of causing serious pyogenic infections, with a tendency for abscess formation. The present article reports a case of S anginosus group pyomyositis in a 47-year-old man. The pathogen was recovered from one of two blood cultures obtained from the patient, but speciation was initially not performed because the organism was considered to be a contaminant (viridans streptococci group). The diagnosis was ultimately confirmed using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing of purulent fluid obtained from a muscle abscess aspirate. The present case serves to emphasize that finding even a single positive blood culture of an organism belonging to the S anginosus group should prompt careful evaluation of the patient for a pyogenic focus of infection. It also highlights the potential utility of 16S ribosomal DNA amplification and sequencing in direct pathogen detection from aspirated fluid in cases of pyomyositis in which antimicrobial therapy was initiated before specimen collection.

  18. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  19. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  20. Phylogenetic relationships between Bacillus species and related genera inferred from 16s rDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wei Wang, Mi Sun

    2009-01-01

    Neighbor-joining, maximum-parsimony, minimum-evolution, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian trees constructed based on 16S rDNA sequences of 181 type strains of Bacillus species and related taxa manifested nine phylogenetic groups. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Bacillus was not a monophyletic group. B. subtilis was in Group 1. Group 4, 6 and 8 respectively consisted of thermophiles, halophilic or halotolerant bacilli and alkaliphilic bacilli. Group 2, 4 and 8 consisting of Bacillus species and related genera demonstrated that the current taxonomic system did not agree well with the 16S rDNA evolutionary trees. The position of Caryophanaceae and Planococcaceae in Group 2 suggested that they might be transferred into Bacillaceae, and the heterogeneity of Group 2 implied that some Bacillus species in it might belong to several new genera. Group 9 was mainly comprised of the genera (excluding Bacillus) of Bacillaceae, so some Bacillus species in Group 9: B. salarius, B. qingdaonensis and B. thermcloacae might not belong to Bacillus. Four Bacillus species, B. schlegelii, B. tusciae, B. edaphicus and B. mucilaginosus were clearly placed outside the nine groups. PMID:24031394

  1. Identification of Clinical Isolates of Actinomyces Species by Amplified 16S Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Val; Talbot, P. R.; Stubbs, S. L.; Duerden, B. I.

    2001-01-01

    Amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction analysis (ARDRA), using enzymes HaeIII and HpaII, was applied to 176 fresh and 299 stored clinical isolates of putative Actinomyces spp. referred to the Anaerobe Reference Unit of the Public Health Laboratory Service for confirmation of identity. Results were compared with ARDRA results obtained previously for reference strains and with conventional phenotypic reactions. Identities of some strains were confirmed by analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences. Of the 475 isolates, 331 (70%) were clearly assigned to recognized Actinomyces species, including 94 isolates assigned to six recently described species. A further 52 isolates in 12 ARDRA profiles were designated as apparently resembling recognized species, and 44 isolates, in 18 novel profiles, were confirmed as members of genera other than Actinomyces. The identities of 48 isolates in nine profiles remain uncertain, and they may represent novel species of Actinomyces. For the majority of species, phenotypic results, published reactions for the species, and ARDRA profiles concurred. However, of 113 stored isolates originally identified as A. meyeri or resembling A. meyeri by phenotypic tests, only 21 were confirmed as A. meyeri by ARDRA; 63 were reassigned as A. turicensis, 7 as other recognized species, and 22 as unidentified actinomycetes. Analyses of incidence and clinical associations of Actinomyces spp. add to the currently sparse knowledge of some recently described species. PMID:11574572

  2. Rapid identification of marine bioluminescent bacteria by amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Wada, Minoru; Yao, Katomi; Kamiya, Akiko; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Uchiyama, Nami; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2006-03-01

    To rapidly identify natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, we developed amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) methods. ARDRA, which is based on the restriction patterns of 16S rRNA gene digested with five enzymes (EcoRI, DdeI, HhaI, HinfI, RsaI), clearly distinguished the 14 species of marine bioluminescent bacteria currently known, which belong to the genera Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella. When we applied ARDRA to 129 natural isolates from two cruises in Sagami Bay, Japan, 127 were grouped into six ARDRA types with distinctive restriction patterns; these isolates represented the bioluminescent species, P. angustum, P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, S. woodyi, V. fischeri, and V. harveyi. The other two isolates showing unexpected ARDRA patterns turned out to have 16S rRNA gene sequences similar to P. leiognathi and P. phosphoreum. Nevertheless, ARDRA provides a simple and fairly robust means for rapid identification of the natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, and is therefore useful in studying their diversity.

  3. Mitochondrial swinger replication: DNA replication systematically exchanging nucleotides and short 16S ribosomal DNA swinger inserts.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (swinger RNAs) resolves genomic 'parenthood' of some orphan mitochondrial transcripts. Twenty-three different systematic nucleotide exchanges (bijective transformations) exist. Similarities between transcription and replication suggest occurrence of swinger DNA. GenBank searches for swinger DNA matching the 23 swinger versions of human and mouse mitogenomes detect only vertebrate mitochondrial swinger DNA for swinger type AT+CG (from five different studies, 149 sequences) matching three human and mouse mitochondrial genes: 12S and 16S ribosomal RNAs, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I. Exchange A<->T+C<->G conserves self-hybridization properties, putatively explaining swinger biases for rDNA, against protein coding genes. Twenty percent of the regular human mitochondrial 16S rDNA consists of short swinger repeats (from 13 exchanges). Swinger repeats could originate from recombinations between regular and swinger DNA: duplicated mitochondrial genes of the parthenogenetic gecko Heteronotia binoei include fewer short A<->T+C<->G swinger repeats than non-duplicated mitochondrial genomes of that species. Presumably, rare recombinations between female and male mitochondrial genes (and in parthenogenetic situations between duplicated genes), favors reverse-mutations of swinger repeat insertions, probably because most inserts affect negatively ribosomal function. Results show that swinger DNA exists, and indicate that swinger polymerization contributes to the genesis of genetic material and polymorphism.

  4. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  5. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  6. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization. PMID:25477935

  7. 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions in four Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Zhemin; Wen, Shaoping; Rozalski, Antoni; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-01

    Proteus is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium. In this study, 813 Proteus 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were determined from 46 Proteus strains, including 388 ITS from 22 P. mirabilis strains, 211 ITS from 12 P. vulgaris strains, 169 ITS from 10 P. penneri strains, and 45 ITS from 2 P. myxofaciens strains. The Proteus strains carry mainly two types of ITS, ITS(Glu) (containing tRNA(Glu (UUC)) gene) and ITS(Ile+Ala) (containing tRNA(Ile (GAU)) and tRNA(Ala (UGC)) gene), and are in the forms of 28 variants with 25 genomic origins. The ITS sequences are a mosaic-like structure consisting of three conservative regions and two variable regions. The nucleotide identity of ITS subtypes in strains of the same species ranges from 96.2% to 100%. The divergence of Proteus ITS divergence was most likely due to intraspecies recombinations or horizontal transfers of sequence blocks. The phylogenetic relationship deduced from the second variable region of ITS sequences of the three facultative human pathogenic species P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. penneri is similar with that based on 16S rDNA sequences, but has higher resolution to differentiate closely related P. vulgaris and P. penneri. This study is the first comprehensive study of ITS in four Proteus species and laid solid foundation for the development of high-throughput technology for quick and accurate identification of the important foodborne and nosocomial pathogens.

  8. Characterization of the Gut Microbiome Using 16S or Shotgun Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Jovel, Juan; Patterson, Jordan; Wang, Weiwei; Hotte, Naomi; O'Keefe, Sandra; Mitchel, Troy; Perry, Troy; Kao, Dina; Mason, Andrew L.; Madsen, Karen L.; Wong, Gane K.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled investigations of the gut microbiome with unprecedented resolution and throughput. This has stimulated the development of sophisticated bioinformatics tools to analyze the massive amounts of data generated. Researchers therefore need a clear understanding of the key concepts required for the design, execution and interpretation of NGS experiments on microbiomes. We conducted a literature review and used our own data to determine which approaches work best. The two main approaches for analyzing the microbiome, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons and shotgun metagenomics, are illustrated with analyses of libraries designed to highlight their strengths and weaknesses. Several methods for taxonomic classification of bacterial sequences are discussed. We present simulations to assess the number of sequences that are required to perform reliable appraisals of bacterial community structure. To the extent that fluctuations in the diversity of gut bacterial populations correlate with health and disease, we emphasize various techniques for the analysis of bacterial communities within samples (α-diversity) and between samples (β-diversity). Finally, we demonstrate techniques to infer the metabolic capabilities of a bacteria community from these 16S and shotgun data. PMID:27148170

  9. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  10. Changes in 16s RNA Gene Microbial Community Profiling by Concentration of Prokaryotic DNA.

    PubMed

    Glassing, Angela; Dowd, Scot E; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Jorden, Jeffrey R; Chiodini, Rodrick J

    2015-12-01

    Microbial metagenomics are hindered in clinical tissue samples as a result of the large relative amount of human DNA in relation to microbial DNA acting as competitive inhibitors of downstream applications. We evaluated the LOOXSTER® Enrichment Kit to separate eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA in submucosal intestinal tissue samples having a low microbial biomass and to determine the effects of enrichment on 16s rRNA microbiota sequencing. The enrichment kit reduced the amount of human DNA in the samples 40-70% resulting in a 3.5-fold increase in the number of 16s bacterial gene sequences detected on the Illumina MiSeq platform. This increase was accompanied by the detection of 41 additional bacterial genera and 94 tentative species. The additional bacterial taxa detected accounted for as much as 25% of the total bacterial population that significantly altered the relative prevalence and composition of the intestinal microbiota. The ability to reduce the competitive inhibition created by human DNA and the concentration of bacterial DNA may allow metagenomics to be performed on complex tissues containing a low bacterial biomass.

  11. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions.

    PubMed

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-09

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2-5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo.

  12. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2–5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo. PMID:27794044

  13. Review of 16S and ITS Direct Sequencing Results for Clinical Specimens Submitted to a Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Michael; Azana, Robert; Hoang, Linda M. N.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of 16S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region amplification and sequencing of rDNA from clinical specimens, for the respective detection and identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Direct rDNA amplification of 16S and ITS targets from clinical samples was performed over a 4-year period and reviewed. All specimens were from sterile sites and submitted to a reference laboratory for evaluation. Results of 16S and ITS were compared to histopathology, Gram and/or calcofluor stain microscopy results. A total of 277 16S tests were performed, with 64 (23%) positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Identification of an organism was more likely in microscopy positive 16S samples 14/21 (67%), compared to 35/175 (20%) of microscopy negative samples. A total of 110 ITS tests were performed, with 14 (13%) positive. The yield of microscopy positive ITS samples, 9/44 (21%), was higher than microscopy negative samples 3/50 (6%). Given these findings, 16S and ITS are valuable options for culture negative specimens from sterile sites, particularly in the setting of positive microscopy findings. Where microscopy results are negative, the limited sensitivity of 16S and ITS in detecting and identifying an infectious agent needs to be considered. PMID:27366168

  14. Different organisms associated with heartwater as shown by analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Allsopp, M; Visser, E S; du Plessis, J L; Vogel, S W; Allsopp, B A

    1997-08-01

    Cowdria ruminantium is a rickettsial parasite which causes heartwater, a economically important disease of domestic and wild ruminants in tropical and subtropical Africa and parts of the Caribbean. Because existing diagnostic methods are unreliable, we investigated the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene from heartwater-infected material to characterise the organisms present and to develop specific oligonucleotide probes for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based diagnosis. DNA was obtained from ticks and ruminants from heartwater-free and heartwater-endemic areas from Cowdria in tissue culture. PCR was carried out using primers designed to amplify only rickettsial srRNA genes, the target region being the highly variable V1 loop. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced; 51% were C. ruminantium sequences corresponding to four genotypes, two of which were identical to previously reported C. ruminantium sequences while the other two were new. The four different Cowdria genotypes can be correlated with different phenotypes. Tissue-culture samples yielded only Cowdria genotype sequences, but an extraordinary heterogeneity of 16S sequences was obtained from field samples. In addition to Cowdria genotypes we found sequences from previously unknown Ehrlichia spp., sequences showing homology to other Rickettsiales and a variety of Pseudomonadaceae. One Ehrlichia sequence was phylogenetically closely related to Ehrlichia platys (Group II Ehrlichia) and one to Ehrlichia canis (Group III Ehrlichia). This latter sequence was from an isolate (Germishuys) made from a naturally infected sheep which, from brain smear examination and pathology, appeared to be suffering from heartwater; nevertheless no Cowdria genotype sequences were found in this isolate. In addition no Cowdria sequences were obtained from uninfected ticks. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for two C. ruminantium genotypes and for two previously uncharacterised heartwater-associated Ehrlichia spp

  15. Production of transgenic piglets using ICSI-sperm-mediated gene transfer in combination with recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    García-Vázquez, Francisco A; Ruiz, Salvador; Matás, Carmen; Izquierdo-Rico, M José; Grullón, Luis A; De Ondiz, Aitor; Vieira, Luis; Avilés-López, Karen; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Gadea, Joaquín

    2010-08-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is a method for the production of transgenic animals based on the intrinsic ability of sperm cells to bind and internalize exogenous DNA molecules and to transfer them into the oocyte at fertilization. Recombinase-A (RecA) protein-coated exogenous DNA has been used previously in pronuclear injection systems increasing integration into goat and pig genomes. However, there are no data regarding transgene expression after ICSI. Here, we set out to investigate whether the expression of transgenic DNA in porcine embryos is improved by recombinase-mediated DNA transfer and if it is possible to generate transgenic animals using this methodology. Different factors which could affect the performance of this transgenic methodology were analyzed by studying 1) the effect of the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA protein on boar sperm functionality; 2) the effect of recombinase RecA on in vitro enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing embryos produced by ICSI or IVF; and 3) the efficiency of generation of transgenic piglets by RecA-mediated ICSI. Our results suggested that 1) the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA-DNA complexes at 5 microg/ml did not affect sperm functionality in terms of motility, viability, membrane lipid disorder, or reactive oxygen species generation; 2) EGFP-expressing embryos were obtained with a high efficiency using the SMGT-ICSI technique in combination with recombinase; however, the use of IVF system did not result in any fluorescent embryos; and 3) transgenic piglets were produced by this methodology. To our knowledge, this is the first time that transgenic pigs have been produced by ICSI-SGMT and a recombinase.

  16. Comparative evolution of the recA gene of surface and deep subsurface microorganisms (an evolutionary clock of intermediate rate). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.V.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the ability of the recA protein product to maintain both DNA integrity and increase genetic diversity, this gene may be essential to the survival of microorganisms following the damaging effects of numerous environmental stresses such as exposure to solar UV radiation, exposure to gamma radiation, starvation, and changing environments. While the various activities and amino-acid sequence of recA have been highly conserved among the eubacteria and archaea, little is known as to whether a strict structure-function relationship has been conserved. In other words, are the same regions of this highly plastic, functionally heterogeneous protein involved in the same catalytic capacities throughout the bacterial kingdom? While it is reasonable to assume that this type of conservation has also occurred, we felt it necessary to test the assumption by demonstrating that mutations in different genera of bacteria which eliminate similar functions (i.e., lead to similar phenotypes) are caused by changes in the amino-acid sequence in the same regions of their recA proteins. Therefore, we located the changes in nucleotide sequence in two recA mutants of P. aeruginosa which displayed mutant phenotypes in recombination and UV resistance. Our assumption was that if structure-function relationships held, these mutations would be found in areas already identified as essential for the function of the E. coli recA protein.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  18. Structure of E. coli 16S RNA elucidated by psoralen crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Hearst, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    E. coli 16S RNA in solution was photoreacted with hydroxymethyltrimethylpsoralen and long wave ultraviolet light. Positions of crosslinks were determined to high resolution by partially digesting the RNA with T/sub 1/ RNase, separating the crosslinked fragments by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, reversing the crosslink, and sequencing the separated fragments. This method yielded the locations of crosslinks to +/-15 nucleotides. Even finer placement has been made on the basis of our knowledge of psoralen reactivity. Thirteen unique crosslinks were mapped. Seven crosslinks confirmed regions of secondary structure which had been predicted in published phylogenetic models, three crosslinks discriminated between phylogenetic models, and three proved the existence of new structures. The new structures were all long-range interactions which appear to be in dynamic equilibrium with local secondary structure. Because this technique yields direct information about the secondary structure of large RNAs, it should prove invaluable in studying the structure of other RNAs of all sizes.

  19. [PCR rDNA 16S used for the etiological diagnosis of blood culture negative endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Baty, G; Lanotte, P; Hocqueloux, L; Prazuck, T; Bret, L; Romano, M; Mereghetti, L

    2010-06-01

    We report the case of a 55 year-old man presenting with a double aortic and mitral endocarditis for which resected valve culture was repeatedly negative. Specific PCR made on valves because of highly positive blood tests for Bartonella henselae remained negative. A molecular approach was made with 16S rDNA PCR, followed by sequencing. Bartonella quintana was identified as the etiology of endocarditis. B. quintana, "fastidious" bacteria, even if hard to identify in a laboratory, is often reported as a blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) agent. Molecular biology methods have strongly improved the diagnosis of BCNE. We propose a review of the literature focusing on the interest of broad-spectrum PCR on valve for the etiological diagnosis of BCNE.

  20. Isolation of bacteria and 16S rDNAs from Lake Vostok accretion ice.

    PubMed

    Christner, B C; Mosley-Thompson, E; Thompson, L G; Reeve, J N

    2001-09-01

    Lake Vostok, the largest subglacial lake in Antarctica, is separated from the surface by approximately 4 km of glacial ice. It has been isolated from direct surface input for at least 420 000 years, and the possibility of a novel environment and ecosystem therefore exists. Lake Vostok water has not been sampled, but an ice core has been recovered that extends into the ice accreted below glacial ice by freezing of Lake Vostok water. Here, we report the recovery of bacterial isolates belonging to the Brachybacteria, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus and Sphingomonas lineages from a sample of melt water from this accretion ice that originated 3593 m below the surface. We have also amplified small-subunit ribosomal RNA-encoding DNA molecules (16S rDNAs) directly from this melt water that originated from alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, low- and high-G+C Gram-positive bacteria and a member of the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides lineage.

  1. An unusual case of seronegative, 16S PCR positive Brucella infection

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Lucy; Rawat, David; Naik, Sandhia; Millar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Brucella is a zoonotic infection commonly diagnosed by isolation of the organism from blood culture or positive serological testing. It is an uncommon cause of a pyrexia of unknown origin in the United Kingdom. Case presentation: We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl with no history of travel who presented with pyrexia, weight loss, arthralgia, multiple splenic abscesses and a subsequent pleural effusion, the latter of which isolated a Brucella species on 16S rRNA PCR. The patient responded well to initiation of treatment for brucellosis and on repeat imaging, after 3 months, the splenic abscesses had resolved. Conclusion: This unique case demonstrates uncommon complications of brucellosis and the challenges of diagnosing the organism, the latter of which can be alleviated by the utilization of molecularbased technologies. This patient had a negative serology result for brucellosis, which highlights the need to interpret serology results with caution in non-endemic regions for brucellosis. PMID:28348782

  2. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  3. Fully stereocontrolled total syntheses of the prostacyclin analogues 16S-iloprost and 16S-3-oxa-iloprost by a common route, using alkenylcopper-azoalkene conjugate addition, asymmetric olefination, and allylic alkylation.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Guido J; Kim, Mikhail; Gais, Hans-Joachim; Vermeeren, Cornelia

    2005-12-21

    In this article we describe fully stereocontrolled total syntheses of 16S-iloprost (16S-2), the most active component of the drugs Ilomedin and Ventavis, and of 16S-3-oxa-iloprost (16S-3), a close analogue of 16S-2 having the potential for a high oral activity, by a new and common route. The key steps of this route are (1) the establishment of the complete C13-C20 omega side chain of the target molecules through a stereoselective conjugate addition of the alkenylcopper derivative 9 to the bicyclic C6-C12 azoalkene 10 with formation of hydrazone 8, (2) the diastereoselective olefination of ketone 7 with the chiral phosphoryl acetate 39, and (3) the regio- and stereoselective alkylation of the allylic acetate 43 with cuprate 42. These measures allowed the 5E,15S,16S-stereoselective synthesis of 16S-2 and 16S-3, a goal which had previously not been achieved. Azoalkene 10 was obtained from the achiral bicyclic C6-C12 ketone 11 as previously described by using as key step an enantioselective deprotonation. The configuration at C16 of omega-side chain building block 9 has been installed with high stereoselectivity by the oxazolidinone method and that at C15 by a diastereoselective oxazaborolidine-catalyzed reduction of the C13-C20 ketone 23 with catecholborane. Surprisingly, a high diastereoselectivity in the reduction of 23 was only obtained by using 2 equiv of oxazaborolidine 24. Application of substoichiometric amounts of 24 resulted in irreproducible diastereoselectivities ranging from very high to nil.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai.

  5. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  6. Hosts, distribution and genetic divergence (16S rDNA) of Amblyomma dubitatum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Labruna, Marcelo B; Mastropaolo, Mariano; González, Enrique M; Mangold, Atilio J; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2010-08-01

    We supply information about hosts and distribution of Amblyomma dubitatum. In addition, we carry out an analysis of genetic divergence among specimens of A. dubitatum from different localities and with respect to other Neotropical Amblyomma species, using sequences of 16S rDNA gene. Although specimens of A. dubitatum were collected on several mammal species as cattle horse, Tapirus terrestris, Mazama gouazoubira, Tayassu pecari, Sus scrofa, Cerdocyon thous, Myocastor coypus, Allouata caraya, Glossophaga soricina and man, most records of immature and adult stages of A. dubitatum were made on Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, making this rodent the principal host for all parasitic stages of this ticks. Cricetidae rodents (Lundomys molitor, Scapteromys tumidus), opossums (Didelphis albiventris) and vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus) also were recorded as hosts for immature stages. All findings of A. dubitatum correspond to localities of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, and they were concentrated in the Biogeographical provinces of Pampa, Chaco, Cerrado, Brazilian Atlantic Forest, Parana Forest and Araucaria angustifolia Forest. The distribution of A. dubitatum is narrower than that of its principal host, therefore environmental variables rather than hosts determine the distributional ranges of this tick. The intraspecific genetic divergence among 16S rDNA sequences of A. dubitatum ticks collected in different localities from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay was in all cases lower than 0.8%, whereas the differences with the remaining Amblyomma species included in the analysis were always bigger than 6.8%. Thus, the taxonomic status of A. dubitatum along its distribution appears to be certain at the specific level.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships linking Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) species based on 12S and 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Suman; Bhattacharya, Manojit; Deuti, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Genus Duttaphrynus (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) is endemic to southwestern and southern China and throughout southern Asia. Duttaphrynus phylogeny was also under debate for many years. 12S and 16S rDNAs help us to elucidate Duttaphrynus phylogeny.

  8. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  9. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  10. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  11. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing for Epidemiological Surveys of Bacteria in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Bard, Emilie; Bernard, Maria; Brouat, Carine; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Dehne-Garcia, Alexandre; Loiseau, Anne; Tatard, Caroline; Tamisier, Lucie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vignes, Helene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission posed by urban rodents in West Africa. In addition to listing pathogenic bacteria in wild populations, as in other high-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies, our approach can estimate essential parameters for studies of zoonotic risk, such as prevalence and patterns of coinfection within individual hosts. However, the estimation of these parameters requires cleaning of the raw data to mitigate the biases generated by HTS methods. We present here an extensive review of these biases and of their consequences, and we propose a comprehensive trimming strategy for managing these biases. We demonstrated the application of this strategy using 711 commensal rodents, including 208 Mus musculus domesticus, 189 Rattus rattus, 93 Mastomys natalensis, and 221 Mastomys erythroleucus, collected from 24 villages in Senegal. Seven major genera of pathogenic bacteria were detected in their spleens: Borrelia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia. Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia have never before been detected in West African rodents. Bacterial prevalence ranged from 0% to 90% of individuals per site, depending on the bacterial taxon, rodent species, and site considered, and 26% of rodents displayed coinfection. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing strategy presented here has the advantage over other molecular surveillance tools of dealing with a large spectrum of bacterial

  12. Nucleotide sequencing and analysis of 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) of Taylorella equigenitalis, as an important pathogen for contagious equine metritis (CEM).

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Nagano, Y; Tazumi, A; Murayama, O; Millar, B C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M

    2006-05-01

    The primer set for 16S rDNA amplified an amplicon of about 1500 bp in length for three strains of Taylorella equigenitalis (NCTC11184(T), Kentucky188 and EQ59). Sequence differences of the 16S rDNA among the six sequences, including three reference sequences, occurred at only a few nucleotide positions and thus, an extremely high sequence similarity of the 16S rDNA was first demonstrated among the six sequences. In addition, the primer set for 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) amplified two amplicons about 1300 bp and 1200 bp in length for the three strains. The ISRs were estimated to be about 920 bp in length for large ISR-A and about 830 bp for small ISR-B. Sequence alignment of the ISR-A and ISR-B demonstrated about 10 base differences between NCTC11184(T) and EQ59 and between Kentucky188 and EQ59. However, only minor sequence differences were demonstrated between the ISR-A and ISR-B from NCTC11184(T) and Kentucky188, respectively. A typical order of the intercistronic tRNAs with the 29 nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ile)-tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-3' was demonstrated in the all ISRs. The ISRs may be useful for the discrimination amongst isolates of T. equigenitalis if sequencing is employed.

  13. Algae-bacteria association inferred by 16S rDNA similarity in established microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Dagmar; Nohynek, Liisa; Rischer, Heiko

    2014-06-01

    Forty cultivable, visually distinct bacterial cultures were isolated from four Baltic microalgal cultures Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus obliquus, Isochrysis sp., and Nitzschia microcephala, which have been maintained for several years in the laboratory. Bacterial isolates were characterized with respect to morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. A total of 17 unique bacterial strains, almost all belonging to one of three families, Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Erythrobacteraceae, were subsequently isolated. The majority of isolated bacteria belong to Rhodobacteraceae. Literature review revealed that close relatives of the bacteria isolated in this study are not only often found in marine environments associated with algae, but also in lakes, sediments, and soil. Some of them had been shown to interact with organisms in their surroundings. A Basic Local Alignment Search Tool study indicated that especially bacteria isolated from the Isochrysis sp. culture were highly similar to microalgae-associated bacteria. Two of those isolates, I1 and I6, belong to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, members of which are known to occur in close communities with microalgae. An UniFrac analysis revealed that the bacterial community of Isochrysis sp. significantly differs from the other three communities.

