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Sample records for 16s-23s internal transcribed

  1. Development of a PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer for identification of strictly anaerobic bacterium Zymophilus.

    PubMed

    Felsberg, Jurgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Kubizniaková, Petra; Matoulková, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    PCR-primers were designed for identification of strictly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Zymophilus based on genus-specific sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. The specificity of the primers was tested against 37 brewery-related non-target microorganisms that could potentially occur in the same brewery specimens. None DNA was amplified from any of the non-Zymophilus strains tested including genera from the same family (Pectinatus, Megasphaera, Selenomonas), showing thus 100% specificity. PCR assay developed in this study allows an extension of the spectra of detected beer spoilage microorganisms in brewery laboratories. PMID:25725268

  2. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  3. Variations in the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer of fibrolytic Butyrivibrio isolates from the reindeer rumen.

    PubMed

    Præsteng, Kirsti E; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O; Mathiesen, Svein D; Sundset, Monica A

    2011-07-01

    Strains of Butyrivibrio are principal cellulytic bacteria in the rumen of the High Arctic Svalbard reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus ). According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Butyrivibrio can be divided into three subgroups within the Clostridia class of the phylum Firmicutes, but the current phenotypic and genotypic differentiation within the family Lachnospiraceae is insufficient. This current study describes the sequence diversity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Butyrivibrio isolates from reindeer. A total of 17 different ITS sequences with sizes between 449 and 784 nt were obtained. Genes encoding tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) were identified in four of the sequences. Phylogenetic neighbor-joining trees were constructed based on the ITS sequence and compared with a phylogenetic neighbor-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences previously obtained for the same isolates. These comparisons indicated a better differentiation between strains in the ITS sequence than the 16S rRNA gene based tree. Through this study, a better means for identifying and tracking fibrolytic and potentially probiotic Butyrivibrio strains in reindeer and other ruminants has been provided.

  4. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J.; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I–V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC. PMID:27749897

  5. Cyanobacterial Ecotypes in Different Optical Microenvironments of a 68°C Hot Spring Mat Community Revealed by 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Variation†

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mike J.; Kühl, Michael; Wieland, Andrea; Ward, David M.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic photosynthesis demonstrated the existence of physiologically distinct Synechococcus populations at different depths along a light gradient quantified by scalar irradiance microprobes. Molecular methods were used to evaluate whether physiologically distinct populations could be correlated with genetically distinct populations over the vertical interval. We were unable to identify patterns in genetic variation in Synechococcus 16S rRNA sequences that correlate with different vertically distributed populations. However, patterns of variation at the internal transcribed spacer locus separating 16S and 23S rRNA genes suggested the existence of closely related but genetically distinct populations corresponding to different functional populations occurring at different depths. PMID:12732563

  6. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  7. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  8. Rapid Identification and Differentiation of the Soft Rot Erwinias by 16S-23S Intergenic Transcribed Spacer-PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toth, I. K.; Avrova, A. O.; Hyman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current identification methods for the soft rot erwinias are both imprecise and time-consuming. We have used the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) to aid in their identification. Analysis by ITS-PCR and ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism was found to be a simple, precise, and rapid method compared to current molecular and phenotypic techniques. The ITS was amplified from Erwinia and other genera using universal PCR primers. After PCR, the banding patterns generated allowed the soft rot erwinias to be differentiated from all other Erwinia and non-Erwinia species and placed into one of three groups (I to III). Group I comprised all Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum isolates. Group II comprised all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, subsp. odorifera, and subsp. wasabiae and E. cacticida isolates, and group III comprised all E. chrysanthemi isolates. To increase the level of discrimination further, the ITS-PCR products were digested with one of two restriction enzymes. Digestion with CfoI identified E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum (group I) and E. chrysanthemi (group III) isolates, while digestion with RsaI identified E. carotovora subsp. wasabiae, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. odorifera/carotovora and E. cacticida isolates (group II). In the latter case, it was necessary to distinguish E. carotovora subsp. odorifera and subsp. carotovora using the α-methyl glucoside test. Sixty suspected soft rot erwinia isolates from Australia were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. chrysanthemi, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and non-soft rot species. Ten “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. betavasculorum and non-soft rot species, and two “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and subsp. atroseptica. PMID:11526007

  9. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing.

  10. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing. PMID:12957895

  11. Lactobacillus species identification by amplified ribosomal 16S-23S rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandes, S H C; Alvin, L B; Silva, B C; Zanirati, D F; Jung, L R C; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria strains are commonly used for animal and human consumption due to their probiotic properties. One of the major genera used is Lactobacillus, a highly diverse genus comprised of several closely related species. The selection of new strains for probiotic use, especially strains of Lactobacillus, is the focus of several research groups. Accurate identification to species level is fundamental for research on new strains, as well as for safety assessment and quality assurance. The 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) is a deeply homologous region among prokaryotes that is commonly used for identification to the species level because it is able to acquire and accumulate mutations without compromising general bacterial metabolism. In the present study, 16S-23S ITS regions of 45 Lactobacillus species (48 strains) were amplified and subjected to independent enzymatic digestions, using 12 restriction enzymes that recognise six-base sequences. Twenty-nine species showed unique restriction patterns, and could therefore be precisely identified solely by this assay (64%). This approach proved to be reproducible, allowing us to establish simplified restriction patterns for each evaluated species. The restriction patterns of each species were similar among homologous strains, and to a large extent reflected phylogenetic relationships based on 16S rRNA sequences, demonstrating the promising nature of this region for evolutionary studies.

  12. Insertions or Deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS) Compromise the Typing and Identification of Strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) Complex and Closely Related Members

    PubMed Central

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2–13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species. PMID:25141005

  13. Insertions or deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) compromise the typing and identification of strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex and closely related members.

    PubMed

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2-13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species.

  14. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  15. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  16. Differentiation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains based on 16S-23S rDNA spacer polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Rogério F; Novo, Maria Teresa M; Veríssimo, Ricardo V; Paulino, Luciana C; Stoppe, Nancy C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Manfio, Gilson P; Prado, Paulo Inácio; Garcia, Oswaldo; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2004-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) were used for differentiating Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains from other related acidithiobacilli, including A. ferrooxidans and A. caldus. RFLP fingerprints obtained with AluI, DdeI, HaeIII, HinfI and MspI enabled the differentiation of all Acidithiobacillus reference strains into species groups. The A. thiooxidans strains investigated (metal mine isolates) yielded identical RFLP patterns to the A. thiooxidans type strain (ATCC 19377(T)), except for strain DAMS, which had a distinct pattern for all enzymes tested. Fourteen A. ferrooxidans mine strains were assigned to 3 RFLP groups, the majority of which were grouped with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T). The spacer region of one representative strain from each of the RFLP groups obtained was subjected to sequence analysis, in addition to eleven additional A. thiooxidans strains isolated from sediment and water samples, and A. caldus DSM 8584(T). The tRNA(IIe) and tRNA(Ala) genes, present in all strains analyzed, showed high sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences differentiated all three Acidithiobacillus species. Inter- and infraspecific genetic variations detected were mainly due to the size and sequence polymorphism of the ITS3 region. Mantel tests showed no significant correlation between ITS sequence similarity and the geographical origin of strains. The results showed that the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region is a useful target for the development of molecular-based methods aimed at the detection, rapid differentiation and identification of acidithiobacilli.

  17. Analysis of 16S-23S rRNA Intergenic Spacer Regions of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Jongsik; Huq, Anwarul; Colwell, Rita R.

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae identification based on molecular sequence data has been hampered by a lack of sequence variation from the closely related Vibrio mimicus. The two species share many genes coding for proteins, such as ctxAB, and show almost identical 16S DNA coding for rRNA (rDNA) sequences. Primers targeting conserved sequences flanking the 3′ end of the 16S and the 5′ end of the 23S rDNAs were used to amplify the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Two major (ca. 580 and 500 bp) and one minor (ca. 750 bp) amplicons were consistently generated for both species, and their sequences were determined. The largest fragment contains three tRNA genes (tDNAs) coding for tRNAGlu, tRNALys, and tRNAVal, which has not previously been found in bacteria examined to date. The 580-bp amplicon contained tDNAIle and tDNAAla, whereas the 500-bp fragment had single tDNA coding either tRNAGlu or tRNAAla. Little variation, i.e., 0 to 0.4%, was found among V. cholerae O1 classical, O1 El Tor, and O139 epidemic strains. Slightly more variation was found against the non-O1/non-O139 serotypes (ca. 1% difference) and V. mimicus (2 to 3% difference). A pair of oligonucleotide primers were designed, based on the region differentiating all of V. cholerae strains from V. mimicus. The PCR system developed was subsequently evaluated by using representatives of V. cholerae from environmental and clinical sources, and of other taxa, including V. mimicus. This study provides the first molecular tool for identifying the species V. cholerae. PMID:10224020

  18. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis. PMID:27546720

  19. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis.

  20. Identification of Carnobacterium species by restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region and species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Rachman, Cinta; Kabadjova, Petia; Valcheva, Rosica; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2004-08-01

    The genus Carnobacterium is currently divided into the following eight species: Carnobacterium piscicola, C. divergens, C. gallinarum, C. mobile, C. funditum, C. alterfunditum, C. inhibens, and C. viridans. An identification tool for the rapid differentiation of these eight Carnobacterium species was developed, based on the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer region (ISR). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of this 16S-23S rDNA ISR was performed in order to obtain restriction profiles for all of the species. Three PCR amplicons, which were designated small ISR (S-ISR), medium ISR (M-ISR), and large ISR (L-ISR), were obtained for all Carnobacterium species. The L-ISR sequence revealed the presence of two tRNA genes, tRNA(Ala) and tRNA(Ile), which were separated by a spacer region that varied from 24 to 38 bp long. This region was variable among the species, allowing the design of species-specific primers. These primers were tested and proved to be species specific. The identification method based on the 16S-23S rDNA ISR, using PCR-RFLP and specific primers, is very suitable for the rapid low-cost identification and discrimination of all of the Carnobacterium species from other phylogenetically related lactic acid bacteria.

  1. Characterization of the Lancefield group C streptococcus 16S-23S RNA gene intergenic spacer and its potential for identification and sub-specific typing.

    PubMed Central

    Chanter, N.; Collin, N.; Holmes, N.; Binns, M.; Mumford, J.

    1997-01-01

    The 16S-23S RNA gene intergenic spacers of isolates of Streptococcus equi (n = 5), S. zooepidemicus (n = 5), S. equisimilis (n = 3) and S. dysgalactiae (n = 2) were sequenced and compared. There were distinct regions within the spacer, arranged in the order 1-9 for all S. equi and one S. zooepidemicus isolate and 1,2 and 4-9 for the remaining isolates. Region 4 was identical to the tRNA(ala) gene found in the 16S-23S intergenic spacers of other streptococci. Regions 1, 5, 6 and 7 had distinct variations, each conserved in different isolates. However, amongst the intergenic spacers there were different combinations of variant regions, suggesting a role for DNA recombination in their evolution. The intergenic spacer of all isolates of S. equi and one S. zooepidemicus isolate were almost identical. Primers derived from the variant sequences of regions 1 and 5 to 6 were used to group all S. zooepidemicus (n = 17) and S. equi (n = 5) into 1 of 8 types by polymerase chain reaction; three S. zooepidemicus isolates typed the same as S. equi. S. equi and S. zooepidemicus were clearly distinguishable from S. equisimilis and S. dysgalactiae which had shorter regions 5 and 6 and no region 7. Most homology for the group C sequences was found in previously published sequences for the 16S-23S intergenic spacers of S. anginosis, S. constellatus, S. intermedius, S. salivarius and S. agalactiae. A 75-90 nucleotide length shared with S. anginosus and S. intermedius in opposite orientations in the two main variants of region 6 supported the role for DNA recombination in the evolution of the spacer. The 16S-23S intergenic spacers indicate that S. zooepidemicus was the archetypal species for S. equi and that both are genetically more distant from S. equisimilis and S. dysgalactiae. The intergenic spacer can be used to identify specifically the group C streptococci and as an epidemiological marker for S. zooepidemicus. PMID:9129589

  2. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer among Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Matveeva, Eugenia V; Schaad, Norman W; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2004-10-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1) from 14 strains of Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens were sequenced. ITS1 exhibited significant sequence variability among different operons within a single genome. From 1 to 4 types of ITS1 were found in individual genomes of the P. syringae and P. fluorescens strains. A total of eight ITS1 types were identified among strains studied. The ITS1 nucleotide sequences consisted of conserved blocks including, among others, a stem-forming region of box B, tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes and several variable blocks. The differences in the variable regions were mostly due to insertions and/or deletions of nucleotide blocks. The intragenomic heterogeneity of ITS1 was brought about by different combinations of variable blocks, which possibly have resulted from recombination and horizontal transfer.

  3. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  4. Development of a 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer-based quantitative PCR assay for improved detection and enumeration of Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Hien Dang; Park, Hee Kuk; Kim, Wonyong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2013-02-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is an important foodborne pathogen causing lactococcosis associated with hemorrhagic septicemia in fish worldwide. A real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) protocol targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) region was developed for the detection and enum-eration of L. garvieae. The specificity was evaluated using genomic DNAs extracted from 66 cocci strains. Fourteen L. garvieae strains tested were positive, whereas 52 other strains including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris did not show a specific signal. The minimal limit of detection was 2.63 fg of purified genomic DNA, equivalent to 1 genome of L. garvieae. The optimized protocol was applied for the survey of L. garvieae in naturally contaminated fish samples. Our results suggest that the qPCR protocol using ITS is a sensitive and efficient tool for the rapid detection and enumeration of L. garvieae in fish and fish-containing foods.

  5. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  6. Use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect mutation in VS2 of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer amplified from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Barrie, H D; Mayall, B C

    2001-06-01

    To develop a double gradient denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) based typing method that rapidly and accurately types clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, the VS2 region of the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region (ISR) was chosen because of its potential high variation. The VS2 region was amplified with a 40-mer GC-clamp attached to the 5'-end of the reverse primer. The 145 bp PCR product was then separated by DG-DGGE using denaturant concentrations of 25-40% and polyacrylamide concentrations of 6-12%. Of the five mutations identified in 336 S. aureus isolates, one mutation was found to be highly specific for 161/171 (94%) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates from different geographic locations and isolation times. This same mutation was found in 15/160 (9%) of penicillin- or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates. In some isolates two mutations occured together in the one genome suggesting some S. aureus isolates have two copies of VS2. In these 336 isolates nine genotypes with different combinations of the five mutations were identified. In 18 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), the MRSA-specific mutation was found along with two other mutations in all isolates demonstrating consistent differences in the presence of these mutations between CNS and S. aureus. The marked differences in VS2 sequences found between MRSA, methicillin- or penicillin-sensitive S. aureus (SSA), and CNS by DGGE in the present study may be useful in evolutionary studies and in the development of a specific assay for MRSA from clinical specimens.

  7. Analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (IGSs) of marine vibrios for species-specific signature DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon K Y; Wang, H Z; Law, Sheran H W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Kong, Richard Y C

    2002-05-01

    Vibrios are widespread in the marine environment and a few pathogenic species are known to be commonly associated with outbreaks of diarrheal diseases in humans due to the consumption of raw or improperly cooked seafood. However, there are also many Vibrio species which are potentially pathogenic to vertebrate and invertebrate aquatic animals, and of which little is known. In an attempt to develop rapid PCR detection methods for these latter class of vibrios, we have examined the 16S-23S intergenic spacers (IGSs) of 10 lesser-known Vibrio species and successfully developed species-specific primers for eight of them--Vibrio costicola, V. diazotrophicus, V. fluvialis, V. nigripulchritudo, V. proteolyticus, V. salmonicida, V. splendidus and V. tubiashii. The IGS amplicons were amplified using primers complementary to conserved regions of the 16S and 23S rRNA genes, and cloned into plasmid vectors and sequenced. Analysis of the IGS sequences showed that 37 ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons representing seven different IGS types have been cloned from the 10 vibrios. The three IGS types--IGS(0), IGS(IA) and IGS(Glu)--were the most prevalent forms detected. Multiple alignment of representative sequences of these three IGS types from different Vibrio species revealed several domains of high sequence variability, which were used to design species-specific primers for PCR. The specificity of the primers were evaluated using total DNA prepared from different Vibrio species and bacterial genera. The results showed that the PCR method can be used to reliably detect eight of the 10 Vibrio species in marine waters in this study.

  8. Phylogeny of bradyrhizobia from Chinese cowpea miscellany inferred from 16S rRNA, atpD, glnII, and 16S-23S intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Xie, Fuli; Yang, Jiangke; Li, Youguo

    2011-04-01

    The cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) belong to a group of plants known as the "cowpea miscellany" plants, which are widely cultivated throughout the tropic and subtropical zones of Africa and Asia. However, the phylogeny of the rhizobial strains that nodulate these plants is poorly understood. Previous studies have isolated a diversity of rhizobial strains from cowpea miscellany hosts and have suggested that, phylogenetically, they are from different species. In this work, the phylogeny of 42 slow-growing rhizobial strains, isolated from root nodules of cowpea, peanut, and mung bean from different geographical regions of China, was investigated using sequences from the 16S rRNA, atpD and glnII genes, and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer. The indigenous rhizobial strains from the cowpea miscellany could all be placed in the genus Bradyrhizobium , and Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense were the main species. Phylogenies derived from housekeeping genes were consistent with phylogenies generated from the ribosomal gene. Mung bean rhizobia clustered only into B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense and were phylogenetically less diverse than cowpea and peanut rhizobia. Geographical origin was significantly reflected in the phylogeny of mung bean rhizobia. Most cowpea rhizobia were more closely related to the 3 major groups B. liaoningense, B. yuanmingense, and Bradyrhizobium elkanii than to the minor groups Bradyrhizobium japonicum or Bradyrhizobium canariense . However, most peanut rhizobia were more closely related to the 2 major groups B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense than to the minor group B. elkanii.

  9. DNA sequence heterogeneity in the three copies of the long 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Rao, Y; Pearson, S R; Bates, S M; Mayall, B C

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of intragenic heterogeneity between copies of the long intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region (LISR) was investigated by specific amplification of this region from 21 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Three copies of the LISR (rrnA, B and C) were demonstrated by hybridization of the LISR to genomic DNA cleaved with I-Ceul and SmaI. When the LISR amplicon was digested with Tsp509I, two known nucleotide substitutions were detected, one 4 nt upstream from the 5' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (allele rrnB has the Tsp509I site and rrnA and C do not) and the other 22 nt downstream from the 3' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (rrnC has the Tsp509I site). Sequence differences at these sites were detected at the allelic level (alleles rrnA, B and C) and different combinations of these alleles were designated Tsp Types. Using densitometry to analyse bands from electrophoresis gels, the intra-isolate ratios of the separate alleles (rrnA:rrnB:rrnC) were determined in each Tsp Type: I (0:3:0), II (1:2:0), III (2:0:1), IV (3:0:0), V (2:1:0) and VI (1:1:1). Sequence variation between the three copies of the LISR was confirmed by the detection of at least five other intra-isolate nucleotide substitutions using heteroduplex analysis by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) that were not detected by Tsp509I cleavage. Perpendicular denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was capable of resolving homoduplexes; six to seven out of a possible nine curves were obtained in some isolates. In the isolate where seven curves were obtained one or more further nucleotide substitutions, not detected by Tsp509I cleavage or CSGE, were detected. On the basis of LISR sequence heterogeneity, isolates were categorized into homogeneous (only one allele sequence present) and heterogeneous (two or three allele sequences present). The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous LISRs may be useful in studying evolutionary mechanisms between E. faecalis isolates.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of vertically transmitted psyllid endosymbionts (Candidatus Carsonella ruddii) based on atpAGD and rpoC: comparisons with 16S-23S rDNA-derived phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Thao, M L; Clark, M A; Burckhardt, D H; Moran, N A; Baumann, P

    2001-06-01

    Psyllids are insects that harbor endosymbionts (Candidatuus Carsonella ruddii) within specialized cells found in the insect's body cavity. Previous phylogenetic analyses based on endosymbiont 16S-23S ribosomal DNA and a host gene were concordant (M.L. Thao, et al., Appl. Env. Microbiol. 66:2898, 2000). Additional analyses with atpAGD and rpoBC gave similar trees showing the agreement expected from organisms that evolve through vertical transmission with no gene exchange.

  11. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  12. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak based on the inter-genomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Atreyi; Majumdar, Anasuya; Ghosh, Ranajit K

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak. ISR classes 'a' and 'g' were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O 139 serogroup and post-O 139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  13. 7th International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences. Beyond the Identification of Transcribed Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Kathleen

    1997-11-19

    The Seventh Annual Human Genome Conference: Beyond the Identification of Transcribed Sequences (BITS) was held November 16-19, 1997 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Monterey, California. The format for the meeting was a combination of oral presentations, group discussions and poster sessions. The original workshop was held to discuss methodologies for the identification of transcribed sequences in mammalian genomes. Over the years, the focus of the workshops has gradually shifted towards functional analysis, with the most dramatic change in emphasis at this meeting, as reflected in the modest change in the workshop title. Topics presented and discussed included: (1) large scale expression and mutational analysis in yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila and zebrafish, (2) comparative mapping of zebrafish, chicken and Fugu; (3) functional analysis in mouse using promoter traps, mutational analysis of biochemical pathways, and Cre/lox constructs; (4) construction of 5 foot end and complete cDNA libraries; (5) expression analysis in mammalian organisms by array screening and differential display; (6) genome organization as determined by detailed transcriptional mapping and genomic sequence analysis; (7) analysis of genomic sequence, including gene and regulatory sequence predictions, annotation of genomic sequence, development of expression databases and verification of sequence analysis predictions; and (8) structural/functional relationships as determined by RNA secondary structure analysis and evolutionary conservation of non-coding sequences.

  14. Touchdown Enzyme Time Release-PCR for Detection and Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci Using the 16S and 16S-23S Spacer rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Quinn, Thomas C.; Boman, Jens; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2000-01-01

    Three touchdown enzyme time release (TETR)-PCR assays were used to amplify different DNA sequences in the variable regions of the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes specific for Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Chlamydia psittaci as improved tests for sensitive diagnosis and rapid species differentiation. The TETR-PCR protocol used 60 cycles of amplification, which provided improved analytical sensitivity (0.004 to 0.063 inclusion-forming unit of Chlamydia species per PCR). The sensitivity of TETR-PCR with primer set CTR 70-CTR 71 was 96.7%, and the specificity was 99.6%, compared to those of the AMPLICOR PCR for the detection of C. trachomatis in vaginal swab samples. TETR-PCR for C. pneumoniae with primer set CPN 90-CPN 91 was 90% sensitive and 93.3% specific compared with a nested PCR with primer set CP1/2-CPC/D for clinical respiratory samples. TETR-PCR for C. psittaci with primer set CPS 100-CPS 101 showed substantial agreement with cell culturing (κ, 0.78) for animal tissue samples. Primer sets were then combined into a single multiplex TETR-PCR test. The respective 315-, 195-, and 111-bp DNA target products were precisely amplified when DNA from each of the respective Chlamydia species or combinations of them was used. Multiplex chlamydia TETR-PCR correctly identified one strain of each of the 15 serovars of C. trachomatis, 22 isolates of C. pneumoniae, and 20 isolates of C. psittaci. The primer sets were specific for each species. No target products were amplified when DNA from C. pecorum or a variety of other microorganisms was tested for specificity. TETR-PCR with primers selected for specific sequences in the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes is a valuable test that could be used either with individual primers or in a multiplex assay for the identification and differentiation of Chlamydia species from culture isolates or for the detection of chlamydiae in clinical samples. PMID:10699002

  15. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  16. Identification of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using a simple set of biochemical tests correlating with 16S-23S interspace region molecular weight patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Martison; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus spp. not only as human pathogens, but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants, requires the development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification in medically important samples. The aim of this study was to compare three phenotypic methods for the identification of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using the PCR of the 16S-23S interspace region generating molecular weight patterns (ITR-PCR) as reference. All 57 S. saprophyticus studied were correctly identified using only the novobiocin disk. A rate of agreement of 98.0% was obtained for the simplified battery of biochemical tests in relation to ITR-PCR, whereas the Vitek I system and novobiocin disk showed 81.2% and 89.1% agreement, respectively. No other novobiocin-resistant non-S. saprophyticus strain was identified. Thus, the novobiocin disk is a feasible alternative for the identification of S. saprophyticus in urine samples in laboratories with limited resources. ITR-PCR and the simplified battery of biochemical tests were more reliable than the commercial systems currently available. This study confirms that automated systems are still unable to correctly differentiate CoNS species and that simple, reliable and inexpensive methods can be used for routine identification.

  17. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here.