  14. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships among cirrate octopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) resolved using mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piertney, Stuart B; Hudelot, Cendrine; Hochberg, F G; Collins, Martin A

    2003-05-01

    PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE CIRRATE OCTOPODS (MOLLUSCA: Cephalopoda) were investigated using partial sequences of the 16S rRNA mitochondrial gene. The derived phylogeny supports the traditional separation of cirrate families based on web form. Genera with a single web (Opisthoteuthis, Grimpoteuthis, Luteuthis, and Cirroctopus) are clearly distinct from those with an intermediate or secondary web (Cirroteuthis, Cirrothauma, and Stauroteuthis). The cirrates with a single web are separated into three groups. The first group is represented by Opisthoteuthis species, the second by Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis, and the third by members of the genus Cirroctopus. There is no support for the isolation of Luteuthis in a separate family (Luteuthidae). There is, however, evidence of two groupings within the genus Opisthoteuthis. The data suggest the following revisions in the systematic classification of the cirrates: (1) Cirrothauma, Cirroteuthis, and Stauroteuthis be united in the Cirroteuthidae; (2) Grimpoteuthis and Luteuthis be placed in the Grimpoteuthidae; (3) Opisthoteuthis in the Opisthoteuthidae, and; (4) Cirroctopus be considered sufficiently distinct from both Opisthoteuthidae and Grimpoteuthidae to warrant placement in a new family.

  16. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; ...

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as wellmore » as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.« less

  17. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  18. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, T.; Reeves, R. H.; Gilichinsky, D. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite).

  19. Investigation of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) hindgut microbiome via 16S pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Barker, Christopher J; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2013-12-27

    As a dietary source, the foliage of Eucalyptus spp. is low in available protein and carbohydrate while containing polyphenolic compounds that interfere with enzymatic digestion. To overcome this, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) has evolved a range of anatomical and physiological adaptations to assist with digestion and absorption of nutrients from this food source. Microbial fermentation of partially digested eucalyptus leaves is thought to be critical in this process, however, little is known about the composition and diversity of microorganisms that are associated with digestive health in this native species. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of caecum, colon and faecal pellet samples from two wild, free ranging, Queensland koalas. Our results reveal a highly complex and diverse ecosystem with considerable intra-individual variation. Although samples were dominated by sequences from the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla there was considerable variation at the genus level. This study is the first non-culture based microbiota analysis, using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing, and provides preliminary data to expand our understanding of the koala hindgut.

  20. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  1. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; Kirton, Edward S.; He, Shaomei; Woyke, Tanja; Lee, Janey; Chen, Feng; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as well as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.

  2. 16S rRNA Gene Mutations Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Tetracycline in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Amram, E.; Mikula, I.; Schnee, C.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.; Rosales, R. S.; Harrus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis isolates with decreased susceptibilities to tetracyclines are increasingly reported worldwide. The acquired molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon were investigated in 70 clinical isolates of M. bovis. Sequence analysis of the two 16S rRNA-encoding genes (rrs3 and rrs4 alleles) containing the primary binding pocket for tetracycline (Tet-1 site) was performed on isolates with tetracycline hydrochloride MICs of 0.125 to 16 μg/ml. Mutations at positions A965T, A967T/C (Escherichia coli numbering) of helix 31, U1199C of helix 34, and G1058A/C were identified. Decreased susceptibilities to tetracycline (MICs, ≥2 μg/ml) were associated with mutations present at two (A965 and A967) or three positions (A965, A967, and G1058) of the two rrs alleles. No tet(M), tet(O), or tet(L) determinants were found in the genome of any of the 70 M. bovis isolates. The data presented correlate (P < 0.0001) the mutations identified in the Tet-1 site of clinical isolates of M. bovis with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline. PMID:25403668

  3. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  4. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  5. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  6. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  7. 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis of a Large Collection of Environmental and Clinical Unidentifiable Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, Michel; Bollet, Claude; Carlioz, Antoine; Martelin, Rolland; Gayral, Jean-Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Some bacteria are difficult to identify with phenotypic identification schemes commonly used outside reference laboratories. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based identification of bacteria potentially offers a useful alternative when phenotypic characterization methods fail. However, as yet, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequence analysis in the identification of conventionally unidentifiable isolates has not been evaluated with a large collection of isolates. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S rDNA sequencing as a means to identify a collection of 177 such isolates obtained from environmental, veterinary, and clinical sources. For 159 isolates (89.8%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥97%, and for 139 isolates (78.5%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥99%. These similarity score values were used to defined identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. For isolates identified to the species level, conventional identification failed to produce accurate results because of inappropriate biochemical profile determination in 76 isolates (58.7%), Gram staining in 16 isolates (11.6%), oxidase and catalase activity determination in 5 isolates (3.6%) and growth requirement determination in 2 isolates (1.5%). Eighteen isolates (10.2%) remained unidentifiable by 16S rDNA sequence analysis but were probably prototype isolates of new species. These isolates originated mainly from environmental sources (P = 0.07). The 16S rDNA approach failed to identify Enterobacter and Pantoea isolates to the species level (P = 0.04; odds ratio = 0.32 [95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 1.14]). Elsewhere, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing was compromised by the presence of 16S rDNA sequences with >1% undetermined positions in the databases. Unlike phenotypic identification, which can be modified by the variability of expression of characters, 16S rDNA sequencing provides

  8. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  9. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  10. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  11. Analysis of the unexplored features of rrs (16S rDNA) of the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny based on rrs (16S rDNA) sequencing is being vigorously pursued. In fact, it has been stated that novel biological findings are driven by comparison and integration of massive data sets. In spite of a large reservoir of rrs sequencing data of 1,237,963 entries, this analysis invariably needs supplementation with other genes. The need is to divide the genetic variability within a taxa or genus at their rrs phylogenetic boundaries and to discover those fundamental features, which will enable the bacteria to naturally fall within them. Within the large bacterial community, Clostridium represents a large genus of around 110 species of significant biotechnological and medical importance. Certain Clostridium strains produce some of the deadliest toxins, which cause heavy economic losses. We have targeted this genus because of its high genetic diversity, which does not allow accurate typing with the available molecular methods. Results Seven hundred sixty five rrs sequences (> 1200 nucleotides, nts) belonging to 110 Clostridium species were analyzed. On the basis of 404 rrs sequences belonging to 15 Clostridium species, we have developed species specific: (i) phylogenetic framework, (ii) signatures (30 nts) and (iii) in silico restriction enzyme (14 Type II REs) digestion patterns. These tools allowed: (i) species level identification of 95 Clostridium sp. which are presently classified up to genus level, (ii) identification of 84 novel Clostridium spp. and (iii) potential reduction in the number of Clostridium species represented by small populations. Conclusions This integrated approach is quite sensitive and can be easily extended as a molecular tool for diagnostic and taxonomic identification of any microbe of importance to food industries and health services. Since rapid and correct identification allows quicker diagnosis and consequently treatment as well, it is likely to lead to reduction in economic losses and mortality

  12. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Feces of Pet Birds Using 16S Marker Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Castillo-Carranza, Stephany A; Guard, Blake; Gomez-Vazquez, Jose P; Dowd, Scot E; Brigthsmith, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    Birds and other animals live and evolve in close contact with millions of microorganisms (microbiota). While the avian microbiota has been well characterized in domestic poultry, the microbiota of other bird species has been less investigated. The aim of this study was to describe the fecal bacterial communities of pet birds. Pooled fecal samples from 22 flocks representing over 150 individual birds of three different species (Melopsittacus undulatus or budgerigars, Nymphicus hollandicus or cockatiels, and Serinus canaria or domestic canaries) were used for analysis using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the MiSeq platform (Illumina). Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum (median 88.4 %; range 12.9-98.4 %) followed by other low-abundant phyla such as Proteobacteria (median 2.3 %; 0.1-85.3 %) and Actinobacteria (median 1.7 %; 0-18.3 %). Lactobacillaceae (mostly Lactobacillus spp.) was the most abundant family (median 78.1 %; 1.4-97.5 %), especially in budgerigars and canaries, and it deserves attention because of the ascribed beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria. Importantly, feces from birds contain intestinal, urinary, and reproductive-associated microbiota thus posing a serious problem to study one anatomical region at a time. Other groups of interest include the family Clostridiaceae that showed very low abundance (overall median <0.1 %) with the exception of two samples from cockatiels (14 and 45.9 %) and one sample from budgerigars (19.9 %). Analysis of UniFrac metrics showed that overall, the microbial communities from the 22 flocks tended to cluster together for each bird species, meaning each species shed distinctive bacterial communities in feces. This descriptive analysis provides insight into the fecal microbiota of pet birds.

  13. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  14. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  15. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M.; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities. PMID:27708630

  16. Identification of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens and Beneficial Species by Quantitative 16S Clonal Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Purnima S.; Griffen, Ann L.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2005-01-01

    Most studies of the bacterial etiology of periodontitis have used either culture-based or targeted DNA approaches, and so it is likely that pathogens remain undiscovered. The purpose of this study was to use culture-independent, quantitative analysis of biofilms associated with chronic periodontitis and periodontal health to identify pathogens and beneficial species. Samples from subjects with periodontitis and controls were analyzed using ribosomal 16S cloning and sequencing. Several genera, many of them uncultivated, were associated with periodontitis, the most numerous of which were gram positive, including Peptostreptococcus and Filifactor. The genera Megasphaera and Desulfobulbus were elevated in periodontitis, and the levels of several species or phylotypes of Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Deferribacteres, Dialister, Catonella, Tannerella, Streptococcus, Atopobium, Eubacterium, and Treponema were elevated in disease. Streptococcus and Veillonella spp. were found in high numbers in all samples and accounted for a significantly greater fraction of the microbial community in healthy subjects than in those with periodontitis. The microbial profile of periodontal health also included the less-abundant genera Campylobacter, Abiotrophia, Gemella, Capnocytophaga, and Neisseria. These newly identified candidates outnumbered Porphyromonas gingivalis and other species previously implicated as periodontopathogens, and it is not clear if newly identified and more numerous species may play a more important role in pathogenesis. Finally, more differences were found in the bacterial profile between subjects with periodontitis and healthy subjects than between deep and shallow sites within the same subject. This suggests that chronic periodontitis is the result of a global perturbation of the oral bacterial ecology rather than a disease-site specific microbial shift. PMID:16081935

  17. Sources for sedimentary bacteriohopanepolyols as revealed by 16S rDNA stratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Marco J L; Talbot, Helen M; Abbas, Ben A; Ward, Christopher; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2008-07-01

    Bacteriohopanoids are widespread lipid biomarkers in the sedimentary record. Many aerobic and anaerobic bacteria are potential sources of these lipids which sometimes complicates the use of these biomarkers as proxies for ecological and environmental changes. Therefore, we applied preserved 16S ribosomal RNA genes to identify likely Holocene biological sources of bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) in the sulfidic sediments of the permanently stratified postglacial Ace Lake, Antarctica. A suite of intact BHPs were identified, which revealed a variety of structural forms whose composition differed through the sediment core reflecting changes in bacterial populations induced by large changes in lake salinity. Stable isotopic compositions of the hopanols formed from periodic acid-cleaved BHPs, showed that some were substantially depleted in (13)C, indicative of their methanotrophic origin. Using sensitive molecular tools, we found that Type I and II methanotrophic bacteria (respectively Methylomonas and Methylocystis) were unique to the oldest lacustrine sediments (> 9400 years BP), but quantification of fossil DNA revealed that the Type I methanotrophs, including methanotrophs related to methanotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea cold-seep mussels, were the main precursors of the 35-amino BHPs (i.e. aminopentol, -tetrol and -triols). After isolation of the lake approximately 3000 years ago, one Type I methanotroph of the 'methanotrophic gill symbionts cluster' remained the most obvious source of aminotetrol and -triol. We, furthermore, identified a Synechococcus phylotype related to pelagic freshwater strains in the oldest lacustrine sediments as a putative source of 2-methylbacteriohopanetetrol (2-Me BHT). This combined application of advanced geochemical and paleogenomical tools further refined our knowledge about Holocene biogeochemical processes in Ace Lake.

  18. Vikodak - A Modular Framework for Inferring Functional Potential of Microbial Communities from 16S Metagenomic Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Sunil; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The overall metabolic/functional potential of any given environmental niche is a function of the sum total of genes/proteins/enzymes that are encoded and expressed by various interacting microbes residing in that niche. Consequently, prior (collated) information pertaining to genes, enzymes encoded by the resident microbes can aid in indirectly (re)constructing/ inferring the metabolic/ functional potential of a given microbial community (given its taxonomic abundance profile). In this study, we present Vikodak—a multi-modular package that is based on the above assumption and automates inferring and/ or comparing the functional characteristics of an environment using taxonomic abundance generated from one or more environmental sample datasets. With the underlying assumptions of co-metabolism and independent contributions of different microbes in a community, a concerted effort has been made to accommodate microbial co-existence patterns in various modules incorporated in Vikodak. Results Validation experiments on over 1400 metagenomic samples have confirmed the utility of Vikodak in (a) deciphering enzyme abundance profiles of any KEGG metabolic pathway, (b) functional resolution of distinct metagenomic environments, (c) inferring patterns of functional interaction between resident microbes, and (d) automating statistical comparison of functional features of studied microbiomes. Novel features incorporated in Vikodak also facilitate automatic removal of false positives and spurious functional predictions. Conclusions With novel provisions for comprehensive functional analysis, inclusion of microbial co-existence pattern based algorithms, automated inter-environment comparisons; in-depth analysis of individual metabolic pathways and greater flexibilities at the user end, Vikodak is expected to be an important value addition to the family of existing tools for 16S based function prediction. Availability and Implementation A web implementation of Vikodak

  19. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  20. DECIPHER, a search-based approach to chimera identification for 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Noguera, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    DECIPHER is a new method for finding 16S rRNA chimeric sequences by the use of a search-based approach. The method is based upon detecting short fragments that are uncommon in the phylogenetic group where a query sequence is classified but frequently found in another phylogenetic group. The algorithm was calibrated for full sequences (fs_DECIPHER) and short sequences (ss_DECIPHER) and benchmarked against WigeoN (Pintail), ChimeraSlayer, and Uchime using artificially generated chimeras. Overall, ss_DECIPHER and Uchime provided the highest chimera detection for sequences 100 to 600 nucleotides long (79% and 81%, respectively), but Uchime's performance deteriorated for longer sequences, while ss_DECIPHER maintained a high detection rate (89%). Both methods had low false-positive rates (1.3% and 1.6%). The more conservative fs_DECIPHER, benchmarked only for sequences longer than 600 nucleotides, had an overall detection rate lower than that of ss_DECIPHER (75%) but higher than those of the other programs. In addition, fs_DECIPHER had the lowest false-positive rate among all the benchmarked programs (<0.20%). DECIPHER was outperformed only by ChimeraSlayer and Uchime when chimeras were formed from closely related parents (less than 10% divergence). Given the differences in the programs, it was possible to detect over 89% of all chimeras with just the combination of ss_DECIPHER and Uchime. Using fs_DECIPHER, we detected between 1% and 2% additional chimeras in the RDP, SILVA, and Greengenes databases from which chimeras had already been removed with Pintail or Bellerophon. DECIPHER was implemented in the R programming language and is directly accessible through a webpage or by downloading the program as an R package (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  1. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  2. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the “central pseudoknot” and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A–916U and betaproteobacterial 19C–916G) and the non-native 19A–916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C–916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A–916U or 19C–916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts. PMID:28293553

  3. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the "central pseudoknot" and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A-916U and betaproteobacterial 19C-916G) and the non-native 19A-916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C-916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A-916U or 19C-916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts.

  4. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA from lyophilized cell cultures facilitates studies in molecular systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the major portion of a Bacillus cycloheptanicus strain SCH(T) 16S rRNA gene is reported. This sequence suggests that B. cycloheptanicus is genetically quite distinct from traditional Bacillus strains (e.g., B. subtilis) and may be properly regarded as belonging to a different genus. The sequence was determined from DNA that was produced by direct amplification of ribosomal DNA from a lyophilized cell pellet with straightforward polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. By obviating the need to revive cell cultures from the lyophile pellet, this approach facilitates rapid 16S rDNA sequencing and thereby advances studies in molecular systematics.

  5. Molecular systematics of the genus Troglophilus (Rhaphidophoridae, Orthoptera) in Turkey: mitochondrial 16S rDNA evidences

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Russo, Claudio Di; Rampini, Mauro; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study focuses on the evolutionary relationships among Turkish species of the cave cricket genus Troglophilus.Fifteen populations were studied for sequence variation in a fragment (543 base pairs) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 16S rDNA gene (16S) to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history. Genetic data retrieved three main clades and at least three divergent lineages that could not be attributed to any of the taxa known for the area. Molecular time estimates suggest that the diversification of the group took place between the Messinian and the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:23653493

  6. High-temperature piezoelectric crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fapeng; Hou, Shuai; Zhao, Xian; Zhang, Shujun

    2014-08-01

    High-temperature sensors are desirable for structural health monitoring and/or nondestructive evaluation of next-generation turbines, more efficient jet engines, and the furnace components of electrical power plants. Of all the investigated high-temperature piezoelectric materials, rare-earth calcium oxyborate crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3 (ReCOB, Re: rare-earth) exhibit attractive advantages for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing. In this paper, the electroelastic properties of different ReCOB piezoelectric crystals are investigated. The crosstalk between various vibration modes are discussed, from which the optimized crystal cuts are achieved. Furthermore, temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity, dielectric, elastic, piezoelectric, and electromechanical properties of ReCOB crystals are studied. Finally, the thermal properties, including thermal expansion, specific heat, and thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures are studied and compared with commercially available high-temperature piezoelectric crystals.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF ACTIVE BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN A MODEL DRINKING WATER BIOFILM SYSTEM USING 16S RRNA-BASED CLONE LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent phylogenetic studies have used DNA as the target molecule for the development of environmental 16S rDNA clone libraries. As DNA may persist in the environment, DNA-based libraries cannot be used to identify metabolically active bacteria in water systems. In this study, a...

  8. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  9. Molecular Diagnosis of Kingella kingae Pericarditis by Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. PMID:17634294

  10. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  11. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  13. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    PubMed

    Ong, Swee Hoe; Kukkillaya, Vinutha Uppoor; Wilm, Andreas; Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  14. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  15. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  17. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA-BASED ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate between ruminant and human fecal pollution. These assays are rapid and relatively inexpensive but have been used in a limited number of studies. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy o...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  20. Minimization of chloroplast contamination in 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of insect herbivore bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Hanshew, Alissa S.; Mason, Charles J.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast sequence contamination in 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S) analyses can be particularly problematic when sampling microbial communities in plants and folivorous arthropods. We previously encountered high levels of plastid contamination in herbivorous insect samples when we used the predominant 454 pyrosequencing 16S methodologies described in the literature. 799F, a primer previously found to exclude chloroplast sequences, was modified to enhance its efficacy, and we describe, in detail, our methodology throughout amplicon pyrosequencing. Thirteen versions of 799F were assessed for the exclusion of chloroplast sequences from our samples. We found that a shift in the mismatch between 799F and chloroplast 16S resulted in significant reduction of chloroplast reads. Our results also indicate that amplifying sequences from environmental samples in a two-step PCR process, with the addition of the multiplex identifiers and 454 adapters in a second round of PCR, further improved primer specificity. Primers that included 3′ phosphorothioate bonds, which were designed to block primer degradation, did not amplify consistently across samples. The different forward primers do not appear to bias the bacterial communities detected. We provide a methodological framework for reducing chloroplast reads in high-throughput sequencing data sets that can be applied to a number of environmental samples and sequencing techniques. PMID:23968645

  1. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  2. Diversity and abundance of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial habitats studied by 16S RNA surveys and real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Selezi, Drazenka; Quaiser, Achim; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Liza; Schleper, Christa

    2003-09-01

    Novel phylogenetic lineages of as yet uncultivated crenarchaeota have been frequently detected in low to moderate-temperature, marine and terrestrial environments. In order to gain a more comprehensive view on the distribution and diversity of Crenarchaeota in moderate habitats, we have studied 18 different terrestrial and freshwater samples by 16S rDNA-based phylogenetic surveys. In seven different soil samples of diverse geographic areas in Europe (forest, grassland, ruderal) and Asia (permafrost, ruderal) as well as in two microbial mats, we have consistently found one particular lineage of crenarchaeota. The diversity of Crenarchaeota in freshwater sediments was considerably higher with respresentative 16S rDNA sequences distributed over four different groups within the moderate crenarchaeota. Systematic analysis of a 16S rDNA universal library from a sandy ecosystem containing 800 clones exclusively revealed the presence of the soil-specific crenarchaeotal cluster. With primers specific for non-thermophilic crenarchaeota we established a rapid method to quantify archaeal 16S rDNA in real time PCR. The relative abundance of crenarchaeotal rDNA was 0.5-3% in the bulk soil sample and only 0.16% in the rhizosphere of the sandy ecosystem. A nearby agricultural setting yielded a relative abundance of 0.17% crenarchaeotal rDNA. In total our data suggest that soil crenarchaeota represent a stable and specific component of the microbiota in terrestrial habitats.

  3. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  5. A Web-Hosted R Workflow to Simplify and Automate the Analysis of 16S NGS Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) produces large data sets that include tens-of-thousands of sequence reads per sample. For analysis of bacterial diversity, 16S NGS sequences are typically analyzed in a workflow that containing best-of-breed bioinformatics packages that may levera...

  6. MULTIPLE ENZYME RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION DISTINCTION OF PSEUDOMONAS (SENSU STRICTO) 16S RRNA GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas specific 16S rDNA PCR amplification and multiple enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (MERFLP) analysis using a single digestion mixture of Alu I, Hinf I, Rsa I, and Tru 9I distinguished 150 published sequences and reference strains of authentic Pseudomonas...

  7. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  8. COI is better than 16S rRNA for DNA barcoding Asiatic salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata: Hynobiidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun; Gu, Hai-Feng; Peng, Rui; Chen, Qin; Zheng, Yu-Chi; Murphy, Robert W; Zeng, Xiao-Mao

    2012-01-01

    The 5' region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is the standard marker for DNA barcoding. However, because COI tends to be highly variable in amphibians, sequencing is often challenging. Consequently, another mtDNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, is often advocated for amphibian barcoding. Herein, we directly compare the usefulness of COI and 16S in discriminating species of hynobiid salamanders using 130 individuals. Species identification and classification of these animals, which are endemic to Asia, are often based on morphology only. Analysis of Kimura 2-parameter genetic distances (K2P) documents the mean intraspecific variation for COI and 16S rRNA genes to be 1.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Whereas COI can always identify species, sometimes 16S cannot. Intra- and interspecific genetic divergences occasionally overlap in both markers, thus reducing the value of a barcoding gap to identify genera. Regardless, COI is the better DNA barcoding marker for hynobiids. In addition to the comparison of two potential markers, high levels of intraspecific divergence in COI (>5%) suggest that both Onychodactylus fischeri and Salamandrella keyserlingii might be composites of cryptic species.

  9. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  10. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  11. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  12. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  13. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alberto I; Almada, Albert E; Abajian, Aaron C

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. Results We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program. We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family – a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. Conclusion ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical properties, and permits the display

  14. A new system for the amplification of biological signals: RecA and complimentary single strand DNA probes on a leaky surface acoustic wave biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Ming; Luo, Yang; Deng, Kun; Chen, Dong; Fu, Weiling

    2014-10-15

    This research describes a new amplification signals system of the leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) bis-peptide nucleic acid (bis-PNA) biosensor for the simple, sensitive and rapid detection of the target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The system consists of a RecA protein-coated complementary single-stranded DNA (cssDNA) probe complex that amplifies the biological signal to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The bis-PNA probe for detecting HPV was first immobilized on a gold surface membrane of the detection channel. After the probe was completely hybridized with the corresponding target DNA, different concentrations of the "RecA protein-complementary single strand DNA probe" were added to react with the bis-PNA/dsDNA complex. The phase shift of the LSAW biosensors, which was measured and found to be most significant when the RecA protein was 45 μg/mL and the ATPγS was 2.5 mmol/L. Compared with other concentrations (P<0.01) of RecA and ATPγS, the value of the phase shift was (11.74 ± 1.03) degrees and the ratio of the phase shift and hybridization time clearly outperformed that of the other concentrations. Compared to the direct hybridization of the bis-PNA probe and the target DNA sequence, the sensitivity was effectively improved and the detection time was significantly shortened. PNA binding adjacent to the area of the target sequence homologous to the probe significantly increased the yield of the hybridization reaction between the PNA/dsDNA complex and the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe. In this condition, the phase shift was significantly obvious and the detection time was significantly shortened. In conclusion, the combination of the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe and the LSAW bis-PNA biosensor provides sensitivity and simple and rapid detection of clinical trace pathogenic microorganisms.

  15. Isolation and 16S DNA characterization of soil microorganisms from tropical soils capable of utilizing the herbicides hexazinone and tebuthiuron.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Fadwa I Y; Helling, Charles S

    2003-11-01

    Six non-fermentative bacteria were isolated from Colombian (South America) and Hawaiian (USA) soils after enrichment with minimal medium supplemented with two herbicides, hexazinone (Hex) and tebuthiuron (Teb). Microscopic examination and physiological tests were followed by partial 16S DNA sequence analysis, using the first 527 bp of the 16S rRNA gene for bacterial identification. The isolated microorganisms (and in brackets, the herbicide that each degraded) were identified as: from Colombia. Methylobacterium organophilum [Teb], Paenibacillus pabuli [Teb], and Micrmbacterium foliorum [Hex]; and from Hawaii, Methylobacterium radiotolerans [Teb], Paenibacillus illinoisensis [Hex], and Rhodococcus equi [Hex]. The findings further explain how these herbicides, which have potential for illicit coca (Erythroxylum sp.) control, dissipate following their application to tropical soils.