  18. Species-level identification of isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsien Chang; Wei, Yu Fang; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Tang, Chung Tao; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2005-04-01

    The species Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, genomic species 3, and genomic species 13TU included in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex are genetically highly related and difficult to distinguish phenotypically. Except for A. calcoaceticus, they are all important nosocomial species. In the present study, the usefulness of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer (ITS) sequence for the differentiation of (genomic) species in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex was evaluated. The ITSs of 11 reference strains of the complex and 17 strains of other (genomic) species of Acinetobacter were sequenced. The ITS lengths (607 to 638 bp) and sequences were highly conserved for strains within the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. Intraspecies ITS sequence similarities ranged from 0.99 to 1.0, whereas interspecies similarities varied from 0.86 to 0.92. By using these criteria, 79 clinical isolates identified as A. calcoaceticus (18 isolates) or A. baumannii (61 isolates) with the API 20 NE system (bioMerieux Vitek, Marcy l'Etoile, France) were identified as A. baumannii (46 isolates), genomic species 3 (19 isolates), and genomic species 13TU (11 isolates) by ITS sequencing. An identification rate of 96.2% (76 of 79 isolates) was obtained by using ITS sequence analysis for identification of isolates in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, and the accuracy of the method was confirmed for a subset of strains by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis and genomic DNA analysis by AFLP analysis by using libraries of profiles of reference strains. In conclusion, ITS sequence-based identification is reliable and provides a promising tool for elucidation of the clinical significance of the different species of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex.

  19. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  20. Sequence variation in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer of Tridacna crocea.

    PubMed

    Yu, E T; Juinio-Meñez, M A; Monje, V D

    2000-11-01

    DNA-based genetic markers are needed to augment existing allozyme markers in the assessment of genetic diversity of wild giant clam populations. The dearth of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions amplified from known universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers has led us to search other regions of the genome for viable sources of DNA polymorphism. We have designed tridacnid-specific PCR primers for the amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions. Sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer segment (ITS-1) revealed very high polymorphism, showing 29% variation arising from base substitutions alone. Preliminary restriction analysis of the ITS regions using 8 restriction enzymes revealed cryptic changes in the DNA sequence. These mutations are promising as marker tools for differentiating geographically separated populations. Such variation in the ITS region can possibly be used for population genetic analysis.

  1. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  2. Selection of enzymes for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of fungal internally transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L

    2009-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs.

  3. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Mingming; CAO, Shinuo; VUDRIKO, Patrick; SUZUKI, Hiroshi; SOMA, Takehisa; XUAN, Xuenan

    2016-01-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2–100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  4. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  5. Internal transcribed spacer guided multiplex PCR for species identification of Convolvulus prostratus and Evolvulus alsinoides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonal; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2016-05-01

    Shankhpushpi is a reputed drug from an Indian system of medicine for treating mental disorders and enhancing memory. Two herbs, namely Convolvulus prostratus Forssk. and Evolvulus alsinoides (L.) L., are commonly known as Shankhpushpi. Ambiguous vernacular identity can affect the scientific validity of the Shankpushpi-based herbal drug therapy. In the present investigation, a novel and sensitive multiplex PCR method based on polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was developed to establish the molecular identity of C. prostratus and E. alsinoides. DNA was isolated and the ITS region was amplified, sequenced and assembled. Sequences were aligned to identify variable nucleotides in order to develop plant-specific primers. Primers were validated in singleplex reactions and eventually a multiplex assay was developed. This assay was tested for sensitivity and validated by amplifying DNA isolated from the simulated blended powdered plant material. Primers developed for C. prostratus resulted into a 200 bp amplicon and 596 bp for E. alsinoides. The assay was found to be sensitive enough for amplification of low quantities of DNA. The method can detect 10% of the mixing of plants with each other in blended material. This PCR assay can be used for rapid botanical identification of Shankhpushpi plant materials and will improve evidence-based herbal drug therapy. PMID:27175337

  6. Definition of Eight Mulberry Species in the Genus Morus by Internal Transcribed Spacer-Based Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiwei; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Chao; Han, Minjing; Li, Tian; Qi, Xiwu; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry, belonging to the order Rosales, family Moraceae, and genus Morus, has received attention because of both its economic and medicinal value, as well as for its important ecological function. The genus Morus has a worldwide distribution, however, its taxonomy remains complex and disputed. Many studies have attempted to classify Morus species, resulting in varied numbers of designated Morus spp. To address this issue, we used information from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genetic sequences to study the taxonomy of all the members of generally accepted genus Morus. We found that intraspecific 5.8S rRNA sequences were identical but that interspecific 5.8S sequences were diverse. M. alba and M. notabilis showed the shortest (215 bp) and the longest (233 bp) ITS1 sequence length, respectively. With the completion of the mulberry genome, we could identify single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS locus in the M. notabilis genome. From reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree based on the complete ITS data, we propose that the Morus genus should be classified into eight species, including M. alba, M. nigra, M. notabilis, M. serrata, M. celtidifolia, M. insignis, M. rubra, and M. mesozygia. Furthermore, the classification of the ITS sequences of known interspecific hybrid clones into both paternal and maternal clades indicated that ITS variation was sufficient to distinguish interspecific hybrids in the genus Morus. PMID:26266951

  7. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer analysis supports synonomy of Scedosporium inflatum and Lomentospora prolificans.

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, C R; Salkin, I F; Lee, S B

    1994-01-01

    Scedosporium inflatum is a dematiaceous opportunistic pathogen originally described by D. Malloch and I.F. Salkin (Mycotaxon 21:247-255, 1984). However, E. Gueho and G. S. De Hoog (J. Mycol. Med. 118:3-9, 1991) recently suggested reducing this mold to synonomy with Lomentospora prolificans on the basis of their similar morphological and molecular characteristics. We have investigated the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS), i.e., ITS I and ITS II, of 18 isolates, including these two fungi and a closely related pathogen, Scedosporium apiospermum, and its telemorph, Pseudallescheria boydii. Identical ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms were found in eight isolates of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. These results support Gueho and De Hoog's proposal to combine S. inflatum and L. prolificans into the binomial Scedosporium prolificans. However, the ITS I sequence of S. apiospermum and the ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms of S. apiospermum and P. boydii were found to be significantly different from those of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. The ITS restriction pattern differences may be valuable in clinical settings for distinguishing these fungi. Images PMID:7814476

  8. Definition of Eight Mulberry Species in the Genus Morus by Internal Transcribed Spacer-Based Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiwei; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Chao; Han, Minjing; Li, Tian; Qi, Xiwu; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry, belonging to the order Rosales, family Moraceae, and genus Morus, has received attention because of both its economic and medicinal value, as well as for its important ecological function. The genus Morus has a worldwide distribution, however, its taxonomy remains complex and disputed. Many studies have attempted to classify Morus species, resulting in varied numbers of designated Morus spp. To address this issue, we used information from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genetic sequences to study the taxonomy of all the members of generally accepted genus Morus. We found that intraspecific 5.8S rRNA sequences were identical but that interspecific 5.8S sequences were diverse. M. alba and M. notabilis showed the shortest (215 bp) and the longest (233 bp) ITS1 sequence length, respectively. With the completion of the mulberry genome, we could identify single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS locus in the M. notabilis genome. From reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree based on the complete ITS data, we propose that the Morus genus should be classified into eight species, including M. alba, M. nigra, M. notabilis, M. serrata, M. celtidifolia, M. insignis, M. rubra, and M. mesozygia. Furthermore, the classification of the ITS sequences of known interspecific hybrid clones into both paternal and maternal clades indicated that ITS variation was sufficient to distinguish interspecific hybrids in the genus Morus.

  9. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    PubMed Central

    Das, Koushik; Chowdhury, Punam; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1). Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis. PMID:26504510

  10. Analysis of sequence diversity through internal transcribed spacers and simple sequence repeats to identify Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y T; Chen, R K; Lin, S J; Chen, Y C; Chin, S W; Chen, F C; Lee, C Y

    2014-04-08

    The Orchidaceae is one of the largest and most diverse families of flowering plants. The Dendrobium genus has high economic potential as ornamental plants and for medicinal purposes. In addition, the species of this genus are able to produce large crops. However, many Dendrobium varieties are very similar in outward appearance, making it difficult to distinguish one species from another. This study demonstrated that the 12 Dendrobium species used in this study may be divided into 2 groups by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. Red and yellow flowers may also be used to separate these species into 2 main groups. In particular, the deciduous characteristic is associated with the ITS genetic diversity of the A group. Of 53 designed simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs, 7 pairs were polymorphic for polymerase chain reaction products that were amplified from a specific band. The results of this study demonstrate that these 7 SSR primer pairs may potentially be used to identify Dendrobium species and their progeny in future studies.

  11. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation.

  12. Internal transcribed spacer sequence phylogeny of Crambe L. (Brassicaceae): molecular data reveal two Old World disjunctions.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Ortega, J; Fuertes-Aguilar, J; Gómez-Campo, C; Santos-Guerra, A; Jansen, R K

    1999-04-01

    Crambe L. (Brassicaceae) is an Old World genus with a disjunct distribution among four major centers of species diversity. A phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal repeat was conducted with 27 species of Crambe and 18 related genera. Cladistic analyses using weighted and unweighted parsimony support Crambe as a monophyletic genus with three major lineages. The first comprises those taxa endemic to the Macaronesian archipelagos. Taxa with a predominant Mediterranean distribution form the second assemblage, and a disjunction between east Africa (C. abyssinica) and the Mediterranean (C. hispanica) occurs in this clade. The third lineage includes all Eurosiberian-Asian taxa and C. kilimandscharica, a species from the highlands of east Africa. A basal biogeographic split between east Africa and Eurasia is present in the third clade. The patterns of relationships in the ITS tree are concordant with known climatic events in northern Africa and southwestern Asia since the middle Miocene. The ITS trees are congruent with the current sectional classification except for a few members of sections Crambe, Leptocrambe, and Orientecrambe (C. cordifolia, C. endentula, C. kilimandscharica, and C. kotschyana). Low levels of support in the basal branches do not allow resolution of which genera of the subtribes Raphaniae or Brassicinae are sister to Crambe. Both subtribes appear to be highly polyphyletic in the ITS trees.

  13. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  14. Internal transcribed spacer 2 barcode: a good tool for identifying Acanthopanacis cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sha; Chen, Xiaochen; Song, Jingyuan; Pang, Xiaohui; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Acanthopanacis cortex has been used in clinical applications for a long time. Considering some historical and geographical factors, Acanthopanacis cortex is easily confused with other herbs in medicine markets, thereby causing potential safety issues. In this study, we used the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) barcode to identify 69 samples belonging to six species, including Acanthopanacis cortex and its adulterants. The nearest distance, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and neighbor-joining (NJ) tree methods were used to evaluate the identification ability of the ITS2 barcode. According to the kimura-2-parameter model, the intraspecific distance of Eleutherococcus nodiflorus ITS2 sequences ranged from 0 to 0.0132. The minimum interspecific distance between E. nodiflorus and E. giraldii was 0.0221, which was larger than the maximum intraspecific distance of E. nodiflorus. Three stable SNPs in ITS2 can be used to distinguish Acanthopanacis cortex and its closely related species. The NJ tree indicated that the Acanthopanacis cortex samples clustered into one clade, which can be distinguished clearly from the adulterants of this herb. A secondary structure of ITS2 provided another dimensionality to identify species. In conclusion, the ITS2 barcode effectively identifies Acanthopanacis cortex, and DNA barcoding is a convenient tool for medicine market supervision. PMID:26500674

  15. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  16. Molecular variation of Sporisorium scitamineum in Mainland China revealed by internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Huang, N; Xiao, X H; Huang, L; Liu, F; Su, W H; Que, Y X

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane smut caused by the fungus Sporisorium scitamineum is a worldwide disease and also one of the most prevalent diseases in sugarcane production in mainland China. To study molecular variation in S. scitamineum, 23 S. scitamineum isolates from the 6 primary sugar-cane production areas in mainland, China (Guangxi, Yunnan, Guangdong, Hainan, Fujian, and Jiangxi Provinces), were assessed using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) methods. The results of ITS sequence analysis showed that the organisms can be defined at the genus level, including Ustilago and Sporisorium, and can also differentiate between closely related species. This method was not suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis of different S. scitamineum isolates and could not provide support regarding their race ascription at the molecular level. The results of the present study will be useful for studies examining the molecular diversity of S. scitamineum and for establishing a genetic foundation for their pathogenicity differentiation and new race detection. In addition, our results can provide useful information for the pathogen selection principle in sugarcane smut resistance breeding and variety distribution. PMID:26214470

  17. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  18. Genetic differences in internal transcribed spacer 1 between Dermanyssus gallinae from wild birds and domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Brännström, S; Morrison, D A; Mattsson, J G; Chirico, J

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the presence of the poultry red mite or the chicken mite, Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, Acari: Dermanyssidae, in wild bird populations in four different geographical regions of Sweden. The mites identified as D. gallinae were compared genetically with D. gallinae from egg-producing poultry farms in the same regions. The small subunit (SSU) gene, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the rRNA genes were used in the genetic analysis. All D. gallinae mites had identical SSU rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 sequences independent of their origin. By contrast, we identified significant differences in the ITS1 sequences. Based on the differences in the ITS1 sequences, the mites could be divided into two genotypes, of wild and domesticated origin, with no variation within the groups. These results imply that wild bird populations are of low importance, if any, as natural reservoirs of D. gallinae in these four geographical regions of Sweden.

  19. Definition of Eight Mulberry Species in the Genus Morus by Internal Transcribed Spacer-Based Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiwei; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Chao; Han, Minjing; Li, Tian; Qi, Xiwu; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry, belonging to the order Rosales, family Moraceae, and genus Morus, has received attention because of both its economic and medicinal value, as well as for its important ecological function. The genus Morus has a worldwide distribution, however, its taxonomy remains complex and disputed. Many studies have attempted to classify Morus species, resulting in varied numbers of designated Morus spp. To address this issue, we used information from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genetic sequences to study the taxonomy of all the members of generally accepted genus Morus. We found that intraspecific 5.8S rRNA sequences were identical but that interspecific 5.8S sequences were diverse. M. alba and M. notabilis showed the shortest (215 bp) and the longest (233 bp) ITS1 sequence length, respectively. With the completion of the mulberry genome, we could identify single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS locus in the M. notabilis genome. From reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree based on the complete ITS data, we propose that the Morus genus should be classified into eight species, including M. alba, M. nigra, M. notabilis, M. serrata, M. celtidifolia, M. insignis, M. rubra, and M. mesozygia. Furthermore, the classification of the ITS sequences of known interspecific hybrid clones into both paternal and maternal clades indicated that ITS variation was sufficient to distinguish interspecific hybrids in the genus Morus. PMID:26266951

  20. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    PubMed

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia. PMID:21708650

  1. Internal transcribed spacer 1 secondary structure analysis reveals a common core throughout the anaerobic fungi (Neocallimastigomycota).

    PubMed

    Koetschan, Christian; Kittelmann, Sandra; Lu, Jingli; Al-Halbouni, Djamila; Jarvis, Graeme N; Müller, Tobias; Wolf, Matthias; Janssen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is a popular barcode marker for fungi and in particular the ITS1 has been widely used for the anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota). A good number of validated reference sequences of isolates as well as a large number of environmental sequences are available in public databases. Its highly variable nature predisposes the ITS1 for low level phylogenetics; however, it complicates the establishment of reproducible alignments and the reconstruction of stable phylogenetic trees at higher taxonomic levels (genus and above). Here, we overcame these problems by proposing a common core secondary structure of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi employing a Hidden Markov Model-based ITS1 sequence annotation and a helix-wise folding approach. We integrated the additional structural information into phylogenetic analyses and present for the first time an automated sequence-structure-based taxonomy of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi. The methodology developed is transferable to the ITS1 of other fungal groups, and the robust taxonomy will facilitate and improve high-throughput anaerobic fungal community structure analysis of samples from various environments.

  2. Identification of Clinical Staphylococcal Isolates from Humans by Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Isabel; Pereira, Sandro; Miragaia, Maria; Sanches, Ilda Santos; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of coagulase-negative staphylococci not only as human pathogens but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants requires the deployment and development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification. Internal transcribed spacer-PCR (ITS-PCR) was used to identify a collection of 617 clinical staphylococcal isolates. The amplicons were resolved in high-resolution agarose gels and visually compared with the patterns obtained for the control strains of 29 staphylococcal species. Of the 617 isolates studied, 592 (95.95%) were identified by ITS-PCR and included 11 species: 302 isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 157 of S. haemolyticus, 79 of S. aureus, 21 of S. hominis, 14 of S. saprophyticus, 8 of S. warneri, 6 of S. simulans, 2 of S. lugdunensis, and 1 each of S. caprae, S. carnosus, and S. cohnii. All species analyzed had unique ITS-PCR patterns, although some were very similar, namely, the group S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. gallinarum, S. xylosus, S. lentus, S. equorum, and S. chromogenes, the pair S. schleiferi and S. vitulus, and the pair S. piscifermentans and S. carnosus. Four species, S. aureus, S. caprae, S. haemolyticus, and S. lugdunensis, showed polymorphisms on their ITS-PCR patterns. ITS-PCR proved to be a valuable alternative for the identification of staphylococci, offering, within the same response time and at lower cost, higher reliability than the currently available commercial systems. PMID:11526135

  3. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  4. Heterogeneity of the internal transcribed spacer region in Leishmania tropica isolates from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghatee, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Iraj; Kuhls, Katrin; Kanannejad, Zahra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; de Almeida, Marcos E; Hatam, Gholamreza; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    Most of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occur in only 7 countries, including Iran. Leishmania tropica is the main cause of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. In order to study the heterogeneity and phylogeny of L. tropica in southern Iran, a total of 61 isolates were obtained from Bam district and the cities Kerman and Shiraz. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) from the ribosomal DNA locus was amplified and then analysed by sequencing. Analysis of the ITS sequences showed four haplotypes in the isolates, including 3 haplotypes among the 58 isolates from the south eastern region, including Bam district and Kerman city, and 2 haplotypes among the 3 isolates from Shiraz city. The results showed a monophyletic structure for the south eastern population. In comparison to GenBank sequences of L. tropica from different countries, most of the southeast Iranian and Indian isolates are comprised in one cluster, while isolates from other countries and few other Iranian isolates group in a different cluster. Analysis of ITS sequences of south eastern L. tropica showed a homogeneous population which could be the basis for other molecular epidemiology studies using more discriminative markers and tracing possible changes in the population structure of L. tropica. PMID:24932536

  5. DNA barcoding of oomycetes with cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and internal transcribed spacer

    PubMed Central

    Robideau, Gregg P; de Cock, Arthur W A M; Coffey, Michael D; Voglmayr, Hermann; Brouwer, Henk; Bala, Kanak; Chitty, David W; Désaulniers, Nicole; Eggertson, Quinn A; Gachon, Claire M M; Hu, Chia-Hui; Küpper, Frithjof C; Rintoul, Tara L; Sarhan, Ehab; Verstappen, Els C P; Zhang, Yonghong; Bonants, Peter J M; Ristaino, Jean B; Lévesque, C André

    2011-01-01

    Oomycete species occupy many different environments and many ecological niches. The genera Phytophthora and Pythium for example, contain many plant pathogens which cause enormous damage to a wide range of plant species. Proper identification to the species level is a critical first step in any investigation of oomycetes, whether it is research driven or compelled by the need for rapid and accurate diagnostics during a pathogen outbreak. The use of DNA for oomycete species identification is well established, but DNA barcoding with cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) is a relatively new approach that has yet to be assessed over a significant sample of oomycete genera. In this study we have sequenced COI, from 1205 isolates representing 23 genera. A comparison to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences from the same isolates showed that COI identification is a practical option; complementary because it uses the mitochondrial genome instead of nuclear DNA. In some cases COI was more discriminative than ITS at the species level. This is in contrast to the large ribosomal subunit, which showed poor species resolution when sequenced from a subset of the isolates used in this study. The results described in this paper indicate that COI sequencing and the dataset generated are a valuable addition to the currently available oomycete taxonomy resources, and that both COI, the default DNA barcode supported by GenBank, and ITS, the de facto barcode accepted by the oomycete and mycology community, are acceptable and complementary DNA barcodes to be used for identification of oomycetes. PMID:21689384

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Sorghum and related taxa using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Skinner, D Z; Liang, G H; Hulbert, S H

    1994-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the genus Sorghum and related genera were studied by sequencing the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). DNA was extracted from 15 Sorghum accessions, including one accession from each of the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum, four accessions from Parasorghum, two accessions from Stiposorghum, and seven representatives from three species of the section Sorghum (one accession from each of S. propinquum and S. halepense, and five races of S. bicolor). The maize (Zea mays) line, H95, and an accession from Cleistachne sorghoides were also included in the study. Variable nucleotides were used to construct a strict consensus phylogenetic tree. The analyses indicate that S. propinquum, S. halepense and S. bicolor subsp. arundinaceum race aethiopicum may be the closest wild relatives of cultivated sorghum; Sorghum nitidum may be the closest 2n=10 relative to S. bicolor, the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum appear closely related to each other and more closely related to the section Sorghum than Parasorghum; and the section Parasorghum is not monophyletic. The results also indicate that the genus Sorghum is a very ancient and diverse group.

  7. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation. PMID:24412628

  8. Secondary structure models for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region 1 from symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Daniel J; Lord, Jenna B

    2010-07-01

    Ribosomal genes and their spacers have been extensively utilized to examine the biodiversity and phylogenetics of protists. Among these, the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) are known to form secondary structures that are critically important for proper processing of the pre-rRNA into mature ribosomes. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, considerably less is known about ITS1 and its secondary structure. Here, secondary structures of the ITS1 were modeled for 46 ITS "types" from Symbiodinium, a diverse dinoflagellate genus that forms symbioses with many protists and metazoans, using comparative phylogenetic and minimum free energy approaches. The predicted ITS1 secondary structures for each Symbiodinium "type" were highly stable (DeltaG=-46.40 to -85.30 kcal mol(-1) at 37 degrees C) and consisted of an open loop with five helices separated by single-stranded regions. Several structural characteristics were conserved within monophyletic sub-groups, providing additional support for the predicted structures and the relationships within this genus. Finally, the structures were applied to identify potential pseudogenes from five Symbiodinium ITS1 datasets. Consequently, ITS1 secondary structures are useful in understanding the biology and phylogenetics, as well as recognizing and excluding questionable sequences from datasets, of protists such as Symbiodinium.

  9. Internal transcribed spacer guided multiplex PCR for species identification of Convolvulus prostratus and Evolvulus alsinoides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonal; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Shankhpushpi is a reputed drug from an Indian system of medicine for treating mental disorders and enhancing memory. Two herbs, namely Convolvulus prostratus Forssk. and Evolvulus alsinoides (L.) L., are commonly known as Shankhpushpi. Ambiguous vernacular identity can affect the scientific validity of the Shankpushpi-based herbal drug therapy. In the present investigation, a novel and sensitive multiplex PCR method based on polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was developed to establish the molecular identity of C. prostratus and E. alsinoides. DNA was isolated and the ITS region was amplified, sequenced and assembled. Sequences were aligned to identify variable nucleotides in order to develop plant-specific primers. Primers were validated in singleplex reactions and eventually a multiplex assay was developed. This assay was tested for sensitivity and validated by amplifying DNA isolated from the simulated blended powdered plant material. Primers developed for C. prostratus resulted into a 200 bp amplicon and 596 bp for E. alsinoides. The assay was found to be sensitive enough for amplification of low quantities of DNA. The method can detect 10% of the mixing of plants with each other in blended material. This PCR assay can be used for rapid botanical identification of Shankhpushpi plant materials and will improve evidence-based herbal drug therapy. PMID:27175337

  10. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  11. Ribosomal internal transcribed spacer of Prototheca wickerhamii has characteristic structure useful for identification and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Nishimura, Kazuko; Inoue-Sakamoto, Maki; Masuda, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Prototheca species are achlorophyllous algae ubiquitous in nature and known to cause localized and systemic infection both in humans and animals. Although identification of the Prototheca species in clinical specimens is a challenge, there are an increasing number of cases in which molecular techniques have successfully been used for diagnosis of protothecosis. In this study, we characterized nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of a strain of Prototheca (FL11-0001) isolated from a dermatitis patient in Japan for its species identification. When nuclear rDNA of FL11-0001 and that of various other Prototheca strains were compared by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the results indicated that the sizes of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were different in a species-dependent manner, suggesting that the variation might be useful for differentiation of Prototheca spp. Especially, ITS of P. wickerhamii, the most common cause of human protothecosis, was distinctively larger than that of other Prototheca spp. FL11-0001, whose ITS was comparably large, could easily be identified as P. wickerhamii. The usefulness of the PCR analysis of ITS was also demonstrated by the discovery that one of the clinical isolates that had previously been designated as P. wickerhamii was likely a novel species. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that nucleotide sequences of P. wickerhamii ITS are heterogenous between different rDNA copies in each strain and also polymorphic between strains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the ITS sequences could be classified to four clades, based on which P. wickerhamii strains might be grouped into at least two genotypes. Comprehensive characterization of Prototheca rDNA may provide valuable insights into diagnosis and epidemiology of protothecosis, as well as evolution and taxonomy of Prototheca and related organisms. PMID:24312279

  12. Ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer of Prototheca wickerhamii Has Characteristic Structure Useful for Identification and Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Nishimura, Kazuko; Inoue-Sakamoto, Maki; Masuda, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Prototheca species are achlorophyllous algae ubiquitous in nature and known to cause localized and systemic infection both in humans and animals. Although identification of the Prototheca species in clinical specimens is a challenge, there are an increasing number of cases in which molecular techniques have successfully been used for diagnosis of protothecosis. In this study, we characterized nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of a strain of Prototheca (FL11-0001) isolated from a dermatitis patient in Japan for its species identification. When nuclear rDNA of FL11-0001 and that of various other Prototheca strains were compared by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the results indicated that the sizes of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were different in a species-dependent manner, suggesting that the variation might be useful for differentiation of Prototheca spp. Especially, ITS of P. wickerhamii, the most common cause of human protothecosis, was distinctively larger than that of other Prototheca spp. FL11-0001, whose ITS was comparably large, could easily be identified as P. wickerhamii. The usefulness of the PCR analysis of ITS was also demonstrated by the discovery that one of the clinical isolates that had previously been designated as P. wickerhamii was likely a novel species. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that nucleotide sequences of P. wickerhamii ITS are heterogenous between different rDNA copies in each strain and also polymorphic between strains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the ITS sequences could be classified to four clades, based on which P. wickerhamii strains might be grouped into at least two genotypes. Comprehensive characterization of Prototheca rDNA may provide valuable insights into diagnosis and epidemiology of protothecosis, as well as evolution and taxonomy of Prototheca and related organisms. PMID:24312279

  13. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  14. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  15. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  16. Reliable differentiation of Meyerozyma guilliermondii from Meyerozyma caribbica by internal transcribed spacer restriction fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meyerozyma guilliermondii (anamorph Candida guilliermondii) and Meyerozyma caribbica (anamorph Candida fermentati) are closely related species of the genetically heterogenous M. guilliermondii complex. Conventional phenotypic methods frequently misidentify the species within this complex and also with other species of the Saccharomycotina CTG clade. Even the long-established sequencing of large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene remains ambiguous. We also faced similar problem during identification of yeast isolates of M. guilliermondii complex from indigenous bamboo shoot fermentation in North East India. There is a need for development of reliable and accurate identification methods for these closely related species because of their increasing importance as emerging infectious yeasts and associated biotechnological attributes. Results We targeted the highly variable internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and identified seven restriction enzymes through in silico analysis for differentiating M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Fifty five isolates of M. guilliermondii complex which could not be delineated into species-specific taxonomic ranks by API 20 C AUX and LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 sequencing were subjected to ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) analysis. TaqI ITS-RFLP distinctly differentiated the isolates into M. guilliermondii (47 isolates) and M. caribbica (08 isolates) with reproducible species-specific patterns similar to the in silico prediction. The reliability of this method was validated by ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequencing, mitochondrial DNA RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Conclusions We herein described a reliable ITS-RFLP method for distinct differentiation of frequently misidentified M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Even though in silico analysis differentiated other closely related species of M. guilliermondii complex from the above two species, it is yet to be confirmed by in vitro analysis using reference

  17. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  18. Sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of five species of South American human malaria mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G N

    1998-03-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was sequenced for 5 species of mosquitoes that may be important vectors of human malaria in certain regions of South America and are difficult to distinguish by morphology: Anopheles evansae, An. nuneztovari, An. rangeli, An. strodei and An. trinkae. ITS2 sequences from samples collected in Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil were aligned and compared in order to determine the usefulness of this spacer for the elaboration of species specific primers and DNA probes. The ITS2 was found to be different in size (ranging from 333 to 397 bp) and sequence between all pairs of species. Highly variable regions were found primarily at the 3' end of the spacer and were interspersed with relatively conserved sites. Instraspecific sequence variation was limited to a single transversion between specimens of An. rangeli from distant geographic locations suggesting concerted evolution and homogenization of the ITS2. PMID:10520449

  19. Detection of multiple infections by Monocystis strains in a single earthworm host using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Velavan, T P; Schulenburg, H; Michiels, N K

    2010-01-01

    Monocystis sp. are sporocyst-forming apicomplexan parasites common in seminal vesicles of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris where they may account for temporary castration. This study describes the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal cistron of Monocystis sp. This region, including ITS-1, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and ITS-2, was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced for Monocystis sp. isolated from the seminal vesicles of several wild-caught L. terrestris. Our analysis revealed substantial polymorphisms, also within single host organisms, indicating intra-host diversity of parasites. These genetic markers are the first that allow distinction of Monocystis sp. genotypes, opening new avenues for the study of parasite diversity within and between hosts. PMID:19691863

  20. Selection of Enzymes for Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Fungal Internally Transcribed Spacer Sequences▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L.

    2009-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs. PMID:19465521

  1. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed Spacer and 18S rRNA gene sequences from Lonar lake sediment, India.

    PubMed

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Ghelani, Anjana; Bhavsar, Sunil; Bhatt, Shreyas

    2015-09-01

    The data in this article contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon lined between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. Data were obtained using Fungal tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) technique and used to analyze fungal profile by the culture-independent method. Primary analysis using PlutoF 454 pipeline suggests the Lonar lake mycobiome contained the 29 different fungal species. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) under accession No. SRX889598 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/SRX889598).

  2. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  3. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-02-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift-mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicum chinense and Capsicum frutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  4. Molecular identification of isolated fungi from unopened containers of greek yogurt by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-06-25

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  5. Multiple origins and nrDNA internal transcribed spacer homeologue evolution in the Glycine tomentella (Leguminosae) allopolyploid complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rauscher, Jason T; Doyle, Jeff J; Brown, A H D

    2004-01-01

    Despite the importance of polyploidy in the evolution of plants, patterns of molecular evolution and genomic interactions following polyploidy are not well understood. Nuclear ribosomal DNA is particularly complex with respect to these genomic interactions. The composition of nrDNA tandem arrays is influenced by intra- and interlocus concerted evolution and their expression is characterized by patterns such as nucleolar dominance. To understand these complex interactions it is important to study them in diverse natural polyploid systems. In this study we use direct sequencing to isolate and characterize nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) homeologues from multiple accessions of six different races in the Glycine tomentella allopolyploid complex. The results indicate that in most allopolyploid accessions both homeologous nrDNA repeats are present, but that there are significant biases in copy number toward one homeologue, possibly resulting from interlocus concerted evolution. The predominant homeologue often differs between races and between accessions within a race. A phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences provides evidence for multiple origins in several of the polyploid races. This evidence for diverse patterns of nrDNA molecular evolution and multiple origins of polyploid races will provide a useful system for future studies of natural variation in patterns of nrDNA expression. PMID:15020482

  6. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction methods for detecting major food allergens (peanut, soybean, and wheat) by using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Takashi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Temmei, Yusuke; Hiramoto, Masayuki; Kato, Hisanori

    2009-01-01

    Allergen detection methods for peanut, soybean, and wheat were developed by designing PCR primer pairs for specific amplification of a fragment of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reported for Arachis spp. for peanut, Glycine spp. for soybean, and Triticum and Aegilops spp. for wheat. The target species for detection included not only cultivated, but also wild and ancestor species, which were thought to be potentially allergenic. The ability of the resultant primer pairs to detect the target species was verified using genomic DNA extracted from A. hypogaea for peanut and G max for soybean; T. aestivum, T. turgidum, T. durum, T. aestivum-rye amphidiploid, T. monococcum, T. timopheevi, Ae. speltoides, and Ae. squarrosa for wheat. The LODs were 50-500 fg of target DNA, which were comparable to those of the most sensitive PCR methods previously reported. The results from the present work, as well as those from our previous work on buckwheat and kiwifruit, prove that the ITS region, for its high copy number and interspecific diversity, is particularly useful as the target of allergen detection methods.

  7. Improved Selection of Internal Transcribed Spacer-Specific Primers Enables Quantitative, Ultra-High-Throughput Profiling of Fungal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of fungal communities has been restricted by short read lengths and primer amplification bias, slowing the adoption of newer sequencing technologies to fungal community profiling. To address these issues, we evaluated the performance of several common internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers and designed a novel primer set and work flow for simultaneous quantification and species-level interrogation of fungal consortia. Primer comparison and validation were predicted in silico and by sequencing a “mock community” of mixed yeast species to explore the challenges of amplicon length and amplification bias for reconstructing defined yeast community structures. The amplicon size and distribution of this primer set are smaller than for all preexisting ITS primer sets, maximizing sequencing coverage of hypervariable ITS domains by very-short-amplicon, high-throughput sequencing platforms. This feature also enables the optional integration of quantitative PCR (qPCR) directly into the HTS preparatory work flow by substituting qPCR with these primers for standard PCR, yielding quantification of individual community members. The complete work flow described here, utilizing any of the qualified primer sets evaluated, can rapidly profile mixed fungal communities and capably reconstructed well-characterized beer and wine fermentation fungal communities. PMID:23377949

  8. [Clinical evaluation of rapid identification of bacteria from positive-testing blood culture bottles by internal transcribed spacer PCR].

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuko; Fujita, Shinichi; Sakai, Yoshio; Wada, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Delays in diagnosis and initiation of treatment of severe infections such as sepsis greatly influence patient prognosis. Our laboratory introduced rapid identification of bacterial species by PCR for positive blood culture samples as a routine laboratory test since April 2008. We extracted DNA directly from positive blood culture bottles and amplified the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of pathogenic microorganisms by PCR in order to identify bacterial species from electrophoretic patterns of PCR products. Of 167 strains from 167 samples excluding three samples with polymicrobial organisms, 144 strains (86.2%) were correctly identified at species level and 17 strains (10.2%) at genus level. The time required between DNA extraction and bacterial identification was about one and one-half hours. In patients with MRSA sepsis, the time of initiation of treatments such as administration of anti-MRSA drugs and intravascular catheter removal has clearly become earlier with the introduction of ITS-PCR, resulting decreased mortality from 35.0% to 16.0%. Rapid identification of pathogens directly from blood culture bottles by ITS-PCR seems to be useful for appropriate treatment of severe infectious diseases.

  9. Phylogeny of the Macaronesian endemic Crambe section Dendrocrambe (Brassicaceae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Fuertes-Aguilar, Javier; Kim, Seung-Chul; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo; Crawford, Daniel J; Jansen, Robert K

    2002-12-01

    The 14 species of Crambe L. sect. Dendrocrambe DC. (Brassicaceae) form a monophyletic group endemic to the Canary and Madeira archipelagos. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of sequence data from the two internal transcribed spacer regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships within this section. These analyses support the monophyly of three major clades. No clade is restricted to a single island, and therefore it appears that inter-island colonization has been the main avenue for speciation in these two archipelagos. The two species endemic to Fuerteventura (C. sventenii) and Madeira (C. fruticosa) comprise a clade, providing the first evidence for a floristic link between the Eastern Canary Islands and the archipelago of Madeira. Both maximum likelihood and weighted parsimony analyses show that this clade is sister to the two other clades, although bootstrap support for this relationship is weak. Parsimony optimizations of ecological zones and island distribution suggest a colonization route from the low-altitude areas of the lowland scrub toward the high-elevation areas of the laurel and pine forests. In addition, Tenerife is likely the ancestral island for species endemic to the five westernmost islands of Gran Canaria, La Gomera, El Hierro, La Palma, and Tenerife.

  10. Taxonomic and ecological discrimination of Fagaceae species based on internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, João Paulo; Carvalho, Ana; Lima-Brito, José

    2014-11-26

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA has been used to confirm taxonomic classifications and define phylogenies in several plant species following sequencing or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. In this study, co-dominant ITS PCR-RFLP molecular markers were produced in 30 Fagaceae individuals belonging to the Castanea, Fagus and Quercus genera in order to assess the potential of this technique for taxonomic discrimination and determination of phylogenies. The complete ITS region (ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2) was amplified in most of the Fagaceae individuals as a single fragment of ∼700 bp. The ITS amplified products were digested with nine restriction enzymes, but only four (HaeIII, HpaII, TaqI and Sau96I) produced polymorphic/discriminative patterns. The total expected heterozygosity (HE) was 20.31 % and the gene diversity (I), 32.97 %. The ITS polymorphism was higher within the Quercus genus (85.3 %). The ITS PCR-RFLP markers clustered the Fagaceae species according to genus or infrageneric group (in the case of Quercus sp. individuals). Five oaks did not cluster in line with the adopted infrageneric classification, but three of these were grouped according to their actual ecological distributions. The ITS PCR-RFLP markers indicated their potential for phylogenetic studies since all Fagaceae individuals were discriminated according to genus, and most of the oaks were clustered according to infrageneric group or ecological area.

  11. Alternate pathways for processing in the internal transcribed spacer 1 in pre-rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, L; Archer, R H; Zengel, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have extended the system of Nogi et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 1991, 3962-3966) for transcription of rRNA from an RNA polymerase II promoter in strains lacking functional RNA polymerase I. In our strains two differentially marked rRNA transcription units can be expressed alternately. Using this system we have shown that the A2 processing site in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the pre-rRNA is dispensable. According to the accepted processing scheme, the A2 site serves to separate the parts of the primary rRNA transcript that are destined for incorporation into the two ribosomal subunits. However, we have found that, when A2 is impaired, separation of the small and large subunit rRNAs occurs at a processing site further downstream in ITS1, indicating that alternate pathways for ITS1 processing exist. Short deletions in the A2 region still allow residual processing at the A2 site. Mapping of the cleavage sites in such deletion transcripts suggests that sequences downstream of the A2 site are used for determining the position of the cleavage. Images PMID:7816631

  12. Additional data for a new Theileria sp. from China based on the sequences of ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junlong; Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Zhijie; Liu, Aihong; Ma, Miling; Bai, Qi; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-02-01

    Theileria sinensis was recently isolated and named as an independent Theileria species that infects cattle in China. To date, this parasite has been described based on its morphology, transmission and molecular studies, indicating that it should be classified as a distinct species. To test the validity of this taxon, the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene were cloned and sequenced from three T. sinensis isolates. The complete ITS sequences were compared with those of other Theileria sp. available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequence data for the complete ITS sequences indicate that T. sinensis lies in a distinct clade that is separate from that of T. buffeli/orientalis and T. annulata. Sequence comparisons indicate that different T. sinensis isolates possess unique sizes of ITS1 and ITS2 as well as species-specific nucleotide sequences. This analysis provides new molecular data to support the classification of T. sinensis as a distinct species from other known Theileria spp. based on ITS sequences.

  13. Identification of internal transcribed spacer sequence motifs in truffles: a first step toward their DNA bar coding.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-08-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (< or = 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  14. Development of PCR primers from internal transcribed spacer region 2 for detection of Phytophthora species infecting potatoes.

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, P W; Bunyard, B A; Carras, M M; Hatziloukas, E

    1997-01-01

    We developed PCR primers and assay methods to detect and differentiate three Phytophthora species which infect potatoes and cause late blight (Phytophthora infestans) and pink rot (P. erythroseptica and P. nicotianae) diseases. Primers based on sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer region 2 of ribosomal DNA produced PCR products of 456 bp (P. infestans), 136 bp (P. erythroseptica), and 455 bp (P. nicotianae) and were used to detect the pathogens in potato leaf (P. infestans) and tuber (P. infestans, P. erythroseptica, and P. nicotianae) tissue with a sensitivity of 1 to 10 pg of DNA. Leaf and tuber tissue were processed for PCR by a rapid NaOH method as well as a method based on the use of commercially available ion-exchange columns of P. infestans primers and the rapid NaOH extraction method were used to detect late blight in artificially and naturally infected tubers of potato cultivar Red LaSoda. In sampling studies, P. infestans was detected by PCR from artificially infected tubers at 4 days postinoculation, before any visible symptoms were present. The PCR assay and direct tissue extraction methods provide tools which may be used to detect Phytophthora pathogens in potato seedlots and storages and thus limit the transmission and spread of new, aggressive strains of P. infestans in U.S. potato-growing regions. PMID:9097445

  15. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  16. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  17. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift–mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicumchinense and Capsicumfrutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  18. Genetic variability in Melipona quinquefasciata (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) from northeastern Brazil determined using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1).

    PubMed

    Pereira, J O P; Freitas, B M; Jorge, D M M; Torres, D C; Soares, C E A; Grangeiro, T B

    2009-01-01

    Melipona quinquefasciata is a ground-nesting South American stingless bee whose geographic distribution was believed to comprise only the central and southern states of Brazil. We obtained partial sequences (about 500-570 bp) of first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) nuclear ribosomal DNA from Melipona specimens putatively identified as M. quinquefasciata collected from different localities in northeastern Brazil. To confirm the taxonomic identity of the northeastern samples, specimens from the state of Goiás (Central region of Brazil) were included for comparison. All sequences were deposited in GenBank (accession numbers EU073751-EU073759). The mean nucleotide divergence (excluding sites with insertions/deletions) in the ITS1 sequences was only 1.4%, ranging from 0 to 4.1%. When the sites with insertions/deletions were also taken into account, sequence divergences varied from 0 to 5.3%. In all pairwise comparisons, the ITS1 sequence from the specimens collected in Goiás was most divergent compared to the ITS1 sequences of the bees from the other locations. However, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis showed that all ITS1 sequences from northeastern specimens along with the sample of Goiás were resolved in a single clade with a bootstrap support of 100%. The ITS1 sequencing data thus support the occurrence of M. quinquefasciata in northeast Brazil. PMID:19554762

  19. Application of Partial Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences for the Discrimination of Artemisia capillaris from Other Artemisia Species.

    PubMed

    Doh, Eui Jeong; Paek, Seung-Ho; Lee, Guemsan; Lee, Mi-Young; Oh, Seung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Several Artemisia species are used as herbal medicines including the dried aerial parts of Artemisia capillaris, which are used as Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (known as "Injinho" in Korean medicinal terminology and "Yin Chen Hao" in Chinese). In this study, we developed tools for distinguishing between A. capillaris and 11 other Artemisia species that grow and/or are cultured in China, Japan, and Korea. Based on partial nucleotide sequences in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) that differ between the species, we designed primers to amplify a DNA marker for A. capillaris. In addition, to detect other Artemisia species that are contaminants of A. capillaris, we designed primers to amplify DNA markers of A. japonica, A. annua, A. apiacea, and A. anomala. Moreover, based on random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, we confirmed that primers developed in a previous study could be used to identify Artemisia species that are sources of Artemisiae Argyi Folium and Artemisiae Iwayomogii Herba. By using these primers, we found that multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was a reliable tool to distinguish between A. capillaris and other Artemisia species and to identify other Artemisia species as contaminants of A. capillaris in a single PCR. PMID:27313651

  20. Application of Partial Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences for the Discrimination of Artemisia capillaris from Other Artemisia Species

    PubMed Central

    Doh, Eui Jeong; Paek, Seung-Ho; Lee, Guemsan; Lee, Mi-Young; Oh, Seung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Several Artemisia species are used as herbal medicines including the dried aerial parts of Artemisia capillaris, which are used as Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (known as “Injinho” in Korean medicinal terminology and “Yin Chen Hao” in Chinese). In this study, we developed tools for distinguishing between A. capillaris and 11 other Artemisia species that grow and/or are cultured in China, Japan, and Korea. Based on partial nucleotide sequences in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) that differ between the species, we designed primers to amplify a DNA marker for A. capillaris. In addition, to detect other Artemisia species that are contaminants of A. capillaris, we designed primers to amplify DNA markers of A. japonica, A. annua, A. apiacea, and A. anomala. Moreover, based on random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, we confirmed that primers developed in a previous study could be used to identify Artemisia species that are sources of Artemisiae Argyi Folium and Artemisiae Iwayomogii Herba. By using these primers, we found that multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was a reliable tool to distinguish between A. capillaris and other Artemisia species and to identify other Artemisia species as contaminants of A. capillaris in a single PCR. PMID:27313651

  1. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  2. The internal transcribed spacer 2 database--a web server for (not only) low level phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Jörg; Müller, Tobias; Achtziger, Marco; Seibel, Philipp N; Dandekar, Thomas; Wolf, Matthias

    2006-07-01

    The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) is a phylogenetic marker which has been of broad use in generic and infrageneric level classifications, as its sequence evolves comparably fast. Only recently, it became clear, that the ITS2 might be useful even for higher level systematic analyses. As the secondary structure is highly conserved within all eukaryotes it serves as a valuable template for the construction of highly reliable sequence-structure alignments, which build a fundament for subsequent analyses. Thus, any phylogenetic study using ITS2 has to consider both sequence and structure. We have integrated a homology based RNA structure prediction algorithm into a web server, which allows the detection and secondary structure prediction for ITS2 in any given sequence. Furthermore, the resource contains more than 25,000 pre-calculated secondary structures for the currently known ITS2 sequences. These can be taxonomically searched and browsed. Thus, our resource could become a starting point for ITS2-based phylogenetic analyses and is therefore complementary to databases of other phylogenetic markers, which focus on higher level analyses. The current version of the ITS2 database can be accessed via http://its2.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de.

  3. Novel polymorphism of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and their utilization in phylogenetic analysis of Neanthes glandicincta (Annelida: Polychaeta: Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Hong; Gu, Ji-Guang

    2012-08-01

    Sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) are increasingly being used to infer phylogenetic relationships at or below species levels. Here we report a novel case of ITS polymorphism within Neanthes glandicincta (Annelida: Polychaeta: Nereididae). Two types of ITS sequence (Type I and Type II) were cloned and sequenced, which showed significant differences both in nucleotide composition and length. Variations of these two types sequences also differed from each other with Type I was highly divergent while Type II was highly conserved. Phylogenetic trees inferred from ITS1 and ITS2 sequences showed striking discrepancy in N. glandicincta. Non-concerted evolution of multi-gene is suggested to be responsible for the high degree of polymorphism in ITS regions. Due to the two divergent types of ITS presented within a single N. glandicincta individual, the utilization of ITS regions for delineation of population or closely related species cannot be substantiated. The finding of different types of ITS in a single individual also stresses the need for analyzing a large number of clones whenever ITS sequences obtained by PCR amplification and cloning are being used in phylogenetic reconstruction.

  4. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The IT...

  5. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  6. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  7. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  8. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    PubMed

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis).

  9. Study on sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers of clams belonging to the Veneridae family (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Liang; Xia, De-Quan; Wu, Ting-Ting; Meng, Xue-Ping; Ji, Hong-Ju; Dong, Zhi-Guo

    2006-08-01

    The first and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions of the ribosomal DNA from four species, Meretrix meretrix L., Cyclina sinensis G., Mercenaria mercenaria L., and Protothaca jedoensis L., belonging to the family Veneridae were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The size of the ITS1 PCR amplification product ranged from 663 bp to 978 bp, with GC contents ranging from 60.78% to 64.97%. The size of the ITS1 sequence ranged from 585 bp to 900 bp, which is the largest range reported thus far in bivalve species, with GC contents ranging from 61.03% to 65.62%. The size of the ITS2 PCR amplification product ranged from 513 bp to 644 bp, with GC contents ranging from 61.29% to 62.73%. The size of the ITS2 sequence ranged from 281 bp to 412 bp, with GC contents ranging from 65.21% to 67.87%. Extensive sequence variation and obvious length polymorphisms were noted for both regions in these species, and sequence similarity of ITS2 was higher than that of ITS1 across species. The complete sequences of 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene were obtained by assembling ITS1 and ITS2 sequences, and the sequence length in all species was 157 bp. The phylogenetic tree of Veneridae clams was reconstructed using ITS2-containing partial sequences of both 5.8S and 28S ribosomal DNA as markers and the corresponding sequence information in Arctica islandica as the outgroup. Tree topologies indicated that P. jedoensis shared a close relationship with M. mercenaria and C. sinensis, a distant relationship with other species.

  10. CloVR-ITS: Automated internal transcribed spacer amplicon sequence analysis pipeline for the characterization of fungal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Besides the development of comprehensive tools for high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequence analysis, there exists a growing need for protocols emphasizing alternative phylogenetic markers such as those representing eukaryotic organisms. Results Here we introduce CloVR-ITS, an automated pipeline for comparative analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) pyrosequences amplified from metagenomic DNA isolates and representing fungal species. This pipeline performs a variety of steps similar to those commonly used for 16S rRNA amplicon sequence analysis, including preprocessing for quality, chimera detection, clustering of sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs), taxonomic assignment (at class, order, family, genus, and species levels) and statistical analysis of sample groups of interest based on user-provided information. Using ITS amplicon pyrosequencing data from a previous human gastric fluid study, we demonstrate the utility of CloVR-ITS for fungal microbiota analysis and provide runtime and cost examples, including analysis of extremely large datasets on the cloud. We show that the largest fractions of reads from the stomach fluid samples were assigned to Dothideomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Agaricomycetes and Sordariomycetes but that all samples were dominated by sequences that could not be taxonomically classified. Representatives of the Candida genus were identified in all samples, most notably C. quercitrusa, while sequence reads assigned to the Aspergillus genus were only identified in a subset of samples. CloVR-ITS is made available as a pre-installed, automated, and portable software pipeline for cloud-friendly execution as part of the CloVR virtual machine package (http://clovr.org). Conclusion The CloVR-ITS pipeline provides fungal microbiota analysis that can be complementary to bacterial 16S rRNA and total metagenome sequence analysis allowing for more comprehensive studies of environmental and host-associated microbial

  11. Assessment of phylogenetic relationship of rare plant species collected from Saudi Arabia using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Al-Qurainy, F; Khan, S; Nadeem, M; Tarroum, M; Alaklabi, A

    2013-01-01

    The rare and endangered plants of any country are important genetic resources that often require urgent conservation measures. Assessment of phylogenetic relationships and evaluation of genetic diversity is very important prior to implementation of conservation strategies for saving rare and endangered plant species. We used internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA for the evaluation of sequence identity from the available taxa in the GenBank database by using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Two rare plant species viz, Heliotropium strigosum claded with H. pilosum (98% branch support) and Pancratium tortuosum claded with P. tenuifolium (61% branch support) clearly. However, some species, viz Scadoxus multiflorus, Commiphora myrrha and Senecio hadiensis showed close relationships with more than one species. We conclude that nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequences are useful markers for phylogenetic study of these rare plant species in Saudi Arabia.