  16. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  17. RmtC and RmtF 16S rRNA Methyltransferase in NDM-1-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohibur; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Pathak, Ashutosh; Pati, Binod Kumar; Singh, Avinash; Ovejero, Cristina M; Ahmad, Saheem; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA methyltransferases in 38 blaNDM-1-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and found RmtC in 3 isolates, 1 of which also harbored RmtF. The isolates were clonally unrelated; rmtC and rmtF genes were located on a chromosome with the blaNDM-1 gene. Strategies are needed to limit the spread of such isolates.

  18. Use of 16S rRNA Sequencing for Identification of Actinobacillus ureae Isolated from a Cerebrospinal Fluid Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A. C.; Shankland, I. M.; Elisha, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus ureae, previously Pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of DNA sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:11825992

  19. Usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Pathipati, Padmaja; Menon, Thangam; Kumar, Naveen; Francis, Thara; Sekar, Prem; Cherian, Kotturathu Mammen

    2012-08-01

    We report a rare case of infective endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae in an 8-year-old boy, 2 years after a right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with a bovine Contegra valved conduit. The patient recovered well after an RV-PA conduit enblock explantation and replacement with an aortic homograft with antibiotic treatment. All bacteriological cultures of excised tissue and blood were negative. The aetiological agent was identified as C. diphtheriae subsp. gravis by 16s rDNA sequencing.

  20. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  1. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; ...

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n =more » 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.« less

  2. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  3. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  4. Short-read assembly of full-length 16S amplicons reveals bacterial diversity in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher S; Handley, Kim M; Wrighton, Kelly C; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology, a fundamental question relates to how community diversity and composition change in response to perturbation. Most studies have had limited ability to deeply sample community structure (e.g. Sanger-sequenced 16S rRNA libraries), or have had limited taxonomic resolution (e.g. studies based on 16S rRNA hypervariable region sequencing). Here, we combine the higher taxonomic resolution of near-full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the economics and sensitivity of short-read sequencing to assay the abundance and identity of organisms that represent as little as 0.01% of sediment bacterial communities. We used a new version of EMIRGE optimized for large data size to reconstruct near-full-length 16S rRNA genes from amplicons sheared and sequenced with Illumina technology. The approach allowed us to differentiate the community composition among samples acquired before perturbation, after acetate amendment shifted the predominant metabolism to iron reduction, and once sulfate reduction began. Results were highly reproducible across technical replicates, and identified specific taxa that responded to the perturbation. All samples contain very high alpha diversity and abundant organisms from phyla without cultivated representatives. Surprisingly, at the time points measured, there was no strong loss of evenness, despite the selective pressure of acetate amendment and change in the terminal electron accepting process. However, community membership was altered significantly. The method allows for sensitive, accurate profiling of the "long tail" of low abundance organisms that exist in many microbial communities, and can resolve population dynamics in response to environmental change.

  5. recA gene of Escherichia coli complements defects in DNA repair and mutagenesis in Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6).

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, P; Baltz, R H

    1987-01-01

    Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6) is a mutant which is defective in repair of DNA damage induced by a variety of chemical mutagens and UV light. JS6 is also defective in error-prone (mutagenic) DNA repair (J. Stonesifer and R. H. Baltz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1180-1183, 1985). The recA gene of Escherichia coli, cloned in a bifunctional vector that replicates in E. coli and Streptomyces spp., complemented the mutation in S. fradiae JS6, indicating that E. coli and S. fradiae express similar SOS responses and that the mcr+ gene product of S. fradiae is functionally analogous to the protein encoded by the recA gene of E. coli. PMID:3308856

  6. Analytical model for determination of parameters of helical structures in solution by small angle scattering: comparison of RecA structures by SANS.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, D V; Baitin, D M; Islamov, A Kh; Kuklin, A I; Shalguev, V Kh; Lanzov, V A; Isaev-Ivanov, V V

    2003-02-27

    The filament structures of the self-polymers of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their complexes with ATPgammaS, phage M13 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and the tertiary complexes RecA::ATPgammaS::ssDNA were compared by small angle neutron scattering. A model was developed that allowed for an analytical solution for small angle scattering on a long helical filament, making it possible to obtain the helical pitch and the mean diameter of the protein filament from the scattering curves. The results suggest that the structure of the filaments formed by these two RecA proteins, and particularly their complexes with ATPgammaS, is conservative.

  7. Microbial community of salt crystals processed from Mediterranean seawater based on 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Baati, Houda; Guermazi, Sonda; Gharsallah, Neji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was used to investigate for the first time the structure of the microbial community that inhabits salt crystals retrieved from the bottom of a solar saltern, located in the coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea (Sfax, Tunisia). This community lives in an extremely salty environment of 250-310 g/L total dissolved salt. A total of 78 bacterial 16S rRNA clone sequences making up to 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), determined by the DOTUR program to 97% sequence similarity, was analyzed. These OTUs were affiliated to Bacteroidetes (71.4% of OTUs), and gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria (equally represented by 14.2% of the OTUs observed). The archaeal community composition appeared more diverse with 68 clones, resulting in 44 OTUs, all affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Of the bacterial and archaeal clones showing <97% 16S rRNA sequence identity with sequences in public databases, 47.6% and 84.1% respectively were novel clones. Both rarefaction curves and diversity measurements (Simpson, Shannon-Weaver, Chao) showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the Tunisian solar saltern pond. The analysis of an increasing clone's number may reveal additional local diversity.

  8. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies

    PubMed Central

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users’ own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org. PMID:27659943

  9. IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Joseph, Divya; Kapfhammer, Martin; Giritli, Sabahattin; Horn, Matthias; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2016-09-23

    The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users' own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org.

  10. Microbial diversity in the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient studied with 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Armougom, F; Bittar, F; Stremler, N; Rolain, J-M; Robert, C; Dubus, J-C; Sarles, J; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies using 16S rRNA gene amplification followed by clonal Sanger sequencing in cystic fibrosis demonstrated that cultured microorganisms are only part of the infecting flora. The purpose of this paper was to compare pyrosequencing and clonal Sanger sequencing on sputum. The sputum of a patient with cystic fibrosis was analysed by culture, Sanger clone sequencing and pyrosequencing after 16S rRNA gene amplification. A total of 4,499 sequencing reads were obtained, which could be attributed to six consensus sequences, but the length of reads leads to fastidious data analysis. Compared to clonal Sanger sequencing and to cultivation results, pyrosequencing recovers greater species richness and gives a more reliable estimate of the relative abundance of bacterial species. The 16S pyrosequencing approach expands our knowledge of the microbial diversity of cystic fibrosis sputum. The current lack of phylogenetic resolution at the species level for the GS 20 sequencing reads will be overcome with the next generation of pyrosequencing apparatus.

  11. New Screening Software Shows that Most Recent Large 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries Contain Chimeras†

    PubMed Central

    Ashelford, Kevin E.; Chuzhanova, Nadia A.; Fry, John C.; Jones, Antonia J.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/. PMID:16957188

  12. Diversity of thermophiles in a Malaysian hot spring determined using 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chia Sing; Chan, Kok-Gan; Tay, Yea-Ling; Chua, Yi-Heng; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-01-01

    The Sungai Klah (SK) hot spring is the second hottest geothermal spring in Malaysia. This hot spring is a shallow, 150-m-long, fast-flowing stream, with temperatures varying from 50 to 110°C and a pH range of 7.0-9.0. Hidden within a wooded area, the SK hot spring is continually fed by plant litter, resulting in a relatively high degree of total organic content (TOC). In this study, a sample taken from the middle of the stream was analyzed at the 16S rRNA V3-V4 region by amplicon metagenome sequencing. Over 35 phyla were detected by analyzing the 16S rRNA data. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented approximately 57% of the microbiome. Approximately 70% of the detected thermophiles were strict anaerobes; however, Hydrogenobacter spp., obligate chemolithotrophic thermophiles, represented one of the major taxa. Several thermophilic photosynthetic microorganisms and acidothermophiles were also detected. Most of the phyla identified by 16S rRNA were also found using the shotgun metagenome approaches. The carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism within the SK hot spring community were evaluated by shotgun metagenome sequencing, and the data revealed diversity in terms of metabolic activity and dynamics. This hot spring has a rich diversified phylogenetic community partly due to its natural environment (plant litter, high TOC, and a shallow stream) and geochemical parameters (broad temperature and pH range). It is speculated that symbiotic relationships occur between the members of the community.

  13. Quantifying Microbial Diversity: Morphotypes, 16S rRNA Genes, and Carotenoids of Oxygenic Phototrophs in Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kühl, Michael; Muyzer, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    We quantified the diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms present in eight hypersaline microbial mats on the basis of three cultivation-independent approaches. Morphological diversity was studied by microscopy. The diversity of carotenoids was examined by extraction from mat samples and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The diversity of 16S rRNA genes from oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms was investigated by extraction of total DNA from mat samples, amplification of 16S rRNA gene segments from cyanobacteria and plastids of eukaryotic algae by phylum-specific PCR, and sequence-dependent separation of amplification products by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. A numerical approach was introduced to correct for crowding the results of chromatographic and electrophoretic analyses. Diversity estimates typically varied up to twofold among mats. The congruence of richness estimates and Shannon-Weaver indices based on numbers and proportional abundances of unique morphotypes, 16S rRNA genes, and carotenoids unveiled the underlying diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms in the eight mat communities studied. PMID:9925563

  14. Multiplex 16S rRNA‐derived geno‐biochip for detection of 16 bacterial pathogens from contaminated foods

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne diseases caused by various pathogenic bacteria occur worldwide. To prevent foodborne diseases and minimize their impacts, it is important to inspect contaminated foods and specifically detect many types of pathogenic bacteria. Several DNA oligonucleotide biochips based on 16S rRNA have been investigated to detect bacteria; however, a mode of detection that can be used to detect diverse pathogenic strains and to examine the safety of food matrixes is still needed. In the present work, a 16S rRNA gene‐derived geno‐biochip detection system was developed after screening DNA oligonucleotide specific capture probes, and it was validated for multiple detection of 16 pathogenic strains that frequently occur with a signature pattern. rRNAs were also used as detection targets directly obtained from cell lysates without any purification and amplification steps in the bacterial cells separated from 8 food matrixes by simple pretreatments. Thus, the developed 16S rRNA‐derived geno‐biochip can be successfully used for the rapid and multiple detection of the 16 pathogenic bacteria frequently isolated from contaminated foods that are important for food safety. PMID:27492058

  15. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  16. Designation of Streptomycete 16S and 23S rRNA-based target regions for oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Witt, D; Kemmerling, C; Kroppenstedt, R; Liesack, W

    1991-05-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA of various Streptomyces species were partially sequenced and screened for the presence of stretches that could define all members of the genus, groups of species, or individual species. Nucleotide 929 (Streptomyces ambofaciens nomenclature [J.L. Pernodet, M.T. Alegre, F. Boccard, and M. Guerineau, Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) is a nucleotide highly unique to Streptomyces species which, in combination with flanking regions, allowed the designation of a genus-specific probe. Regions 158 through 203 of the 16S rRNA and 1518 through 1645 of the 23S rRNA (helix 54 [Pernodet et al., Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) have a high potential to define species, whereas the degree of variation in regions 982 through 998 and 1102 through 1122 of the 16S rRNA is less pronounced but characteristic for at least certain species. Alone or in combination with each other, these regions may serve as target sites for synthetic oligonucleotide probes and primers to be used in the determination of pure cultures and in the characterization of community structures. The specificity of several probes is demonstrated by dot blot hybridization.

  17. Comparison of 16S rDNA analysis and rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting for molecular identification of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Song, Mi-Ok; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Ki-Jung; Chung, Sang-In; Choi, Chul-Soon; Park, Yong-Ha

    2003-01-01

    16S rDNA sequence analysis and repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprinting were evaluated on 11 type strains of the genus Yersinia and 17 recognized serotype strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis to investigate their genetic relatedness and to establish the value of techniques for the identification of Y. pseudotuberculosis. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 16S rDNA sequences showed that the type strains of Yersinia species formed distinct clusters with the exception of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. Moreover, Y. pestis NCTC 5923T was found to be closely related to Y. pseudotuberculosis serotypes 1b, 3, and 7. Dendrograms generated from REP-PCR, and ERIC-PCR data revealed that members of the genus Yersinia differed from each other with the degree of similarity 62% and 58%, respectively. However, the BOX-PCR results showed that Y. pestis 5923T clustered with the Y. pseudotuberculosis group with a degree of similarity 74%. According to these findings, 16S rDNA sequence analysis was unable to reliably discriminate Y. pseudotuberculosis from Y. pestis. However, REP-PCR and especially ERIC-PCR provided an effective means of differentiating between members of the taxa.

  18. Escherichia coli 16S rRNA 3'-end formation requires a distal transfer RNA sequence at a proper distance.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    The 16S rRNA species in bacterial precursor rRNAs is followed by two evolutionarily conserved features: (i) a double-stranded stem formed by complementary sequences adjacent to the 5' and 3' ends of the 16S rRNA; and (ii) a 3'-transfer RNA sequence. To assess the possible role of these features, plasmid constructs with precursor-specific features deleted were tested for their capacity to form mature rRNA. Stem-forming sequences were dispensable for both 5' and 3' terminus formation; whereas an intact spacer tRNA positioned greater than 24 nucleotides downstream of the 16S RNA sequence was required for correct 3'-end maturation. These results suggest that spacer tRNA at an appropriate location helps form a conformation obligate for pre-rRNA processing, perhaps by binding to a nascent binding site in preribosomes. Thus, spacer tRNAs may be an obligate participant in ribosome formation. Images PMID:2684637

  19. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  20. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  1. The mechanism of recA polA lethality: Suppression by RecA-independent recombination repair activated by the lexA(Def) mutation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yang; Kogoma, Tokio

    1995-04-01

    The mechanism of recA polA lethality in Escherichia coli has been studied. Complementation tests have indicated that both the 5{prime} {yields} 3{prime} exonuclease and the polymerization activities of DNA polymerase I are essential for viability in the absence of RecA protein, whereas the viability and DNA replication of DNA polymerase I-defective cells depend on the recombinase activity of RecA. An alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis has indicated that RecA has only a minor role in Okazaki fragment processing. Double-strand break repair is proposed for the major role of RecA in the absence of DNA polymerase I. The lexA(Def)::Tn5 mutation has previously been shown to suppress the temperature-sensitive growth of recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutants. The lexA(Def) mutation can alleviate impaired DNA synthesis in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutant cells at the restrictive temperature. recF{sup +} is essential for this suppression pathway, recJ and recQ mutations have minor but significant adverse effects on the suppression. The recA200(Ts) allele in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc lexA(Def) mutant can be replaced by {Delta}recA, indicating that the lexA(Def)-induced suppression is RecA independent. lexA(Def) reduces the sensitivity of {Delta}recA polA25::spc cells to UV damage by {approximately}10{sup 4}-fold. lexA(Def) also restores P1 transduction proficiency to the {Delta}recA polA25::spc mutant to a level that is 7.3% of the recA{sup +} wild type. These results suggest that lexA(Def) activates a RecA-independent, RecF-dependent recombination repair pathway that suppresses the defect in DNA replication in recA polA double mutants. 52 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. The RecD subunit of the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme inhibits RecA loading, homologous recombination, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2000-01-01

    The RecBCD enzyme is required for homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The structure and function of RecBCD enzyme is altered on its interaction with the recombination hotspot Chi (5′-GCTGGTGG-3′). It has been hypothesized that the RecD subunit plays a role in Chi-dependent regulation of enzyme activity [Thaler, D. S., Sampson, E., Siddiqi, I., Rosenberg, S. M., Stahl, F. W. & Stahl, M. (1988) in Mechanisms and Consequences of DNA Damage Processing, eds. Friedberg, E. & Hanawalt, P. (Liss, New York), pp. 413–422; Churchill, J. J., Anderson, D. G. & Kowalczykowski, S. C. (1999) Genes Dev. 13, 901–911]. We tested the hypothesis that the RecD subunit inhibits recombination by deleting recD from the nuclease- and recombination-deficient mutant recBD1080ACD. We report here that the resulting strain, recBD1080AC, was proficient for recombination and DNA repair. Recombination proficiency was accompanied by a change in enzyme activity: RecBD1080AC enzyme loaded RecA protein onto DNA during DNA unwinding whereas RecBD1080ACD enzyme did not. Together, these genetic and biochemical results demonstrate that RecA loading by RecBCD enzyme is required for recombination in E. coli cells and suggest that RecD interferes with the enzyme domain required for its loading. A nuclease-dependent signal appears to be required for a change in RecD that allows RecA loading. Because RecA loading is not observed with wild-type RecBCD enzyme until it acts at a Chi site, our observations support the view that RecD inhibits recombination until the enzyme acts at Chi. PMID:10840065

  3. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  4. Development of an Analysis Pipeline Characterizing Multiple Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Using Mock Samples

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Jennifer J.; Oler, Andrew J.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Chalmers, Natalia; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Cashion, Ann; Munson, Peter J.; Ames, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is much speculation on which hypervariable region provides the highest bacterial specificity in 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimum solution to prevent bias and to obtain a comprehensive view of complex bacterial communities would be to sequence the entire 16S rRNA gene; however, this is not possible with second generation standard library design and short-read next-generation sequencing technology. Methods This paper examines a new process using seven hypervariable or V regions of the 16S rRNA (six amplicons: V2, V3, V4, V6-7, V8, and V9) processed simultaneously on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Four mock samples were amplified using the 16S Ion Metagenomics Kit™ (Life Technologies) and their sequencing data is subjected to a novel analytical pipeline. Results Results are presented at family and genus level. The Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL), a measure of the departure of the computed from the nominal bacterial distribution in the mock samples, was used to infer which region performed best at the family and genus levels. Three different hypervariable regions, V2, V4, and V6-7, produced the lowest divergence compared to the known mock sample. The V9 region gave the highest (worst) average DKL while the V4 gave the lowest (best) average DKL. In addition to having a high DKL, the V9 region in both the forward and reverse directions performed the worst finding only 17% and 53% of the known family level and 12% and 47% of the genus level bacteria, while results from the forward and reverse V4 region identified all 17 family level bacteria. Conclusions The results of our analysis have shown that our sequencing methods using 6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA and subsequent analysis is valid. This method also allowed for the assessment of how well each of the variable regions might perform simultaneously. Our findings will provide the basis for future work intended to assess microbial abundance at

  5. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  6. Flow Cytometry-assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs fromComplex 16S ribosomal RNA Gene Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.L.; Schramm, A.; Bernhard, A.E.; van den Engh, G.J.; Stahl, D.A.

    2004-07-21

    A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screeningand recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. Thisapproach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting-assisted cloning,was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within theBacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNAgenes. Retrieval and sequence analysis of phylogenetically informativegenes has become a standard cultivation-independent technique toinvestigate microbial diversity in nature (7, 18). Genes encoding the 16SrRNA, because of the relative ease of their selective amplification, havebeen most frequently employed for general diversity surveys (16).Environmental studies have also focused on specific subpopulationsaffiliated with a phylogenetic group or identified by genes encodingspecific metabolic functions (e.g., ammonia oxidation, sulfaterespiration, and nitrate reduction) (8,15,20). However, specificpopulations may be of low abundance (1,23), or the genes encodingspecific metabolic functions may be insufficiently conserved to providepriming sites for general PCR amplification. Three general approacheshave been used to obtain 16S rRNA sequence information from low-abundancepopulations: screening hundreds to thousands of clones in a general 16SrRNA gene library (21), flow cytometric sorting of a subpopulation ofenvironmentally derived cells labeled by fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) (27), or selective PCR amplification using primersspecific for the subpopulation (2,23). While the first approach is simplytime-consuming and tedious, the second has been restricted to fairlylarge and strongly fluorescent cells from aquatic samples (5, 27). Thethird approach often generates fragments of only a few hundred bases dueto the limited number of specific priming sites. Partial sequenceinformation often degrades analysis, obscuring or distorting thephylogenetic placement of the new sequences (11, 20). A more robustcharacterization of environ

  7. The discovery of error-prone DNA polymerase V and its unique regulation by RecA and ATP.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Myron F

    2014-09-26

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2006-04-01

    RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with ATP. Both crystal forms belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21 and diffract X-rays to 2.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 Å. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 Å resolution.

  9. The Discovery of Error-prone DNA Polymerase V and Its Unique Regulation by RecA and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts. PMID:25160630

  10. Touchdown Enzyme Time Release-PCR for Detection and Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci Using the 16S and 16S-23S Spacer rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Quinn, Thomas C.; Boman, Jens; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2000-01-01

    Three touchdown enzyme time release (TETR)-PCR assays were used to amplify different DNA sequences in the variable regions of the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes specific for Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Chlamydia psittaci as improved tests for sensitive diagnosis and rapid species differentiation. The TETR-PCR protocol used 60 cycles of amplification, which provided improved analytical sensitivity (0.004 to 0.063 inclusion-forming unit of Chlamydia species per PCR). The sensitivity of TETR-PCR with primer set CTR 70-CTR 71 was 96.7%, and the specificity was 99.6%, compared to those of the AMPLICOR PCR for the detection of C. trachomatis in vaginal swab samples. TETR-PCR for C. pneumoniae with primer set CPN 90-CPN 91 was 90% sensitive and 93.3% specific compared with a nested PCR with primer set CP1/2-CPC/D for clinical respiratory samples. TETR-PCR for C. psittaci with primer set CPS 100-CPS 101 showed substantial agreement with cell culturing (κ, 0.78) for animal tissue samples. Primer sets were then combined into a single multiplex TETR-PCR test. The respective 315-, 195-, and 111-bp DNA target products were precisely amplified when DNA from each of the respective Chlamydia species or combinations of them was used. Multiplex chlamydia TETR-PCR correctly identified one strain of each of the 15 serovars of C. trachomatis, 22 isolates of C. pneumoniae, and 20 isolates of C. psittaci. The primer sets were specific for each species. No target products were amplified when DNA from C. pecorum or a variety of other microorganisms was tested for specificity. TETR-PCR with primers selected for specific sequences in the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes is a valuable test that could be used either with individual primers or in a multiplex assay for the identification and differentiation of Chlamydia species from culture isolates or for the detection of chlamydiae in clinical samples. PMID:10699002

  11. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Ferrell, Joshua C; Witkowski, Travis A; Grice, Alison N

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage.

  12. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  13. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  14. CLUSTOM: A Novel Method for Clustering 16S rRNA Next Generation Sequences by Overlap Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Kwon; Yu, Dong Su; Hou, Bo Kyeng; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2013-01-01

    The recent nucleic acid sequencing revolution driven by shotgun and high-throughput technologies has led to a rapid increase in the number of sequences for microbial communities. The availability of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from a multitude of natural environments now offers a unique opportunity to study microbial diversity and community structure. The large volume of sequencing data however makes it time consuming to assign individual sequences to phylotypes by searching them against public databases. Since ribosomal sequences have diverged across prokaryotic species, they can be grouped into clusters that represent operational taxonomic units. However, available clustering programs suffer from overlap of sequence spaces in adjacent clusters. In natural environments, gene sequences are homogenous within species but divergent between species. This evolutionary constraint results in an uneven distribution of genetic distances of genes in sequence space. To cluster 16S rRNA sequences more accurately, it is therefore essential to select core sequences that are located at the centers of the distributions represented by the genetic distance of sequences in taxonomic units. Based on this idea, we here describe a novel sequence clustering algorithm named CLUSTOM that minimizes the overlaps between adjacent clusters. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated in a comparative exercise with existing programs, using the reference sequences of the SILVA database as well as published pyrosequencing datasets. The test revealed that our algorithm achieves higher accuracy than ESPRIT-Tree and mothur, few of the best clustering algorithms. Results indicate that the concept of an uneven distribution of sequence distances can effectively and successfully cluster 16S rRNA gene sequences. The algorithm of CLUSTOM has been implemented both as a web and as a standalone command line application, which are available at http://clustom.kribb.re.kr. PMID:23650520

  15. Microbial diversity in an in situ reactor system treating monochlorobenzene contaminated groundwater as revealed by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Alfreider, Albin; Vogt, Carsten; Babel, Wolfgang

    2002-08-01

    A molecular approach based on the construction of 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries was used to investigate the microbial diversity of an underground in situ reactor system filled with the original aquifer sediments. After chemical steady state was reached in the monochlorobenzene concentration between the original inflowing groundwater and the reactor outflow, samples from different reactor locations and from inflowing and outflowing groundwater were taken for DNA extraction. Small-subunit rRNA genes were PCR-amplified with primers specific for Bacteria, subsequently cloned and screened for variation by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 87 bacterial 16S rDNA genes were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The original groundwater was found to be dominated by a bacterial consortium affiliated with various members of the class of Proteobacteria, by phylotypes not affiliated with currently recognized bacterial phyla, and also by sporulating and non-sporulating sulfate-reducing bacteria. The most occurring clone types obtained from the sediment samples of the reactor were related to the beta-Proteobacteria, dominated by sequences almost identical to the widespread bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis, to low G+C gram-positive bacteria and to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (formerly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) within the gamma subclass of Proteobacteria in the upper reactor sector. Although bacterial phylotypes originating from the groundwater outflow of the reactors also grouped within different subdivisions of Proteobacteria and low G+C gram-positive bacteria, most of the 16S rDNA sequences were not associated with the sequence types observed in the reactor samples. Our results suggest that the different environments were inhabited by distinct microbial communities in respect to their taxonomic diversity, particular pronounced between sediment attached microbial communities from the reactor samples and free-living bacteria from the

  16. Diversity of thermophiles in a Malaysian hot spring determined using 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia Sing; Chan, Kok-Gan; Tay, Yea-Ling; Chua, Yi-Heng; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-01-01

    The Sungai Klah (SK) hot spring is the second hottest geothermal spring in Malaysia. This hot spring is a shallow, 150-m-long, fast-flowing stream, with temperatures varying from 50 to 110°C and a pH range of 7.0–9.0. Hidden within a wooded area, the SK hot spring is continually fed by plant litter, resulting in a relatively high degree of total organic content (TOC). In this study, a sample taken from the middle of the stream was analyzed at the 16S rRNA V3-V4 region by amplicon metagenome sequencing. Over 35 phyla were detected by analyzing the 16S rRNA data. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented approximately 57% of the microbiome. Approximately 70% of the detected thermophiles were strict anaerobes; however, Hydrogenobacter spp., obligate chemolithotrophic thermophiles, represented one of the major taxa. Several thermophilic photosynthetic microorganisms and acidothermophiles were also detected. Most of the phyla identified by 16S rRNA were also found using the shotgun metagenome approaches. The carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism within the SK hot spring community were evaluated by shotgun metagenome sequencing, and the data revealed diversity in terms of metabolic activity and dynamics. This hot spring has a rich diversified phylogenetic community partly due to its natural environment (plant litter, high TOC, and a shallow stream) and geochemical parameters (broad temperature and pH range). It is speculated that symbiotic relationships occur between the members of the community. PMID:25798135

  17. Distribution, hosts, 16S rDNA sequences and phylogenetic position of the Neotropical tick Amblyomma parvum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Nava, S; Szabó, M P J; Mangold, A J; Guglielmone, A A

    2008-07-01

    The hosts, distribution, intraspecific genetic variation and phylogenetic position of Amblyomma parvum (Acari: Ixodidae) have recently been re-assessed. Data on this tick's hosts and distribution were obtained not only from existing literature but also from unpublished records. Sequences of the ticks' mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were used to evaluate genetic variation among specimens of A. parvum from different localities in Argentina and Brazil, and to explore the phylogenetic relationships between this tick and other Amblyomma species. Although several species of domestic and wild mammal act as hosts for adult A. parvum, most collected adults of this species have come from cattle and goats. Caviid rodents of the subfamily Caviinae appear to be the hosts for the immature stages. So far, A. parvum has been detected in 12 Neotropical biogeographical provinces (Chaco, Cerrado, Eastern Central America, Venezuelan Coast, Pantanal, Parana Forest, Caatinga, Chiapas, Venezuelan Llanos, Monte, Western Panamanian Isthmus, and Roraima) but the Chaco province has provided significantly more specimens than any other (P<0.0001). The 16S rDNA sequences showed just 0.0%-1.1% divergence among the Argentinean A. parvum investigated and no more than 0.2% divergence among the Brazilian specimens. The observed divergence between the Argentinean and Brazilian specimens was, however, greater (3.0%-3.7%). Although there is now molecular and morphological evidence to indicate that A. parvum, A. pseudoparvum, A. auricularium and A. pseudoconcolor are members of a natural group, previous subgeneric classifications do not reflect this grouping. The subgeneric status of these tick species therefore needs to be re-evaluated. The 16S-rDNA-based evaluation of divergence indicates that the gene flow between Argentinean and Brazilian 'A. parvum' is very limited and that the Argentinean 'A. parvum' may be a different species to the Brazilian.