  12. Study of Genetic Variation of Leishmania major Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) in Chabahar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dabirzadeh, Mansour; Hashemi, Mohammad; Maroufi, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is polymorphic disease that may show various clinical manifestations. Objectives This study investigates the determination of genetic variation within the species of Leishmania major isolates from new cases in Chabahar, a port city in Southeast Iran (situated at the Iran-Pakistan border). Migration in this region indicates that leishmaniasis is spreading gradually, and a new micro-habitat focus appears each year. Materials and Methods A variety of nucleic acid detection methods that target both DNA and RNA have been developed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of amplified internal transcribed spacer 1 with polymerase chain reaction (ITS1-RFLP PCR) assay is a multipurpose tool for the diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and for enabling the determination of the infecting Leishmania species. The goal of this study was the identification of species based on ITS1-RFLP in the ribosomal operon of L. major from clinically different forms of ZCL amplified by PCR, followed by the digestion of the PCR product with restriction enzymes. The profiles were observed and visualized in agarose gel under UV light. We used direct smears to identify the parasites. While taking the smear, samples were collected for culture or direct PCR. We used the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 24 out of 33 suspected patients. PCR-ITS1 amplification was done on the 24 samples confirmed by culture via growth and parasitological methods. Results Of the 24 isolates, 21 had 350 bp bands (87.5%) and three had 450 bp bands (12.5%). After using the restriction enzyme, banding patterns including fragments of 210 and 140 bp for L. major were detected in 19 cases. Conclusions The L. major species causing ZCL in Chabahar have limited genetic variation. There seems to be little manifestation of diversity between these lesions as a new focus of disease, and new micro-habitats for

  13. Comparative evolution of S7 Intron 1 and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer in Coilia nasus (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Hong-Yi; Tang, Wen-Qiao; Yang, Jin-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Coilia nasus is widely distributed in the Yangtze River, the coastal waters of China, Korea and the Ariake Sound of Japan. Several ecotypes exist and this provides a useful model for the study of comparative diversity between molecular markers. Here we analyze and compare the nucleotide sequences between single-copy ribosomal protein S7 gene intron 1 (rpS7) and multiple-copy ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) in this species to compare the phylogenetic signal of the two nuclear genes. Nucleotide substitutions among the two gene sequences and partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene were also analyzed. A total of 115 clones for rpS7 and 122 clones for ITS1 were obtained from 37 specimens. The nucleotide sequence length is 741 to 743 bp for rpS7 and 334 to 348 bp for ITS1. Intra- and inter-specimen variation in rpS7 results from nucleotide substitution, while such variation in ITS1 is mainly due to different numbers of short base repeats. The content of G + C is lower in rpS7 (43.5%) than in ITS1 (68.2%). Our results indicate that the proportion of the sequence variable sites is higher in rpS7 (61) than in ITS1 (23); the informative parsimony of rpS7 is evidently higher than that of ITS1 (26 vs. 2); the overall ratio between transitions and transversions in ITS1 is slightly lower than in rpS7, but remarkably lower than in COI. These results suggest that rpS7 is more suitable than ITS1 as a marker for genetic divergence of this group. Furthermore, gene flow is observed between the different geographic populations of C. nasus from the phylogeny of this species based on rpS7, showing that rpS7 has more evolutionary characteristics for understanding the processes of genomic evolution at the intraspecific level.

  14. Study of Genetic Variation of Leishmania major Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) in Chabahar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dabirzadeh, Mansour; Hashemi, Mohammad; Maroufi, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is polymorphic disease that may show various clinical manifestations. Objectives This study investigates the determination of genetic variation within the species of Leishmania major isolates from new cases in Chabahar, a port city in Southeast Iran (situated at the Iran-Pakistan border). Migration in this region indicates that leishmaniasis is spreading gradually, and a new micro-habitat focus appears each year. Materials and Methods A variety of nucleic acid detection methods that target both DNA and RNA have been developed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of amplified internal transcribed spacer 1 with polymerase chain reaction (ITS1-RFLP PCR) assay is a multipurpose tool for the diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and for enabling the determination of the infecting Leishmania species. The goal of this study was the identification of species based on ITS1-RFLP in the ribosomal operon of L. major from clinically different forms of ZCL amplified by PCR, followed by the digestion of the PCR product with restriction enzymes. The profiles were observed and visualized in agarose gel under UV light. We used direct smears to identify the parasites. While taking the smear, samples were collected for culture or direct PCR. We used the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 24 out of 33 suspected patients. PCR-ITS1 amplification was done on the 24 samples confirmed by culture via growth and parasitological methods. Results Of the 24 isolates, 21 had 350 bp bands (87.5%) and three had 450 bp bands (12.5%). After using the restriction enzyme, banding patterns including fragments of 210 and 140 bp for L. major were detected in 19 cases. Conclusions The L. major species causing ZCL in Chabahar have limited genetic variation. There seems to be little manifestation of diversity between these lesions as a new focus of disease, and new micro-habitats for

  15. DNA authentication of Plantago Herb based on nucleotide sequences of 18S-28S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Fatma Pinar; Yamashita, Hiromi; Guo, Yahong; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masao; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Mizukami, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were amplified from 23 plant- and herbarium specimens belonging to eight Plantago species (P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major, P. erosa, P. hostifolia, P. camtschatica, P. virginica and P. lanceolata). Sequence comparison indicated that these Plantago species could be identified based on the sequence type of the ITS locus. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions amplified from the crude drug Plantago Herb obtained in the markets indicated that all the drugs from Japan were derived from P. asiatica whereas the samples obtained in China were originated from various Plantago species including P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major and P. erosa.

  16. Sequence, secondary structure, and phylogenetic analyses of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) in members of the North American Signifera Group of Orthopodomyia (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Byrd, Brian D; Harrison, Bruce A; Zavortink, Thomas J; Wesson, Dawn M

    2012-11-01

    Mosquitoes of the genus Orthopodomyia (Diptera: Culicidae) are little known and of uncertain epidemiological importance. In the United States, there are three Orthopodomyia species (i.e., Or. signifera (Coquillett), Or. alba Baker, and Or. kummi Edwards); they are all members of the Signifera Group based on the current morphological taxonomy. In the course of identifying recently collected specimens, a problem was found with the current key morphological characters for separating the fourth instar larvae of Or. signifera and Or. kummi. Internal transcribed spacer two sequences of the rDNA were obtained to resolve the identities. The Orthopodomyia internal transcribed spacer two ranged in size from 193 (Or. kummi) to 244 bp (Or. signifera) (mean = 218 bp) and were slightly Adenine/Thymine enriched (44.7% Guanine/Cytosine on average). Putative secondary structures reveal structural homologies (four domains) consistent between species that also feature conserved sequences specific to mosquitoes (e.g., a conserved motif on the 3' aspect of the longest helix: GARTACATCC). Sequence analyses suggest that in certain areas of southwestern North America, hybridization may occur between Or. kummi and Or. signifera. Furthermore, our analyses confirm that Or. californica (a junior synonym of Or. signifera) is indeed Or. signifera. To our knowledge, this is the first sequence-based phylogenetic and molecular analysis of the Orthopodomyia.

  17. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  18. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  19. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included.

  20. Molecular characterization of the first internal transcribed spacer of rDNA of Parabronema skrjabini for the first time in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hasheminasab, Seyed Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Parabronema skrjabini is a spirurid nematode of the family Habronematidae that lives in the abomasum of ruminants such as sheep and goats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular aspects of Parabronema skrjabini in sheep. The worms were collected from sheep in Sanandaj (west of Iran). The first internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) nucleotide fragments of Parabronema skrjabini were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two pairs of specific primers (Para-Ir-R and Para-Ir-F). ITS1 homology in the sequence of this study was 69% compared with the sequence data in GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the world exploring the genetic diversity of P. skrjabini in sheep based on ITS1. PMID:26878620

  1. Internal transcribed spacer sequence-based rapid molecular identification of Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca blaschkeae directly from milk of infected cows.

    PubMed

    Marques, S; Huss, V A R; Pfisterer, K; Grosse, C; Thompson, G

    2015-05-01

    The increasing incidence of rare mastitis-causing pathogens has urged the implementation of fast and efficient diagnostic and control measures. Prototheca algae are known to be associated with diseases in humans and animals. In the latter, the most prevalent form of protothecosis is bovine mastitis with Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca blaschkeae representing the most common pathogenic species. These nonphotosynthetic and colorless green algae are ubiquitous in different environments and are widely resistant against harmful conditions and antimicrobials. Hence, the association of Prototheca with bovine mastitis represents a herd problem, requiring fast and easy identification of the infectious agent. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and rapid method, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of ribosomal DNA, for molecular identification and discrimination between P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae in bovine mastitic milk. The complete ITS sequences of 32 Prototheca isolates showed substantial interspecies but moderate intraspecies variability facilitating the design of species-specific PCR amplification primers. The species-specific PCR was successfully applied to the identification of P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae directly from milk samples. The intraspecific ITS phylogeny was compared for each species with the geographical distribution of the respective Prototheca isolates, but no significant correlation was found. PMID:25726118

  2. Mutation scanning analysis of sequence heterogeneity in the second internal transcribed spacer (rDNA) within some members of the Hypodontus macropi (Nematoda: Strongyloidea) complex.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Zhu, X; Beveridge, I; Chilton, N

    2001-04-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis was employed to investigate sequence variation in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA within and among individuals representing three operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of Hypodontus macropi from different species of Australian macropodid marsupials. Of the 96 nematodes analysed, totals of 3 (OTU1 from Petrogale persephone), 10 (OTU2 from Macropus robustus) and 7 (OTU9 from Macropus rufus) representative individuals were selected for DNA sequencing to characterise and estimate the magnitude of nucleotide variation in the ITS-2. While no unequivocal nucleotide difference in the ITS-2 was detectable within OTU1, most sequence variation (3/44.7%) detected within OTU2 and OTU9 was related chiefly to dinucleotide (CA, TA, or a combination of both) differences. This microsatellite variability in some H. macropi OTUs suggests that the ITS-2 rDNA may be subjected to slippage events during DNA replication, resulting in short dinucleotide repeat tracts being dispersed throughout the ITS-2 lineages, or possibly transposition and/or crossing-over events. Nucleotide variation in the ITS-2 of individual OTUs was related to the proposed secondary structure for the precursor ribosomal RNAs. Most of the sequence heterogeneity or polymorphism within OTU2 and OTU9 occurred in loops or bulges of the predicted secondary structure, which appear not to be under functional constraint. The findings of this study have implications for investigating speciation events and population differentiation in nematodes at the molecular level.

  3. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  4. Analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region of the Fusarium species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    ZARRIN, MAJID; GANJ, FARZANEH; FARAMARZI, SAMA

    2016-01-01

    The Fusarium species are a widely spread phytopathogen identified in an extensive variety of hosts. The Fusarium genus is one of the most heterogeneous fungi and is difficult to classify. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis is a useful method in detection of DNA polymorphism in objective sequences. The aim of the present study was to identify the phylogenetic associations and usefulness of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a genetic marker within the most clinically important strain of the Fusarium species. A total of 50 strains of Fusarium spp. were used in the study, including environmental, clinical and reference isolates. The primers ITS1 and ITS4 were used in the study. Two restriction enzymes, HaeIII and SmaI, were assessed for the digestion of PCR products. A PCR product of ~550-base pairs was generated for each Fusarium species. The digested products with HaeIII and SmaI demonstrated that the bands generated for the medically significant Fusarium species, including F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. verticillidea, F. proliferatum and F. fujikuri, have different restriction enzyme patterns. In conclusion, it appears that the PCR-RFLP method used in the present study produces a sufficient restriction profile for differentiation of the most medically significant Fusarium species. PMID:27073635

  5. Molecular phylogenetic studies of Brassica, rorippa, arabidopsis and allied genera based on the internal transcribed spacer region of 18S-25S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y W; Lai, K N; Tai, P Y; Ma, D P; Li, W H

    1999-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of nine genera in four tribes of the family Brassicaceae were estimated from the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of the 18S-25S nuclear ribosomal DNA. The entire ITS region of 16 accessions belonging to 10 species of seven genera was sequenced. Eight published sequences of Brassicaceae were also used. A total of 27 sequences were included in this study; four of them were found to be pseudogenes. Both the neighbor-joining and the parsimony trees suggest that the nine genera can be divided into three groups: (1) Arabidopsis, Cardaminopsis, Capsella, and Lepidium; (2) Rorippa and Cardamine; and (3) Brassica, Sinapis, and Raphanus. In contradiction to the proposal that Cardaminopsis and Arabidopsis be put into an expanded tribe Arabideae, our data show that these two genera are more closely related to Capsella and Lepidium (tribe Lepidieae) than to Rorippa and Cardamine (tribe Arabideae). Further, our data show that within the tribe Brassiceae, Raphanus is more closely related to B. nigra than to the B. oleracea/B. rapa clade. This result is in agreement with the nuclear data obtained in several studies, but is in conflict with the RFLP data of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA. As pointed out by previous authors, it is possible that Raphanus is a hybrid between the B. nigra and B. oleracea/B. rapa lineages with the latter as the maternal parent.

  6. Restriction Analysis of PCR-Amplified Internal Transcribed Spacers of Ribosomal DNA as a Tool for Species Identification in Different Genera of the Order Glomales

    PubMed Central

    Redecker, D.; Thierfelder, H.; Walker, C.; Werner, D.

    1997-01-01

    A technique combining PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to generate specific DNA fragment patterns from spore extracts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. With the universal primers ITS1 and ITS4, DNA fragments were amplified from species of Scutellospora and Gigaspora that were approximately 500 bp long. The apparent lengths of the corresponding fragments from Glomus spp. varied between 580 and 600 bp. Within the genus Glomus, the restriction enzymes MboI, HinfI, and TaqI were useful for distinguishing species. Depending on the restriction enzyme used, groups of species with common fragment patterns could be found. Five tropical and subtropical isolates identified as Glomus manihotis and G. clarum could not be distinguished by their restriction patterns, corresponding to the morphological similarity of the spores. The variation of internal transcribed spacer sequences among the Gigaspora species under study was low. Fragment patterns of Scutellospora spp. showed their phylogenetic relationship with Gigaspora and revealed only a slightly higher degree of variation. PMID:16535592

  7. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  8. Evaluation of Medicinal Categorization of Atractylodes japonica Koidz. by Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequencing Analysis and HPLC Fingerprinting Combined with Statistical Tools

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Doh, Eui-Jeong; Lee, Guemsan

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodes rhizomes have been used as the herbal medicine “Changchul” or “Baekchul,” according to their clinical purpose, in Korea, China, and Japan. Among the Atractylodes species, the medicinal use of Atractylodes japonica has been controversial, as it is categorized as both Changchul and Baekchul in those countries, and, moreover, parts of the rhizome have been differently used, depending on age of the plant, in Korea. Chromatographic fingerprinting by using HPLC combined with chemometric analyses and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing analysis were conducted to classify and identify 34 crude drugs derived from Atractylodes rhizomes. The identification of the samples, authenticated by their morphological features as A. japonica Koidz. (Changchul and Baekchul), A. chinensis Koidz., and A. macrocephala Koidz., was confirmed as A. japonica, A. chinensis, and A. macrocephala by ITS sequencing. The results from chemometric analyses showed that the chemical components of the crude drugs from A. japonica were significantly different from those from A. macrocephala but were similar to those from A. chinensis. The analyses also suggested that the categorization by age of A. japonica as Changchul or Baekchul is not recommended. The results indicate that A. japonica should be categorized as “Changchul” and should not be further categorized by age. PMID:27190530

  9. Differentiation and grouping of isolates of the Ganoderma lucidum complex by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR compared with grouping on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, R S; Wang, H H; Wang, H F; Moncalvo, J M

    1996-01-01

    Laccate polypores of the Ganoderma lucidum species complex are widespread white rot fungi of economic importance, but isolates cannot be identified by traditional taxonomic methods. Parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA) distinguished six lineages in this species complex. Each ITS lineage may represent one or more putative species. While some isolates have identical ITS sequences, all of them could be clearly differentiated by genetic fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). To investigate the suitability of RAPD markers for taxonomic identification and grouping of isolates of the G. lucidum complex, RAPD fragments (RAPDs) were used as phenotypic characters in numerical and parsimony analyses. Results show that data from RAPDS do not distinguish the same clades as ITS data do. Groupings based on analysis of RAPD data were very sensitive to the choice of the grouping method used, and no consistent grouping of isolates could be proposed. However, analysis with RAPDs did resolve several robust terminal clades containing putatively conspecific isolates, suggesting that RAPDs might be helpful for systematics at the lower taxonomic levels that are unresolved by ITS sequence data. The limitations of RAPDs for systematics are briefly discussed. The conclusion of this study is that ITS sequences can be used to identify isolates of the G. lucidum complex, whereas RAPDs can be used to differentiate between isolates having identical ITS sequences. The practical implications of these results are briefly illustrated. PMID:8919797

  10. Systematics of marine brown alga Sargassum from Thailand: A preliminary study based on morphological data and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantachumpoo, Attachai; Uwai, Shinya; Noiraksar, Thidarat; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2015-06-01

    The marine brown algal genus Sargassum has been investigated extensively based on genetic information. In this report, we performed the first comparative study of morphological and molecular data among common species of Sargassum found in Thailand and explored the phylogenetic diversity within the genus. Our results revealed an incongruent pattern for species classification in Thai Sargassum. Morphologically, our Sargassum specimens were distinguishable and represented 8 species, namely, S. aquifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, Sargassum baccularia (Mertens) C. Agardh, S. cinereum J. Agardh, S. ilicifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, S. oligocystum Montagne, S. plagiophyllum C. Agardh, S. polycystum C. Agardh and S. swartzii (Turuner) C. Agardh. In contrast, using three different methods, phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) revealed six distinct clades, including S. baccularia/ S. oligosyntum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. swartzii clade, S. cinereum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. ilicifolium clade, S. polycystum clade, and S. plagiophyllum clade, which was suggestive of a phenotypic plasticity species complex. Our molecular data also confirmed the paraphyletic relationship in the section Binderianae and suggested that this section requires reassessment. Overall, further studies are required to increase our understanding of the taxonomy, phylogenetic relationships and species boundaries among Sargassum species in Thailand.

  11. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates. PMID:24299459

  12. Novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to determine internal transcribed spacer-2 group in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811).

    PubMed

    Richards, Bethany; Rúa, Nicholas M de la; Monroy, Carlota; Stevens, Lori; Dorn, Patricia L

    2013-06-01

    Triatoma dimidiata is the most important Chagas disease insect vector in Central America as this species is primarily responsible for Trypanosoma cruzi transmission to humans, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. T. dimidiata sensu lato is a genetically diverse assemblage of taxa and effective vector control requires a clear understanding of the geographic distribution and epidemiological importance of its taxa. The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) is frequently used to infer the systematics of triatomines. However, oftentimes amplification and sequencing of ITS-2 fails, likely due to both the large polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and polymerase slippage near the 5' end. To overcome these challenges we have designed new primers that amplify only the 3'-most 200 base pairs of ITS-2. This region distinguishes the ITS-2 group for 100% of known T. dimidiata haplotypes. Furthermore, we have developed a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) approach to determine the ITS-2 group, greatly reducing, but not eliminating, the number of amplified products that need to be sequenced. Although there are limitations with this new PCR-RFLP approach, its use will help with understanding the geographic distribution of T. dimidiata taxa and can facilitate other studies characterising the taxa, e.g. their ecology, evolution and epidemiological importance, thus improving vector control.

  13. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) from Philornis seguyi (García, 1952) and Philornis torquans (Nielsen, 1913) (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Monje, Lucas D; Quiroga, Martín; Manzoli, Darío; Couri, Márcia S; Silvestri, Leonardo; Venzal, José M; Cuervo, Pablo; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2013-09-01

    Philornis Meinert, 1890 (Diptera: Muscidae) is a genus of Neotropical dipterans that parasitise birds. The currently used external morphological characters to distinguish between species within this genus present some limitations. We used the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS2) of the rRNA gene as a molecular marker to differentiate adult specimens of Philornis identified morphologically as Philornis torquans and Philornis seguyi from different localities. Specimens identified as P. seguyi from Magdalena (Buenos Aires Province) showed an ITS2 sequence different from that for P. torquans, whereas all other specimens of P. seguyi had sequences identical to those for P. torquans. These findings do not necessarily confirm that specimens from Magdalena indeed belong to P. seguyi, nor that P. seguyi is a valid species. Instead, they alert us about the potential for species misidentification when using morphological characters alone. The use of molecular approaches to aid the identification of Philornis spp. will shed light on the systematics of this group. P. torquans is reported for the first time in Mendoza Province and Uruguay.

  14. Combining nested PCR and restriction digest of the internal transcribed spacer region to characterize arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on roots from the field.

    PubMed

    Renker, Carsten; Heinrichs, Jochen; Kaldorf, Michael; Buscot, François

    2003-08-01

    Identification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on roots is almost impossible with morphological methods and, due to the presence of contaminating fungi, it is also difficult with molecular biological techniques. To allow broad investigation of the population structure of AMF in the field, we have established a new method to selectively amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most AMF with a unique primer set. Based on available sequences of the rDNA, one primer pair specific for AMF and a few other fungal groups was designed and combined in a nested PCR with the already established primer pair ITS5/ITS4. Amplification from contaminating organisms was reduced by an AluI restriction after the first reaction of the nested PCR. The method was assessed at five different field sites representing different types of habitats. Members of all major groups within the Glomeromycota (except Archaeosporaceae) were detected at the different sites. Gigasporaceae also proved detectable with the method based on cultivated strains. PMID:12938031

  15. Rapid authentication of the precious herb saffron by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingming; Shi, Yuhua; Wu, Lan; Guo, Licheng; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Chao; Yan, Song; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Saffron is one of the most expensive species of Chinese herbs and has been subjected to various types of adulteration because of its high price and limited production. The present study introduces a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for the differentiation of saffron from its adulterants. This novel technique is sensitive, efficient and simple. Six specific LAMP primers were designed on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA of Crocus sativus. All LAMP amplifications were performed successfully, and visual detection occurred within 60 min at isothermal conditions of 65 °C. The results indicated that the LAMP primers are accurate and highly specific for the discrimination of saffron from its adulterants. In particular, 10 fg of genomic DNA was determined to be the limit for template accuracy of LAMP in saffron. Thus, the proposed novel, simple, and sensitive LAMP assay is well suited for immediate on-site discrimination of herbal materials. Based on the study, a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for utilizing the LAMP protocol for herbal authentication is provided. PMID:27146605

  16. Internal Transcribed Spacer rRNA Gene-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction Using Algorithms with Local and Global Sequence Alignment for Black Yeasts and Their Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Caligiorne, R. B.; Licinio, P.; Dupont, J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2005-01-01

    Sequences of rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of a standard set of black yeast-like fungal pathogens were compared using two methods: local and global alignments. The latter is based on DNA-walk divergence analysis. This method has become recently available as an algorithm (DNAWD program) which converts sequences into three-dimensional walks. The walks are compared with, or fit to, each other generating global alignments. The DNA-walk geometry defines a proper metric used to create a distance matrix appropriated for phylogenetic reconstruction. In this work, the analyses were carried out for species currently classified in Capronia, Cladophialophora, Exophiala, Fonsecaea, Phialophora, and Ramichloridium. Main groups were verified by small-subunit rRNA gene data. DNAWD applied to ITS2 alone enabled species recognition as well as phylogenetic reconstruction reflecting clades discriminated in small-subunit rRNA gene phylogeny, which was not possible with any other algorithm using local alignment for the same data set. It is concluded that DNAWD provides rapid insight into broader relationships between groups using genes that otherwise would be hardly usable for this purpose. PMID:15956403

  17. Identification of three yeast species using the conventional and internal transcribed spacer region sequencing methods as first or second global record from human superficial infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Mohamed Ahmed; Moubasher, Abdel-Aal Hassan; Soliman, Zeinab

    2016-10-01

    During the mycological analysis of skin and nail samples taken from patients with onychomycosis and tineas in Assiut city, it is interesting to report that yeast fungi were the main causal agents being cultured from 45.79% of total cases. In general, 21 species of yeast were isolated. Some of these are reported for the first time from clinical specimens. From the literature available up-to-date around the world, this study reports for the first time Saccharomycopsis fibuligera as the causal agent of four clinical cases: two onychomycoses, one tinea capitis and one tinea amiantacea. Also, it is reported here the second record for Trichosporon dohaense from a case of onychomycosis of a 40-year-old woman (after its original description in 2009 by Taj-Aldeen et al. J Clin Microbiol 47: 1791). Candida galli was also reported for the first time from clinical specimen (tinea unguium) in 2014 by Galán-Sánchez et al. Mycopathol 178: 303, and this study reports the second case of onychomycosis by C. galli. These strains were identified on the basis of their phenotypic, biochemical, physiological and genotypic features. Strains and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequences of these species are deposited at Assiut University Mycological Center Culture Collection (AUMC) and National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI) respectively. PMID:27392537

  18. Genotyping of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates in Iran by using single stranded conformational polymorphism-PCR technique and internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Matini, M; Rezaeian, M; Mohebali, M; Maghsood, A H; Rabiee, S; Rahimi-Foroushani, A; Fallah, M; Miahipour, A; Rezaie, S

    2012-12-01

    Infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of human urogenital infection, is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In spite of the high prevalence and medical importance of trichomoniasis, there is little knowledge about genetic epidemiology and genetic characterisation of this parasite. For this purpose, a Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism-PCR (SSCP-PCR) typing method was conducted for Iranian T. vaginalis isolates using 5.8s ribosomal gene (rRNA gene) and the flanking internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Nine hundred and fifty vaginal swab samples were examined in which 50 (5.3%) samples were parasitologically positive and used for molecular identification based on SSCP-PCR and nucleotide sequence analyses. Results of the SSCP analysis showed two distinct reproducible banding patterns (I, II) which were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis in the ITS1 regions. Frequencies of the SSCP banding patterns I and II were 84% (42/50) and 16% (8/50), respectively. In conclusion, SSCP-PCR analysis provided a reliable and sensitive method for strain genotyping of T. vaginalis based on the ITS1/5.8s/ITS2 region. This finding may help us gain more information about correlation between genetic properties and biological features of this parasite. PMID:23202606

  19. Rapid authentication of the precious herb saffron by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingming; Shi, Yuhua; Wu, Lan; Guo, Licheng; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Chao; Yan, Song; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Saffron is one of the most expensive species of Chinese herbs and has been subjected to various types of adulteration because of its high price and limited production. The present study introduces a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for the differentiation of saffron from its adulterants. This novel technique is sensitive, efficient and simple. Six specific LAMP primers were designed on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA of Crocus sativus. All LAMP amplifications were performed successfully, and visual detection occurred within 60 min at isothermal conditions of 65 °C. The results indicated that the LAMP primers are accurate and highly specific for the discrimination of saffron from its adulterants. In particular, 10 fg of genomic DNA was determined to be the limit for template accuracy of LAMP in saffron. Thus, the proposed novel, simple, and sensitive LAMP assay is well suited for immediate on-site discrimination of herbal materials. Based on the study, a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for utilizing the LAMP protocol for herbal authentication is provided. PMID:27146605

  20. Characterization of Dicrocoelium dendriticum isolates from small ruminants in Shaanxi Province, north-western China, using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Bian, Q Q; Zhao, G H; Jia, Y Q; Fang, Y Q; Cheng, W Y; Du, S Z; Ma, X T; Lin, Q

    2015-01-01

    The genetic variations in internal transcribed spacers (ITS) spanning ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA of Dicrocoelium dendriticum, isolated from sheep and goats in four geographical regions in Shaanxi province, were examined. The lengths of ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences for D. dendriticum were 749 bp, 161 bp and 234 bp, respectively. Intra-specific sequence variations of D. dendriticum were 0-0.5% for ITS-1 and 0-1.3% for ITS-2 rDNA, while the inter-specific variations among species in genus Dicrocoelium in ITS-2 rDNA were 3.4-12.3%. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of ITS-2 rDNA showed that all D. dendriticum isolates in the present study were grouped with reference D. dendriticum isolates from sheep and goats, and D. dendriticum isolates from cattle and Japanese serow were clustered in a sister clade. However, the phylogenetic tree could not reveal geographically genetic relationships of D. dendriticum isolates in different origins and hosts. These findings provided basic information for further study of molecular epidemiology and control of D. dendriticum infection in Shaanxi province as well as in the world.

  1. Genetic analysis of Fasciola isolates from cattle in Korea based on second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-Eun; Nguyen, Thuy Thi-Dieu; Kang, Tae-Gyu; Kweon, Chang-Hee; Kang, Seung-Won

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) has been used efficiently to identify the liver fluke species collected from different hosts and various geographic regions. ITS-2 sequences of 19 Fasciola samples collected from Korean native cattle were determined and compared. Sequence comparison including ITS-2 sequences of isolates from this study and reference sequences from Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica and intermediate Fasciola in Genbank revealed seven identical variable sites of investigated isolates. Among 19 samples, 12 individuals had ITS-2 sequences completely identical to that of pure F. hepatica, five possessed the sequences identical to F. gigantica type, whereas two shared the sequence of both F. hepatica and F. gigantica. No variations in length and nucleotide composition of ITS-2 sequence were observed within isolates that belonged to F. hepatica or F. gigantica. At the position of 218, five Fasciola containing a single-base substitution (C>T) formed a distinct branch inside the F. gigantica-type group which was similar to those of Asian-origin isolates. The phylogenetic tree of the Fasciola spp. based on complete ITS-2 sequences from this study and other representative isolates in different locations clearly showed that pure F. hepatica, F. gigantica type and intermediate Fasciola were observed. The result also provided additional genetic evidence for the existence of three forms of Fasciola isolated from native cattle in Korea by genetic approach using ITS-2 sequence. PMID:21494845

  2. The first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA as a molecular marker for phylogenetic and population analyses in crustacea.

    PubMed

    Chu, K H; Li, C P; Ho, H Y

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore the feasibility of using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA as a molecular marker for studying the interspecific and intraspecific genetic variations among crustaceans. We designed primers that could amplify ITS-1 from a majority of taxonomic groups of crustaceans. The gene was found to exhibit a high degree of length polymorphism among different groups, ranging from 182 bp in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite to approximately 820 bp in the spiny lobster Panulirus japonicus. With respect to differences between congeneric species, it was found that the ITS-1 sequences of 3 mitten crabs, Eriocheir sinensis, Eriocheir leptognathus, and Eriocheir formosa, exhibit 5.4% to 16.3% nucleotide divergence, suggesting that ITS-1 is informative for phylogenetic analysis at the species level. Yet there are extensive (0.9%-2.3%) variations within individual E. formosa, so that phylogenetic analyses could be obscured. ITS-1 was found to vary between 2 geographical populations of the shrimp Penaeus japonicus. The variations involved substitutions as well as insertions/deletions between shrimp from Australia and South China Sea. These results show that ITS-1 is highly divergent among different crustaceans and could be an appropriate marker for molecular systematic studies at the species and population levels, although the presence of intragenomic variation needs to be taken into consideration.

  3. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  4. Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (nu ITS2 rRNA) Sequence-Structure Phylogenetics: Towards an Automated Reconstruction of the Green Algal Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Mark A.; Keller, Alexander; Koetschan, Christian; Förster, Frank; Merget, Benjamin; Wolf, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background Chloroplast-encoded genes (matK and rbcL) have been formally proposed for use in DNA barcoding efforts targeting embryophytes. Extending such a protocol to chlorophytan green algae, though, is fraught with problems including non homology (matK) and heterogeneity that prevents the creation of a universal PCR toolkit (rbcL). Some have advocated the use of the nuclear-encoded, internal transcribed spacer two (ITS2) as an alternative to the traditional chloroplast markers. However, the ITS2 is broadly perceived to be insufficiently conserved or to be confounded by introgression or biparental inheritance patterns, precluding its broad use in phylogenetic reconstruction or as a DNA barcode. A growing body of evidence has shown that simultaneous analysis of nucleotide data with secondary structure information can overcome at least some of the limitations of ITS2. The goal of this investigation was to assess the feasibility of an automated, sequence-structure approach for analysis of IT2 data from a large sampling of phylum Chlorophyta. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences and secondary structures from 591 chlorophycean, 741 trebouxiophycean and 938 ulvophycean algae, all obtained from the ITS2 Database, were aligned using a sequence structure-specific scoring matrix. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed by Profile Neighbor-Joining coupled with a sequence structure-specific, general time reversible substitution model. Results from analyses of the ITS2 data were robust at multiple nodes and showed considerable congruence with results from published phylogenetic analyses. Conclusions/Significance Our observations on the power of automated, sequence-structure analyses of ITS2 to reconstruct phylum-level phylogenies of the green algae validate this approach to assessing diversity for large sets of chlorophytan taxa. Moreover, our results indicate that objections to the use of ITS2 for DNA barcoding should be weighed against the utility of an automated

  5. Phylogeny and biogeography of Allium (Amaryllidaceae: Allieae) based on nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and chloroplast rps16 sequences, focusing on the inclusion of species endemic to China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; He, Xing-Jin; Yu, Yan; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Allium comprises more than 800 species, placing it among the largest monocotyledonous genera. It is a variable group that is spread widely across the Holarctic region. Previous studies of Allium have been useful in identifying and assessing its evolutionary lineages. However, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of infrageneric taxonomy and evolution of Allium. Further understanding of its phylogeny and biogeography will be achieved only through continued phylogenetic studies, especially of those species endemic to China that have often been excluded from previous analyses. Earlier molecular studies have shown that Chinese Allium is not monophyletic, so the goal of the present study was to infer the phylogeny and biogeography of Allium and to provide a classification of Chinese Allium by placement of Chinese species in the context of the entire phylogeny. Methods Phylogenetic studies were based on sequence data of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rps16 intron, analysed using parsimony and Bayesian approaches. Biogeographical patterns were conducted using statistical dispersal–vicariance analysis (S-DIVA). Key Results Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Allium is monophyletic and consists of three major clades. Optimal reconstructions have favoured the ancestors of Amerallium, Anguinum, Vvedenskya, Porphyroprason and Melanocrommyum as originating in eastern Asia. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Allium is monophyletic but that some subgenera are not. The large genetic distances imply that Allium is of ancient origin. Molecular data suggest that its evolution proceeded along three separate evolutionary lines. S-DIVA indicates that the ancestor of Amerallium, Anguinum, Vvedenskya, Porphyroprason and Melanocrommyum originated from eastern Asia and underwent different biogeographical pathways. A taxonomic synopsis of Chinese Allium at sectional level is given, which divides Chinese

  6. Molecular approaches to differentiate three species of Nematodirus in sheep and goats from China based on internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G H; Jia, Y Q; Bian, Q Q; Nisbet, A J; Cheng, W Y; Liu, Y; Fang, Y Q; Ma, X T; Yu, S K

    2015-05-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequences of three Nematodirus species from naturally infected goats or sheep in two endemic provinces of China were analysed to establish an effective molecular approach to differentiate Nematodirus species in small ruminants. The respective intra-specific genetic variations in ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA regions were 0.3-1.8% and 0-0.4% in N. spathiger, 0-6.5% and 0-5.4% in N. helvetianus, and 0-4.4% and 0-6.1% in N. oiratianus from China. The respective intra-specific variations of ITS1 and ITS2 were 1.8-4.4% and 1.6-6.1% between N. oiratianus isolates from China and Iran, 5.7-7.1% and 6.3-8.3% between N. helvetianus samples from China and America. For N. spathiger, compared with samples from China, sequence differences in ITS1 rDNA were 0.3-2.4% in isolates from America, 0.3-2.9% in New Zealand and 2.1-2.4% in Australia. Genetic variations in ITS2 rDNA of N. spathiger were 0-0.4% between samples from China and America, and 0-0.8% between samples from China and New Zealand. Using mutation sites, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and specific PCR techniques were developed to differentiate these three Nematodirus species. The specific PCR assay allowed the accurate identification of N. oiratianus from other common nematodes with a sensitivity of 0.69 pg and further examination of Nematodirus samples demonstrated the reliability of these two molecular methods.

  7. Myxobolus cerebralis internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) sequences support recent spread of the parasite to North America and within Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whipps, C.M.; El-Matbouli, M.; Hedrick, R.P.; Blazer, V.; Kent, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular approaches for resolving relationships among the Myxozoa have relied mainly on small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. This region of the gene is generally used for higher phylogenetic studies, and the conservative nature of this gene may make it inadequate for intraspecific comparisons. Previous intraspecific studies of Myxobolus cerebralis based on molecular analyses reported that the sequence of SSU rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were highly conserved in representatives of the parasite from North America and Europe. Considering that the ITS is usually a more variable region than the SSU, we reanalyzed available sequences on GenBank and obtained sequences from other M. cerebralis representatives from the states of California and West Virginia in the USA and from Germany and Russia. With the exception of 7 base pairs, most of the sequence designated as ITS-1 in GenBank was a highly conserved portion of the rDNA near the 3-prime end of the SSU region. Nonetheless, the additional ITS-1 sequences obtained from the available geographic representatives were well conserved. It is unlikely that we would have observed virtually identical ITS-1 sequences between European and American M. cerebralis samples had it spread naturally over time, particularly when compared to the variation seen between isolates of another myxozoan (Kudoa thyrsites) that has most likely spread naturally. These data further support the hypothesis that the current distribution of M. cerebralis in North America is a result of recent introductions followed by dispersal via anthropogenic means, largely through the stocking of infected trout for sport fishing.

  8. Disparate infection patterns of Ceratomyxa shasta (Myxozoa) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) correlate with internal transcribed spacer-1 sequence variation in the parasite.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Stephen D; Bartholomew, Jerri L

    2010-04-01

    Ceratomyxa shasta is a virulent myxosporean parasite of salmon and trout in the Pacific Northwest of North America. The parasite is endemic in the Klamath River, Oregon/California, where a series of dams prevent movement of fish hosts between the upper and lower parts of the basin. Ceratomyxa shasta exhibits a range of infection patterns in different fish species above and below the dams. We hypothesised that the variations in infection and disease are indicators that different strains of the parasite exist, each with distinct host associations. Accordingly, we sought to identify strain-specific genetic markers in the ssrRNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1). We examined 46 C. shasta isolates from water samples and two fish hosts, from June 2007 field exposures at upper and lower Klamath River sites with similarly high parasite densities. We found 100% of non-native rainbow trout became infected and died at both locations. In contrast, mortality in native Chinook salmon was <10% in the upper basin, compared with up to 40% in the lower basin. Parasite ssrRNA sequences were identical from all fish. However, ITS-1 sequences contained multiple polymorphic loci and a trinucleotide repeat (ATC)(0-3) from which we defined four genotypes: 0, I, II and III. Non-native rainbow trout at both sites were infected with genotype II and with a low level of genotype III. Chinook salmon in the upper basin had genotypes II and III, whereas in the lower basin genotype I predominated. Genotype I was not detected in water from the upper basin, a finding consistent with the lack of anadromous Chinook salmon there. Genotype O was only detected in water from the upper basin. Resolution of C. shasta into sympatric, host-specific genotypes has implications for taxonomy, monitoring and management of this significant parasite. PMID:19895812

  9. SSCP-based identification of members within the Pseudoterranova decipiens complex (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea: Anisakidae) using genetic markers in the internal transcribed spacers of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; D'Amelio, S; Palm, H W; Paggi, L; George-Nascimento, M; Gasser, R B

    2002-06-01

    The anisakid nematodes morphologically corresponding with Pseudoterranova decipiens sensu lato (s.l.) (Krabbe, 1878) from different seal or sea lion hosts and geographical origins, previously identified as Pseudoterranova krabbei, P. decipiens (s.s.), P. bulbosa, P. azarasi and P. cattani by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, were characterized using a DNA approach. Also a population of P. decipiens (s.l.) from Chaenocephalus aceratus, the blackfin icefish, from Antarctica and another from Osmerus eperlanus, the European smelt, from Germany were included in the study. The first (ITS-1) and second (ITS-2) internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were amplified by PCR from individual nematodes and analysed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. While no variation in single-stranded ITS-1 and ITS-2 profiles was detected among samples representing each of the species or populations (with the exception of slight microheterogeneity), SSCP analysis of the ITS-2 amplicons allowed the unequivocal differentiation of all of the 5 sibling species of P. decipiens (s.l.) examined, which was supported by sequence differences in ITS rDNA. Samples representing the P. decipiens (s.l.) population from O. eperlanus had the same SSCP profile as those of P. decipiens (s.s.), which was supported by a lack of nucleotide difference in the ITS between them, suggesting that the former represented P. decipiens (s.s.). Based on SSCP results and ITS sequence data, P. decipiens (s.l.) from C. aceratus was genetically most distinct with respect to all other members of Pseudoterranova examined, which indicated that it may represent P. decipiens E (based on geographical origin) or a distinct species. These findings and the molecular approach taken should have important implications for studying the life-cycles, transmission patterns, epidemiology and population genetics of these anisakid nematodes, and the diagnosis of their infections

  10. A Real-Time PCR Method for Quantifying Viable Ascaris Eggs Using the First Internally Transcribed Spacer Region of Ribosomal DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Pecson, Brian M.; Barrios, José Antonio; Johnson, David R.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide, 1.4 billion people are infected with the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides. As a result, Ascaris eggs are commonly found in wastewater and sludges. The current microscopy method for detecting viable Ascaris eggs is time- and labor-intensive. The goal of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to determine the levels of total and viable Ascaris eggs in laboratory solutions using the first internally transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA. ITS-1 rDNA levels were proportional to Ascaris egg cell numbers, increasing as eggs developed from single cells to mature larvae and ultimately reaching a constant level per egg. Treatments causing >99% inactivation (high heat, moderate heat, ammonia, and UV) eliminated this increase in ITS-1 rDNA levels and caused decreases that were dependent on the treatment type. By taking advantage of this difference in ITS-1 rDNA level between viable, larvated eggs and inactivated, single-celled eggs, qPCR results were used to develop inactivation profiles for the different treatments. No statistical difference from the standard microscopy method was found in 75% of the samples (12 of 16). ITS-1 rRNA was detected only in samples containing viable eggs, but the levels were more variable than rDNA levels and ITS-1 rRNA could not be used for quantification. The detection limit of the rDNA-based method was approximately one larvated egg or 90 single-celled eggs; the detection limit for the rRNA-based method was several orders of magnitude higher. The rDNA qPCR method is promising for both research and regulatory applications. PMID:17056687

  11. Development of a Reverse Genetic System for Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus: Rescue of Recombinant Fluorescent Virus by Using Salmon Internal Transcribed Spacer Region 1 as a Novel Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Tambley, Carolina; Beltran, Carolina; Mascayano, Carolina; Sandoval, Nicolas; Olivares, Eduardo; Medina, Rafael A.; Spencer, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a serious disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), belonging to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. There is an urgent need to understand the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms of ISAV and to develop new vaccine approaches. Using a recombinant molecular biology approach, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetic system for ISAV, which includes the use of a novel fish promoter, the Atlantic salmon internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1). Salmon cells cotransfected with pSS-URG-based vectors expressing the eight viral RNA segments and four cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors that express the four proteins of the ISAV ribonucleoprotein complex allowed the generation of infectious recombinant ISAV (rISAV). We generated three recombinant viruses, wild-type rISAV901_09 and rISAVrS6-NotI-HPR containing a NotI restriction site and rISAVS6/EGFP-HPR harboring the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), both within the highly polymorphic region (HPR) of segment 6. All rescued viruses showed replication activity and cytopathic effect in Atlantic salmon kidney-infected cells. The fluorescent recombinant viruses also showed a characteristic cytopathic effect in salmon cells, and the viruses replicated to a titer of 6.5 × 105 PFU/ml, similar to that of the wild-type virus. This novel reverse genetics system offers a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of ISAV and to develop a new generation of ISAV vaccines to prevent and mitigate ISAV infection, which has had a profound effect on the salmon industry. PMID:25480750

  12. From genus to phylum: large-subunit and internal transcribed spacer rRNA operon regions show similar classification accuracies influenced by database composition.

    PubMed

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kuske, Cheryl R; Xie, Gary

    2014-02-01

    We compared the classification accuracy of two sections of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, individually and combined, and the 5' section (about 600 bp) of the large-subunit rRNA (LSU), using a naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN. A hand-curated ITS-LSU training set of 1,091 sequences and a larger training set of 8,967 ITS region sequences were used. Of the factors evaluated, database composition and quality had the largest effect on classification accuracy, followed by fragment size and use of a bootstrap cutoff to improve classification confidence. The naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN gave similar results at higher taxonomic levels, but the classifier was faster and more accurate at the genus level when a bootstrap cutoff was used. All of the ITS and LSU sections performed well (>97.7% accuracy) at higher taxonomic ranks from kingdom to family, and differences between them were small at the genus level (within 0.66 to 1.23%). When full-length sequence sections were used, the LSU outperformed the ITS1 and ITS2 fragments at the genus level, but the ITS1 and ITS2 showed higher accuracy when smaller fragment sizes of the same length and a 50% bootstrap cutoff were used. In a comparison using the larger ITS training set, ITS1 and ITS2 had very similar accuracy classification for fragments between 100 and 200 bp. Collectively, the results show that any of the ITS or LSU sections we tested provided comparable classification accuracy to the genus level and underscore the need for larger and more diverse classification training sets.

  13. A comparison of polymerase chain reaction and international organization for standardization methods for determination of Enterobacter sakazakii contamination of infant formulas from Chinese mainland markets.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingwang; Wu, Qingping; Yao, Lin; Dong, Xiaohui; Wu, Kui; Zhang, Jumei

    2009-12-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is an emerging foodborne pathogen associated with meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in infants. One of the main transmission vehicles is the commercially available infant formulas. To provide efficient options and direction for detecting E. sakazakii in infant formulas, evaluation of different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the ompA gene, and the alpha-1,4-glucosidase gene (gluA) of this organism, were compared to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method for detecting E. sakazakii in the 243 commercial infant formula samples. Twelve samples were found to be positive for E. sakazakii by all the PCR assays used, followed by sequencing of PCR products. Ten samples were found to be positive by the ISO method, and all 10 gave positive signals for all the PCR amplifications. In contrast, four false-positive results were generated by single-PCR of the ITS region and one false-positive result targeting the ompA gene, while two false-negative results occurred with the ISO method. Combined with selective enrichment step(s), duplex-PCR targeting ITS and ompA and targeting ompA and gluA genes or single-PCR of the gluA gene can be used to test for contamination by E. sakazakii in infant formulas before they enter the market. PCR techniques will be helpful for routine monitoring and risk assessment for large-scale screenings.

  14. Co-infection of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. among livestock in Malaysia as revealed by amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer II DNA region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. are reported to be the most prevalent and highly pathogenic parasites in livestock, particularly in small ruminants. However, the routine conventional tool used in Malaysia could not differentiate the species accurately and therefore limiting the understanding of the co-infections between these two genera among livestock in Malaysia. This study is the first attempt to identify the strongylids of veterinary importance in Malaysia (i.e., H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp.) by amplification and sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer II DNA region. Results Overall, 118 (cattle: 11 of 98 or 11.2%; deer: 4 of 70 or 5.7%; goats: 99 of 157 or 63.1%; swine: 4 of 91 or 4.4%) out of the 416 collected fecal samples were microscopy positive with strongylid infection. The PCR and sequencing results demonstrated that 93 samples (1 or 25.0% of deer; 92 or 92.9% of goats) contained H. contortus. In addition, Trichostrongylus colubriformis was observed in 75 (75.8% of 99) of strongylid infected goats and Trichostrongylus axei in 4 (4.0%) of 99 goats and 2 (50.0%) of 4 deer. Based on the molecular results, co-infection of H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. (H. contortus + T. colubriformis denoted as HTC; H. contortus + T. axei denoted as HTA) were only found in goats. Specifically, HTC co-infections have higher rate (71 or 45.2% of 157) compared to HTA co-infections (3 or 1.9% of 157). Conclusions The present study is the first molecular identification of strongylid species among livestock in Malaysia which is essential towards a better knowledge of the epidemiology of gastro-intestinal parasitic infection among livestock in the country. Furthermore, a more comprehensive or nationwide molecular-based study on gastro-intestinal parasites in livestock should be carried out in the future, given that molecular tools could assist in improving diagnosis of veterinary parasitology in Malaysia due to its high

  15. Characterization of Trichuris trichiura from humans and T. suis from pigs in China using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, G H; Zhou, W; Nisbet, A J; Xu, M J; Zhou, D H; Zhao, G H; Wang, S K; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Zhu, X Q

    2014-03-01

    Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis parasitize (at the adult stage) the caeca of humans and pigs, respectively, causing trichuriasis. Despite these parasites being of human and animal health significance, causing considerable socio-economic losses globally, little is known of the molecular characteristics of T. trichiura and T. suis from China. In the present study, the entire first and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1 and ITS-2) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of T. trichiura and T. suis from China were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the representative amplicons were cloned and sequenced, and sequence variation in the ITS rDNA was examined. The ITS rDNA sequences for the T. trichiura and T. suis samples were 1222-1267 bp and 1339-1353 bp in length, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that the ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNAs of both whipworms were 600-627 bp and 655-661 bp, 154 bp, and 468-486 bp and 530-538 bp in size, respectively. Sequence variation in ITS rDNA within and among T. trichiura and T. suis was examined. Excluding nucleotide variations in the simple sequence repeats, the intra-species sequence variation in the ITS-1 was 0.2-1.7% within T. trichiura, and 0-1.5% within T. suis. For ITS-2 rDNA, the intra-species sequence variation was 0-1.3% within T. trichiura and 0.2-1.7% within T. suis. The inter-species sequence differences between the two whipworms were 60.7-65.3% for ITS-1 and 59.3-61.5% for ITS-2. These results demonstrated that the ITS rDNA sequences provide additional genetic markers for the characterization and differentiation of the two whipworms. These data should be useful for studying the epidemiology and population genetics of T. trichiura and T. suis, as well as for the diagnosis of trichuriasis in humans and pigs.