  18. Flow Cytometric and 16S Sequencing Methodologies for Monitoring the Physiological Status of the Microbiome in Powdered Infant Formula Production

    PubMed Central

    Anvarian, Amir H. P.; Cao, Yu; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Fanning, Séamus; Jordan, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop appropriate protocols for flow cytometric (FCM) and 16S rDNA sequencing investigation of the microbiome in a powdered infant formula (PIF) production facility. Twenty swabs were collected from each of the three care zones of a PIF production facility and used for preparing composite samples. For FCM studies, the swabs were washed in 200 mL phosphate buffer saline (PBS). The cells were harvested by three-step centrifugation followed by a single stage filtration. Cells were dispersed in fresh PBS and analyzed with a flow cytometer for membrane integrity, metabolic activity, respiratory activity and Gram characteristics of the microbiome using various fluorophores. The samples were also plated on agar plates to determine the number of culturable cells. For 16S rDNA sequencing studies, the cells were harvested by centrifugation only. Genomic DNA was extracted using a chloroform-based method and used for 16S rDNA sequencing studies. Compared to the dry low and high care zones, the wet medium care zone contained a greater number of viable, culturable, and metabolically active cells. Viable but non-culturable cells were also detected in dry-care zones. In total, 243 genera were detected in the facility of which 42 were found in all three care zones. The greatest diversity in the microbiome was observed in low care. The genera present in low, medium and high care were mostly associated with soil, water, and humans, respectively. The most prevalent genera in low, medium and high care were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Streptococcus, respectively. The integration of FCM and metagenomic data provided further information on the density of different species in the facility. PMID:27446009

  19. High-density universal 16S rRNA microarray analysis revealsbroader diversity than typical clone library when sampling theenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Moberg, Jordan P.; Zubieta,Ingrid X.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-06-15

    Molecular approaches aimed at detection of a broad-range ofprokaryotes in the environment routinely rely upon classifyingheterogeneous 16S rRNA genes amplified by PCR using primers with broadspecificity. The general method of sampling and categorizing DNA has beento clone then sequence the PCR products. However, the number of clonesrequired to adequately catalogue the majority of taxa in a sample isunwieldy. Alternatively, hybridizing target sequences to a universal 16SrRNA gene microarray may provide a more rapid and comprehensive view ofprokaryotic community composition. This study investigated the breadthand accuracy of a microarray in detecting diverse 16S rRNA gene sequencetypes compared to clone-and-sequencing using three environmental samples:urban aerosol, subsurface soil and subsurface water. PCR productsgenerated from universal 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers were classifiedusing either the clone-and-sequence method or by hybridization to a novelhigh-density microarray of 297,851 probes complementary to 842prokaryotic sub-families. The three clone libraries comprised 1,391high-quality sequences. Approximately 8 percent of the clones could notbe placed into a known sub-family and were considered novel. Themicroarray results confirmed the majority of clone-detected sub-familiesand additionally demonstrated greater amplicon diversity extending intophyla not observed by the cloning method. Sequences matching OTUs withinthe phyla Nitrospira, Planctomycetes, and TM7, which were uniquelydetected by the array, were verified with specific primers and subsequentamplicon sequencing. Sub-family richness detected by the arraycorresponded well with non-parametric richness predictions extrapolatedfrom clone libraries except in the water community where clone-basedrichness predictions were greatly exceeded. It was concluded thatalthough the microarray is unreliable inidentifying novel prokaryotictaxa, it reveals greater diversity in environmental samples thansequencing a

  20. Using DGGE and 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis to Evaluate Changes in Oral Bacterial Composition

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Zhou; TRIVEDI, Harsh M.; CHHUN, Nok; BARNES, Virginia M.; SAXENA, Deepak; XU, Tao; LI, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a standard dental prophylaxis followed by tooth brushing with an antibacterial dentifrice will affect the oral bacterial community, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults were instructed to brush their teeth using commercial dentifrice for 1 week during a washout period. An initial set of pooled supragingival plaque samples was collected from each participant at baseline (0 h) before prophylaxis treatment. The subjects were given a clinical examination and dental prophylaxis and asked to brush for 1 min with a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). On the following day, a second set of pooled supragingival plaque samples (24 h) was collected. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from the samples. Differences in the microbial composition before and after the prophylactic procedure and tooth brushing were assessed by comparing the DGGE profiles of PCR-amplified and 16S rRNA gene segments sequence analysis. Results Two distinct clusters of DGGE profiles were found, suggesting that a shift in the microbial composition had occurred 24 h after the prophylaxis and brushing. A detailed sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene segments further identified six phyla and 29 genera, including known and unknown bacterial species. Importantly, an increase in bacterial diversity was observed after 24 h, including members of the Streptococcaceae family, Prevotella, Corynebacterium, TM7 and other commensal bacteria. Conclusion The results suggest that the use of a standard prophylaxis followed by the use of the dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride may promote a healthier composition within the oral bacterial community. PMID:22319750

  1. Assessment of Three Mitochondrial Genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for Identifying Species in the Praomyini Tribe (Rodentia: Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Violaine; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Missoup, Alain Didier; Kennis, Jan; Colyn, Marc; Denys, Christiane; Tatard, Caroline; Cruaud, Corinne; Laredo, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Praomyini tribe is one of the most diverse and abundant groups of Old World rodents. Several species are known to be involved in crop damage and in the epidemiology of several human and cattle diseases. Due to the existence of sibling species their identification is often problematic. Thus an easy, fast and accurate species identification tool is needed for non-systematicians to correctly identify Praomyini species. In this study we compare the usefulness of three genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for identifying species of this tribe. A total of 426 specimens representing 40 species (sampled across their geographical range) were sequenced for the three genes. Nearly all of the species included in our study are monophyletic in the neighbour joining trees. The degree of intra-specific variability tends to be lower than the divergence between species, but no barcoding gap is detected. The success rate of the statistical methods of species identification is excellent (up to 99% or 100% for statistical supervised classification methods as the k-Nearest Neighbour or Random Forest). The 16S gene is 2.5 less variable than the Cytb and CO1 genes. As a result its discriminatory power is smaller. To sum up, our results suggest that using DNA markers for identifying species in the Praomyini tribe is a largely valid approach, and that the CO1 and Cytb genes are better DNA markers than the 16S gene. Our results confirm the usefulness of statistical methods such as the Random Forest and the 1-NN methods to assign a sequence to a species, even when the number of species is relatively large. Based on our NJ trees and the distribution of all intraspecific and interspecific pairwise nucleotide distances, we highlight the presence of several potentially new species within the Praomyini tribe that should be subject to corroboration assessments. PMID:22574186

  2. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  3. Multicenter quality assessment of 16S ribosomal DNA-sequencing for microbiome analyses reveals high inter-center variability.

    PubMed

    Hiergeist, Andreas; Reischl, Udo; Gessner, Andrè

    2016-08-01

    The composition of human as well as animal microbiota has increasingly gained in interest since metabolites and structural components of endogenous microorganisms fundamentally influence all aspects of host physiology. Since many of the bacteria are still unculturable, molecular techniques such as high-throughput sequencing have dramatically increased our knowledge of microbial communities. The majority of microbiome studies published thus far are based on bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing, so that they can, at least in principle, be compared to determine the role of the microbiome composition for host metabolism and physiology, developmental processes, as well as different diseases. However, differences in DNA preparation and purification, 16S rDNA PCR amplification, sequencing procedures and platforms, as well as bioinformatic analysis and quality control measures may strongly affect the microbiome composition results obtained in different laboratories. To systematically evaluate the comparability of results and identify the most influential methodological factors affecting these differences, identical human stool sample replicates spiked with quantified marker bacteria, and their subsequent DNA sequences were analyzed by nine different centers in an external quality assessment (EQA). While high intra-center reproducibility was observed in repetitive tests, significant inter-center differences of reported microbiota composition were obtained. All steps of the complex analysis workflow significantly influenced microbiome profiles, but the magnitude of variation caused by PCR primers for 16S rDNA amplification was clearly the largest. In order to advance microbiome research to a more standardized and routine medical diagnostic procedure, it is essential to establish uniform standard operating procedures throughout laboratories and to initiate regular proficiency testing.

  4. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  5. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  6. Identification of bacterial pathogens from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues by using 16S sequencing: retrospective correlation of results to clinicians' responses.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Hiskey, Matthew; Guarner, Jeannette

    2017-01-01

    16S sequencing on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material has been used to identify bacteria when culture-based phenotyping techniques have not worked. The objective of this study was to determine how frequently 16S sequencing used in FFPE material was helpful to clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Requests for testing occurred upon consultation between an infectious disease pathologist and a surgical pathologist or an infectious disease physician. A selected paraffin block from each case was referred for 16S sequencing. Retrospectively, we correlated clinical history and management decisions on 27 cases that were tested by paneubacterial 16S sequencing. Samples included 24 surgical specimens, 1 autopsy, and 2 cytology blocks. Seventeen (63%) of the 27 cases had a positive 16S sequencing. Acute inflammation was present in 10 of these cases, and organisms were observed using special stains in 3. In 11 (65%) of the 17 cases, clinicians considered the organism identified by 16S sequencing to be the cause or possible cause of the infectious process. Organisms included common (Citrobacter) and fastidious bacteria (Haemophilus, Fusobacterium). In 3 cases, clinicians changed antibiotic treatment based on the bacteria identified, whereas in 8 (including 2 where no organism was found), clinicians continued the antibiotic treatment. The use of 16S sequencing on FFPE identified specific bacteria even when organisms were not observed histopathologically. 16S results had an impact in infectious disease management decisions.

  7. 16S Ribosomal DNA Characterization of Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Isolated from Banana (Musa spp.) and Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril)

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães Cruz, Leonardo; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Weber, Olmar Baler; Baldani, José Ivo; Döbereiner, Johanna; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) were characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans, Burkholderia brasilensis, and Burkholderia tropicalis were identified. Eight other types were placed in close proximity to these genera and other alpha and beta Proteobacteria. PMID:11319127

  8. Metagenomic and near full-length 16S rRNA sequence data in support of the phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  9. Evaluation of 16S Rrna amplicon sequencing using two next-generation sequencing technologies for phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  10. Evaluation of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using two next-generation sequencing technologies for phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplificatio...

  11. RmtC introduces G1405 methylation in 16S rRNA and confers high-level aminoglycoside resistance on Gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Kimura, Kouji; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Satowa; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2010-10-01

    Seven plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methyltransferases (MTases), RmtA, RmtB, RmtC, RmtD, RmtE, ArmA, and NpmA, conferring aminoglycoside resistance have so far been found in Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, by performing an RNase protection assay, primer extension, and HPLC, we confirmed that RmtC indeed methylates at the N7 position of nucleotide G1405 in 16S rRNA as found in ArmA and RmtB. RmtC has an MTase activity specific for the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit consisting of 16S rRNA and several ribosomal proteins, but not for the naked 16S rRNA, as seen in ArmA, RmtB, and NpmA. All seven 16S rRNA MTases have been found exclusively in Gram-negative bacilli to date, and no plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA MTase has been reported in Gram-positive pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, we checked whether or not the RmtC could function in Gram-positive bacilli, and found that RmtC could indeed confer high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. 16S rRNA MTases seemed to be functional to some extent in any bacterial species, regardless of the provenance of the 16S rRNA MTase gene responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

  12. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  13. 16S ribosomal DNA characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril).

    PubMed

    Magalhães Cruz, L; de Souza, E M; Weber, O B; Baldani, J I; Döbereiner, J; Pedrosa, F de O

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) were characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans, Burkholderia brasilensis, and Burkholderia tropicalis were identified. Eight other types were placed in close proximity to these genera and other alpha and beta Proteobacteria.

  14. A comprehensive benchmarking study of protocols and sequencing platforms for 16S rRNA community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Podar, Mircea; Shakya, Migun; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Schirmer, Melanie; Kenny, John G.; Gregory, Richard; Darby, Alistair C.; Quince, Christopher; Hall, Neil

    2016-01-14

    In the last 5 years, the rapid pace of innovations and improvements in sequencing technologies has completely changed the landscape of metagenomic and metagenetic experiments. Therefore, it is critical to benchmark the various methodologies for interrogating the composition of microbial communities, so that we can assess their strengths and limitations. Here, the most common phylogenetic marker for microbial community diversity studies is the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and in the last 10 years the field has moved from sequencing a small number of amplicons and samples to more complex studies where thousands of samples and multiple different gene regions are interrogated.

  15. A comprehensive benchmarking study of protocols and sequencing platforms for 16S rRNA community profiling

    DOE PAGES

    Podar, Mircea; Shakya, Migun; D'Amore, Rosalinda; ...

    2016-01-14

    In the last 5 years, the rapid pace of innovations and improvements in sequencing technologies has completely changed the landscape of metagenomic and metagenetic experiments. Therefore, it is critical to benchmark the various methodologies for interrogating the composition of microbial communities, so that we can assess their strengths and limitations. Here, the most common phylogenetic marker for microbial community diversity studies is the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and in the last 10 years the field has moved from sequencing a small number of amplicons and samples to more complex studies where thousands of samples and multiple different gene regions aremore » interrogated.« less

  16. Linear programming model to construct phylogenetic network for 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Rinku; Adlakha, Neeru

    2014-06-01

    Phylogenetic trees give the information about the vertical relationships of ancestors and descendants but phylogenetic networks are used to visualize the horizontal relationships among the different organisms. In order to predict reticulate events there is a need to construct phylogenetic networks. Here, a Linear Programming (LP) model has been developed for the construction of phylogenetic network. The model is validated by using data sets of chloroplast of 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and Influenza A/H5N1 viruses. Results obtained are in agreement with those obtained by earlier researchers.

  17. Recovery of partial 16S rDNA sequences suggests the presence of Crenarchaeota in the human digestive ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rieu-Lesme, Françoise; Delbès, Céline; Sollelis, Lauriane

    2005-11-01

    Human feces collected from 10 healthy teenagers was analyzed for the presence of Crenarchaeota. After a first polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Archaea-specific primers, a nested real-time PCR was performed using Crenarchaeota-specific primers. Real-time Crenarchaeotal PCR products detected from four subjects were cloned and the sequencing revealed that most of the partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were highly similar (> or = 97% homology) to sequences affiliated to the Sulfolobus group of the Crenarchaeota phylum. Our findings suggest for the first time that Crenarchaeota might be present in the microbiota of the human digestive ecosystem in which this phylum has never been found yet.

  18. 16S rRNA gene sequences from bacteria associated with adult Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Terenius, Olle; de Oliveira, Caroline Dantas; Pinheiro, Waleria Dasso; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; James, Anthony Amade; Marinotti, Osvaldo

    2008-01-01

    The microbial flora associated with Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae), a major Neotropical malaria vector, was investigated for the development of a paratransgenesis-based approach to control malaria transmission in Brazil. Female mosquitoes were collected using human land catches and captured insects provided a bloodmeal. The controlled blood feeding resulted in increased detection of mosquito bacterial population because it was possible to retrieve bacterial DNA from all blood-fed mosquitoes. The 16S sequences of bacteria recovered, include some closely related to those found in other vector mosquitoes, including Aeromonas, Pantoea and Pseudomonas species.

  19. RAP, the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein in Arabidopsis, is required for chloroplast 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, Laura; Wang, Fei; Stübe, Roland; Philippar, Katrin; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2014-02-01

    The biogenesis and activity of chloroplasts in both vascular plants and algae depends on an intracellular network of nucleus-encoded, trans-acting factors that control almost all aspects of organellar gene expression. Most of these regulatory factors belong to the helical repeat protein superfamily, which includes tetratricopeptide repeat, pentatricopeptide repeat, and the recently identified octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins. Whereas green algae express many different OPR proteins, only a single orthologous OPR protein is encoded in the genomes of most land plants. Here, we report the characterization of the only OPR protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, RAP, which has previously been implicated in plant pathogen defense. Loss of RAP led to a severe defect in processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA resulting in impaired chloroplast translation and photosynthesis. In vitro RNA binding and RNase protection assays revealed that RAP has an intrinsic and specific RNA binding capacity, and the RAP binding site was mapped to the 5' region of the 16S rRNA precursor. Nucleoid localization of RAP was shown by transient green fluorescent protein import assays, implicating the nucleoid as the site of chloroplast rRNA processing. Taken together, our data indicate that the single OPR protein in Arabidopsis is important for a basic process of chloroplast biogenesis.

  20. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Caamaño-Antelo, S; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp. that may be useful for typing purposes. These species include, among others, Bacillus cereus, an important pathogenic species involved in food poisoning, and Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, which are causative agents of food spoilage described as responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. With this purpose in mind, 52 Bacillus strains isolated from culture collections and fresh and processed food were considered. SNP type "Y" at sites 212 and 476 appeared in the majority of B. licheniformis studied strains. SNP type "R" at site 278 was detected in many strains of the B. subtilis/Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group, while polymorphism "Y" at site 173 was characteristic of the majority of strains of B. cereus/Bacillus thuringiensis group. The analysis of SNPs provided more intra-specific information than phylogenetic analysis in the cases of B. cereus and B. subtilis. Moreover, this study describes novel SNPs that should be considered when designing 16S rRNA-based primers and probes for multiplex-PCR, Real-Time PCR and microarray systems for foodborne Bacillus spp.

  2. Use of acetate for enrichment of electrochemically active microorganisms and their 16S rDNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoung; Phung, Nguyet Thu; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Sung, Ha Chin

    2003-06-27

    A fuel cell-type electrochemical device has been used to enrich microbes oxidizing acetate with concomitant electricity generation without using an electron mediator from activated sludge. The device generated a stable current of around 5 mA with complete oxidation of 5 mM acetate at the hydraulic retention time of 2.5 h after 4 weeks of enrichment. Over 70% of electrons available from acetate oxidation was recovered as current. Carbon monoxide or hydrogen did not influence acetate oxidation or current generation from the microbial fuel cell (MFC). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that DNA extracted from the acetate-enriched MFC had different 16S rDNA patterns from those of sludge or glucose+glutamate-enriched MFCs. Nearly complete 16S rDNA sequence analyses showed that diverse bacteria were enriched in the MFC fed with acetate. Electron microscopic observations showed biofilm developed on the electrode, but not microbial clumps observed in MFCs fed with complex fuel such as glucose and wastewater from a corn-processing factory.

  3. Relative Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates of Elizabethkingia Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Mi-Soon; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myungsook; Ku, Nam Su; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2017-01-01

    Some of the previously reported clinical isolates of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica may be later named species of Elizabethkingia We determined the accuracy of species identification (with two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry [MALDI-TOF MS] systems and the Vitek 2 GN card), relative prevalence of three Elizabethkingia spp. in clinical specimens, and antimicrobial susceptibility of the species identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Specimens for culture were collected from patients in a university hospital in Seoul, South Korea, between 2009 and 2015. All 3 Elizabethkingia spp. were detected in patients; among the 86 isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 17 (19.8%) were E. meningoseptica, 18 (20.9%) were Elizabethkingia miricola, and 51 (59.3%) were Elizabethkingia anophelis Only the MALDI-TOF Vitek MS system with an amended database correctly identified all of the isolates. The majority (76.7%) of the isolates were from the lower respiratory tract, and 8 (9.3%) were from blood. Over 90% of E. meningoseptica and E. anophelis isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and rifampin. In contrast, all E. miricola isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones except ciprofloxacin. Further studies are urgently needed to determine the optimal antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infections due to each individual Elizabethkingia species.

  4. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj; Clavel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea.

  5. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  6. Assessment of microbial dynamics in the Pearl River Estuary by 16S rRNA terminal restriction fragment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Madeline; Song, Liansheng; Ren, Jianping; Kan, Jianjun; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2004-10-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) pattern of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 16S rRNA sequences to track the changes of the free-living bacterial community for the Pearl River Estuary surface waters. The suitability of specific PCR primers, PCR bias induced by thermal cycles, and field-sampling volumes were critically evaluated in laboratory tests. We established a workable protocol and obtained TRF patterns that reflected the changes in the bacterial population. The temporal dynamics over a 24 h period were examined at one anchored station, as well as the spatial distribution pattern of the bacterial community at several stations, covering the transects along the river discharge direction and across the river plume. The TRF pattern revealed 9 dominant bacterial groups. Changes in their relative abundance reflecting the changes in the bacterial community composition were documented. Many culturable species were isolated from each field sample and a portion of the 16S rRNA gene for each species was sequenced. The species was identified based on sequence data comparison. In this region, the dominant species belong to the γ-subdivision of proteobacteria and the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Firmicutes. We also detected the wide spread distribution of Acinetobacter spp.; many of these species are known nosocomial pathogen for humans.

  7. Comparison of the gut microbial community between obese and lean peoples using 16S gene sequencing in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Akira; Nishida, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Inatomi, Osamu; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Bamba, Shigeki; Kito, Katsuyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kobayashi, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    Altered gut microbial ecology contributes to the development of metabolic diseases including obesity. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the gut microbiota profiles of obese and lean Japanese populations. The V3-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA of fecal samples from 10 obese and 10 lean volunteers were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq(TM)II system. The average body mass index of the obese and lean group were 38.1 and 16.6 kg/m(2), respectively (p<0.01). The Shannon diversity index was significantly higher in the lean group than in the obese group (p<0.01). The phyla Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were significantly more abundant in obese people than in lean people. The abundance of the phylum Bacteroidetes and the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio were not different between the obese and lean groups. The genera Alistipes, Anaerococcus, Corpococcus, Fusobacterium and Parvimonas increased significantly in obese people, and the genera Bacteroides, Desulfovibrio, Faecalibacterium, Lachnoanaerobaculum and Olsenella increased significantly in lean people. Bacteria species possessing anti-inflammatory properties, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, increased significantly in lean people, but bacteria species possessing pro-inflammatory properties increased in obese people. Obesity-associated gut microbiota in the Japanese population was different from that in Western people.

  8. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Corynebacterium striatum confirmed by 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequencing: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are non-fermentous Gram-positive bacilli that are normal flora of human skin and mucous membranes and are commonly isolated in clinical specimens. Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium are regarded as contaminants when found in blood culture. Currently, Corynebacterium striatum is considered one of the emerging nosocomial agents implicated in endocarditis and serious infections. We report a case of native-valve infective endocarditis caused by C. striatum, which was misidentified by automated identification system but identified accurately by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, in a 55-year-old male patient. The patient had two mobile vegetations on his mitral valve, both of which had high embolic risk. Through surgical valve replacement and an antibiotic regimen, the patient recovered completely. In unusual clinical scenarios, C. striatum should not be simply dismissed as a contaminant when isolated from clinical specimens. The possibility of C. striatum infection should be considered even in an immunocompetent patient, and we suggest a genotypic assay, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, to confirm species identity. PMID:27659439

  9. PCR detection of colonization by Helicobacter pylori in conventional, euthymic mice based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J G; Kong, L; Abruzzo, G K; Gill, C J; Flattery, A M; Scott, P M; Bramhill, D; Cioffe, C; Thompson, C M; Bartizal, K

    1996-01-01

    Many animal models of Helicobacter infection have been described, including infection in rhesus monkeys, ferrets, gnotobiotic piglets, and mice. These animal models utilize a combination of detection methods, including culture, urease testing, and histopathology, all of which may be unreliable, insensitive, or labor-intensive. Development of new animal models of Helicobacter pylori requires new methods of detection with increased sensitivity and specificity. We have developed sensitive and specific PCR primers based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence of H. pylori. The primers detected single-copy 16S DNA representing 0.2 cell of pure H. pylori (2 cells in the presence of mouse stomach mucosal DNA) and did not cross-react with closely related bacteria. We were able to detect colonization by H. pylori in conventional, euthymic, outbred mice up to 4 weeks postinoculation with a high percentage of isolates tested. One isolate of H. pylori was detected by PCR in 100% of the mice at 6 months and 60% of the mice 1 year after inoculation. Approximately 10(3) to 10(4) H. pylori cells per stomach were detected by utilizing this PCR methodology semiquantitatively. These primers and PCR methodology have facilitated detection of H. pylori colonization in conventional, euthymic mice, colonization which may not have been detectable by other methods. PMID:8770506

  10. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea. PMID:28097056

  11. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  12. Microbial diversity in uranium mining-impacted soils as revealed by high-density 16S microarray and clone library.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Osman, Shariff; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Andersen, Gary L; Stetler, Larry D; Sani, Rajesh K

    2010-01-01

    Microbial diversity was characterized in mining-impacted soils collected from two abandoned uranium mine sites, the Edgemont and the North Cave Hills, South Dakota, using a high-density 16S microarray (PhyloChip) and clone libraries. Characterization of the elemental compositions of soils by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy revealed higher metal contamination including uranium at the Edgemont than at the North Cave Hills mine site. Microarray data demonstrated extensive phylogenetic diversity in soils and confirmed nearly all clone-detected taxonomic levels. Additionally, the microarray exhibited greater diversity than clone libraries at each taxonomic level at both the mine sites. Interestingly, the PhyloChip detected the largest number of taxa in Proteobacteria phylum for both the mine sites. However, clone libraries detected Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the most numerically abundant phyla in the Edgemont and North Cave Hills mine sites, respectively. Several 16S rDNA signatures found in both the microarrays and clone libraries displayed sequence similarities with yet-uncultured bacteria representing a hitherto unidentified diversity. Results from this study demonstrated that highly diverse microbial populations were present in these uranium mine sites. Diversity indices indicated that microbial communities at the North Cave Hills mine site were much more diverse than those at the Edgemont mine site.