  16. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations providing information more quickly than other time-honoured methods traditionally used in these types of analyses. PMID:20331883

  17. Identification of transcribed sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hochgeschwender, U.; Gardiner, K.

    1994-12-31

    The international Human Genome Project is providing three essential ingredients for the efficient identification of diseases genes. One is the high density of polymorphic markers that are critical for the mapping of disease genes to defined chromosomal regions. The second is a physical map in the form of overlapping genomic clones in YACs or cosmids that will allow detailed analysis of the critical region. The third is a transcription map (gene map) that will provide a bank of regionally mapped candidate genes to test for mutations once a disease gene is mapped. In the past 5 years the identification and mapping of several thousand simple-sequence-repeat polymorphisms has provided the first ingredient, and the physical maps of many chromosomes are approaching completion. However, the transcription map is problematic and a long way from being a useful tool. A detailed analysis of the technology involved in building the requisite transcription maps is found in this book, the published proceedings of the third international workshop on the topic, held October 2-4, 1993, in association with the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in New Orleans.

  18. A comparison of polymerase chain reaction and international organization for standardization methods for determination of Enterobacter sakazakii contamination of infant formulas from Chinese mainland markets.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingwang; Wu, Qingping; Yao, Lin; Dong, Xiaohui; Wu, Kui; Zhang, Jumei

    2009-12-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is an emerging foodborne pathogen associated with meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in infants. One of the main transmission vehicles is the commercially available infant formulas. To provide efficient options and direction for detecting E. sakazakii in infant formulas, evaluation of different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the ompA gene, and the alpha-1,4-glucosidase gene (gluA) of this organism, were compared to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method for detecting E. sakazakii in the 243 commercial infant formula samples. Twelve samples were found to be positive for E. sakazakii by all the PCR assays used, followed by sequencing of PCR products. Ten samples were found to be positive by the ISO method, and all 10 gave positive signals for all the PCR amplifications. In contrast, four false-positive results were generated by single-PCR of the ITS region and one false-positive result targeting the ompA gene, while two false-negative results occurred with the ISO method. Combined with selective enrichment step(s), duplex-PCR targeting ITS and ompA and targeting ompA and gluA genes or single-PCR of the gluA gene can be used to test for contamination by E. sakazakii in infant formulas before they enter the market. PCR techniques will be helpful for routine monitoring and risk assessment for large-scale screenings. PMID:19743923

  19. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  20. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  1. Utility of internally transcribed spacer region of rDNA (ITS) and β-tubulin gene sequences to infer genetic diversity and migration patterns of Colletotrichum truncatum infecting Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Kandyce; Ramdial, Hema; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is among the most economically important diseases affecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) production in the tropics and subtropics. Of the three species of Colletotrichum implicated as causal agents of pepper anthracnose, C. truncatum is considered to be the most destructive in agro-ecosystems worldwide. However, the genetic variation and the migration potential of C. truncatum infecting pepper are not known. Five populations were selected for study and a two-locus (internally transcribed spacer region, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and β-tubulin, β-TUB) sequence data set was generated and used in the analyses. Sequences of the ITS region were less informative than β -tubulin gene sequences based on comparisons of DNA polymorphism indices. Trinidad had the highest genetic diversity and also had the largest effective population size in pairwise comparisons with the other populations. The Trinidad population also demonstrated significant genetic differentiation from the other populations. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses both suggested significant genetic variation within populations more so than among populations. A consensus Maximum Likelihood tree based on β-TUB gene sequences revealed very little intraspecific diversity for all isolates except for Trinidad. Two clades consisting solely of Trinidad isolates may have diverged earlier than the other isolates. There was also evidence of directional migration among the five populations. These findings may have a direct impact on the development of integrated disease management strategies to control C. truncatum infection in pepper. PMID:26843942

  2. [Molecular epidemiology of the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) by the internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) method and the phage open reading frame typing (POT) method].

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuko; Takemori, Yukiko; Iwata, Yasunori; Fujita, Shinichi; Sakai, Yoshio; Wada, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most common causative bacteria of hospital acquired infection, and should be rapidly identified for infection control. For this purpose, in our hospital, the PCR electrophoresis patterns of spacer regions (ITS: internal transcribed spacers) (ITS-PCR) are combined with a toxigenicity assay to establish a strain identification method for outbreak surveillance. In the present study, the usefulness of this method was evaluated in comparison with the POT (phage-open reading frame typing) method. One hundred MRSA strains isolated from inpatients in our hospital between April 2011 and March 2012 were classified into 25 patterns using the ITS-PCR method combined with a toxigenicity assay. The strains could be classified into 46 patterns using the POT method. ITS-PCR type 22 strain producing enterotoxin C and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 could be further classified into 7 patterns using the POT method. In the outbreak of the type 22 strain, cross-infection could be excluded by additional analysis using the POT method, providing more precise information on strain identification. We identified that some strains of the same POT type consisted of different ITS-PCR types or toxigenicities. Therefore, these results suggest that the combination of ITS-PCR method plus toxigenicity assay with POT method may be a useful technique of MRSA typing.

  3. Novel genetic diversity within Anopheles punctimacula s.l.: phylogenetic discrepancy between the Barcode cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2).

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Jose R; Scott, Marilyn E; Bermingham, Eldredge; Sanjur, Oris I; Rovira, Jose R; Dutari, Larissa C; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Bickersmith, Sara; Conn, Jan E

    2013-10-01

    Anopheles punctimacula s.l. is a regional malaria vector in parts of Central America, but its role in transmission is controversial due to its unresolved taxonomic status. Two cryptic species, An. malefactor and An. calderoni, have been previously confused with this taxon, and evidence for further genetic differentiation has been proposed. In the present study we collected and morphologically identified adult female mosquitoes of An. punctimacula s.l. from 10 localities across Panama and one in Costa Rica. DNA sequences from three molecular regions, the three prime end of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene (3' COI), the Barcode region in the five prime end of the COI (5' COI), and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) were used to test the hypothesis of new molecular lineages within An. punctimacula s.l. Phylogenetic analyses using the 3' COI depicted six highly supported molecular lineages (A-F), none of which was An. malefactor. In contrast, phylogenetic inference with the 5' COI demonstrated paraphyly. Tree topologies based on the combined COI regions and ITS2 sequence data supported the same six lineages as the 3' COI alone. As a whole this evidence suggests that An. punctimacula s.l. comprises two geographically isolated lineages, but it is not clear whether these are true species. The phylogenetic structure of the An. punctimacula cluster as well as that of other unknown lineages (C type I vs C type II; D vs E) appears to be driven by geographic partition, because members of these assemblages did not overlap spatially. We report An. malefactor for the first time in Costa Rica, but our data do not support the presence of An. calderoni in Panama. PMID:23806568

  4. Phylogenetic study of Baylisascaris schroederi isolated from Qinling subspecies of giant panda in China based on combined nuclear 5.8S and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Hui; Li, Hong-Mei; Ryan, Una M; Cong, Mei-Mei; Hu, Bing; Gao, Man; Ren, Wan-Xin; Wang, Xing-Ye; Zhang, Shui-Ping; Lin, Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Yu, San-Ke

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region spanning 5.8S rDNA and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of Baylisascaris schroederi isolated from the Qinling subspecies of giant panda in Shaanxi Province, China were amplified and sequenced. Sequence variations in the two rDNA regions within B. schroederi and among species in the family Ascarididae were examined. The lengths of B. schroederi 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences were 156 bp and 327 bp, respectively, and no nucleotide variation was found in these two rDNA regions among the 20 B. schroederi samples examined, and these ITS-2 sequences were identical to that of B. schroederi isolated from giant panda in Sichuan province, China. The inter-species differences in 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences among members of the family Ascarididae were 0-1.3% and 0-17.7%, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships among species in the Ascarididae were re-constructed by Bayesian inference (Bayes), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses, based on combined sequences of 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA. All B. schroederi samples clustered together and sistered to B. transfuga with high posterior probabilities/bootstrap values, which further confirmed that nematodes isolated from the Qinling subspecies of giant panda in Shaanxi Province, China represent B. schroederi. Because of the large number of ambiguously aligned sequence positions (difficulty of inferring homology by positions), ITS-2 sequence alone is likely unsuitable for phylogenetic analyses at the family level, but the combined 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNA sequences provide alternative genetic markers for the identification of B. schroederi and for phylogenetic analysis of parasites in the family Ascarididae.

  5. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  6. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Vera; James, Erick R; Perlman, Steve J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica), 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis), as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  7. Misidentification of Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii as Aspergillus flavus: characterization by internal transcribed spacer, β-Tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, metabolic fingerprinting, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tam, Emily W T; Chen, Jonathan H K; Lau, Eunice C L; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Fung, Kitty S C; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii are Aspergillus species that phenotypically resemble Aspergillus flavus. In the last decade, a number of case reports have identified A. nomius and A. tamarii as causes of human infections. In this study, using an internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, only 8 of 11 clinical isolates reported as A. flavus in our clinical microbiology laboratory by phenotypic methods were identified as A. flavus. The other three isolates were A. nomius (n = 2) or A. tamarii (n = 1). The results corresponded with those of metabolic fingerprinting, in which the A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii strains were separated into three clusters based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC MS) analysis. The first two patients with A. nomius infections had invasive aspergillosis and chronic cavitary and fibrosing pulmonary and pleural aspergillosis, respectively, whereas the third patient had A. tamarii colonization of the airway. Identification of the 11 clinical isolates and three reference strains by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) showed that only six of the nine strains of A. flavus were identified correctly. None of the strains of A. nomius and A. tamarii was correctly identified. β-Tubulin or the calmodulin gene should be the gene target of choice for identifying A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii. To improve the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS, the number of strains for each species in MALDI-TOF MS databases should be expanded to cover intraspecies variability.

  8. Misidentification of Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii as Aspergillus flavus: Characterization by Internal Transcribed Spacer, β-Tubulin, and Calmodulin Gene Sequencing, Metabolic Fingerprinting, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W. T.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Lau, Eunice C. L.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii are Aspergillus species that phenotypically resemble Aspergillus flavus. In the last decade, a number of case reports have identified A. nomius and A. tamarii as causes of human infections. In this study, using an internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, only 8 of 11 clinical isolates reported as A. flavus in our clinical microbiology laboratory by phenotypic methods were identified as A. flavus. The other three isolates were A. nomius (n = 2) or A. tamarii (n = 1). The results corresponded with those of metabolic fingerprinting, in which the A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii strains were separated into three clusters based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC MS) analysis. The first two patients with A. nomius infections had invasive aspergillosis and chronic cavitary and fibrosing pulmonary and pleural aspergillosis, respectively, whereas the third patient had A. tamarii colonization of the airway. Identification of the 11 clinical isolates and three reference strains by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) showed that only six of the nine strains of A. flavus were identified correctly. None of the strains of A. nomius and A. tamarii was correctly identified. β-Tubulin or the calmodulin gene should be the gene target of choice for identifying A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii. To improve the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS, the number of strains for each species in MALDI-TOF MS databases should be expanded to cover intraspecies variability. PMID:24452174

  9. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Small Senegalese Legumes by 16S-23S rRNA Intergenic Gene Spacers and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprint Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Doignon-Bourcier, Florence; Willems, Anne; Coopman, Renata; Laguerre, Gisele; Gillis, Monique; de Lajudie, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations. PMID:10966419

  10. Genotypic characterization of Bradyrhizobium strains nodulating small Senegalese legumes by 16S-23S rRNA intergenic gene spacers and amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprint analyses.

    PubMed

    Doignon-Bourcier, F; Willems, A; Coopman, R; Laguerre, G; Gillis, M; de Lajudie, P

    2000-09-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations.

  11. Identification of Lactobacillus Isolates from the Gastrointestinal Tract, Silage, and Yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Ng, J.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PMID:10473450

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the 16S - 23S spacer region in an rRNA gene cluster from tobacco chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Takaiwa, F; Sugiura, M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a spacer region between 16S and 23S rRNA genes from tobacco chloroplasts has been determined. The spacer region is 2080 bp long and encodes tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes which contain intervening sequences of 707 bp and 710 bp, respectively. Strong homology between the two intervening sequences is observed. These spacer tRNAs are synthesized as part of an 8.2 kb precursor molecule containing 16S and 23S rRNA sequences. Images PMID:6281739

  13. The Mycoplasma gallisepticum 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region sequence as a novel tool for epizootiological studies.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Ziv; Callison, S; Ferguson-Noel, N; Laibinis, V; Wooten, R; Kleven, S H

    2007-06-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) contains two sets of rRNA genes (5S, 16S and 23S) in its genome, but only one of the two is organized in an operon cluster and contains a unique 660-nucleotide intergenic spacer region (IGSR) between the 16S and the 23S rRNA genes. We designed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific amplification of the complete MG IGSR segment. The MG IGSR PCR was tested on 18 avian mollicute species and was confirmed as MG specific. The reaction sensitivity was demonstrated by comparing it to the well-established MG mgc2 PCR. The MG IGSR sequence was found to be highly variable (discrimination [D] index of 0.950) among a variety of MG laboratory strains, vaccine strains, and field isolates. The sequencing of the MG IGSR appears to be a valuable single-locus sequence typing (SLST) tool for MG isolate differentiation in diagnostic cases and epizootiological studies. PMID:17626483

  14. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  15. Distanced Data: Transcribing Other People's Research Tapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Susan A.; Powick, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report on our qualitative study involving eight individuals hired to transcribe research tapes in university contexts. We consider issues of data analysis and data trustworthiness and the implications for both when transcription is assigned to someone other than the researcher. We explore the challenges transcribers faced…

  16. A quick transcribing technique for oral data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schleicher, David

    1972-01-01

    Stenographic techniques offer a means for transcribing oral data accurately and efficiently. In one such application, during five Appolo lunar missions, a rough but helpful transcript was produced within minutes. Similarly, lectures, conferences, and audio tapes can be accurately transcribed as promptly as necessary. Computer programs for translating shorthand notes are being developed; they will increase both speed and accuracy of translation.

  17. First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Julia

    2008-04-01

    Qualitative research in primary care deepens understanding of phenomena such as health, illness and health care encounters. Many qualitative studies collect audio or video data (e.g. recordings of interviews, focus groups or talk in consultation), and these are usually transcribed into written form for closer study. Transcribing appears to be a straightforward technical task, but in fact involves judgements about what level of detail to choose (e.g. omitting non-verbal dimensions of interaction), data interpretation (e.g. distinguishing 'I don't, no' from 'I don't know') and data representation (e.g. representing the verbalization 'hwarryuhh' as 'How are you?'). Representation of audible and visual data into written form is an interpretive process which is therefore the first step in analysing data. Different levels of detail and different representations of data will be required for projects with differing aims and methodological approaches. This article is a guide to practical and theoretical considerations for researchers new to qualitative data analysis. Data examples are given to illustrate decisions to be made when transcribing or assigning the task to others.

  18. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  19. 5. international workshop on the identification of transcribed sequences

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This workshop was held November 5--8, 1995 in Les Embiez, France. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on mapping the human genome. Attention is focused on the following topics: transcriptional maps; functional analysis; techniques; model organisms; and tissue specific libraries and genes. Abstracts are included of the papers that were presented.

  20. Transcribed dark matter: meaning or myth?

    PubMed

    Ponting, Chris P; Belgard, T Grant

    2010-10-15

    Genomic tiling arrays, cDNA sequencing and, more recently, RNA-Seq have provided initial insights into the extent and depth of transcribed sequence across human and other genomes. These methods have led to greatly improved annotations of protein-coding genes, but have also identified transcription outside of annotated exons. One resultant issue that has aroused dispute is the balance of transcription of known exons against transcription outside of known exons. While non-genic 'dark matter' transcription was found by tiling arrays to be pervasive, it was seen to contribute only a small percentage of the polyadenylated transcriptome in some RNA-Seq experiments. This apparent contradiction has been compounded by a lack of clarity about what exactly constitutes a protein-coding gene. It remains unclear, for example, whether or not all transcripts that overlap on either strand within a genomic locus should be assigned to a single gene locus, including those that fail to share promoters, exons and splice junctions. The inability of tiling arrays and RNA-Seq to count transcripts, rather than exons or exon pairs, adds to these difficulties. While there is agreement that thousands of apparently non-coding loci are present outside of protein-coding genes in the human genome, there is vigorous debate of what constitutes evidence for their functionality. These issues will only be resolved upon the demonstration, or otherwise, that organismal or cellular phenotypes frequently result when non-coding RNA loci are disrupted.

  1. Transcribing Disordered Speech: By Target or by Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to transcribe disordered speech is a vital tool for speech-language pathologists, as accurate description of a client's speech output is needed for both diagnosis and effective intervention. Clients in the speech clinic often use sounds that are not part of the target sound system and which may, in some cases, be sounds not found in…

  2. Training and Availability of Braille Transcribers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corn, Anne L.; Wall, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of Braille transcribers in 40 states found Braille production systems rely on volunteers and hence Braille transcription is not considered a bona fide career. The majority cited low funding and resources as obstacles to change. Issues of certification, training, availability, and definition are discussed, along with recommendations.…

  3. Terminal dual-labeling of a transcribed RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Shibo; Ma, Dejun; Yi, Long; Mei, Shiyue; Ouyang, Di; Xi, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    We report here a site-specific terminal dual-labeling strategy for a transcribed RNA. The combination of 5'-thiophosphoryl and 3'-amino functionalities enables efficient RNA dual labeling with different fluorophores at both 5'- and 3'-terminal positions specifically. This dual-labeling strategy is applied to pre-miRNA for construction of molecular beacons. The RNA beacons in their native hairpin formation bring the fluorophore and quencher groups into close proximity, leading to fluorescence quenching by FRET effect. Ribonuclease (dicer enzyme or micrococcal nuclease) can efficiently cleave RNA beacons leading to concentration- and time-dependent fluorescence increase. The dual-labeling strategy for transcribed RNAs involves only commercially available reagents, enzymes and native RNA, making it more accessible for general applications.

  4. Phenomenology in nursing research: methodology, interviewing and transcribing.

    PubMed

    Balls, Paula

    While nurses can relate to the phenomenological approach because they see it as sharing the values of nursing, this may not be sufficient on its own to start conducting this kind of research. Using examples from my own research experience, this article aims to examine what draws nursing to this method and why nurses think they may be good at it. It also offers practical advice on how to carry out a good interview, how and what to transcribe and how to use quotes to support research.

  5. Project to transcribe old ship logs provides important weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-11-01

    Kathy Wendolkowski is a citizen scientist. It's a term that Wendolkowski considers far too lofty for what she claims is simply a happy addiction that she and others have for transcribing old logs from naval ship and other vessels. They perform this task to glean the regularly recorded weather data from those logs for the benefit of science. For Wendolkowski, though, greater satisfaction comes from reading what the logs also reveal about the daily lives of the sailors as well as any accompanying historical drama.

  6. Drosophila Paf1 modulates chromatin structure at actively transcribed genes.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Karen; Wei, Wenxiang; Ardehali, M Behfar; Werner, Janis; Zhu, Bing; Reinberg, Danny; Lis, John T

    2006-01-01

    The Paf1 complex in yeast has been reported to influence a multitude of steps in gene expression through interactions with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and chromatin-modifying complexes; however, it is unclear which of these many activities are primary functions of Paf1 and are conserved in metazoans. We have identified and characterized the Drosophila homologs of three subunits of the yeast Paf1 complex and found striking differences between the yeast and Drosophila Paf1 complexes. We demonstrate that although Drosophila Paf1, Rtf1, and Cdc73 colocalize broadly with actively transcribing, phosphorylated Pol II, and all are recruited to activated heat shock genes with similar kinetics; Rtf1 does not appear to be a stable part of the Drosophila Paf1 complex. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of Paf1 or Rtf1 leads to defects in induction of Hsp70 RNA, but tandem RNAi-chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that loss of neither Paf1 nor Rtf1 alters the density or distribution of phosphorylated Pol II on the active Hsp70 gene. However, depletion of Paf1 reduces trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in the Hsp70 promoter region and significantly decreases the recruitment of chromatin-associated factors Spt6 and FACT, suggesting that Paf1 may manifest its effects on transcription through modulating chromatin structure. PMID:16354696

  7. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  8. Medical Terminology of the Circulatory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Developed as a result of an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis…

  9. The Selenocysteine tRNA Gene in Leishmania major Is Transcribed by both RNA Polymerase II and RNA Polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Mejía, Norma E.; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E.; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Vizuet-de-Rueda, Juan C.; Cevallos, Ana M.; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Manning-Cela, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic tRNAs, transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), contain boxes A and B as internal promoter elements. One exception is the selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (tRNA-Sec), whose transcription is directed by an internal box B and three extragenic sequences in vertebrates. Here we report on the transcriptional analysis of the tRNA-Sec gene in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. This organism has unusual mechanisms of gene expression, including Pol II polycistronic transcription and maturation of mRNAs by trans splicing, a process that attaches a 39-nucleotide miniexon to the 5′ end of all the mRNAs. In L. major, tRNA-Sec is encoded by a single gene inserted into a Pol II polycistronic unit, in contrast to most tRNAs, which are clustered at the boundaries of polycistronic units. 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that some tRNA-Sec transcripts contain the miniexon at the 5′ end and a poly(A) tail at the 3′ end, indicating that the tRNA-Sec gene is polycistronically transcribed by Pol II and processed by trans splicing and polyadenylation, as was recently reported for the tRNA-Sec genes in the related parasite Trypanosoma brucei. However, nuclear run-on assays with RNA polymerase inhibitors and with cells that were previously UV irradiated showed that the tRNA-Sec gene in L. major is also transcribed by Pol III. Thus, our results indicate that RNA polymerase specificity in Leishmania is not absolute in vivo, as has recently been found in other eukaryotes. PMID:25548151

  10. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  11. Confirmation of hybrid origin of Cyrtanthus based on the sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to create interspecific hybrids between Cyrtanthus elatus and C. sanguineus and to confirm the hybrid origin of the progeny based on morphological characters and using molecular markers. The tip of the leaves, the shape and size of cells, and stomata distribution i...

  12. Sequence variation of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) in commercially important Phytoseiidae mites.

    PubMed

    Navajas, M; Lagnel, J; Fauvel, G; de Moraes, G

    1999-11-01

    Preliminary work is needed to assess the usefulness of different markers at different taxonomic scales when a new group is analyzed, such as the commercially important Phytoseiidae mites. We investigate here the level of sequence variation of the nuclear ribosomal spacers ITS 1 and 2 and the 5.8S gene in six species of Phytoseiidae: Neoseiulus culifornicus, N. fallacis, Euseius concordis, Metaseiulus occidentalis, Typhlodromus pyri and Phytoseiulus persimilis. As expected, the 5.8S gene (148 base pairs) is markedly conserved and displays little variation in between genera comparisons. ITS1 and ITS2 show contrasting patterns: while the ITS2 is short (80-89 bp) and shows little variation, the ITS1 is longer (303-404 bp) and is very variable in sequence. This fact compromises reliable nucleotide homologies when comparing the genera. The comparison of ITS1 sequence similarity at the species level might be useful for species identification, however, the value of ITS in taxonomic studies does not extend to the level of the family. The intraspecific variations of ITS were investigated in three species: N. californicus, N. fallacis and E. concordis. The first species has identical ITS1 sequences and the last two display low polymorphism (2 nucleotide substitutions). The ITS2 and 5.8S sequences were identical in all three subspecies comparisons.

  13. Sequence variation of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) in commercially important Phytoseiidae mites.

    PubMed

    Navajas, M; Lagnel, J; Fauvel, G; de Moraes, G

    1999-11-01

    Preliminary work is needed to assess the usefulness of different markers at different taxonomic scales when a new group is analyzed, such as the commercially important Phytoseiidae mites. We investigate here the level of sequence variation of the nuclear ribosomal spacers ITS 1 and 2 and the 5.8S gene in six species of Phytoseiidae: Neoseiulus culifornicus, N. fallacis, Euseius concordis, Metaseiulus occidentalis, Typhlodromus pyri and Phytoseiulus persimilis. As expected, the 5.8S gene (148 base pairs) is markedly conserved and displays little variation in between genera comparisons. ITS1 and ITS2 show contrasting patterns: while the ITS2 is short (80-89 bp) and shows little variation, the ITS1 is longer (303-404 bp) and is very variable in sequence. This fact compromises reliable nucleotide homologies when comparing the genera. The comparison of ITS1 sequence similarity at the species level might be useful for species identification, however, the value of ITS in taxonomic studies does not extend to the level of the family. The intraspecific variations of ITS were investigated in three species: N. californicus, N. fallacis and E. concordis. The first species has identical ITS1 sequences and the last two display low polymorphism (2 nucleotide substitutions). The ITS2 and 5.8S sequences were identical in all three subspecies comparisons. PMID:10668860

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in internal transcribed spacer genes of Balantidium coli (Litostomatea, Ciliophora).