  13. 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of culturable predominant bacteria from diseased Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea, Echinodermata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyan; Jiang, Guoliang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-01

    Cultured Apostichopus japonicus in China suffers from a kind of skin ulceration disease that has caused severe economic loss in recent years. The disease, pathogens of which are supposed to be bacteria by most researchers, is highly infectious and can often cause all individuals in the same culture pool to die in a very short time. The 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of the culturable bacteria from the lesions of diseased individuals was conducted to study the biodiversity of the bacterial communities in the lesions and to identify probable pathogen(s) associated with this kind of disease. S. japonica samples were selected from a hatchery located in the eastern part of Qingdao, China. Bacterial universal primers GM5F and DS907R were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria colonies, and touchdown PCR was performed to amplify the target sequences. The results suggest that γ- proteobacteria (Alteromonadales and Vibrionales) of CFB group, many strains of which have been also determined as pathogens in other marine species, are the predominant bacterial genera of the diseased Apostichopus japonicus individuals.

  14. Collagenase production and hemolytic activity related to 16S rRNA variability among Parvimonas micra oral isolates.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, Claudia; Alves Mayer, Marcia Pinto

    2010-02-01

    Parvimonas micra are gram positive anaerobic cocci isolated from the oral cavity and frequently related to polymicrobial infections in humans. Despite reports about phenotypic differences, the genotypic variation of P. micra and its role in virulence are still not elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypic diversity of P. micra isolates obtained from the subgingival biofilm of subjects with different periodontal conditions and to correlate these findings with phenotypic traits. Three reference strains and 35 isolates of P. micra were genotyped by 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP and phenotypic traits such as collagenase production, elastolytic and hemolytic activities were evaluated. 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP showed that P. micra could be grouped into two main clusters: C1 and C2; cluster C1 harbored three genotypes (HG1259-like, HG1467-like and ICBMO583-like) while cluster C2 harbored two genotypes (ATCC33270-like and ICBMO36). A wide variability in collagenolytic activity intensities was observed among all isolates, while elastolytic activity was detected in only two isolates. There was an association between hemolytic activity in rabbit erythrocytes and cluster C2. There was an association between hemolytic activity in rabbit erythrocytes and cluster C1. Although these data suggest a possible association between P. micra genetic diversity and their pathogenic potential, further investigations are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  15. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species. PMID:25313278

  16. Comparison of the gut microbial community between obese and lean peoples using 16S gene sequencing in a Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Nishida, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Inatomi, Osamu; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Bamba, Shigeki; Kito, Katsuyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kobayashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Altered gut microbial ecology contributes to the development of metabolic diseases including obesity. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the gut microbiota profiles of obese and lean Japanese populations. The V3–V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA of fecal samples from 10 obese and 10 lean volunteers were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeqTMII system. The average body mass index of the obese and lean group were 38.1 and 16.6 kg/m2, respectively (p<0.01). The Shannon diversity index was significantly higher in the lean group than in the obese group (p<0.01). The phyla Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were significantly more abundant in obese people than in lean people. The abundance of the phylum Bacteroidetes and the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio were not different between the obese and lean groups. The genera Alistipes, Anaerococcus, Corpococcus, Fusobacterium and Parvimonas increased significantly in obese people, and the genera Bacteroides, Desulfovibrio, Faecalibacterium, Lachnoanaerobaculum and Olsenella increased significantly in lean people. Bacteria species possessing anti-inflammatory properties, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, increased significantly in lean people, but bacteria species possessing pro-inflammatory properties increased in obese people. Obesity-associated gut microbiota in the Japanese population was different from that in Western people. PMID:27499582

  17. 16S rDNA-based probes for two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Feldhake, D.J.; Loper, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    PAHs are a class of widespread pollutants, some of which have been shown to be genotoxic, hence the fate of these compounds in the environment is of considerable interest. Research on the biodegradation of 4 and 5 ring PAHs has been limited by the general lack of microbial isolates or consortia which can completely degrade these toxicants. Heitkamp and Cerniglia have described an oxidative soil Mycobacterium-strain PYR-1 that metabolizes pyrene and fluoranthene more rapidly than the 2 and 3 ring naphthalene and phenanthrene; although some metabolites of benzo-(a)-pyrene (BaP) were detected, no mineralization of BaP was observed. In 1991 Grosser et al. reported the isolation of a Mycobacterium sp. which mineralizes pyrene and also causing some mineralization of BaP. Their study describes a comparative analysis of these two strains, which show very similar colony morphology, growth rate and yellow-orange pigmentation. Genetic differences were shown by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) using two arbitrary GC-rich octanucleotide primers, and by sequence comparison of PCR amplified 16S rDNA, although both strains show similarity closest to that of the genus Mycobacteria. These 16S rDNA sequences are in use for the construction of strain-specific DNA probes to monitor the presence, survival and growth of these isolates in PAH-contaminated soils in studies of biodegradation.

  18. 16S rRNA gene probe quantitates residual host cell DNA in pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Yu; Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Shi, Ke; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Kai-Hui; Yi-Zhang; Chen, Zu-Huan

    2006-03-24

    The development and widespread use of DNA-based vaccination against infectious pathogens have been a great triumph of medical science. Quality control of DNA vaccines as biopharmaceutical productions is a problem to solve. Residual genomic DNA of engineering bacteria has been identified as a potential risk factor, so whose level must be controlled under the regulatory standards. We report a dot-blot hybridization method to detect residual host cell DNA in purified DNA vaccines. The assay utilizes PCR amplified and digoxigenin-labeled Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene as probe. The sensitivity of the dot-blot hybridization assay with E. coli 16S rRNA gene probe was evaluated in comparison with single copy UidR gene probe. The optimized dot-blot hybridization assay had both low background and a suitable sensitivity, detecting 10 pg of residual E. coli DNA. The method is suitable in the routine use of measuring the levels of residual E. coli DNA in the pharmaceutical-grade DNA vaccine.

  19. High or low correlation between co-occuring gene clusters and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Sekelja, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are universal for all living organisms. Yet, the correspondence between genome composition and rRNA phylogeny remains poorly known. The aim of this study was to use the information from genome sequence databases to address the correlation between rRNA gene phylogeny and total gene composition in bacteria. This was done by analysing 327 genomes with TIGRFAM functional gene annotations. Our approach consisted of two steps. First, we searched for discriminatory clusters of co-occurring genes. Using a multivariate statistical approach, we identified 11 such clusters which contain genes that were co-occurring only in a subset of genomes and contributed to explain the gene content differences between genome subsets. Second, we mapped the discovered clusters to 16S rRNA-based phylogeny and calculated the correlation between co-occuring genes and phylogeny. Six of the 11 clusters exhibited significant correlation with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The most distinct phylogenetic finding was a high correlation between iron-sulfur oxidoreductases in combination with carbon nitrogen ligases and Chlorobium. The other correlations identified covered relatively large phylogroups: Actinobacteria were positively associated with kinases, while Gammaproteobacteria were positively associated with methylases and acyltransferases. The suggested functional differences between higher phylogroups, however, need experimental verification.

  20. Studying long 16S rDNA sequences with ultrafast-metagenomic sequence classification using exact alignments (Kraken).

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-González, Fabiola; Martínez-Porchas, Marcel; Villalpando-Canchola, Enrique; Vargas-Albores, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast-metagenomic sequence classification using exact alignments (Kraken) is a novel approach to classify 16S rDNA sequences. The classifier is based on mapping short sequences to the lowest ancestor and performing alignments to form subtrees with specific weights in each taxon node. This study aimed to evaluate the classification performance of Kraken with long 16S rDNA random environmental sequences produced by cloning and then Sanger sequenced. A total of 480 clones were isolated and expanded, and 264 of these clones formed contigs (1352 ± 153 bp). The same sequences were analyzed using the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) classifier. Deeper classification performance was achieved by Kraken than by the RDP: 73% of the contigs were classified up to the species or variety levels, whereas 67% of these contigs were classified no further than the genus level by the RDP. The results also demonstrated that unassembled sequences analyzed by Kraken provide similar or inclusively deeper information. Moreover, sequences that did not form contigs, which are usually discarded by other programs, provided meaningful information when analyzed by Kraken. Finally, it appears that the assembly step for Sanger sequences can be eliminated when using Kraken. Kraken cumulates the information of both sequence senses, providing additional elements for the classification. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that Kraken is an excellent choice for use in the taxonomic assignment of sequences obtained by Sanger sequencing or based on third generation sequencing, of which the main goal is to generate larger sequences.

  1. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control.

  2. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species.

  3. Bases in 16S rRNA Important for Subunit Association, tRNA binding, and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinying; Chiu, Katie; Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomes are the cellular machinery responsible for protein synthesis. A well-orchestrated step in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis is the precise translocation of the tRNA-mRNA complex within the ribosome. Here we report the application of a new in vitro modification-interference method for the identification of bases in 16S rRNA that are essential for translocation. Our results suggest that conserved bases U56, U723, A1306, A1319, and A1468 in 16S rRNA are important for translocation. These five bases were deleted or mutated in order to study their role in translation. Depending on the type of mutation, we observed inhibition of growth rate, subunit association, tRNA binding and/or translocation. Interestingly, deletion of U56 or A1319 or mutation of A1319 to C showed a lethal phenotype and were defective in protein synthesis in vitro. Further analysis showed that deletion of U56 or A1319 caused defects in 30S subunit assembly, subunit association and tRNA binding. In contrast, A1319C mutation showed no defects in subunit association; however, the extent of tRNA binding and translocation was significantly reduced. These results show that conserved bases located as far away as 100 Å from the tRNA binding sites can be important for translation. PMID:19545171

  4. Analysis of conformational changes in 16 S rRNA during the course of 30 S subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kristi L; Culver, Gloria M

    2005-11-25

    Ribosome biogenesis involves an integrated series of binding events coupled with conformational changes that ultimately result in the formation of a functional macromolecular complex. In vitro, Escherichia coli 30 S subunit assembly occurs in a cooperative manner with the ordered addition of 20 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with 16 S rRNA. The assembly pathway for 30 S subunits has been dissected in vitro into three steps, where specific r-proteins associate with 16 S rRNA early in 30 S subunit assembly, followed by a mid-assembly conformational rearrangement of the complex that then enables the remaining r-proteins to associate in the final step. Although the three steps of 30 S subunit assembly have been known for some time, few details have been elucidated about changes that occur as a result of these three specific stages. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the concerted early and late stages of small ribosomal subunit assembly. Conformational changes, roles for base-pairing and r-proteins at specific stages of assembly, and a polar nature to the assembly process have been revealed. This work has allowed a more comprehensive and global view of E.coli 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly to be obtained.

  5. Development and evaluation of two novel oligonucleotide probes based on 16S rRNA sequence for the identification of Salmonella in foods.

    PubMed

    Lin, C K; Tsen, H Y

    1995-05-01

    DNA sequence in the V3 to V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene of Salmonella enteritidis was determined. By comparison of this sequence with those of Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris obtained from GenBank/EMBL database, three oligonucleotides termed as 16S I, 16S II and 16S III were synthesized. Hybridization of these oligonucleotides with 325 Salmonella isolates and some non-Salmonella isolates including the Salmonella closely related species of the family of Enterobacteriaceae showed that 16S II could not be used as a Salmonella specific-probe. 16S I and 16S III hybridized with all the Salmonella isolates tested, the former also hybridizing with Citrobacter spp. and the latter hybridizing with Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as Serratia marcescens. Since enrichment of the target cells in food samples was usually required prior to the DNA hybridization assay, the interference from those non-Salmonella isolates could be prevented by enrichment by culturing in lactose-combined tetrathionate (CTET) broth followed by Gram-negative (GN) broth at 37 degrees C and/or 43 degrees C. Such a culture step could inhibit the growth of Klebsiella spp., Ser. marcescens and/or Citrobacter spp. and allowed the specific detection of Salmonella.

  6. RecET driven chromosomal gene targeting to generate a RecA deficient Escherichia coli strain for Cre mediated production of minicircle DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Palaszewski, Iwona; Bigger, Brian; Coutelle, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Minicircle DNA is the non-replicating product of intramolecular site-specific recombination within a bacterial minicircle producer plasmid. Minicircle DNA can be engineered to contain predominantly human sequences which have a low content of CpG dinucleotides and thus reduced immunotoxicity for humans, whilst the immunogenic bacterial origin and antibiotic resistance marker gene sequences are entirely removed by site-specific recombination. This property makes minicircle DNA an excellent vector for non-viral gene therapy. Large-scale production of minicircle DNA requires a bacterial strain expressing tightly controlled site-specific recombinase, such as Cre recombinase. As recombinant plasmids tend to be more stable in RecA-deficient strains, we aimed to construct a recA- bacterial strain for generation of minicircle vector DNA with less chance of unwanted deletions. Results We describe here the construction of the RecA-deficient minicircle DNA producer Escherichia coli HB101Cre with a chromosomally located Cre recombinase gene under the tight control of the araC regulon. The Cre gene expression cassette was inserted into the chromosomal lacZ gene by creating transient homologous recombination proficiency in the recA- strain HB101 using plasmid-born recET genes and homology-mediated chromosomal "pop-in, pop-out" of the plasmid pBAD75Cre containing the Cre gene and a temperature sensitive replication origin. Favourably for the Cre gene placement, at the "pop-out" step, the observed frequency of RecET-led recombination between the proximal regions of homology was 10 times higher than between the distal regions. Using the minicircle producing plasmid pFIXluc containing mutant loxP66 and loxP71 sites, we isolated pure minicircle DNA from the obtained recA- producer strain HB101Cre. The minicircle DNA preparation consisted of monomeric and, unexpectedly, also multimeric minicircle DNA forms, all containing the hybrid loxP66/71 site 5'-TACCGTTCGT ATAATGTATG

  7. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

  8. Microbiological and 16S rRNA analysis of sulphite-reducing clostridia from river sediments in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Marcheggiani, Stefania; Iaconelli, Marcello; D'angelo, Annamaria; Pierdominici, Elio; La Rosa, Giuseppina; Muscillo, Michele; Equestre, Michele; Mancini, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background Microbiological indicators are commonly used in the assessment of public health risks associated with fecal contamination of freshwater ecosystems. Sediments are a reservoir of microorganisms, and can thus provide information on past pollution events, not obtainable through the testing of surface water. Moreover, pathogens present in sediment may represent future threats to human health. Clostridium perfringens, a typical colonizer of sediments, has been suggested as an alternative indicator of fecal pollution. In order to be suitable for such purpose, the microorganism should be widely distributed in contaminated environments. The objective of this study was thus to determine the composition of the anaerobic community in sediment samples of the lower Tiber basin, in central Italy, through a combined approach involving granulometric analysis of sediment samples, as well as a microbiological and molecular (16S rRNA) analysis of strains. Results Granulometry showed a similar, clayey sediment composition, in most sampling sites. The microbiological method, employing, an adaptation of the standard method, proved to be effective in isolating anaerobic bacteria from the environmental matrix for the purpose of genetic analysis. Eighty-three strains of bacteria were isolated and the partial 16S rRNA gene sequenced. While biochemical analysis detected only C. perfringens strains, phylogenetic analysis indicated the presence of three clusters: C. perfringens, C. bifermentans and B. cereus, comprising eight taxa. C. perfringens, the commonest in almost all sediment sampling sites, was present in all sites, and in both seasons (seasonal sampling was carried out only along the Tiber and Aniene rivers). None of the described genetic profiles showed complete similarity with GenBank sequences. Conclusion The study underlines the value of C. perfringens as an alternative microbial indicator of fecal contamination in river sediments. This is supported by the bacterium

  9. Cyanobacterial endobionts within a major marine planktonic calcifier (Globigerina bulloides, Foraminifera) revealed by 16S rRNA metabarcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Clare; Darling, Kate F.; Russell, Ann D.; Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Free, Andrew; Wyman, Michael; Ngwenya, Bryne T.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of bacterial symbiosis in Globigerina bulloides, a palaeoceanographically important, planktonic foraminifer. This marine protist is commonly used in micropalaeontological investigations of climatically sensitive subpolar and temperate water masses as well as wind-driven upwelling regions of the world's oceans. G. bulloides is unusual because it lacks the protist algal symbionts that are often found in other spinose species. In addition, it has a large offset in its stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions compared to other planktonic foraminifer species, and also that predicted from seawater equilibrium. This is suggestive of novel differences in ecology and life history of G. bulloides, making it a good candidate for investigating the potential for bacterial symbiosis as a contributory factor influencing shell calcification. Such information is essential to evaluate fully the potential response of G. bulloides to ocean acidification and climate change. To investigate possible ecological interactions between G. bulloides and marine bacteria, 18S rRNA gene sequencing, fluorescence microscopy, 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed on individual specimens of G. bulloides (type IId) collected from two locations in the California Current. Intracellular DNA extracted from five G. bulloides specimens was subjected to 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and, remarkably, 37-87 % of all 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered were assigned to operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus. This finding was supported by TEM observations of intact Synechococcus cells in both the cytoplasm and vacuoles of G. bulloides. Their concentrations were up to 4 orders of magnitude greater inside the foraminifera than those reported for the California Current water column and approximately 5 % of the intracellular Synechococcus cells observed were undergoing cell division. This suggests

  10. Specificities and Functions of the recA and pps1 Intein Genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Application for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saves, Isabelle; Lewis, Lee-Ann; Westrelin, Fabrice; Warren, Robin; Daffé, Mamadou; Masson, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide recrudescence of tuberculosis and the widespread appearance of antibiotic resistance have strengthened the need for rapid and specific diagnostic tools. The prevailing microbiological identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, which implies the use of in vitro cultures and acid-fast staining microscopy, is time-consuming. Detection of M. tuberculosis directly in clinical samples through PCR amplification of mycobacterium-specific genes, designed to shorten diagnostic delay, demonstrated reliability and high sensitivity. However, the quality of the diagnosis depends on the specificity of the target sequence for M. tuberculosis complex strains. In the present study, we demonstrated the specificity of recA and pps1 inteins for this complex and thus the feasibility of using intein-coding sequences as a new target for PCR diagnosis. Indeed, the recA and pps1 genes of 36 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and 10 field strains of M. bovis were found to be interrupted by an intein sequence at the RecA-a and Pps1-b sites, respectively, while a large number of nontuberculous mycobacterial species failed to demonstrate these insertions. Besides, the MtuPps1, which was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, was shown to possess an endonuclease activity. The intein cleaves the 40-bp sequence spanning the intein insertion site Pps1-b in the inteinless pps1 gene. In addition to the PCR amplification of recA and pps1 intein genes as a tool for diagnosis, the specific endonuclease activity could represent a new molecular approach to identify M. tuberculosis. PMID:11880421

  11. Sequence diversity within the argF, fbp and recA genes of natural isolates of Neisseria meningitidis: interspecies recombination within the argF gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Spratt, B G

    1992-08-01

    Studies of natural populations of Neisseria meningitidis using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis have shown extensive genetic variation within this species, which, it has been proposed, implies a level of sequence diversity within meningococci that is greater than that normally considered as the criterion for species limits in bacteria. To obtain a direct measure of the sequence diversity among meningococci, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of most of the argF, recA and fbp genes of eight meningococci of widely differing electrophoretic type (from the reference collection of Caugant). Sequence variation between the meningococcal strains ranged from 0-0.6% for fbp, 0-1.3% for argF, and 0-3.3% for recA. These levels of diversity are no greater than those found within Escherichia coli 'housekeeping' genes and suggest that multilocus enzyme electrophoresis may overestimate the extent of nucleotide sequence diversity within meningococci. The average sequence divergence between the Neisseria meningitidis strains and N. gonorrhoeae strain FA19 was 1.0% for fbp and 1.6% for recA. The argF gene, although very uniform among the eight meningococcal isolates, had a striking mosaic structure when compared with the gonococcal argF gene: two regions of the gene differed by greater than 13% in nucleotide sequence between meningococci and gonococci, whereas the rest of the gene differed by less than 1.7%. One of the diverged regions was shown to have been introduced from the argF gene of a commensal Neisseria species that is closely related to Neisseria cinerea. The source of the other region was unclear.

  12. Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lau, S K P; Ng, K H L; Woo, P C Y; Yip, K‐t; Fung, A M Y; Woo, G K S; Chan, K‐m; Que, T‐l

    2006-01-01

    Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non‐duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available identification systems also evaluated, its database needs to be expanded for accurate identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli. PMID:16443743

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of a recA gene fragment brings new evidence for a change in the taxonomy of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Felis, G E; Dellaglio, F; Mizzi, L; Torriani, S

    2001-11-01

    The taxonomic positions of species of the Lactobacillus casei group have been evaluated by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of a 277 bp recA gene fragment. High sequence similarity between strain ATCC 393T, currently designated as the type strain of L. casei, and the type strain of Lactobacillus zeae, LMG 17315T, has been established, while L. casei ATCC 334 and Lactobacillus paracasei NCDO 151T form a single phylogenetic group. The taxonomic status of species and strains at issue is discussed.

  14. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  15. 16S ribosomal RNA and phylograms: Characterizing student reasoning to learning outcomes from the American Society for Microbiology Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassie, Chelsey Lee

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has established a suggested curriculum for introductory microbiology courses that includes a focus on evolution. However, no data is published to describe how proficiently students address the learning outcomes, in part because validated assessments do not exist. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop assessment prompts that capture student understanding about fundamental statement five under the core concept of evolution. In total, 167 written responses were collected from upper-division microbiology courses, with pre-pharmacy and microbiology majors comprising the majority of students (74.6%). Two coders coded all written responses, and five student interviews were conducted. Results indicate that students have not retained instruction on 16S rRNA, or have not been exposed to it in their classes. Additionally, most students have not been exposed to phylograms, and are unfamiliar with genetic distance being represented on a phylogenetic tree. Emergent reasoning techniques are described.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of the endosymbionts of mealybugs (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae) based on 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Munson, M A; Baumann, P; Moran, N A

    1992-03-01

    A portion of the gene coding for the 16S ribosomal RNA from the endosymbionts of three species of mealybugs [Pseudococcus longispinus (Targioni-Tozzetti), Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn), and Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (Beardsley)] was cloned, sequenced, and compared to a homologous fragment from bacteria representative of aphid endosymbionts as well as major subdivisions of the Proteobacteria. Parsimony analysis of the sequences indicated that the mealybug endosymbionts are related and belong to the beta-subdivision; in contrast, previous studies showed that aphid endosymbionts are part of the gamma-subdivision. These findings suggest that the endosymbiosis of mealybugs is a consequence of a single bacterial infection and indicate that this ancestor was different from the ancestor involved in aphid endosymbiosis.

  17. [Comparison of MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA methods in identification of viridans group streptococci].

    PubMed

    Süzük Yıldız, Serap; Kaşkatepe, Banu; Altınok, Salih; Çetin, Mustafa; Karagöz, Alper; Savaş, Sümeyra

    2017-01-01

    Accurate identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) frequently encountered as a causative agent of infective endocarditis is always a challenge for the clinical microbiology laboratory. Clinical microbiology laboratories generally use semi automatic/full automatic systems, molecular methods and also conventional methods for the identification of these bacteria. There are recent published studies that have used MALDI-TOF (Matrix Assisted Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry-Time of Flight) systems in the identification of VGS. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of the conventional methods, semi automatic and MALDI-TOF MS system used in identification of VGS in oral microbiota of persons under the risk of infective endocarditis, with the gold standard method 16S rRNA sequence analysis and to create a diagnosis algorithm for the identification of VGS in clinical microbiology laboratories according to the obtained data.The study was conducted with 51 VGS strains isolated from oral microbiota of the patients with rheumatologic cardiac, valve and/or prosthetic valve diseases, under the risk of development of infective endocarditis, who have admitted to Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Department of Cardiology, between February-June 2015. Standard microbiology procedures, optochin susceptibility and bile solubility tests were done for the isolation of bacteria. Bacteria were also identified with APISTREP (bioMérieux, France) and MALDI-TOF MS Bruker Microflex (Bruker Biotyper; Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany) methods. BSF-8 (5´-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG-3´) and BSR-534(5´-ATTACCGCGGCTGCTGGC-3´) primers were used in the 16S rRNA sequence analysis of bacteria. ABI PRISM 3100 Avan t Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biossytems, Foster City, CA, USA) were used for the sequence analysis. Electropherograms were analyzed in SeqScape Software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) and compared with the reference sequences in GenBank with BLASTN

  18. Differentiation of Acinetobacter baumannii biotypes by amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Montoya, R; Bello, H; Gonzalez, G; Dominguez, M; Zemelman, R

    1996-01-01

    Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (32 strains) from blood samples obtained from patients in five Chilean hospitals were identified and biotyped according to their phenotypic properties. They were also submitted to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using eight randomly designed 10-mers and the core sequence of M13 phage (15-mers) as well as amplification of the spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. With some primers, RAPD discriminated between biotypes, whereas with others each isolate showed a particular profile. When amplification of spacer regions was performed, a clear correlation between patterns and biotypes was found. This last technique allowed correct biotyping of clinical isolates. Both genetic methods might be used for the identification of A. baumannii biotypes.