    PubMed

    Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Fonseca-Salamanca, Flery; Martínez-Díaz, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    The species Balantidium coli is the only ciliate that parasitizes humans. It has been described in other primates, and it has been proposed that the species B. suis from pigs and B. struthionis from ostriches are synonyms of B. coli. Previous genetic analysis of pig and ostrich Balantidium isolates found a genetic polymorphism in the ITS region but its taxonomic relevance was not established. We have extended the genetic analysis to Balantidium isolates of pig, gorilla, human and ostrich origin. We have PCR-amplified and sequenced the ITS region of individual Balantidium cells. The predicted ITS secondary structures of the sequences obtained were transferred by homology modelling to the sequences of other Trichostomatia ciliates (Isotricha, Troglodytella, Lacrymaria and Spathidium) and compared to determine the importance of the differences in the primary sequences. The results show that the ITS2 secondary structure of the species considered follows the general pattern of other ciliates, although with some deviations. There are at least two main types of ITS sequence variants in B. coli which could be present in the same cell and they are common to the mammal and avian hosts studied. These data do not support B. suis and B. struthionis as distinct species. PMID:21840258

  15. Transcribing and digitizing eighteenth- and nineteenth-century letters for a historical digital repository.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Emily S; Kipnis, Daniel G; Angelo, F Michael

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2011, the Scott Memorial Library purchased 53 letters belonging to an 1841 graduate of Jefferson Medical College, John Plimpton Green. The library staff transcribed and digitized the letters, creating an online collection in the university's institutional repository, Jefferson Digital Commons. This article will detail the process of transcribing and digitizing the collection along with sharing statistics and the benefits of this project to global researchers.

  16. The Voice Transcription Technique: Use of Voice Recognition Software to Transcribe Digital Interview Data in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    Transcribing interview data is a time-consuming task that most qualitative researchers dislike. Transcribing is even more difficult for people with physical limitations because traditional transcribing requires manual dexterity and the ability to sit at a computer for long stretches of time. Researchers have begun to explore using an automated…

  17. Identification of transcribed sequences in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, K.

    1992-12-01

    The workshop was held at the National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, on October 4 and 5, 1991. Twenty-four investigators attended from England, Germany and the United States. The topics discussed included: Genome sequence analysis using computer assisted detection of open reading frames, splice sites and hexamer patterns, direct exon identification using trapping of internal and 3' exons, and a recombination based system, cDNA library construction and screening, including the use of normalization and subtraction procedures, Alu and splice donor site PCR from hybrid cell lines, and microdissection clones as probes, use of labeled CDNAS as probes to screen lambda and cosmid libraries, and sequencing of random cDNAs.

  18. Genetic diversity of phenazine- and pyoluteorin-producing pseudomonads isolated from green pepper rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiming; Dong, Dexian; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong; Xu, Yuquan

    2006-03-01

    The genetic diversity among indigenous phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA)-producing and pyoluteorin (Plt)-producing isolates of pseudomonads screened from green pepper rhizosphere was exploited in this study. A total of 48 bacterium isolates producing one or both of these antibiotics were screened from green pepper rhizosphere in diverse regions in China. Among these isolates, 45 could produce PCA, 3 could produce both PCA and Plt, and none could produce Plt only. Based on the restriction patterns of partial 16S and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR fragments generated by enzyme HaeIII or HinfI, these isolates fell into 19 or 17 distinct groups respectively, indicating that there was a significant diversity among them. Polygenetic analysis of the partial 16S rDNA and 16S-23S ITS sequence from the representative in each group in the context of similar sequence from previously described bacterial species indicated that most isolates were closely related to the species of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Some of these representatives of these isolates, then, are likely to be novel strains or species in these two genera. PMID:16395554

  19. Transcribed sequences in the human genome to be held in San Francisco, November 7 and 8, 1992. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Second International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences was held in San Francisco on November 7--8, 1992. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss and evaluate techniques for developing a complete transcriptional map of the human genome. Such a map requires the positions, sequences, and expression patterns of all genes. This goal is being approached from two different directions, each with strengths and weaknesses. One method is to identify the transcribed sequences from genomic DNA of a given region; the other is to systematically sequence and map cDNAs. The cDNA approach yields sequence information rapidly, but mapping each cDNA is a technical challenge. In the first approach, the map locations of genomic sequences are known at the outset, and the challenge is to identify exons. The efficient construction of a transcriptional map will require a diverse array of techniques.

  20. Highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are impediments to replication fork progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Azvolinsky, Anna; Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Replication forks face multiple obstacles that slow their progression. By two-dimensional gel analysis, yeast forks pause at stable DNA protein complexes, and this pausing is greatly increased in the absence of the Rrm3 helicase. We used a genome wide approach to identify 96 sites of very high DNA polymerase binding in wild type cells. Most of these binding sites were not previously identified pause sites. Rather, the most highly represented genomic category among high DNA polymerase binding sites was the open reading frames (ORFs) of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes. Twice as many pause sites were identified in rrm3 compared to wild type cells as pausing in this strain occurred at both highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes and the previously identified protein DNA complexes. ORFs of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are the first class of natural pause sites that are not exacerbated in rrm3 cells. PMID:19560424

  1. Differential Reading, Naming, and Transcribing Speeds of Japanese Romaji and Hiragana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Jun; Leong, Che Kan

    2005-01-01

    The morpho-syllabic Japanese writing system consists of the phonetic scripts of hiragana and katakana, the logographic kanji derived from Chinese characters and the less well researched romaji based on the Roman alphabet. In four experiments we investigated the speed with which Japanese college students read, named, and transcribed romaji as…

  2. Phonological Transcribing of English Utterances in Teaching Listening Comprehension for Korean Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Yun Kul

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to discuss the importance of listening and to examine whether or not transcribing utterances in English using the Korean alphabet improved the accuracy in English sentences produced by a group of Korean college students. A total population of 120 students was divided into two groups, control and experiment. The…

  3. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Costa, Fernando F.; Nagai, Maria Aparecida; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Zago, Marco A.; Andrade, Luis Eduardo C.; Carrer, Helaine; El-Dorry, Hamza F. A.; Espreafico, Enilza M.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Gruber, Arthur; Hackel, Christine; Kimura, Edna T.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Marie, Suely K. N.; Martins, Elizabeth A. L.; Nóbrega, Marina P.; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Pardini, Maria Inês M. C.; Pereira, Gonçalo G.; Pesquero, João Bosco; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Rogatto, Silvia R.; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Sogayar, Mari C.; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Acencio, Marcio; Alberto, Fernando L.; Amaral, Maria Elisabete J.; Aneas, Ivy; Bengtson, Mário Henrique; Carraro, Dirce M.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Carvalho, Lúcia Helena; Cerutti, Janete M.; Corrêa, Maria Lucia C.; Costa, Maria Cristina R.; Curcio, Cyntia; Gushiken, Tsieko; Ho, Paulo L.; Kimura, Elza; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Maia, Gustavo; Majumder, Paromita; Marins, Mozart; Matsukuma, Adriana; Melo, Analy S. A.; Mestriner, Carlos Alberto; Miracca, Elisabete C.; Miranda, Daniela C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Nóbrega, Francisco G.; Ojopi, Élida P. B.; Pandolfi, José Rodrigo C.; Pessoa, Luciana Gilbert; Rahal, Paula; Rainho, Claudia A.; da Ro's, Nancy; de Sá, Renata G.; Sales, Magaly M.; da Silva, Neusa P.; Silva, Tereza C.; da Silva, Wilson; Simão, Daniel F.; Sousa, Josane F.; Stecconi, Daniella; Tsukumo, Fernando; Valente, Valéria; Zalcberg, Heloisa; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Reis, Luis F. L.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1,181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes, for 67 (44.6%) of the 150 related genes, and for 45 of the 148 (30.4%) EST-predicted genes on this chromosome. Using a set of stringent criteria to validate our sequences, we identified a further 219 previously unannotated transcribed sequences on chromosome 22. Of these, 171 were in fact also defined by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48 transcribed sequences on chromosome 22 not defined by other sequences. All of the transcribed sequences defined by ORESTES coincided with DNA regions predicted as encoding exons by genscan. (http://genes.mit.edu/GENSCAN.html). PMID:11070084

  4. Isolation and identification of a new tetrodotoxin-producing bacterial species, Raoultella terrigena, from Hong Kong marine puffer fish Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vincent Chung-Him; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Ho, Kin-Chung; Lee, Fred Wang-Fat

    2011-01-01

    Puffer fish, Takifugu niphobles, collected from the Hong Kong coastal waters were screened for tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria. A Gram-negative, non-acid-fast, non-sporing and rod shaped bacterial strain (designated as gutB01) was isolated from the intestine of the puffer fish and was shown to produce tetrodotoxin (TTX). Based on the Microbial Identification (MIDI) and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogenetic analysis, the strain was identified as Raoultella terrigena. The TTX production ability of the strain was confirmed by mouse bioassay, ELISA and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Our results reiterate that the TTX found in puffer fish was likely produced by the associated bacteria and TTX are widely produced amongst a diversity of bacterial species.

  5. Identification of a Mycobacterium sp. as the causative agent of orange nodular lesions in the Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Catherine; Huntsberger, Carl; Markey, Kathryn; Inglis, Susan; Smolowitz, Roxanna

    2016-03-30

    The Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus is an economically important species in the offshore fisheries on the east coast of the USA. Recently, animals collected from waters ranging from Massachusetts to Maryland have shown variably sized (up to 1 cm in diameter) orange nodular foci, predominantly in the adductor muscle tissue, but also in other organs. Histological evaluation of the nodular lesions showed rod-shaped bacteria that stain acid-fast positive and Gram-positive. PCR methodology was employed to identify the causative organism of the nodules as a Mycobacterium sp. using analysis of the partial 16S gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region. Based upon genotypic findings, the causative bacterium fits well into the genus Mycobacterium.

  6. Isolation and Identification of a New Tetrodotoxin-Producing Bacterial Species, Raoultella terrigena, from Hong Kong Marine Puffer Fish Takifugu niphobles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vincent Chung-Him; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Ho, Kin-Chung; Lee, Fred Wang-Fat

    2011-01-01

    Puffer fish, Takifugu niphobles, collected from the Hong Kong coastal waters were screened for tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria. A Gram-negative, non-acid-fast, non-sporing and rod shaped bacterial strain (designated as gutB01) was isolated from the intestine of the puffer fish and was shown to produce tetrodotoxin (TTX). Based on the Microbial Identification (MIDI) and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogenetic analysis, the strain was identified as Raoultella terrigena. The TTX production ability of the strain was confirmed by mouse bioassay, ELISA and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Our results reiterate that the TTX found in puffer fish was likely produced by the associated bacteria and TTX are widely produced amongst a diversity of bacterial species. PMID:22163191

  7. Genetic diversity of Bartonella genotypes found in the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius) in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Kraljik, Jasna; Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Miklisová, Dana; Blaňarová, Lucia; Mošanský, Ladislav; Bona, Martin; Stanko, Michal

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the diversity of Bartonella in Apodemus agrarius, an important rodent of peri-domestic habitats, which has spread into Europe in the past 1000 years. Spleen samples of 344 A. agrarius from Eastern Slovakia were screened for the presence of Bartonella spp. using 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region and bacteria were detected in 9% of rodents. Based on sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gltA, rpoB and groEL) Bartonella genotypes were ascribed to the species typical for mice and voles: B. grahamii, B. taylorii and B. birtlesii. However, the study also confirmed presence of genotypes belonging to the B. clarridgeiae/B. rochalimae clade, and the B. elizabethae/B. tribocorum clade, which are not commonly found in woodland rodents. In addition, a potential recombination event between these two genotypes was noted, which highlights an important role of A. agrarius in shaping Bartonella diversity and evolution. PMID:27279125

  8. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases. PMID:27517607

  9. Identification of Transcribed Enhancers by Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Blinka, Steven; Reimer, Michael H; Pulakanti, Kirthi; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Rao, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription at distal cis-regulatory elements serves as a mark of highly active enhancers. Production of noncoding RNAs at enhancers, termed eRNAs, correlates with higher expression of genes that the enhancer interacts with; hence, eRNAs provide a new tool to model gene activity in normal and disease tissues. Moreover, this unique class of noncoding RNA has diverse roles in transcriptional regulation. Transcribed enhancers can be identified by a common signature of epigenetic marks by overlaying a series of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing datasets. A computational approach to filter non-enhancer elements and other classes of noncoding RNAs is essential to not cloud downstream analysis. Here we present a protocol that combines wet and dry bench methods to accurately identify transcribed enhancers genome-wide as well as an experimental procedure to validate these datasets. PMID:27662872

  10. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases.

  11. CommonSense: a preprocessing system to identify errors in large transcribed corpora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Propper, Ryan; Mohajer, Keyvan; Pratt, Vaughan

    2006-04-01

    A system was designed to locate and correct errors in large transcribed corpora. The program, called CommonSense, relies on a set of rules that identify mistakes related to homonyms, words with distinct definitions but identical pronunciations. The system was run on the 1996 and 1997 Broadcast News Speech Corpora, and correctly identified more than 400 errors in these data. Future work may extend CommonSense to automatically correct errors in hypothesis files created as the output of speech recognition systems.

  12. The anti-tumor drug bleomycin preferentially cleaves at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-04-01

    The genome-wide pattern of DNA cleavage at transcription start sites (TSSs) for the anti-tumor drug bleomycin was examined in human HeLa cells using next-generation DNA sequencing. It was found that actively transcribed genes were preferentially cleaved compared with non-transcribed genes. The 143,600 identified human TSSs were split into non-transcribed genes (82,596) and transcribed genes (61,004) for HeLa cells. These transcribed genes were further split into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, and 80-100 % of expressed genes. The bleomycin cleavage pattern at highly transcribed gene TSSs was greatly enhanced compared with purified DNA and non-transcribed gene TSSs. The top 20 and 20-40 % quintiles had a very similar enhanced cleavage pattern, the 40-60 % quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80 and 80-100 % quintiles were close to the non-transcribed and purified DNA profiles. The pattern of bleomycin enhanced cleavage had peaks that were approximately 200 bp apart, and this indicated that bleomycin was identifying the presence of phased nucleosomes at TSSs. Hence bleomycin can be utilized to detect chromatin structures that are present at actively transcribed genes. In this study, for the first time, the pattern of DNA damage by a clinically utilized cancer chemotherapeutic agent was performed on a human genome-wide scale at the nucleotide level.

  13. Expression of transcribed ultraconserved regions of genome in rat cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Suresh L.; Dharap, Ashutosh; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that 481 regions of the genome (>200 bp) that actively transcribe noncoding RNAs shows 100% homology between humans, rats and mice. These transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs) are thought to control the essential regulatory functions basic for life in rodents and mammals. Using microarray analysis, we presently show that 107 T-UCRs are actively expressed in adult rat cerebral cortex. They are grouped into intragenic (61) and intergenic (46) based on their genic location. Interestingly, 10 T-UCRs are expressed at unusually high levels in cerebral cortex. Additionally, many T-UCRs also showed cogenic expression. We further analyzed the correlation of intragenic T-UCRs with their host protein coding genes. Surprisingly, most of the expressed intragenic T-UCRs (54 out of 61) displayed a negative correlation with their host gene expression. T-UCRs are thought to control the splicing and transcription of the protein-coding genes that host them and flank them. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the protein products of majority of these genes are nuclear in localization, share protein domains and are involved in the regulation of diverse biological and molecular functions including metabolism, development, cell cycle, binding and transcription factor regulation. In conclusion, this is the first study to shows that many T-UCRs are expressed in rodent brain and they might play a role in physiological brain functions. PMID:24953281

  14. Potent microRNA suppression by RNA Pol II-transcribed ‘Tough Decoy’ inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Rasmus O.; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Sørensen, Camilla Darum; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and modulators of diverse biological pathways. Analyses of miRNA function as well as therapeutic managing of miRNAs rely on cellular administration of miRNA inhibitors which may be achieved by the use of viral vehicles. This study explores the miRNA-suppressive capacity of inhibitors expressed intracellularly from lentivirus-derived gene vectors. Superior activity of two decoy-type inhibitors, a “Bulged Sponge” with eight miRNA recognition sites and a hairpin-shaped “Tough Decoy” containing two miRNA recognition sites, is demonstrated in a side-by-side comparison of seven types of miRNA inhibitors transcribed as short RNAs from an RNA Pol III promoter. We find that lentiviral vectors expressing Tough Decoy inhibitors are less vulnerable than Bulged Sponge-encoding vectors to targeting by the cognate miRNA and less prone, therefore, to reductions in transfer efficiency. Importantly, it is demonstrated that Tough Decoy inhibitors retain their miRNA suppression capacity in the context of longer RNA transcripts expressed from an RNA Pol II promoter. Such RNA Pol II-transcribed Tough Decoy inhibitors are new tools in managing of miRNAs and may have potential for temporal and spatial regulation of miRNA activity as well as for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in human disease. PMID:23249752

  15. Transcribed DNA is preferentially located in the perichromatin region of mammalian cell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Niedojadlo, Janusz; Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Cmarko, Dusan; Cremer, Thomas; Driel, Roel van; Fakan, Stanislav

    2011-02-15

    The precise localization of transcribed DNA and resulting RNA is an important aspect of the functional architecture of the nucleus. To this end we have developed a novel in situ hybridization approach in combination with immunoelectron microscopy, using sense and anti-sense RNA probes that are derived from total cellular or cytoplasmic poly(A+) RNA. This new technology is much more gentle than classical in situ hybridization using DNA probes and shows excellent preservation of nuclear structure. Carried out on ultrathin sections of fixed and resin-embedded COS-7 cells, it revealed at high resolution the localization of the genes that code for the cellular mRNAs. Quantitative analysis shows that most transcribed DNA is concentrated in the perichromatin region, i.e. the interface between subchromosomal compact chromatin domains and the interchromatin space essentially devoid of DNA. The RNA that is produced is found mainly in the perichromatin region and the interchromatin space. These results imply that in the mammalian nucleus the chromatin fiber is folded so that active genes are predominantly present in the perichromatin region, which is the most prominent site of transcription.

  16. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D.; Monroe, D.

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  17. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  18. Identification of Novel Transcribed Regions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Using RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model organism to investigate vertebrate development and human genetic diseases. However, the zebrafish genome annotation is still ongoing and incomplete, and there are still new gene transcripts to be found. With the introduction of massive parallel sequencing, whole transcriptome studies became possible. In the present study, we aimed to discover novel transcribed regions (NTRs) using developmental transcriptome data from RNA sequencing. In order to achieve this, we developed an in-house bioinformatics pipeline for NTR discovery. Using the pipeline, we detected 152 putative NTRs that at the time of discovery were not annotated in Ensembl and NCBI gene database. Four randomly selected NTRs were successfully validated using RT-PCR, and expression profiles of 10 randomly selected NTRs were evaluated using qRT-PCR. The identification of these 152 NTRs provide new information for zebrafish genome annotation as well as new candidates for studies of zebrafish gene function. PMID:27462902

  19. Matrix attachment regions and transcribed sequences within a long chromosomal continuum containing maize Adh1.

    PubMed Central

    Avramova, Z; SanMiguel, P; Georgieva, E; Bennetzen, J L

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for the location of matrix attachment sites along a contiguous region of 280 kb on maize chromosome 1. We define nine potential loops that vary in length from 6 kb to > 75 kb. The distribution of the different classes of DNA within this continuum with respect to the predicted structural loops reveals an interesting correlation: the long stretches of mixed classes of highly repetitive DNAs are often segregated into topologically sequestered units, whereas low-copy-number DNAs (including the alcohol dehydrogenase1 [adh1] gene) are positioned in separate loops. Contrary to expectations, several classes of highly repeated elements with representatives in this region were found to be transcribed, and some of these exhibited tissue-specific patterns of expression. PMID:7580257

  20. T7 RNA polymerase cannot transcribe through a highly knotted DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, J; Rodríguez-Campos, A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of T7 RNA polymerase to transcribe a plasmid DNA in vitro in its linear, supercoiled, relaxed and knotted forms was analysed. Similar levels of transcription were found on each template with the exception of plasmids showing varying degrees of knotting (obtained using stoichiometric amounts of yeast topoisomerase II). A purified fraction of knotted DNA with a high number of nodes (crosses) was found to be refractory to transcription. The unknotting of the knotted plasmids, using catalytic amounts of topoisomerase II, restored their capacity as templates for transcription to levels similar to those obtained for the other topological forms. These results demonstrate that highly knotted DNA is the only topological form of DNA that is not a template for transcription. We suggest that the regulation of transcription, which depends on the topological state of the template, might be related to the presence of knotted DNA with different number of nodes. PMID:9016657

  1. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  2. Multiple transcribed elements control expression of the Escherichia coli btuB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Franklund, C V; Kadner, R J

    1997-01-01

    Repression by vitamin B12 of the cobalamin transport protein BtuB in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli operates at both the transcriptional and translational levels and is controlled by transcribed sequences within the leader and proximal portion of the btuB coding sequence. The effects of deletions from either end of this region on repression and expression were determined with lac fusions. An element at the 5' end of the transcript and the putative attenuator within the coding sequence were required for transcriptional repression. The presence of either element caused a marked reduction in btuB-lacZ expression which was reversed by the presence of a conserved sequence element in the leader, suggesting the importance of long-range interactions in the btuB leader for expression and regulation. PMID:9190822

  3. Transcribed enhancers lead waves of coordinated transcription in transitioning mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O.; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Lilje, Berit; Drabløs, Finn; Lennartsson, Andreas; Rönnerblad, Michelle; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Vitezic, Morana; Freeman, Tom C.; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Beckhouse, Anthony; Bodega, Beatrice; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Davis, Margaret; Detmar, Michael; Ehrlund, Anna; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guler, Reto; Ha, Thomas; Hara, Mitsuko; Herlyn, Meenhard; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Khachigian, Levon M.; Klinken, S. Peter; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Klein, Sarah; Mejhert, Niklas; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Morris, Kelly J.; Mummery, Christine; Nakachi, Yutaka; Ogishima, Soichi; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Qin, Xian-Yang; Roy, Sugata; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schwegmann, Anita; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Swoboda, Rolf; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tomoiu, Andru; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Zabierowski, Susan; Zhang, Peter; Abugessaisa, Imad; Bertin, Nicolas; Diehl, Alexander D.; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kondo, Naoto; Lizio, Marina; Meehan, Terrence F.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Sahin, Serkan; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Severin, Jessica; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Kawai, Jun; Kasukawa, Takeya; Lassmann, Timo; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawaji, Hideya; Summers, Kim M.; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we simultaneously measured their activity in 19 human and 14 mouse time courses covering a wide range of cell types and biological stimuli. Enhancer RNAs, then messenger RNAs encoding transcription factors, dominated the earliest responses. Binding sites for key lineage transcription factors were simultaneously overrepresented in enhancers and promoters active in each cellular system. Our data support a highly generalizable model in which enhancer transcription is the earliest event in successive waves of transcriptional change during cellular differentiation or activation. PMID:25678556

  4. Total DNA transcription in vitro: a procedure to detect highly repetitive and transcribable sequences with tRNA-like structures

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, H.; Okada, N.

    1986-01-01

    Total DNAs from various animals were transcribed in vitro in a HeLa cell extract, and it was found that one to several discrete RNAs were transcribed by RNA polymerase III. With tortoise (Geoclemys reevessi) and newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), distinct 6.5S and 8S RNAs were transcribed from these respective DNAs. Representative phage clones carrying the 6.5S and 8S RNA genes were isolated from genomic libraries of these animals, and the sequences of these genes were determined. The 5' parts of highly repetitive and transcribable sequences of tortoise and newt were found to have close resemblance to tRNA/sub 1//sup Lys/ (rabbit) gene (78% homology) and a tRNA/sup Glu/ (Drosophila) gene (74% homology, not counting the aminoacyl stem region), respectively. The homologies extended to secondary structures, homologous nucleotides being located on similar secondary structures. It is proposed that many, if not all, highly repetitive and transcribable sequences detected by total DNA transcription have specific tRNA genes as their progenitors.

  5. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in some countries of South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Differentiat...