  19. MSClust: A Multi-Seeds Based Clustering Algorithm for microbiome profiling using 16S rRNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Cheng, Yongmei; Zhang, Clarence; Zhang, Shaowu; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments of next generation sequencing technologies have led to rapid accumulation of 16s rRNA sequences for microbiome profiling. One key step in data processing is to cluster short sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Although many methods have been proposed for OTU inferences, a major challenge is the balance between inference accuracy and computational efficiency, where inference accuracy is often sacrificed to accommodate the need to analyze large numbers of sequences. Inspired by the hierarchical clustering method and a modified greedy network clustering algorithm, we propose a novel multi-seeds based heuristic clustering method, named MSClust, for OTU inference. MSClust first adaptively selects multi-seeds instead of one seed for each candidate cluster, and the reads are then processed using a greedy clustering strategy. Through many numerical examples, we demonstrate that MSClust enjoys less memory usage, and better biological accuracy compared to existing heuristic clustering methods while preserving efficiency and scalability. PMID:23899776

  20. Surface water-borne multidrug and heavy metal-resistant Staphylococcus isolates characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Fadime; Orman, Nazlı; Serim, Gamze; Kochan, Ceren; Ergene, Aysun; Icgen, Bulent

    2013-12-01

    Four Staphylococcus isolates having both multidrug- and multimetal-resistant ability were isolated from surface water. Further identification of the isolates was obtained through biochemical tests and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. One methicillin-resistant and two methicillin-sensitive isolates were determined as Staphylococcus aureus. The other isolate was identified as Staphylococcus warneri. The antibiotic and heavy metal resistance profiles of the Staphylococcus isolates were determined by using 26 antibiotics and 17 heavy metals. S. aureus isolates displayed resistance to most of the β-lactam antibiotics tested. All Staphylococcus isolates were resistant to heavy metals including silver, lithium, and barium. Due to a possible health risk of these pathogenic bacteria, a need exists for an accurate assessment of their acquired resistance to multiple drugs and metals.

  1. Salmonella detection using 16S ribosomal DNA/RNA probe-gold nanoparticles and lateral flow immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Che; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Chen, Po-Hao; Yeh, Ming-Kung; Hou, Shao-Yi

    2013-12-01

    An ultrasensitive, simple, and fast lateral flow immunoassay for Salmonella detection using gold nanoparticles conjugated with a DNA probe, which is complementary to the 16S ribosomal RNA and DNA of Salmonella, has been developed. The detection limit is 5 fmol for the synthetic single-stranded DNA. For the Salmonella cultured samples, the nucleic acids from 10(7) bacteria were rapidly detected in 30 min. After silver enhancement, the detection limit was as low as 10(4) cells which is lower than 10(5) bacteria cells, the human infective dose of food-borne Salmonella. Furthermore, the probes used in this study are specific to Salmonella compared to several other Enterobacteriaceae. This approach would be a useful tool for microbial detection regarding food safety or clinical diagnosis. It is also suitable for large-scale screening in developing countries because it is low-cost, sensitive, specific and convenient.

  2. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing of the Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene for Forensic Soil Comparison: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Jesmok, Ellen M; Hopkins, James M; Foran, David R

    2016-05-01

    Soil has the potential to be valuable forensic evidence linking a person or item to a crime scene; however, there is no established soil individualization technique. In this study, the utility of soil bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was examined for associating soils with their place of origin. Soil samples were collected from ten diverse and nine similar habitats over time, and within three habitats at various horizontal and vertical distances. Bacterial profiles were analyzed using four methods: abundance charts and nonmetric multidimensional scaling provided simplification and visualization of the massive datasets, potentially aiding in expert testimony, while analysis of similarities and k-nearest neighbor offered objective statistical comparisons. The vast majority of soil bacterial profiles (95.4%) were classified to their location of origin, highlighting the potential of bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing for the forensic analysis of soil samples.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel chlorpyrifos degrading flavobacterium species EMBS0145 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Amareshwari, P; Bhatia, Mayuri; Venkatesh, K; Roja Rani, A; Ravi, G V; Bhakt, Priyanka; Bandaru, Srinivas; Yadav, Mukesh; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2015-03-01

    Indiscriminate application of pesticides like chlorpyrifos, diazinon, or malathion contaminate the soil in addition has being unsafe often it has raised severe health concerns. Conversely, microorganisms like Trichoderma, Aspergillus and Bacteria like Rhizobium Bacillus, Azotobacter, Flavobacterium etc have evolved that are endowed with degradation of pesticides aforementioned to non-toxic products. The current study pitches into identification of a novel species of Flavobacterium bacteria capable to degrade the Organophosphorous pesticides. The bacterium was isolated from agricultural soil collected from Guntur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The samples were serially diluted and the aliquots were incubated for a suitable time following which the suspected colony was subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing. The sequence thus obtained was aligned pairwise against Flavobacterium species, which resulted in identification of novel specie of Flavobacterium later named as EMBS0145, the sequence of which was deposited in in GenBank with accession number JN794045.

  5. A novel mutation 3090 G>A of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA associated with myopathy.

    PubMed

    Coulbault, L; Deslandes, B; Herlicoviez, D; Read, M H; Leporrier, N; Schaeffer, S; Mouadil, A; Lombès, A; Chapon, F; Jauzac, P; Allouche, S

    2007-10-26

    We describe a young woman who presented with a progressive myopathy since the age of 9. Spectrophotometric analysis of the respiratory chain in muscle tissue revealed combined and profound complex I, III, II+III, and IV deficiency ranging from 60% to 95% associated with morphological and histochemical abnormalities of the muscle. An exhaustive screening of mitochondrial transfer and ribosomal RNAs showed a novel G>A substitution at nucleotide position 3090 which was detected only in urine sediment and muscle of the patient and was not found in her mother's blood cells and urine sample. We suggest that this novel de novo mutation in the 16S ribosomal RNA, a nucleotide which is highly conserved in different species, would impair mitochondrial protein synthesis and would cause a severe myopathy.

  6. Structural Insights into the Methylation of C1402 in 16S rRNA by Methyltransferase RsmI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangfeng; Wang, Li; Wang, Jian; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Zhang, Linbo; Gong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    RsmI and RsmH are conserved S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) that are responsible for the 2′-O-methylation and N4-methylation of C1402 in bacterial 16S rRNA, respectively. Methylation of m4Cm1402 plays a role in fine-tuning the shape and functions of the P-site to increase the decoding fidelity, and was recently found to contribute to the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus in host animals. Here we report the 2.20-Å crystal structure of homodimeric RsmI from Escherichia coli in complex with the cofactor AdoMet. RsmI consists of an N-terminal putative RNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain (CTD) with a Rossmann-like fold, and belongs to the class III MTase family. AdoMet is specifically bound into a negatively charged deep pocket formed by both domains by making extensive contacts. Structure-based mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays revealed Asp100 and Ala124 are vital for AdoMet-binding. Although the overall fold of RsmI shows remarkable similarities to the characterized MTases involved in vitamin B12 biosynthesis, it exhibits a distinct charge distribution especially around the AdoMet-binding pocket because of different substrate specificity. The docking model of RsmI-AdoMet-RNA ternary complex suggested a possible base-flipping mechanism of the substrate RNA that has been observed in several known RNA MTases. Our structural and biochemical studies provide novel insights into the catalytic mechanism of C1402 methylation in 16S rRNA. PMID:27711192

  7. Bacterial communities associated with host-adapted populations of pea aphids revealed by deep sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Outreman, Yannick; Mieuzet, Lucie; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Associations between microbes and animals are ubiquitous and hosts may benefit from harbouring microbial communities through improved resource exploitation or resistance to environmental stress. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is the host of heritable bacterial symbionts, including the obligate endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola and several facultative symbionts. While obligate symbionts supply aphids with key nutrients, facultative symbionts influence their hosts in many ways such as protection against natural enemies, heat tolerance, color change and reproduction alteration. The pea aphid also encompasses multiple plant-specialized biotypes, each adapted to one or a few legume species. Facultative symbiont communities differ strongly between biotypes, although bacterial involvement in plant specialization is uncertain. Here, we analyse the diversity of bacterial communities associated with nine biotypes of the pea aphid complex using amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Combined clustering and phylogenetic analyses of 16S sequences allowed identifying 21 bacterial OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit). More than 98% of the sequencing reads were assigned to known pea aphid symbionts. The presence of Wolbachia was confirmed in A. pisum while Erwinia and Pantoea, two gut associates, were detected in multiple samples. The diversity of bacterial communities harboured by pea aphid biotypes was very low, ranging from 3 to 11 OTUs across samples. Bacterial communities differed more between than within biotypes but this difference did not correlate with the genetic divergence between biotypes. Altogether, these results confirm that the aphid microbiota is dominated by a few heritable symbionts and that plant specialization is an important structuring factor of bacterial communities associated with the pea aphid complex. However, since we examined the microbiota of aphid samples kept a few generations in controlled conditions, it may be that bacterial diversity was

  8. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  9. Microbial Diversity of Bovine Mastitic Milk as Described by Pyrosequencing of Metagenomic 16s rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Georgios; Machado, Vinicius Silva; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Dairy cow mastitis is an important disease in the dairy industry. Different microbial species have been identified as causative agents in mastitis, and are traditionally diagnosed by bacterial culture. The objective of this study was to use metagenomic pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to investigate bacterial DNA diversity in milk samples of mastitic and healthy dairy cows and compare the results with those obtained by classical bacterial culture. One hundred and thirty-six milk samples were collected from cows showing signs of mastitis and used for microbiological culture. Additionally, 20 milk samples were collected from healthy quarters. Bacterial DNA was isolated from the same milk samples and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and pyrosequenced. Discriminant analysis showed that the groups of samples that were most clearly different from the rest and thus easily discriminated were the normal milk samples from healthy cows and those characterised by culture as Trueperella pyogenes and Streptococcus spp. The mastitis pathogens identified by culture were generally among the most frequent organisms detected by pyrosequencing, and in some cases (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococcus uberis mastitis) the single most prevalent microorganism. Trueperella pyogenes sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Trueperella pyogenes by culture, Streptococcus dysgalactiae sequences were the second most prevalent sequences in mastitis cases diagnosed as Streptococcus dysgalactiae by culture, and Staphyloccocus aureus sequences were the third most prevalent in mastitis cases diagnosed as Staphylococcus aureus by culture. In samples that were aerobic culture negative, pyrosequencing identified DNA of bacteria that are known to cause mastitis, DNA of bacteria that are known pathogens but have so far not been associated with mastitis, and DNA of bacteria that are currently not known to be pathogens. A

  10. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA and identification of four clinically important bacteria by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert J; Milillo, Michael; Prestwood, Jackson; Quintero, Reyes; Zurawski, Daniel V; Kwak, Yoon I; Waterman, Paige E; Lesho, Emil P; Mc Gann, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Within the paradigm of clinical infectious disease research, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa represent the four most clinically relevant, and hence most extensively studied bacteria. Current culture-based methods for identifying these organisms are slow and cumbersome, and there is increasing need for more rapid and accurate molecular detection methods. Using bioinformatic tools, 962,279 bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were aligned, and regions of homology were selected to generate a set of real-time PCR primers that target 93.6% of all bacterial 16S rRNA sequences published to date. A set of four species-specific real-time PCR primer pairs were also designed, capable of detecting less than 100 genome copies of A. baumannii, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa. All primers were tested for specificity in vitro against 50 species of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Additionally, the species-specific primers were tested against a panel of 200 clinical isolates of each species, randomly selected from a large repository of clinical isolates from diverse areas and sources. A comparison of culture and real-time PCR demonstrated 100% concordance. The primers were incorporated into a rapid assay capable of positive identification from plate or broth cultures in less than 90 minutes. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that current targets, such as the uidA gene in E.coli, are not suitable as species-specific genes due to sequence variation. The assay described herein is rapid, cost-effective and accurate, and can be easily incorporated into any research laboratory capable of real-time PCR.

  11. Molecular identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Classification of Demodex mites has long depended on hosts and morphological characteristics. However, the fact that two species coexist in the same host and phenotype is easily influenced by environment causes difficulty and indeterminacy in traditional classification. Genotype, which directly reflects the molecular structure characteristics, is relatively stable. In this study, species identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites was conducted. Mites were morphologically classified into four phenotypes: long- and short-bodied Demodex folliculorum with finger-like terminus and Demodex brevis with finger- or cone-like terminus. The mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment of individual mite was amplified, cloned, sequenced, and aligned. Sequence divergences, genetic distances, transition/transversion rates, and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the 16S rDNA sequence of three phenotypes with finger-like terminus was 337 bp, and that of phenotype with cone-like terminus was 342 bp. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates among the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 0.0-2.7%, 0.000-0.029, and 5.0-7/0 (5/1-7/0), respectively, indicating an intraspecific variation. Yet, those between these three phenotypes and the one with cone-like terminus were 21.6-22.8%, 2.510-2.589, and 0.47-0.59 (22/47-27/46), respectively, suggesting an interspecific variation. The five phylogenetic trees showed that the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus clustered into one branch, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus clustered into another. In conclusion, terminus is a major morphological characteristic for the identification of human Demodex species. The three phenotypes with finger-like terminus belong to D. folliculorum, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus belongs to D. brevis. Molecular identification can verify and replenish morphological identification.

  12. Temperature Sensitivity Caused by Mutant Release Factor 1 Is Suppressed by Mutations That Affect 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of slow termination on the protein synthesizing machinery, we isolated suppressors to a temperature-sensitive release factor 1 (RF1). Of 26 independent clones, five complementation groups have been identified, two of which are presented here. The first mutation disrupts a base pair in the transcription terminator stem for the rplM-rpsI operon, which encodes ribosomal proteins L13 and S9. We have found that this leads to readthrough of the terminator and that lower levels of transcript (compared to the results seen with the wild type) are found in the cell. This probably leads to decreased expression of the two proteins. The second mutation is a small deletion of the yrdC open reading frame start site, and it is not likely that the protein is expressed. Both mutant strains show an increased accumulation of 17S rRNA (immature 16S rRNA). Maturation of 16S rRNA is dependent on proper assembly of the ribosomal proteins, a process that is disturbed when proteins are missing. The function of the YrdC protein is not known, but it is able to bind to double-stranded RNA; therefore, we suggest that it is an assembly factor important for 30S subunit biogenesis. On the basis of our findings, we propose that lesser amounts of S9 or a lack of YrdC causes the maturation defect. We have shown that as a consequence of the maturation defect, fewer 70S ribosomes and polysomes are formed. This and other results suggest that it is the lowered concentration of functional ribosomes that suppresses the temperature sensitivity caused by the mutant RF1. PMID:15126466

  13. Bacterial Communities Associated with Host-Adapted Populations of Pea Aphids Revealed by Deep Sequencing of 16S Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Outreman, Yannick; Mieuzet, Lucie; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Associations between microbes and animals are ubiquitous and hosts may benefit from harbouring microbial communities through improved resource exploitation or resistance to environmental stress. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is the host of heritable bacterial symbionts, including the obligate endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola and several facultative symbionts. While obligate symbionts supply aphids with key nutrients, facultative symbionts influence their hosts in many ways such as protection against natural enemies, heat tolerance, color change and reproduction alteration. The pea aphid also encompasses multiple plant-specialized biotypes, each adapted to one or a few legume species. Facultative symbiont communities differ strongly between biotypes, although bacterial involvement in plant specialization is uncertain. Here, we analyse the diversity of bacterial communities associated with nine biotypes of the pea aphid complex using amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Combined clustering and phylogenetic analyses of 16S sequences allowed identifying 21 bacterial OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit). More than 98% of the sequencing reads were assigned to known pea aphid symbionts. The presence of Wolbachia was confirmed in A. pisum while Erwinia and Pantoea, two gut associates, were detected in multiple samples. The diversity of bacterial communities harboured by pea aphid biotypes was very low, ranging from 3 to 11 OTUs across samples. Bacterial communities differed more between than within biotypes but this difference did not correlate with the genetic divergence between biotypes. Altogether, these results confirm that the aphid microbiota is dominated by a few heritable symbionts and that plant specialization is an important structuring factor of bacterial communities associated with the pea aphid complex. However, since we examined the microbiota of aphid samples kept a few generations in controlled conditions, it may be that bacterial diversity was

  14. Analysis of microbiota associated with peri-implantitis using 16S rRNA gene clone library

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease which leads to the destruction of soft and hard tissues around osseointegrated implants. The subgingival microbiota appears to be responsible for peri-implant lesions and although the complexity of the microbiota has been reported in PI, the microbiota responsible for PI has not been identified. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the microbiota in subjects who have PI, clinically healthy implants, and periodontitis-affected teeth using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis to clarify the microbial differences. Design Three subjects participated in this study. The conditions around the teeth and implants were evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations and diseased implants, clinically healthy implants, and periodontally diseased teeth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets using sterile paper points. Prevalence and identity of bacteria was analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library technique. Results A total of 112 different species were identified from 335 clones sequenced. Among the 112 species, 51 (46%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 22 were novel phylotypes. The numbers of bacterial species identified at the sites of PI, periodontitis, and periodontally healthy implants were 77, 57, and 12, respectively. Microbiota in PI mainly included Gram-negative species and the composition was more diverse when compared to that of the healthy implant and periodontitis. The phyla Chloroflexi, Tenericutes, and Synergistetes were only detected at PI sites, as were Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Solobacterium moorei. Low levels of periodontopathic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were seen in peri-implant lesions. Conclusions The biofilm in PI showed a more complex microbiota when compared to periodontitis and periodontally healthy teeth

  15. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-01-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria. Images PMID:1577710

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-05-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria.

  17. Production of anti-neurotoxin antibody is enhanced by two subcomponents, HA1 and HA3b, of Clostridium botulinum type B 16S toxin-haemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Yokota, Kenji; Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Hwang, Hyun-Jung; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Cui, Jinhua; Takeshi, Kouichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Oguma, Keiji

    2005-11-01

    Clostridium botulinum type B strain produces two forms of progenitor toxin, 16S and 12S. The 12S toxin is formed by association of a neurotoxin (NTX) and a non-toxic non-haemagglutinin (NTNH), and the 16S toxin is formed by conjugation of the 12S toxin with a haemagglutinin (HA). HA consists of four subcomponents designated HA1, HA2, HA3a and HA3b. When mice were immunized with formalin-detoxified NTX, 12S or 16S, a significantly greater amount of anti-NTX antibody (Ab) was produced in the mice injected with 16S than in NTX- or 12S-injected mice. Immunization with NTX mixed with HA1 and/or HA3b also increased the anti-NTX Ab production, whereas NTX mixed with HA2 did not, indicating that HA1 and HA3b have adjuvant activity. This was further confirmed by immunizing mice with human albumin (Alb) alone or Alb mixed with either HA1 or HA3b. When mouse-spleen cells were stimulated with NTX, 16S or different HA subcomponents, 16S, HA1, HA3b and the mixture of HA1 and HA3 significantly increased interleukin 6 (IL6) production compared with NTX alone. Transcription of IL6 mRNA was low after stimulation with NTX alone, but increased to 16S-stimulation levels when NTX was mixed with HA1 or HA3b. In flow cytometry using labelled Abs against CD3 and CD19, the percentage of CD19 cells was higher following stimulation with 16S or NTX mixed with HA1 or HA3b compared with stimulation with NTX. The percentage of CD3 cells remained unchanged. These results suggest strongly that HA1 and HA3b demonstrate adjuvant activity via increasing IL6 production.

  18. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  19. Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods: integration of both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods (GNR) by conventional phenotypic characteristics is a challenge for diagnostic microbiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular methods, e.g., 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Results A total of 158 clinical isolates covering 20 genera and 50 species isolated from 1993 to 2010 were analyzed by comparing biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based identification. 16S rRNA gene homology analysis identified 148/158 (94%) of the isolates to species level, 9/158 (5%) to genus and 1/158 (1%) to family level. Compared to 16S rRNA gene sequencing as reference method, phenotypic identification correctly identified 64/158 (40%) isolates to species level, mainly Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Pasteurella multocida, and 21/158 (13%) isolates correctly to genus level, notably Capnocytophaga sp.; 73/158 (47%) of the isolates were not identified or misidentified. Conclusions We herein propose an efficient strategy for accurate identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory by integrating both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We conclude that 16S rRNA gene sequencing is an effective means for identification of fastidious GNR, which are not readily identified by conventional phenotypic methods. PMID:23855986

  20. Helicobacter pylori AddAB helicase-nuclease and RecA promote recombination-related DNA repair and survival during stomach colonization

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Fero, Jutta; Hansen, Lori M.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Smith, Gerald R.; Salama, Nina R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Helicobacter pylori colonization of the human stomach is characterized by profound disease-causing inflammation. Bacterial proteins that detoxify reactive oxygen species or recognize damaged DNA adducts promote infection, suggesting that H. pylori requires DNA damage-repair for successful in vivo colonization. The molecular mechanisms of repair remain unknown. We identified homologs of the AddAB class of helicase-nuclease enzymes, related to the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme, which, with RecA, is required for repair of DNA breaks and homologous recombination. H. pylori mutants lacking addA or addB genes lack detectable ATP-dependent nuclease activity, and the cloned H. pylori addAB genes restore both nuclease and helicase activities to an E. coli recBCD deletion mutant. H. pylori addAB and recA mutants have a reduced capacity for stomach colonization. These mutants are sensitive to DNA damaging agents and have reduced frequencies of apparent gene conversion between homologous genes encoding outer membrane proteins. Our results reveal requirements for double-strand break repair and recombination during both acute and chronic phases of H. pylori stomach infection. PMID:18573180

  1. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  2. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  3. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  4. Methanosarcina acetivorans 16S rRNA and transcription factor nucleotide fluctuation with implications in exobiology and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P.; Flamholz, A.; Marchese, P.; Hiciano, O.; Yao, H.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2008-08-01

    Cultures of the methane-producing archaea Methanosarcina, have recently been isolated from Alaskan sediments. It has been proposed that methanogens are strong candidates for exobiological life in extreme conditions. The spatial environmental gradients, such as those associated with the polygons on Mars' surface, could have been produced by past methanogenesis activity. The 16S rRNA gene has been used routinely to classify phenotypes. Using the fractal dimension of nucleotide fluctuation, a comparative study of the 16S rRNA nucleotide fluctuation in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A, Deinococcus radiodurans, and E. coli was conducted. The results suggest that Methanosarcina acetivorans has the lowest fractal dimension, consistent with its ancestral position in evolution. Variation in fluctuation complexity was also detected in the transcription factors. The transcription factor B (TFB) was found to have a higher fractal dimension as compared to transcription factor E (TFE), consistent with the fact that a single TFB in Methanosarcina acetivorans can code three different TATA box proteins. The average nucleotide pair-wise free energy of the DNA repair genes was found to be highest for Methanosarcina acetivorans, suggesting a relatively weak bonding, which is consistent with its low prevalence in pathology. Multitasking capacity comparison of type-I and type-II topoisomerases has been shown to correlate with fractal dimension using the methicillin-resistant strain MRSA 252. The analysis suggests that gene adaptation in a changing chemical environment can be measured in terms of bioinformatics. Given that the radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans is a strong candidate for an extraterrestrial origin and that the cold temperature Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 can function in Siberian permafrost, the fractal dimension comparison in this study suggests that a chemical resistant methanogen could exist in extremely cold conditions (such as that which existed on early

  5. Identification of causative pathogens in mouse eyes with bacterial keratitis by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Yan; Qiu, Bao-Feng; Liu, Chun; Zhu, Shun-Xing; Wang, Sheng-Cun; Miao, Jin; Jing, Jing; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The clone library method using PCR amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was used to identify pathogens from corneal scrapings of C57BL/6-corneal opacity (B6-Co) mice with bacterial keratitis. All 10 samples from the eyes with bacterial keratitis showed positive PCR results. All 10 samples from the normal cornea showed negative PCR results. In all 10 PCR-positive samples, the predominant and second most predominant species accounted for 20.9 to 40.6% and 14.7 to 26.1%, respectively, of each clone library. The predominant species were Staphylococcus lentus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The microbiota analysis detected a diverse group of microbiota in the eyes of B6-Co mice with bacterial keratitis and showed that the causative pathogens could be determined based on percentages of bacterial species in the clone libraries. The bacterial species detected in this study were mostly in accordance with results of studies on clinical bacterial keratitis in human eyes. Based on the results of our previous studies and this study, the B6-Co mouse should be considered a favorable model for studying bacterial keratitis.

  6. 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries to reveal bacterial diversity in anaerobic reactor-degraded tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingxing; Zhang, Zaili; Zhao, Ziling; Jia, Xiaoshan

    2012-05-01

    Microorganisms able to rapidly degrade tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) were domesticated in an anaerobic reactor and added to gradually increased concentrations of TBBPA. After 240 days of domestication, the degradation rate reached 96.0% in cultivated batch experiments lasting 20 days. The optimum cultivating temperature and pH were 30°C and 7.0. The bacterial community's composition and diversity in the reactor was studied by comparative analysis with 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis of 200 clones from the library indicate that the rDNA richness was high (Coverage C 99.5%) and that evenness was not high (Shannon-Weaver index 2.42). Phylogenetic analysis of 63 bacterial sequences from the reactor libraries demonstrated the presence of Betaproteobacteria (33.1%), Gammaproteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (13.9%), Firmicutes (11.4%), Chloroflexi (3.6%), Actinobacteria (0.6%), the candidate division TM7 (4.2%) and other unknown, uncultured bacterial groups (14.5%). Comamonas, Achromobacter, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium were the dominant types.

  7. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Chen, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics. PMID:27957494

  8. Diversity and phylogeny of bacteria on Zimbabwe tobacco leaves estimated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Can; Gu, Wen; Zhe, Wei; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Duan, Yanqing; Yang, Jinkui

    2011-12-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in the tobacco aging process. However, microbial communities on flue-cured tobacco leaves (FCTL) remain largely unknown. In this study, the total microbial genomic DNA of unaged and aging FCTL from Zimbabwe were isolated using a culture-independent method, and the bacterial communities were investigated through analyzing two 16S rRNA gene libraries. Eighty-four and 65 operational taxonomic units were obtained from the libraries of the unaged and aging FCTL, respectively. The following genera were represented more than 4% in both libraries (aging and unaged library): Sphingomonas (4.84%, 4.18%), Stenotrophomonas (4.84%, 5.23%), Erwinia (5.81%, 4.88%), Pantoea (19.35%, 18.47%), and Pseudomonas (21.29%, 24.04%). The dominant species varied between the two libraries. Specifically, several dominant species in unaged FCTL including Pseudomonas fulva, Pseudomonas sp. (AM909658), Klebsiella sp. (HM584796), and Pantoea sp. (AY501386) were not identified in aging FCTL, while several dominant species in aging FCTL such as Pantoea sp. (GU566350), Pseudomonas sp. (EF157292), and Buttiauxella izardii were not found in unaged FCTL. The phylogenetic analysis showed that bacteria from unaged and aging FCTL were divided into two clades, and two unique subclades were identified in aging FCTL. Our results revealed for the first time the bacterial diversities on Zimbabwe tobacco, and provided a basis for clarifying the roles of bacteria in aging process of FCTL.

  9. Analysis of the chronic wound microbiota of 2,963 patients by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, Randall D; Hanson, John D; Rees, Eric J; Koenig, Lawrence D; Phillips, Caleb D; Wolcott, Richard A; Cox, Stephen B; White, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which microorganisms impair wound healing is an ongoing controversy in the management of chronic wounds. Because the high diversity and extreme variability of the microbiota between individual chronic wounds lead to inconsistent findings in small cohort studies, evaluation of a large number of chronic wounds using identical sequencing and bioinformatics methods is necessary for clinicians to be able to select appropriate empiric therapies. In this study, we utilized 16S rDNA pyrosequencing to analyze the composition of the bacterial communities present in samples obtained from patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (N = 910), venous leg ulcers (N = 916), decubitus ulcers (N = 767), and nonhealing surgical wounds (N = 370). The wound samples contained a high proportion of Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas species in 63 and 25% of all wounds, respectively; however, a high prevalence of anaerobic bacteria and bacteria traditionally considered commensalistic was also observed. Our results suggest that neither patient demographics nor wound type influenced the bacterial composition of the chronic wound microbiome. Collectively, these findings indicate that empiric antibiotic selection need not be based on nor altered for wound type. Furthermore, the results provide a much clearer understanding of chronic wound microbiota in general; clinical application of this new knowledge over time may help in its translation to improved wound healing outcomes.

  10. Constraint satisfaction techniques for modeling large complexes: Application to the central domain of 16S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, R.B.; Weiser, B.; Noller, H.F.

    1994-12-31

    Standard experimental techniques for determining the structure of small to moderately-sized molecules are difficult to apply to large macromolecular complexes. These complexes, consisting of multiple protein and/or nucleic acid components, can contain many thousands of atoms and the experimental techniques used to study them provide relatively sparse structural information with significant measurement uncertainty. Computational technologies are required to reduce the conformational search space and synthesize the data in order to produce the structures or (more usually) sets of structures compatible with the data. In this paper, we show that a method based on the constraint satisfaction paradigm produces a three-dimensional topology for the central domain of the 16S ribosomal RNA that is generally consistent with interactively built models, although differing in significant ways. The modeling incorporates information about secondary structure of the nucleic acid, neutron diffraction data about the relative positions and uncertainties of the proteins, and protection experiments indicating proximities of segments of RNA to specific protein subunits. Unlike previously proposed models, our model contains explicit information about the range of positions for each subunit that are compatible with the data. The system uses a grid search, checks distances in a direction-dependent manner, uses disjunctive distance constraints, and checks for volume overlap violations.

  11. Deciphering bacterial community changes in zucker diabetic fatty rats based on 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hong; Li, Shu; Liang, Lina; Sui, Hua; Zhan, Libin; Lu, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was deciphering bacterial community changes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF rats), a model of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies unmasked that the status of gastrointestinal tract microbiota has a marked impact on nutrition-related syndromes such as obesity and type-2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, samples taken from the gastrointestinal tracts (GI tracts) of ZDF and their lean littermates (ZL rats) were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities, including those located in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and feces. Results revealed that the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased and greater numbers of Lactobacillus were detected along GI tracts in ZDF rats compared to ZL rats. In conclusion, this work is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities along ZDF rat GI tract and provides substantial evidence supporting a prospective strategy to alter the GI microbial communities improving obesity and T2D. PMID:27418144

  12. Multiplexed quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA by solution hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Satokari, Reetta M; Kataja, Kari; Söderlund, Hans

    2005-07-01

    Multiplexed and quantitative analysis of nucleic acid sequences in complex mixtures is essential in various applications of microbiological research. We have developed a method based on solution hybridization between biotinylated nucleic acid targets and multiple fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes of distinct sizes. The biotin-nucleic acid-probe complexes are captured on magnetic streptavidin-coated microparticles and washed. The hybridized probes are eluted and their identity and quantity are determined by capillary electrophoresis. The signal intensities of the recorded probes correspond to the amount of target nucleic acid in the mixture, and the size indicates the target. Based on this principle and 16S rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes, we set up an application for the relative quantification of different groups of clostridia and related organisms in a mixed bacterial population. The lower detection limit is 0.05 ng of total RNA and the linear range of measurement is 10(2). The method allowed accurate and highly repeatable quantification of the proportion of clostridia in human feces. Further, we discuss other applications of the method such as quantitative transcriptional analysis of eukaryotic microorganisms, which can be performed without conversion of mRNA to cDNA.

  13. 16S rRNA assessment of the influence of shading on early-successional biofilms in experimental streams.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Katja; Singer, Andrew; Bowes, Michael J; Ings, Nicola L; Field, Dawn; Bell, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Elevated nutrient levels can lead to excessive biofilm growth, but reducing nutrient pollution is often challenging. There is therefore interest in developing control measures for biofilm growth in nutrient-rich rivers that could act as complement to direct reductions in nutrient load. Shading of rivers is one option that can mitigate blooms, but few studies have experimentally examined the differences in biofilm communities grown under shaded and unshaded conditions. We investigated the assembly and diversity of biofilm communities using in situ mesocosms within the River Thames (UK). Biofilm composition was surveyed by 454 sequencing of 16S amplicons (∼400 bp length covering regions V6/V7). The results confirm the importance of sunlight for biofilm community assembly; a resource that was utilized by a relatively small number of dominant taxa, leading to significantly less diversity than in shaded communities. These differences between unshaded and shaded treatments were either because of differences in resource utilization or loss of diatom-structures as habitats for bacteria. We observed more co-occurrence patterns and network interactions in the shaded communities. This lends further support to the proposal that increased river shading can help mitigate the effects from macronutrient pollution in rivers.

  14. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Zhang, Fengying; Chen, Xuezhong; Zhao, Ming; Ma, Lingbo

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Four Bacteria-Specific Primer Pairs for 16S rRNA Gene Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Sofie; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Beckers, Bram; Truyens, Sascha; Stevens, Vincent; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomic community analyses using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and high-throughput sequencing has become a cornerstone in microbiology research. To reliably detect the members, or operational taxonomic units (OTUs), that make up bacterial communities, taxonomic surveys rely on the use of the most informative PCR primers to amplify the broad range of phylotypes present in up-to-date reference databases. However, primers specific for the domain Bacteria were often developed some time ago against database versions that are now out of date. Here we evaluated the performance of four bacterial primers for characterizing complex microbial communities in explosives contaminated and non-contaminated forest soil and by in silico evaluation against the current SILVA123 database. Primer pair 341f/785r produced the highest number of bacterial OTUs, phylogenetic richness, Shannon diversity, low non-specificity and most reproducible results, followed by 967f/1391r and 799f/1193r. Primer pair 68f/518r showed overall low coverage and a bias toward Alphaproteobacteria. In silico, primer pair 341f/785r showed the highest coverage of the domain Bacteria (96.1%) with no obvious bias toward the majority of bacterial species. This suggests the high utility of primer pair 341f/785r for soil and plant-associated bacterial microbiome studies.

  16. Microbial community structure of Arctic multiyear sea ice and surface seawater by 454 sequencing of the 16S RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jeff S; Rasmussen, Simon; Blom, Nikolaj; Deming, Jody W; Rysgaard, Søren; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic decreases in the extent of Arctic multiyear ice (MYI) suggest this environment may disappear as early as 2100, replaced by ecologically different first-year ice. To better understand the implications of this loss on microbial biodiversity, we undertook a detailed census of the microbial community in MYI at two sites near the geographic North Pole using parallel tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the composition of the MYI microbial community has been characterized by previous studies, microbial community structure has not been. Although richness was lower in MYI than in underlying surface water, we found diversity to be comparable using the Simpson and Shannon's indices (for Simpson t=0.65, P=0.56; for Shannon t=0.25, P=0.84 for a Student's t-test of mean values). Cyanobacteria, comprising 6.8% of reads obtained from MYI, were observed for the first time in Arctic sea ice. In addition, several low-abundance clades not previously reported in sea ice were present, including the phylum TM7 and the classes Spartobacteria and Opitutae. Members of Coraliomargarita, a recently described genus of the class Opitutae, were present in sufficient numbers to suggest niche occupation within MYI.

  17. Structural insights of microbial community of Deulajhari (India) hot spring using 16s-rRNA based metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2016-03-01

    Insights about the distribution of the microbial community prove to be the major goal of understanding microbial ecology which remains to be fully deciphered. Hot springs being hub for the thermophilic microbiota attract the attention of the microbiologists. Deulajhari hot spring cluster is located in the Angul district of Odisha. Covered within a wooded area, Deulajhari hot spring is also fed by the plant litter resulting in a relatively high amount of total organic content (TOC). For the first time, Illumina sequencing based biodiversity analysis of microbial composition is studied through amplicon metagenome sequencing of 16s rRNA targeting V3-V4 region using metagenomic DNA from the hot spring sediment. Over 28 phyla were detected through the amplicon metagenome sequencing of which the most dominating phyla at the existing physiochemical parameters like; temperature 69 °C, pH 8.09, electroconductivity 0.025 dSm(- 1) and total organic carbon 0.356%, were Proteobacteria (88.12%), Bacteriodetes (10.76%), Firmicutes (0.35%), Spirochetes (0.18%) and chloroflexi (0.11%). Approximately 713 species were observed at the above physiochemical parameters. The analysis of the metagenome provides the quantitative insights into microbial populations based on the sequence data in Deulajhari hot spring. Metagenome sequence is deposited to SRA database which is available at NCBI with accession no. SRX1459736.

  18. Phylogeny of hard- and soft-tick taxa (Acari: Ixodida) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Black, W C; Piesman, J

    1994-01-01

    Ticks are parasitiform mites that are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. A phylogeny for tick families, subfamilies, and genera has been described based on morphological characters, life histories, and host associations. To test the existing phylogeny, we sequenced approximately 460 bp from the 3' end of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) in 36 hard- and soft-tick species; a mesostigmatid mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, was used as an outgroup. Phylogenies derived using distance, maximum-parsimony, or maximum-likelihood methods were congruent. The existing phylogeny was largely supported with four exceptions. In hard ticks (Ixodidae), members of Haemaphysalinae were monophyletic with the primitive Amblyomminae and members of Hyalomminae grouped within the Rhipicephalinae. In soft ticks (Argasidae), the derived phylogeny failed to support a monophyletic relationship among members of Ornithodorinae and supported placement of Argasinae as basal to the Ixodidae, suggesting that hard ticks may have originated from an Argas-like ancestor. Because most Argas species are obligate bird octoparasites, this result supports earlier suggestions that hard ticks did not evolve until the late Cretaceous. PMID:7937832

  19. Differentiation of Salmonella serovar infantis isolates from human and animal sources by fingerprinting IS200 and 16S rrn loci.

    PubMed Central

    Pelkonen, S; Romppanen, E L; Siitonen, A; Pelkonen, J

    1994-01-01

    We genotyped Salmonella serovar infantis (referred to as S. infantis), which is the most widespread serovar among animals and the third most common cause of human salmonellosis in Finland. Molecular fingerprinting of the 16S rrn locus and the Salmonella-specific insertion sequence IS200 was used to type the 131 isolates originating from the main sources of S. infantis infection. The number of IS200 elements in S. infantis varied from zero to seven; three or more copies were present in 97% of the isolates, and 71% had four copies. There were four conserved chromosomal positions of IS200, which allowed us to group the isolates into three major clonal groups. We defined 11 unique IS200 profiles and five different ribotypes which, in combination, generated 15 genotypes highly restricted to the infection sources: 8 genotypes were typical of isolates from broiler chickens and cattle and seven genotypes were typical of isolates from humans. The eight genotypes of isolates from chickens represented two clonal groups which were differentially associated with chicken-producing companies. The typing scheme allows efficient discrimination between isolates from various infection sources and within sources and, therefore, provides a unique molecular tool for use in the study of the epidemiology of S. infantis infection. Images PMID:7529248

  20. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  1. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, J.; Savio, D.; Ley, R. E.; Mach, R. L.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multicompartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  2. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems.

  3. Identification of causative pathogens in mouse eyes with bacterial keratitis by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong-Yan; Qiu, Bao-Feng; Liu, Chun; Zhu, Shun-Xing; Wang, Sheng-Cun; Miao, Jin; Jing, Jing; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The clone library method using PCR amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was used to identify pathogens from corneal scrapings of C57BL/6-corneal opacity (B6-Co) mice with bacterial keratitis. All 10 samples from the eyes with bacterial keratitis showed positive PCR results. All 10 samples from the normal cornea showed negative PCR results. In all 10 PCR-positive samples, the predominant and second most predominant species accounted for 20.9 to 40.6% and 14.7 to 26.1%, respectively, of each clone library. The predominant species were Staphylococcus lentus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The microbiota analysis detected a diverse group of microbiota in the eyes of B6-Co mice with bacterial keratitis and showed that the causative pathogens could be determined based on percentages of bacterial species in the clone libraries. The bacterial species detected in this study were mostly in accordance with results of studies on clinical bacterial keratitis in human eyes. Based on the results of our previous studies and this study, the B6-Co mouse should be considered a favorable model for studying bacterial keratitis. PMID:25312507

  4. Tertiary interactions between helices h13 and h44 in 16S RNA contribute to the fidelity of translation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Diem K; Finley, Jason; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón; Lale, Ajit; Sun, Qing; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The A-minor interaction, formed between single-stranded adenosines and the minor groove of a receptor helix, is among the most common motifs found in rRNA. Among the A-minors found in 16S rRNA are a set of interactions between adenosines at positions 1433, 1434 and 1468 in helix 44 (h44) and their receptors in the nucleotide 320-340 region of helix 13 (h13). These interactions have been implicated in the maintenance of translational accuracy, because base substitutions at the adjacent C1469 increase miscoding errors. We have tested their functional significance through mutagenesis of h13 and h44. Mutations at the h44 A residues, or the A-minor receptors in h13, increase a variety of translational errors and a subset of the mutants show decreased association between 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. These results are consistent with the involvement of h13-h44 interactions in the alignment and packing of these helices in the 30S subunit and the importance of this helical alignment for tRNA selection and subunit-subunit interaction.

  5. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  6. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  7. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B.; Chae, Jong Pyo; Balolong, Marilen P.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level). Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs. PMID:25656184

  8. 16S rRNA assessment of the influence of shading on early-successional biofilms in experimental streams

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Katja; Singer, Andrew; Bowes, Michael J.; Ings, Nicola L.; Field, Dawn; Bell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nutrient levels can lead to excessive biofilm growth, but reducing nutrient pollution is often challenging. There is therefore interest in developing control measures for biofilm growth in nutrient-rich rivers that could act as complement to direct reductions in nutrient load. Shading of rivers is one option that can mitigate blooms, but few studies have experimentally examined the differences in biofilm communities grown under shaded and unshaded conditions. We investigated the assembly and diversity of biofilm communities using in situ mesocosms within the River Thames (UK). Biofilm composition was surveyed by 454 sequencing of 16S amplicons (∼400 bp length covering regions V6/V7). The results confirm the importance of sunlight for biofilm community assembly; a resource that was utilized by a relatively small number of dominant taxa, leading to significantly less diversity than in shaded communities. These differences between unshaded and shaded treatments were either because of differences in resource utilization or loss of diatom-structures as habitats for bacteria. We observed more co-occurrence patterns and network interactions in the shaded communities. This lends further support to the proposal that increased river shading can help mitigate the effects from macronutrient pollution in rivers. PMID:26499485

  9. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future. PMID:26404329

  10. 16S rRNA gene-targeted TTGE in determining diversity of gut microbiota during acute diarrhoea and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Cravioto, Alejandro; Alam, Munirul

    2012-09-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean ± standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery.

  11. 16S rRNA Gene-targeted TTGE in Determining Diversity of Gut Microbiota during Acute Diarrhoea and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean±standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery. PMID:23082626

  12. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  13. Identification of bacteria recovered from animals using the 16S ribosomal RNA gene with pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Deepanker; Cieply, Stephen; Livengood, Julia

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial identification using genetic sequencing is fast becoming a confirmatory tool for microbiologists. Its application in veterinary diagnostic laboratories is still growing. In addition to availability of Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing has recently emerged as a unique method for short-read DNA sequencing for bacterial identifications. Its ease of use makes it possible to diagnose infections rapidly at a low cost even in smaller laboratories. In the current study, pyrosequencing was compared with Sanger sequencing for identification of the bacterial organisms. Fifty-four bacterial isolates spanning 23 different bacterial families encountered in veterinary diagnostic microbiology laboratories were sequenced using 16S ribosomal RNA gene with pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing. Pyrosequencing was able to identify 80% of isolates to the genus level, and 43% isolates to the species level. Sanger sequencing with approximately 500 bp performed better for both genus (100%) and species (87%) identification. Use of different sequence databases to identify bacteria isolated from animals showed relative importance of public databases compared to a validated commercial library. A time and limited cost comparison between pyrosequencing and genetic sequencing of 500 bp showed pyrosequencing was not only faster but also comparable in cost, making it a viable alternative for use in classifying bacteria isolated from animals.

  14. Matching the crystallographic structure of ribosomal protein S7 to a three-dimensional model of the 16S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, I; Nakagawa, A; Hosaka, H; Wakatsuki, S; Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1998-01-01

    Two recently published but independently derived structures, namely the X-ray crystallographic structure of ribosomal protein S7 and the "binding pocket" for this protein in a three-dimensional model of the 16S rRNA, have been correlated with one another. The known rRNA-protein interactions for S7 include a minimum binding site, a number of footprint sites, and two RNA-protein crosslink sites on the 16S rRNA, all of which form a compact group in the published 16S rRNA model (despite the fact that these interactions were not used as primary modeling constraints in building that model). The amino acids in protein S7 that are involved in the two crosslinks to 16S rRNA have also been determined in previous studies, and here we have used these sites to orient the crystallographic structure of S7 relative to its rRNA binding pocket. Some minor alterations were made to the rRNA model to improve the fit. In the resulting structure, the principal positively charged surface of the protein is in contact with the 16S rRNA, and all of the RNA-protein interaction data are satisfied. The quality of the fit gives added confidence as to the validity of the 16S rRNA model. Protein S7 is furthermore known to be crosslinked both to P site-bound tRNA and to mRNA at positions upstream of the P site codon; the matched S7-16S rRNA structure makes a prediction as to the location of this crosslink site within the protein molecule. PMID:9582096

  15. Identification of grass-associated and toluene-degrading diazotrophs, Axoarcus spp., by analyses of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hurek, T.; Reinhold-Hurek, B.

    1995-06-01

    The genus Azoarcus includes nitrogen-fixing, grass-associated strains as well as denitrifying toluene degraders. In order to identify and group members of the genus Azoarcus, phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) is proposed. 16S rRNA-targeted PCR using specific primers to exclude amplification in the majority of other members of the beta subclass of the class Proteobacteria was combined with direct sequencing of the PCR products. Tree inference from comparisons of 446-bp rDNA fragments yielded similar results for the three known Azoarcus spp. sequences and for analysis of the complete 16S rDNA sequence. These three species formed a phylogenetically coherent group with representatives of two other Azoarcus species which were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing in this study. This group was related to Rhodocyclus purpureus and Thaurea selenatis. New isolates and also sequences of so far uncultured bacteria from roots of Kallar grass were assigned to the genus Azoarcus as well. Also, strains degrading monoaromatic hydrocarbons anaerobically in the presence of nitrate clustered within this genus, albeit not with grass-associated isolates. All representative members of the five species harboring rhizospheric bacteria were able to form N{sub 2}O from nitrate and showed anaerobic growth on malic acid with nitrate but not on toluene. In order to visualize different Azoarcus spp. by whole-cell in situ hybridizations, we generated 16S rRNA-targeted, fluorescent probes by in vitro transcription directly from PCR products which spanned the variable region V2. Hybridization was species specific for Azoarcus communis and Azoarcus indigens. The proposed scheme of phylogenetic analysis of PCR-generated 16S rDNA segements will facilitate studies on ecological distribution, host range, and diversity of Azoarcus spp. and may even allow rapid identification of unc ultured strains from environmental DNAs. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  16. A comparison of random sequence reads versus 16S rDNA sequences for estimating the biodiversity of a metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Chapple, Charles E; Frangeul, Lionel; Gloux, Karine; Guigo, Roderic; Dore, Joel

    2008-09-01

    The construction of metagenomic libraries has permitted the study of microorganisms resistant to isolation and the analysis of 16S rDNA sequences has been used for over two decades to examine bacterial biodiversity. Here, we show that the analysis of random sequence reads (RSRs) instead of 16S is a suitable shortcut to estimate the biodiversity of a bacterial community from metagenomic libraries. We generated 10,010 RSRs from a metagenomic library of microorganisms found in human faecal samples. Then searched them using the program BLASTN against a prokaryotic sequence database to assign a taxon to each RSR. The results were compared with those obtained by screening and analysing the clones containing 16S rDNA sequences in the whole library. We found that the biodiversity observed by RSR analysis is consistent with that obtained by 16S rDNA. We also show that RSRs are suitable to compare the biodiversity between different metagenomic libraries. RSRs can thus provide a good estimate of the biodiversity of a metagenomic library and, as an alternative to 16S, this approach is both faster and cheaper.

  17. Design of Vibrio 16S rRNA gene specific primers and their application in the analysis of seawater Vibrio community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Hualei; Chen, Jixiang; Shi, Xianming; Zou, Guiwei; Wei, Qiwei; Sun, Xiuqin

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenic species of genus Vibrio cause vibriosis, one of the most prevalent diseases of maricultured animals and seafood consumers. Monitoring their kinetics in the chain of seafood production, processing and consumption is of great importance for food and mariculture safety. In order to enrich Vibrio-representing 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) fragments and identify these bacteria further real-timely and synchronously among bacterial flora in the chain, a pair of primers that selectively amplify Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments were designed with their specificities and coverage testified in the analysis of seawater Vibrio community. The specificities and coverage of two primers, VF169 and VR744, were determined theoretically among bacterial 16S rDNAs available in GenBank by using BLAST program and practically by amplifying, Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments from seawater DNA. More than 88.3% of sequences in GenBank, which showed identical matches with VR744, belong to Vibrio genus. A total of 33 clones were randomly selected and sequenced. All of the sequences showed their highest similarities to and clustered around those of diverse known Vibrio species. The primers designed are capable of retrieving a wide range of Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments specifically among bacterial flora in seawater, the most important natural environment of seafood cultivation.

  18. STITCH: algorithm to splice, trim, identify, track, and capture the uniqueness of 16S rRNAs sequence pairs using public or in-house database.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dianhui; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George E

    2011-04-01

    A comparison of variable regions within the 16S rRNA gene is widely used to characterize relationships between bacteria and to identify phylogenetic affiliation of unknown bacteria. In environmental studies, polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA followed by cloning and sequencing of numerous individual clones is an extensively used molecular method for elucidating microbial diversity. The sequencing process typically utilizes a forward and reverse primer pair to produce two partial reads (~700 to 800 base pairs each) that overlap and in total cover a large region of the full 16S rRNA sequence (~1.5 k base). In a typical application, this approach rapidly generates very large numbers of 16S rRNA datasets that can overwhelm manual processing efforts leading to both delays and errors. In particular, the approach presents two computational challenges: (1) the assembly of a composite sequence from the two partial reads and (2) the subsequent appropriate identification of the organism represented by the newly sequenced clones. Herein, we describe a software package, search, trim, identify, track, and capture the uniqueness of 16S rRNAs using public and in-house database (STITCH), which offers automated sequence pair splicing and genetic identification, thus simplifying the computationally intensive analysis of large sequencing libraries. The STITCH software is freely accessible over the Internet at: http://prion.bchs.uh.edu/stitch/.

  19. Comparison of the Biolog OmniLog Identification System and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing for accuracy in identification of atypical bacteria of clinical origin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Megan C; Boyette, Marilyn; Goforth, Chris; Sperry, Katharine Volpe; Greene, Shermalyn R

    2009-12-01

    The Biolog OmniLog Identification System (Biolog) and the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing methods were compared to conventional microbiological methods and evaluated for accuracy of bacterial identification. These methods were evaluated using 159 clinical isolates. Each isolate was initially identified by conventional biochemical tests and morphological characteristics and subsequently placed into one of seven categories: aerobic Actinomycetes, Bacillus, Coryneforms, fastidious Gram-negative rods (GNR), non-fermenting GNR, miscellaneous Gram-positive rods (GPR), and Vibrio/Aeromonas. After comparison to the conventional identification, the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene sequence identifications were classified as follows: a) correct to the genus and species levels; b) correct to the genus level only; or c) neither (unacceptable) identification. Overall, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had the highest percent accuracy with 90.6% correct identifications, while the Biolog system identified 68.3% of the isolates correctly. For each category, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a substantially higher percent accuracy compared to the conventional methods. It was determined that the Biolog system is deficient when identifying organisms in the fastidious GNR category (20.0%). The observed data suggest that 16S rRNA gene sequencing provides a more accurate identification of atypical bacteria than the Biolog system.

  20. Analysis of 525 Samples To Determine the Usefulness of PCR Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene for Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, Florence; Roux, Véronique; Stein, Andréas; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infections has not been systematically tested. Five hundred twenty-five bone and joint samples collected from 525 patients were cultured and submitted to 16S rRNA gene PCR detection of bacteria in parallel. The amplicons with mixed sequences were also cloned. When discordant results were observed, culture and PCR were performed once again. Bacteria were detected in 139 of 525 samples. Culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR yielded identical documentation in 475 samples. Discrepancies were linked to 13 false-positive culture results, 5 false-positive PCR results, 9 false-negative PCR results, 16 false-negative culture results, and 7 mixed infections. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in 6 of 8 patients with mixed infections identified 2 to 8 bacteria per sample. Rarely described human pathogens such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas terrigena, and 21 anaerobes were characterized. We also detected, by 16S rRNA gene PCR, four previously identified bacteria never reported in human infection, Alkanindiges illinoisensis, dehydroabietic acid-degrading bacterium DhA-73, unidentified Hailaer soda lake bacterium, and uncultured bacterium clone HuCa4. Seven organisms representing new potential species were also detected. PCR followed by cloning and sequencing may help to identify new pathogens involved in mixed bone infection. PMID:16517890

  1. Sensitive detection and serovar differentiation of typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica species using 16S rRNA Gene PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Masek, Billie J; Hardick, Justin; Won, Helen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella enterica species infections are a significant public health problem causing high morbidity rates worldwide and high mortality rates in the developing world. These infections are not always rapidly diagnosed as a cause of bloodstream infections because of the limitations of blood culture, which greatly affects clinical care as a result of treatment delays. A molecular diagnostic assay that could rapidly detect and identify S. enterica species infections as a cause of sepsis is needed. Nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to establish the limit of detection (LOD) of a previously published 16S rRNA gene PCR (16S PCR) in mock whole blood specimens. In addition, 16 typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to evaluate the serovar differentiation capability of 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis. The overall LOD of 16S PCR for the nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars analyzed was <10 colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) in mock whole blood specimens, with the lowest and highest LOD at <1 CFU/mL and 9 CFU/mL, respectively. By high-resolution melt analysis, the typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar groups analyzed each generated a unique grouping code, allowing for serovar-level identification. 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis could be a useful molecular diagnostic that could enhance the current diagnostic, treatment, and surveillance methods of S. enterica bloodstream infections.

  2. Clinical impact of the use of 16S rRNA sequencing method for the identification of "difficult-to-identify" bacteria in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, R; Swaminathan, S; Salimnia, H; Fairfax, M; Frey, A; Chandrasekar, P H

    2012-04-01

    Molecular method of 16S rRNA sequencing is reported to be helpful in the accurate identification of organisms with ambiguous phenotypic profiles. We analyzed the use of 16S rRNA sequencing method to identify clinically significant, "difficult-to-identify" bacteria recovered from clinical specimens, and evaluated its role in patient management and consequent clinical outcome. Among the 172 "difficult-to-identify" bacteria recovered over a 4-year period, 140 were gram-positive cocci or gram-negative bacilli; identification by 16S rRNA did not play a role in the management of patients infected with these bacteria. From 32 patients, 33 "difficult-to-identify" gram-positive bacilli were identified; the organisms were mycobacteria, Nocardia, Tsukamurella, Rhodococcus, and Gordonia. In 24 patients for whom clinical data were available, results from the 16S rRNA sequencing method led to treatment change in 14 immunocompromised patients (including 7 hematopoietic stem cell recipients and 1 liver transplant recipient). Therapy was modified in 9 patients, initiated in 3 patients, and discontinued in 2 patients. Most patients' therapy was switched to oral antibiotics with discontinuation of intravascular catheters, facilitating early hospital discharge. All 14 patients were alive 30 days after infection onset. The present study demonstrates the clinical application of 16S rRNA sequencing method to identify "difficult-to-identify" mycobacteria and other gram-positive bacilli in clinical specimens, particularly in immunocompromised hosts.

  3. Description of an Unusual Neisseria meningitidis Isolate Containing and Expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Specific 16S rRNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Skvoretz, Rhonda; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Jonas, Vivian; Brentano, Steve

    2013-01-01

    An apparently rare Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing one copy of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA gene is described herein. This isolate was identified as N. meningitidis by biochemical identification methods but generated a positive signal with Gen-Probe Aptima assays for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the purified isolate revealed mixed bases in signature regions that allow for discrimination between N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. The mixed bases were resolved by sequencing individually PCR-amplified single copies of the genomic 16S rRNA gene. A total of 121 discrete sequences were obtained; 92 (76%) were N. meningitidis sequences, and 29 (24%) were N. gonorrhoeae sequences. Based on the ratio of species-specific sequences, the N. meningitidis strain seems to have replaced one of its four intrinsic 16S rRNA genes with the gonococcal gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes specific for meningococcal and gonococcal rRNA were used to demonstrate the expression of the rRNA genes. Interestingly, the clinical isolate described here expresses both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA genes, as shown by positive FISH signals with both probes. This explains why the probes for N. gonorrhoeae in the Gen-Probe Aptima assays cross-react with this N. meningitidis isolate. The N. meningitidis isolate described must have obtained N. gonorrhoeae-specific DNA through interspecies recombination. PMID:23863567

  4. Strategy for microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Karim, Aos S; Sendler, Edward D; Kato, Ikuko

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the identity and changes of organisms in the urogenital and other microbiomes of the human body may be key to discovering causes and new treatments of many ailments, such as vaginosis. High-throughput sequencing technologies have recently enabled discovery of the great diversity of the human microbiome. The cost per base of many of these sequencing platforms remains high (thousands of dollars per sample); however, the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA) is estimated to have a cost per base less than one-fifth of its nearest competitor. The main disadvantage of the IGA for sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes is that the maximum read-length of the IGA is only 100 bases; whereas, at least 300 bases are needed to obtain phylogenetically informative data down to the genus and species level. In this paper we describe and conduct a pilot test of a multiplex sequencing strategy suitable for achieving total reads of > 300 bases per extracted DNA molecule on the IGA. Results show that all proposed primers produce products of the expected size and that correct sequences can be obtained, with all proposed forward primers. Various bioinformatic optimization of the Illumina Bustard analysis pipeline proved necessary to extract the correct sequence from IGA image data, and these modifications of the data files indicate that further optimization of the analysis pipeline may improve the quality rankings of the data and enable more sequence to be correctly analyzed. The successful application of this method could result in an unprecedentedly deep description (800,000 taxonomic identifications per sample) of the urogenital and other microbiomes in a large number of samples at a reasonable cost per sample.

  5. Improved pipeline for reducing erroneous identification by 16S rRNA sequences using the Illumina MiSeq platform.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Cheol; Lim, Jeongmin; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The cost of DNA sequencing has decreased due to advancements in Next Generation Sequencing. The number of sequences obtained from the Illumina platform is large, use of this platform can reduce costs more than the 454 pyrosequencer. However, the Illumina platform has other challenges, including bioinformatics analysis of large numbers of sequences and the need to reduce erroneous nucleotides generated at the 3'-ends of the sequences. These erroneous sequences can lead to errors in analysis of microbial communities. Therefore, correction of these erroneous sequences is necessary for accurate taxonomic identification. Several studies that have used the Illumina platform to perform metagenomic analyses proposed curating pipelines to increase accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the likelihood of obtaining an erroneous microbial composition using the MiSeq 250 bp paired sequence platform and improved the pipeline to reduce erroneous identifications. We compared different sequencing conditions by varying the percentage of control phiX added, the concentration of the sequencing library, and the 16S rRNA gene target region using a mock community sample composed of known sequences. Our recommended method corrected erroneous nucleotides and improved identification accuracy. Overall, 99.5% of the total reads shared 95% similarity with the corresponding template sequences and 93.6% of the total reads shared over 97% similarity. This indicated that the MiSeq platform can be used to analyze microbial communities at the genus level with high accuracy. The improved analysis method recommended in this study can be applied to amplicon studies in various environments using high-throughput reads generated on the MiSeq platform.

  6. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Dubost, Audrey; Tran-Van, Van; Mavingui, Patrick; Moro, Claire Valiente

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated. Also some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimize the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 92,615 sequences obtained. As Ae. albopictus is known to harbor two Wolbachia strains (wAlbA and wAlbB), a quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, (i.e., the bacteria-to-host gene ratios) of each strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 10(0.01) and 5.47 × 10(0.1) for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 10(0.1) and 1.4 × 10(1) for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 31 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using different method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from this area.

  7. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing identifies microbiota associated with oral cancer, human papilloma virus infection and surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Jedlicka, Anne; Rodríguez-Hilario, Arnold; González, Herminio; Bondy, Jessica; Lawson, Fahcina; Folawiyo, Oluwasina; Michailidi, Christina; Dziedzic, Amanda; Thangavel, Rajagowthamee; Hadar, Tal; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Westra, William; Koch, Wayne; Sidransky, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory events and localized disease, mediated by the microbiome, may be measured in saliva as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) diagnostic and prognostic biomonitors. We used a 16S rRNA V3-V5 marker gene approach to compare the saliva microbiome in DNA isolated from Oropharyngeal (OPSCC), Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OCSCC) patients and normal epithelium controls, to characterize the HNSCC saliva microbiota and examine their abundance before and after surgical resection. The analyses identified a predominance of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, with less frequent presence of Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria before surgery. At lower taxonomic levels, the most abundant genera were Streptococcus, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Lactobacillus and Veillonella, with lower numbers of Citrobacter and Neisseraceae genus Kingella. HNSCC patients had a significant loss in richness and diversity of microbiota species (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Overall, the Operational Taxonomic Units network shows that the relative abundance of OTU's within genus Streptococcus, Dialister, and Veillonella can be used to discriminate tumor from control samples (p<0.05). Tumor samples lost Neisseria, Aggregatibacter (Proteobacteria), Haemophillus (Firmicutes) and Leptotrichia (Fusobacteria). Paired taxa within family Enterobacteriaceae, together with genus Oribacterium, distinguish OCSCC samples from OPSCC and normal samples (p<0.05). Similarly, only HPV positive samples have an abundance of genus Gemellaceae and Leuconostoc (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses of samples taken before and after surgery, revealed a reduction in the alpha diversity measure after surgery, together with an increase of this measure in patients that recurred (p<0.05). These results suggest that microbiota may be used as HNSCC diagnostic and prognostic biomonitors. PMID:27259999

  8. Identification of polybacterial communities in patients with postoperative, posttraumatic, and endogenous endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane

    2014-05-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P=0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P=0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n=19), Streptococcus spp. (n=18), Staphylococcus spp. (n=6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n=3), Gemella spp. (n=2), Enterococcus spp. (n=2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n=1), a Clostridium sp. (n=1), and a Nocardia sp. (n=1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n=18), Pseudomonas spp. (n=10), Enterobacter spp. (n=8), Acinetobacter spp. (n=3), Pantoea spp. (n=3), a Haemophilus sp. (n=1), and a Massilia sp. (n=1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is recommended that, in addition to the

  9. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  10. Uncultured bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Eun; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Myeong, Jeong-In; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to understand the roles of bacterial communities in the system. The RAS was operated at nine different combinations of temperature (15°C, 20°C, and 25°C) and salinity (20‰, 25‰, and 32.5‰). Samples were collected from five or six RAS tanks (biofilters) for each condition. Fifty samples were analyzed. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were most common (sum of both phyla: 67.2% to 99.4%) and were inversely proportional to each other. Bacteria that were present at an average of ≥ 1% included Actinobacteria (2.9%) Planctomycetes (2.0%), Nitrospirae (1.5%), and Acidobacteria (1.0%); they were preferentially present in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. The three biofilters showed higher diversity than other RAS tanks (aerated biofilters, floating bed biofilters, and fish tanks) from phylum to operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level. Samples were clustered into several groups based on the bacterial communities. Major taxonomic groups related to family Rhodobacteraceae and Flavobacteriaceae were distributed widely in the samples. Several taxonomic groups like [Saprospiraceae], Cytophagaceae, Octadecabacter, and Marivita showed a cluster-oriented distribution. Phaeobacter and Sediminicola-related reads were detected frequently and abundantly at low temperature. Nitrifying bacteria were detected frequently and abundantly in the three biofilters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrifying bacteria showed several similar OTUs were observed widely through the biofilters. The diverse bacterial communities and the minor taxonomic groups, except for Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, seemed to play important roles and seemed necessary for nitrifying activity in the RAS, especially in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters.

  11. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure of Supragingival Plaques in Adults with Dental Health or Caries Revealed by 16S Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Cuicui; Ran, Shujun; Huang, Zhengwei; Liang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries has a polymicrobial etiology within the complex oral microbial ecosystem. However, the overall diversity and structure of supragingival plaque microbiota in adult dental health and caries are not well understood. Here, 160 supragingival plaque samples from patients with dental health and different severities of dental caries were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction, pyrosequencing by amplification of the 16S rDNA V1–V3 hypervariable regions, and bioinformatic analysis. High-quality sequences (2,261,700) clustered into 10,365 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% identity), representing 453 independent species belonging to 122 genera, 66 families, 34 orders, 21 classes, and 12 phyla. All groups shared 7522 OTUs, indicating the presence of a core plaque microbiome. α diversity analysis showed that the microbial diversity in healthy plaques exceeded that of dental caries, with the diversity decreasing gradually with the severity of caries. The dominant phyla of plaque microbiota included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and TM7. The dominant genera included Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Rothia, and Leptotrichia. β diversity analysis showed that the plaque microbial community structure was similar in all groups. Using LEfSe analysis, 25 differentially abundant taxa were identified as potential biomarkers. Key genera (27) that potentially contributed to the differential distributions of plaque microbiota between groups were identified by PLS-DA analysis. Finally, co-occurrence network analysis and function predictions were performed. Treatment strategies directed toward modulating microbial interactions and their functional output should be further developed. PMID:27499752

  12. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  13. Comparison of 16S rRNA Gene PCR and BACTEC 9240 for Detection of Neonatal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, J. A.; Durso, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Ten percent of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU) annually. Approximately one-half of these admissions are from term infants (>34 weeks of gestation) at risk for systemic infection. Most of the term infants are not infected but rather have symptoms consistent with other medical conditions that mimic sepsis. The current standard of care for evaluating bacterial sepsis in the newborn is performing blood culturing and providing antibiotic therapy while awaiting the 48-h preliminary result of culture. Implementing a more rapid means of ruling out sepsis in term newborns could result in shorter NICU stays and less antibiotic usage. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the utility of PCR to that of conventional culture. To this end, a total of 548 paired blood samples collected from infants admitted to the NICU for suspected sepsis were analyzed for bacterial growth using the BACTEC 9240 instrument and for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a PCR assay which included a 5-h preamplification culturing step. The positivity rates by culture and PCR were 25 (4.6%) and 27 (4.9%) positive specimens out of a total of 548 specimens, respectively. The comparison revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 96.0, 99.4, 88.9, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR. In summary, this PCR-based approach, requiring as little as 9 h of turnaround time and blood volumes as small as 200 μl, correlated well with conventional blood culture results obtained for neonates suspected of having bacterial sepsis. PMID:10878046

  14. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  15. Evaluation of AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR using cppB nested PCR and 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Farrell, D J

    1999-02-01

    Certain strains of Neisseria subflava and Neisseria cinerea are known to produce false-positive results with the AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, N.J.). The analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity of three PCR tests were assessed with 3 geographically diverse N. gonorrhoeae strains and 30 non-N. gonorrhoeae Neisseria spp. The sensitivities of the in-house nested cppB gene and the 16S rRNA PCR methods were greater than that of the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR with purified DNA from all 3 N. gonorrhoeae strains. Six of 14 clinical strains of N. subflava (1 from a vaginal swab, 5 from respiratory sites) produced false-positive AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR results and were negative by the two other PCR methods. When applied to 207 clinical specimens selected from a population with a high prevalence ( approximately 9%) of infection, the results for 15 of 96 (15.6%) AMPLICOR-positive specimens and 14 of 17 (82.3%) AMPLICOR-equivocal specimens were not confirmed by the more sensitive nested cppB PCR method. Only 2 of 94 (2.1%) of AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR-negative specimens from the same population tested positive by the nested cppB method. These results suggest that for this population the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR test is suitable as a screening test only and all positive results should be confirmed by a PCR method that is more specific and at least as sensitive. This study also illustrates that caution should be used when introducing commercially available nucleic acid amplification-based diagnostic tests into the regimens of tests used for populations not previously tested with these products.

  16. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  17. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  18. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  19. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m)with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  20. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  1. [Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA gene of endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. CB/S1 isolated from soil].

    PubMed

    Xuan, Ying-hua; Cui, Chun-quan; Zheng, Shan-zi

    2011-04-30

    The endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. CB/SI was identified by orcein-carmine staining and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The endosymbiont bacteria were rod-shaped and darkly stained, and irregularly localized within the cytoplasm. The length of the 16S rDNA was 1534 bp and its DNA sequence was closely related to those of Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus and Acanthamoeba sp. KA/E21 with 98% homology. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the endosymbiont of CB/SI, the endosymbiont of KA/E21, Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus, the endosymbiont of Ixodes scapularis, and the endosymbiont of Encarsia pergandiella constitute a monophyletic lineage in phylogenetic tree.

  2. Use of single-strand conformation polymorphism of amplified 16S rDNA for grouping of bacteria isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Mori, Mayumi; Yokoi, Asami; Fujii, Tateo

    2008-04-01

    The grouping method for isolated strains from foods using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) after PCR amplification of a portion of 16S rDNA was developed. This method was able to group the strains from various food samples based on 16S rDNA sequence. As 97.8% of the isolated strains from various foods were grouped correctly, use of the PCR-SSCP method enables the prompt and labor-saving analysis of microbial population of food-derived bacterial strains. Advantages in speed and accuracy of bacterial population identification by the PCR-SSCP method have practical application for food suppliers and testing laboratories.

  3. Culture-negative brain abscess with Streptococcus intermedius infection with diagnosis established by direct nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16s ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Saito, Naoko; Hida, Ayumi; Koide, Yuri; Ooka, Tadasuke; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Shimizu, Jun; Mukasa, Akitake; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Hatakeyama, Shuji; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman developed a headache for a month followed by right upper limb weakness. CT scan and MRI showed multiple ring-enhancing lesions. An intracerebral aspiration of an abscess was performed, but culture results were negative. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from the specimens identified Streptococcus intermedius. Given this result, S. intermedius was cultured by enrichment culture, and its sensitivities to antibiotics were determined. The patient exhibited complete remission. Thus, 16S rRNA gene analysis was highly useful not only for pathogen identification with negative culture results but also for the appropriate selection of antibiotics.

  4. In vitro splicing of erythropoietin by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA intein without substituting amino acids at the splice junctions.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Jiang, Shu-qin; van Berkel, Patrick; Paulus, Henry

    2003-01-20

    Protein splicing is a self-catalyzed process involving the excision of an intervening polypeptide sequence, the intein, and joining of the flanking polypeptide sequences, the extein, by a peptide bond. We have studied the in vitro splicing of erythropoietin (EPO) using a truncated form of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA mini-intein in which the homing endonuclease domain was replaced with a hexahistidine sequence (His-tag). The intein was inserted adjacent to cysteine residues to assure that the spliced product had the natural amino acid sequence. When expressed in Escherichia coli, intein-containing EPO was found entirely as inclusion bodies but could be refolded in soluble form in the presence of 0.5 M arginine. Protein splicing of the refolded protein could be induced with a reducing agent such as DTT or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine and led to the formation of EPO and mini-intein along with some cleavage products. Protein splicing mediated by the RecA intein requires the presence of a cysteine residue adjacent to the intein insertion site. We compared the efficiencies of protein splicing adjacent to three of the four cysteine residues of EPO (Cys29, Cys33 and Cys161) and found that insertion of intein adjacent to Cys29 allowed far more efficient protein splicing than insertion adjacent to Cys33 or Cys161. For ease of purification, our experiments involved a His-tagged EPO fusion protein and a His-tagged intein and the spliced products (25 kDa EPO and 24 kDa mini-intein) were identified by Western blotting using anti-EPO and anti-His-tag antibodies and by mass spectroscopy. The optimal splicing yield at Cys29 (40%) occurred at pH 7.0 after refolding at 4 degrees C and splicing for 18 h at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1 mM DTT.

  5. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p < 0.05) the bioluminescence intensity of the genotoxicity bioreporter. A reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed the different expression levels of the DNA damage-inducible gene recA (p < 0.05), suggesting that carbon sources influenced the DNA damage response in the Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity.

  6. Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas, 1772) and Amblyomma ovale Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae): hosts, distribution and 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Guglielmone, A A; Estrada-Peña, A; Mangold, A J; Barros-Battesti, D M; Labruna, M B; Martins, J R; Venzal, J M; Arzua, M; Keirans, J E

    2003-05-01

    DNA sequences of Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas, 1772) and Amblyomma ovale Koch, 1844 were obtained to determine genetic differences between these tick species. Collections of these species are discussed in relation to distribution and hosts. Seven ticks collections (four from Brazil, one from Argentina, one from Uruguay and one from USA) house a total of 1272 A. aureolatum (224 males, 251 females, 223 nymphs and 574 larvae) and 1164 A. ovale (535 males, 556 females, 66 nymphs and 7 larvae). The length of the sequenced mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene fragment for A. aureolatum was 370bp and for A. ovale was 373bp. The DNA sequence analysis showed a 13.1% difference between the two species. Apart from one male A. ovale found on a toad, all adult ticks were found on mammals. The majority of adult specimens of both tick species were removed from Carnivora (96.1 and 84.3% of A. aureolatum and A. ovale, respectively), especially from dogs (53.1% of A. aureolatum, and 46.4% of A. ovale). Collections on wild Canidae were higher for A. aureolatum (23.3%) than for A. ovale (7.1%). On the other hand, collections of A. ovale adults on wild Felidae were higher (18.3%) than findings of A. aureolatum (9.2%). The contribution of other mammalian orders as hosts for adults of A. aureolatum and A. ovale was irrelevant, with the exception of Perissodactyla because Tapiridae contributed with 13.0% of the total number of A. ovale adults. Adults of both tick species have been found occasionally on domestic hosts (apart of the dog) and humans. Most immature stages of A. aureolatum were found on Passeriformes birds, while rodents and carnivores were the most common hosts for nymphs and larvae of A. ovale. A. aureolatum has been found restricted to the Neotropical region, covering the eastern area of South America from Uruguay to Surinam, including northeastern Argentina, eastern Paraguay, southeastern Brazil and French Guiana. A. ovale showed a distribution that covers the Neotropical region

  7. Species-level core oral bacteriome identified by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing in a healthy young Arab population

    PubMed Central

    Al-hebshi, Nezar Noor; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Albarrag, Ahmed; Basode, Vinod Kumar; Chen, Tsute

    2016-01-01

    Background Reports on the composition of oral bacteriome in Arabs are lacking. In addition, the majority of previous studies on other ethnic groups have been limited by low-resolution taxonomic assignment of next-generation sequencing reads. Furthermore, there has been a conflict about the existence of a ‘core’ bacteriome. Objective The objective of this study was to characterize the healthy core oral bacteriome in a young Arab population at the species level. Methods Oral rinse DNA samples obtained from 12 stringently selected healthy young subjects of Arab origin were pyrosequenced (454's FLX chemistry) for the bacterial 16S V1–V3 hypervariable region at an average depth of 11,500 reads. High-quality, non-chimeric reads ≥380 bp were classified to the species level using the recently described, prioritized, multistage assignment algorithm. A core bacteriome was defined as taxa present in at least 11 samples. The Chao2, abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE), and Shannon indices were computed to assess species richness and diversity. Results Overall, 557 species-level taxa (211±42 per subject) were identified, representing 122 genera and 13 phyla. The core bacteriome comprised 55 species-level taxa belonging to 30 genera and 7 phyla, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Saccharibacteria, and SR1. The core species constituted between 67 and 87% of the individual bacteriomes. However, the abundances differed by up to three orders of magnitude among the study subjects. On average, Streptococcus mitis, Rothia mucilaginosa, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Neisseria flavescence/subflava group, Prevotella melaninogenica, and Veillonella parvula group were the most abundant. Streptococcus sp. C300, a taxon never reported in the oral cavity, was identified as a core species. Species richness was estimated at 586 (Chao2) and 614 (ACE) species, whereas diversity (Shannon index) averaged at 3.99. Conclusions A species

  8. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  9. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  10. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  11. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  12. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  13. True microbiota involved in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients found by culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke B; Thomsen, Trine R; Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper N; Nielsen, Per H; Johansen, Ulla R; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infection. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in transplanted CF lungs (n = 5) by standard culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis. A correspondence between culturing and the molecular methods was observed. In conclusion, standard culturing seems reliable for the identification of the dominating pathogens.

  14. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3–V4 and the other targeting the V4–V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results. PMID:28260999

  15. Plasmid-mediated ArmA and RmtB 16S rRNA methylases in Escherichia coli isolated from chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminoglycosides are widely used antibiotics in China for the prevention and control of Escherichia coli infections in chickens. High-level aminoglycoside resistance mediated by the production of 16S rRNA methylase has been increasingly reported among various Gram-negative pathogens. Previously, onl...

  16. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  17. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  18. Validation of the 16S rDNA and COI DNA barcoding technique for rapid molecular identification of stored product psocids (Insecta: Psocodea: Liposcelididae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Zhao, Shuo; Kucerová, Zuzana; Stejskal, Václav; Opit, George; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yang; Li, Fujun; Li, Zhihong

    2013-02-01

    Psocids are serious storage pests, and their control is hampered by the fact that different species respond differently to insecticides used for the control of stored-product insect pests. Additionally, psocids of genus Liposcelis that are commonly associated with stored-products are difficult to identify using morphological characteristics. The goal of this study was to validate molecular identification of stored-product psocids of genus Liposcelis based on 16S rDNA and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) DNA barcoding. Unidentified liposcelids (Liposcelis DK) imported from Denmark to China were compared with 14 population samples of seven common species (L. bostrychophila, L. brunnea, L. corrodens, L. decolor, L. entomophila, L. mendax, and L. paeta). The explored species (DK) liposcelids shared >98% sequence similarity for both the 16S rDNA and COI genes with the reference L. corrodens samples (98.32 and 98.94% for 16S rDNA and COI, respectively). A neighbor-joining tree revealed that the explored DK sample and the reference L. corrodens samples belong to the same clade. These molecular results were verified by morphological identification of DK specimens, facilitated by SEM microphotography. The DNA barcoding method and the neighbor-joining phylogenetic analyses indicated that both the 16S rDNA and COI genes were suitable for Liposcelis species identification. DNA barcoding has great potential for use in fast and accurate liposcelid identification.

  19. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  20. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  1. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  2. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the sign