  6. Detection and identification of opportunistic Exophiala species using the rolling circle amplification of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, M J; Dolatabadi, S; Saradeghi Keisari, M; Naseri, A; Feng, P; de Hoog, G S

    2013-09-01

    Deep infections by melanized fungi deserve special attention because of a potentially fatal, cerebral or disseminated course of disease in otherwise healthy patients. Timely diagnostics are a major problem with these infections. Rolling circle amplification (RCA) is a sensitive, specific and reproducible isothermal DNA amplification technique for rapid molecular identification of microorganisms. RCA-based diagnostics are characterized by good reproducibility, with few amplification errors compared to PCR. The method is applied here to species of Exophiala known to cause systemic infections in humans. The ITS rDNA region of five Exophiala species (E. dermatitidis, E. oligosperma, E. spinifera, E. xenobiotica, and E. jeanselmei) was sequenced and aligned in view of designing specific padlock probes to be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the Exophiala species concerned. The assay proved to successfully amplify DNA of the target fungi at the level of species; while no cross-reactivity was observed. Amplification products were visualized on 1% agarose gels to verify the specificity of probe-template binding. Amounts of reagents were minimized to avoid the generation of false positive results. The sensitivity of RCA may help to improve early diagnostics of these difficult to diagnose infections. PMID:23872449

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF PFIESTERIA PISCICIDA (DINOPHYCEAE) AND PFIESTERIA-LIKE ORGANISMS USING INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER-SPECIFIC PCR ASSAYS. (R826791)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. FuseFISH: Robust Detection of Transcribed Gene Fusions in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Stefan; Crosetto, Nicola; Bienko, Magda; Boni, Marina; Bernasconi, Bernasconi; Chiarle, Roberto; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcribed gene fusions are key biomarkers in many hematologic and solid tumors, often representing the primary oncogenic driver mutation. Here, we report an experimental and computational pipeline for detecting fusion transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH and unbiased correlation analysis (FuseFISH). We constructed a genome-wide database of optimal oligonucleotide sequences, enabling quick design of FuseFISH probes against known and novel fusions. We implemented FuseFISH in cell lines, tissue sections, and purified RNA, reliably detecting one BCR-ABL1 positive in 10,000 negative cells. In 34 hematologic samples, we detected BCR-ABL1 transcripts with high specificity and sensitivity. Finally, we measured BCR-ABL1 expression heterogeneity and dynamics in single CML cells exposed to the kinase inhibitor Nilotinib. Our resource and methods are ideal for streamlined validation of fusions newly identified by next-generation sequencing, and pave the way to studying the impact of fusion expression variability on clinical outcome. PMID:24373969

  9. Physical isolation of nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II: evidence for cotranscriptional splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Wuarin, J; Schibler, U

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine whether splicing can occur cotranscriptionally in mammalian nuclei, we mapped exon-intron boundaries on nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II. A procedure that allows fractionation of nuclei into a chromatin pellet containing DNA, histones, and ternary transcription complexes and a supernatant containing the bulk of the nonhistone proteins and RNAs that are released from their DNA templates was developed. The transcripts of the genes encoding DBP, a transcriptional activator protein, and HMG coenzyme A reductase recovered from the chromatin pellet and the supernatant were analyzed by S1 nuclease mapping. The large majority of the RNA molecules from the pellet appeared to be nascent transcripts, since, in contrast to the transcripts present in the supernatant, they were not cleaved at the polyadenylation site but rather contained heterogeneous 3' termini encompassing this site. Splicing intermediates could be detected among nascent and released transcripts, suggesting that splicing occurs both cotranscriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Our results also indicate that polyadenylation is not required for the splicing of the last DBP intron. In addition to allowing detailed structural analysis of nascent RNA chains, the physical isolation of nascent transcripts also yields reliable measurements of relative transcription rates. Images PMID:7523861

  10. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of ‘A' versus ‘T' and ‘G' versus ‘C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides ‘U' and ‘C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides ‘A' and ‘G' at non-synonymous coding sites. PMID:27098217

  11. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-04-21

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites.

  12. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites. PMID:27098217

  13. Transgenic cattle produced by reverse-transcribed gene transfer in oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W. S.; Homan, E. Jane; Ballou, Linda U.; Burns, Jane C.; Bremel, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    A critical requirement for integration of retroviruses, other than HIV and possibly related lentiviruses, is the breakdown of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Nuclear envelope breakdown occurs during mitotic M-phase, the envelope reforming immediately after cell division, thereby permitting the translocation of the retroviral preintegration complex into the nucleus and enabling integration to proceed. In the oocyte, during metaphase II (MII) of the second meiosis, the nuclear envelope is also absent and the oocyte remains in MII arrest for a much longer period of time compared with M-phase in a somatic cell. Pseudotyped replication-defective retroviral vector was injected into the perivitelline space of bovine oocytes during MII. We show that reverse-transcribed gene transfer can take place in an oocyte in MII arrest of meiosis, leading to production of offspring, the majority of which are transgenic. We discuss the implications of this mechanism both as a means of production of transgenic livestock and as a model for naturally occurring recursive transgenesis. PMID:9826647

  14. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome.

  15. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome. PMID:27236660

  16. Structure and variation of human ribosomal DNA: the external transcribed spacer and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Szura, L L; Rushford, C; Jackson, D; Erickson, J

    1982-01-01

    A group of human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombinants that include the probable site for initiation of transcription have been examined for sequence polymorphism. A detailed restriction map of one rDNA insert was constructed using plasmid subclones and end-labeled segments. Comparison of 16 similar rDNA inserts by restriction and heteroduplex analysis demonstrated striking conservation of the external transcribed spacer and 18S gene regions, but defined a region where restriction sites for the enzymes Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I become frequent or variable. This region extends for about 400--800 base pairs (bp) at the left end of the rDNA insert and is postulated to contain nontranscribed spacer sequences. The use of cloned rDNA segments as probes for the restriction analysis of genomic rDNA has demonstrated certain fixed sites in the nontranscribed spacer that do not vary significantly among different individuals or tumor cell lines. In contrast, restriction with the enzyme Sal I reveals several variable fragments, one of which has been found only in a retinoblastoma cell line. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6282117

  17. Unified English Braille in the United Kingdom: Part 2--Examination by Literary Braille Users, Braille Teachers, and Transcribers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cryer, Heather; Home, Sarah; Morley Wilkins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    To inform decision-making around the adoption of the Unified English Braille (UEB) code in the United Kingdom, a suite of research was carried out. This study involved a variety of braille stakeholders--student braille readers (in full time education), adult braille readers, braille teachers, and braille transcribers. Participants were sent…

  18. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of transcribed sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.F.; Zhu, Y. )

    1994-03-15

    Seventy-four pairs of oligonucleotides derived from sequence-tagged sites (STSs) on the long arm of human chromosome 21, specifically from bands 21q22.1 to 21q22.3, were used in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of expressed sequences in a fetal brain. These STSs included 69 that had not been related to transcribed sequences and 5 that had detected two known genes and three previously isolated cDNA clones. Of the 69 STSs analyzed in RT-PCR, 25 allowed amplification of specific cDNA fragments. The sizes of amplified cDNA fragments match those amplified from either human genomic DNA or somatic hybrid cells containing human chromosome 21. Of the 11 cDNA analyzed in Northern blot hybridizations, 6 hybridized to specific RNA species. The rapid screening for cDNA using previously mapped STSs has provided insight into the distribution of expressed sequences in this region of chromosome 21. Northern blot analysis of the amplified cDNA fragments has revealed interesting candidate genes in two disease loci. The marker D21S267 was previously mapped in the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21, and the marker D21S113 is closely linked to progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The cDNA fragments amplified using the primer sequences derived from D21S267 and D21S113 hybridized to 7- and 6.5-kb transcripts, respectively, which seems to express predominantly in brain. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, 'universal' SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by 'universal' primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  20. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  1. Isolation of oogenesis-specific genes transcribed in the germ-line of Calliphora erythrocephala and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Poly(A){sup +} RNA from early or mid-stage ovarian follicles of C. erythrocephala was used to generate radiolabelled oogenesis-specific cDNA probes for screening the phage libraries. A cDNA probe made from mid-stage embryo poly(A){sup +} RNA was used as the differential screening probe. Thus plaques hybridizing to the two oogenesis-specific probes but not the mid-stage embryo probe were selected as potentially containing oogenesis-specific genes. Two further rounds of screening were used to eliminate false positives and, after plaque purification, restriction digests of the remaining clones were screened by Southern blot hybridization to identify DNA fragments transcribed in an oogenesis-specific manner. In situ hybridization to sections of ovarian follicles has been used to determine the cell types within the follicles in which the various genes are expressed. Radiolabelled RNA probes for four of the C. erythrocephala oogenesis-specific clones and the two D. melanogaster clones have been hybridized to ovarian follicles. Further studies have been concentrated on the two germ-line transcribed, oogenesis-specific clones isolated from the D. melanogaster clone library. Detailed genetic mapping of the DA clone and of these mutations was performed to determine which mutations might represent the DA gene. cDNA clones have been isolated for the transcribed region of clone DA and have been used to further define the transcription unit from this region of the D. melanogaster genome.

  2. Repair of rDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: RAD4-independent strand-specific nucleotide excision repair of RNA polymerase I transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R A; Van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the individual strands of the rDNA locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Yeast rDNA, that is transcribed by RNA polymerase I(RNA pol I), is repaired efficiently, slightly strand-specific and independently of RAD26, which has been implicated in transcription-coupled repair of the RNA pol II transcribed RPB2 gene. No repair of rDNA is observed in rad1,2,3 and 14 mutants, demonstrating that dimer removal from this highly repetitive DNA is accomplished by nucleotide excision repair (NER). In rad7 and rad16 mutants, which are specifically deficient in repair of non-transcribed DNA, there is a clear preferential repair of the transcribed strand of rDNA, indicating that strand-specific and therefore probably transcription-coupled repair of RNA pol I transcribed genes does exist in yeast. Unexpectedly, the transcribed but not the non-transcribed strand of rDNA can be repaired in rad4 mutants, which seem otherwise completely NER-deficient. PMID:8604332

  3. Isolation and characterization of recombinant DNAs containing repeated elements of barley genome: identification of individual actively transcribed families of repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Kartel', N.A.; Ryskov, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    A bank of Escherichia coli clones containing fragments of barley nuclear DNA was obtained using plasmid pBR 322. Clones carrying repeated sequences of the plant genome were selected by means of colony and blot hybridization. Clones with actively transcribed sequences were selected by hybridization to complementary DNA synthesized by means of reverse transcription on a template of total barley poly(A)-containing RNA. Individual families of repeats, two of which contained transcriptionally active sequences of the barley genome, were identified by blot hybridization of recombinant plasmids containing labeled DNA fragments of the inserts of three different clones.

  4. Molecular typing of isolates of the fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare intraspecies diversity was revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal spacer region (ISR). Standard restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of these sequences was compared with single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Diversity indexes sh...

  5. Transcribed sequences of the Escherichia coli btuB gene control its expression and regulation by vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Köster, W; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB gene product is an outer membrane protein required for the active transport of vitamin B12 and other cobalamins. Synthesis of BtuB is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of cobalamins. Mapping of the 5' end of the btuB transcript revealed that a 240-nucleotide transcribed leader precedes the coding sequence. Point mutations causing increased expression under repressing conditions were isolated by use of a btuB-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations at many sites within the leader region affected btuB-lacZ regulation, whereas some base changes upstream of the start of transcription affected the absolute level of expression but not its repressibility. Analysis of btuB-phoA gene fusions and btuB-lacZ operon and gene fusions of various lengths showed that sequences within the btuB coding region (between nucleotides +250 and +350) had to be present for proper expression and transcriptional regulation. Sequences within the leader region (up to +250) conferred regulation of translational fusions. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled at both the transcriptional and translational levels and that different but possibly overlapping sequences in the transcribed region, including the coding region for the transport protein itself, mediate these two modes of regulation. Images PMID:1847525

  6. Balancing acts of SRI and an auto-inhibitory domain specify Set2 function at transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Niu, Yanling; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation ubiquitously functions in coding regions in all eukaryotes. It has been linked to the regulation of acetylation states, histone exchange, alternative splicing, DNA repair and recombination. Set2 is recruited to transcribed chromatin through its SRI domain's direct association with phosphorylated Pol II. However, regulatory mechanisms for histone modifying enzymes like Set2 that travel with elongating Pol II remain largely unknown beyond their initial recruitment events. Here, by fusing Set2 to RNA Pol II, we found that the SRI domain can also recognize linker DNA of chromatin, thereby controlling Set2 substrate specificity. We also discovered that an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) of Set2 primarily restricts Set2 activity to transcribed chromatin and fine-tunes several functions of SRI. Finally, we demonstrated that AID mutations caused hyperactive Set2 in vivo and displayed a synthetic interaction with the histone chaperone FACT. Our data suggest that Set2 is intrinsically regulated through multiple mechanisms and emphasize the importance of a precise temporal control of H3K36 methylation during the dynamic transcription elongation process. PMID:25925577

  7. Mapping of a replication origin within the promoter region of two unlinked, abundantly transcribed actin genes of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Bénard, M; Lagnel, C; Pallotta, D; Pierron, G

    1996-03-01

    We analyzed the replication of two unlinked actin genes, ardB and ardC , which are abundantly transcribed in the naturally synchronous plasmodium of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Detection and size measurements of single-stranded nascent replication intermediates (RIs) demonstrate that these two genes are concomitantly replicated at the onset of the 3-h S phase and tightly linked to replication origins. Appearance of RIs on neutral-neutral two-dimensional gels at specific time points in early S phase and analysis of their structure confirmed these results and further established that, in both cases, an efficient, site-specific, bidirectional origin of replication is localized within the promoter region of the gene. We also determined similar elongation rates for the divergent replication forks of the ardC gene replicon. Finally, taking advantage of a restriction fragment length polymorphism, we studied allelic replicons and demonstrate similar localizations and a simultaneous firing of allelic replication origins. Computer search revealed a low level of homology between the promoters of ardB and ardC and, most notably, the absence of DNA sequences similar to the yeast autonomously replicating sequence consensus sequence in these Physarum origin regions. Our results with the ardB and ardC actin genes support the model of early replicating origins located within the promoter regions of abundantly transcribed genes in P. polycephalum. PMID:8622700

  8. Identification of transcribed sequences in the human genome. Final report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, K.

    1992-12-01

    The workshop was held at the National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, on October 4 and 5, 1991. Twenty-four investigators attended from England, Germany and the United States. The topics discussed included: Genome sequence analysis using computer assisted detection of open reading frames, splice sites and hexamer patterns, direct exon identification using trapping of internal and 3` exons, and a recombination based system, cDNA library construction and screening, including the use of normalization and subtraction procedures, Alu and splice donor site PCR from hybrid cell lines, and microdissection clones as probes, use of labeled CDNAS as probes to screen lambda and cosmid libraries, and sequencing of random cDNAs.

  9. Transcribing the Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Amy; Chin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and non-target speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic transcriptions to evaluate speech production skills and to develop a plan of care. The purposes of this tutorial are (1) to identify issues associated with phonetic transcriptions of the speech of children with cochlear implants and (2) to discuss implications for assessment. Method Narrow transcription data from an ongoing, longitudinal research study were catalogued and reviewed. Study participants had at least 5 years of cochlear implant experience and used spoken American English as a primary means of communication. In this tutorial, selected phonetic symbols and phonetic phenomena are reviewed. Conclusions A set of principles for phonetic transcriptions is proposed. Narrow phonetic transcriptions that include all segment possibilities in the International Phonetic Alphabet and extensions for disordered speech are needed to capture the subtleties of the speech of children with cochlear implants. Narrow transcriptions also may play a key role in planning treatment. PMID:19880945

  10. Relative effects of mutability and selection on single nucleotide polymorphisms in transcribed regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Gorlova, Olga Y; Amos, Christopher I

    2008-01-01

    Motivation Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common type of genetic variation in humans. However, the factors that affect SNP density are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate the relative effects of mutability and selection on SNP density in transcribed regions of human genes. It is important for prediction of the regions that harbor functional polymorphisms. Results We used frequency-validated SNPs resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions. SNPs were subdivided into five functional categories: (i) 5' untranslated region (UTR) SNPs, (ii) 3' UTR SNPs, (iii) synonymous SNPs, (iv) SNPs producing conservative missense mutations, and (v) SNPs producing radical missense mutations. Each of these categories was further subdivided into nine mutational categories on the basis of the single-nucleotide substitution type. Thus, 45 functional/mutational categories were analyzed. The relative mutation rate in each mutational category was estimated on the basis of published data. The proportion of segregating sites (PSSs) for each functional/mutational category was estimated by dividing the observed number of SNPs by the number of potential sites in the genome for a given functional/mutational category. By analyzing each functional group separately, we found significant positive correlations between PSSs and relative mutation rates (Spearman's correlation coefficient, at least r = 0.96, df = 9, P < 0.001). We adjusted the PSSs for the mutation rate and found that the functional category had a significant effect on SNP density (F = 5.9, df = 4, P = 0.001), suggesting that selection affects SNP density in transcribed regions of the genome. We used analyses of variance and covariance to estimate the relative effects of selection (functional category) and mutability (relative mutation rate) on the PSSs and found that approximately 87% of variation in PSS was due to variation in the mutation rate and approximately 13% was due to selection

  11. Rrp6 is recruited to transcribed genes and accompanies the spliced mRNA to the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Hessle, Viktoria; von Euler, Anne; González de Valdivia, Ernesto; Visa, Neus

    2012-08-01

    Rrp6 is an exoribonuclease involved in the quality control of mRNA biogenesis. We have analyzed the association of Rrp6 with the Balbiani ring pre-mRNPs of Chironomus tentans to obtain insight into the role of Rrp6 in splicing surveillance. Rrp6 is recruited to transcribed genes and its distribution along the genes does not correlate with the positions of exons and introns. In the nucleoplasm, Rrp6 is bound to both unspliced and spliced transcripts. Rrp6 is released from the mRNPs in the vicinity of the nuclear pore before nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation. We show that Rrp6 is associated with newly synthesized transcripts during all the nuclear steps of gene expression and is associated with the transcripts independently of their splicing status. These observations suggest that the quality control of pre-mRNA splicing is not based on the selective recruitment of the exoribonuclease Rrp6 to unprocessed mRNAs.

  12. Preparation and characterization of ordered libraries of transcribable sequences from human chromosome 19 from hybrid human-hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obradovick, D.; Borodin, A.M.; Kopantsev, E.P.

    1994-08-20

    Improvements in the preparation of chromosome-specific libraries of transcribable sequences from the human genome using somatic hybrid cells are described. One of the main advantages of the new method is the enrichment of the starting material with human-specific heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) sequences at each of the three steps in library construction. The method was used to prepare a chromosome-specific library from a hybrid cell line. The resulting ranged library was characterized. The primary structures of 80 randomly selected clones were determined, and these were analyzed. Some 95% of the clones were found to be human-specific and to have arisen from hnRNA, and the chromosomal localizations of a number of clones were identified. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Isolation and DNA-binding characteristics of a protein involved in transcription activation of two divergently transcribed, essential yeast genes.

    PubMed Central

    Halfter, H; Müller, U; Winnacker, E L; Gallwitz, D

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a protein, BAF1, which has two oppositely oriented, partially overlapping binding sites within a symmetrical sequence located midway between and upstream of the divergently transcribed YPT1 and TUB2 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 120 kd BAF1 protein was purified to near homogeneity and used to delineate the two binding sites and to identify apparent protein contact sites by the missing contact technique, methylation interference and by site-directed mutagenesis. The BAF1-recognition sequence contains a conserved TCN7ACG element recently identified at autonomously replicating sequences (ARS) and in the 5' and 3' flanking region of other yeast genes. The symmetrical sequence of the YPT1/TUB2 intergene region seems not to be involved in DNA replication but activates transcription in an orientation-independent fashion. Images PMID:2684633

  14. Classical non-homologous end-joining pathway utilizes nascent RNA for error-free double-strand break repair of transcribed genes

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Tapryal, Nisha; Venkova, Tatiana; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Pandita, Tej K.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leading to loss of nucleotides in the transcribed region can be lethal. Classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is the dominant pathway for DSB repair (DSBR) in adult mammalian cells. Here we report that during such DSBR, mammalian C-NHEJ proteins form a multiprotein complex with RNA polymerase II and preferentially associate with the transcribed genes after DSB induction. Depletion of C-NHEJ factors significantly abrogates DSBR in transcribed but not in non-transcribed genes. We hypothesized that nascent RNA can serve as a template for restoring the missing sequences, thus allowing error-free DSBR. We indeed found pre-mRNA in the C-NHEJ complex. Finally, when a DSB-containing plasmid with several nucleotides deleted within the E. coli lacZ gene was allowed time to repair in lacZ-expressing mammalian cells, a functional lacZ plasmid could be recovered from control but not C-NHEJ factor-depleted cells, providing important mechanistic insights into C-NHEJ-mediated error-free DSBR of the transcribed genome. PMID:27703167

  15. OPTICAL TRANSCRIBING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1961-09-26

    A device is designed for producing accurate graphed waveforms of very fast electronic pulses. The fast pulse is slowly tracked on a cathode ray tube and a pair of photomultiplier tubes, exposed to the pulse trace, view separate vertical portions thereof at each side of a fixed horizontal reference. Each phototube produces an output signal indicative of vertical movement of the exposed trace, which simultaneous signals are compared in a difference amplifier. The amplifier produces a difference signal which, when applied to the cathode ray tube, maintains the trace on the reference. A graphic recorder receives the amplified difference signal at an x-axis input, while a y-axis input is synchronized with the tracking time of the cathode ray tube and therefore graphs the enlarged waveshape.

  16. Affinity purification of in vitro transcribed RNA with homogeneous ends using a 3'-ARiBo tag.

    PubMed

    Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Salvail-Lacoste, Alix; Bouvette, Jonathan; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Common approaches for purification of RNAs synthesized in vitro by the T7 RNA polymerase often denature the RNA and produce RNAs with chemically heterogeneous 5'- and 3'-ends. Thus, native affinity purification strategies that incorporate 5' and 3' trimming technologies provide a solution to two main disadvantages that arise from standard approaches for RNA purification. This chapter describes procedures for nondenaturing affinity purification of in vitro transcribed RNA using a 3'-ARiBo tag, which yield RNAs with a homogeneous 3'-end. The applicability of the method to RNAs of different sequences, secondary structures, and sizes (29-614 nucleotides) is described, including suggestions for troubleshooting common problems. In addition, this chapter presents three complementary approaches to producing 5'-homogeneity of the affinity-purified RNA: (1) selection of the starting sequence; (2) Cse3 endoribonuclease cleavage of a 5'-CRISPR tag; or (3) self-cleavage of a 5'-hammerhead ribozyme tag. The additional steps to express and purify the Cse3 endonuclease are detailed. In light of recent results, the advantages and limitations of current approaches to achieve 5'-homogeneity of affinity-purified RNA are discussed, such that one can select a suitable strategy to purify the RNA of interest. PMID:25432744

  17. Homogenous repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in differentially transcribed regions and strands of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anson, R M; Croteau, D L; Stierum, R H; Filburn, C; Parsell, R; Bohr, V A

    1998-01-01

    Photoactivated methylene blue was used to damage purified DNA and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human fibroblasts in culture. The primary product of this reaction is the DNA lesion 7-hydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG). The DNA damage was quantitated using Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) in a gene-specific damage and repair assay. Assay conditions were refined to give incision at all enzyme-sensitive sites with minimal non-specific cutting. Cultured fibroblasts were exposed to photoactivated methylene blue under conditions that would produce an average of three oxidative lesions per double-stranded mitochondrial genome. Within 9 h, 47% of this damage had been removed by the cells. This removal was due to repair rather than to replication, cell loss or degradation of damaged genomes. The rate of repair was measured in both DNA strands of the frequently transcribed ribosomal region of the mitochondrial genome and in both strands of the non-ribosomal region. Fpg-sensitive alkali-resistant oxidative base damage was efficiently removed from human mtDNA with no differences in the rate of repair between strands or between two different regions of the genome that differ substantially with regard to transcriptional activity. PMID:9421531

  18. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  19. Molecular authentication of Panax ginseng and ginseng products using robust SNP markers in ribosomal external transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Kim, Min-Kyeoung; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Jin, Haizhu; Liang, Zhiqi; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2011-07-15

    Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius are the most widely used Panax species, but they are known to have different properties and medicinal values. The aim of this study is to develop a robust and accurate DNA marker for identifying P. ginseng and the origins of ginseng products. Two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites specific to P. ginseng were exploited from nuclear ribosomal external transcribed spacer (ETS) region. Based on the SNP sites, two specific primers were designed for P. ginseng and P. quinquefolius respectively. P. ginseng can be easily discriminated from P. quinquefolius by amplifying the two specific alleles using multiplex allele-specific PCR. Favorable results can also be obtained from commercial ginseng products. The established method is highly sensitive and can detect 1% of intentional adulteration of P. quinquefolius into P. ginseng down to the 0.1ng level of total DNA. Therefore this study provides a reliable and simple DNA method for authentication of the origins and purities of ginseng products.

  20. Cell-free translation of RNA synthesized in vitro by a transcribing nucleoprotein complex prepared from purified vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, C M; Szilagyi, J F

    1977-01-01

    The RNA species synthesized in vitro by a transcribing nucleoprotein (TNP) complex of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were translated with high efficiency in a fractionated cell-free system derived from reticulocytes. The use of TNP complexes isolated from VSV Indiana, VSV New Jersey, and Chandipura viruses showed that in each case the predominant polypeptides synthesized had electrophoretic mobilities identical to their virion N, NS, and M polypeptides in proportions reflecting those found in infected cells rather than purified virions. A minor polypeptide corresponding to unglycosylated polypeptide G was also observed, but the in vitro synthesis of polypeptide L was not detected. The addition of RNase inhibitor to transcription mixtures markedly increased the rate of RNA synthesis. Furthermore, the messenger activity of the RNA was significantly enhanced. The inclusion of S-adenosyl L-methionine during transcription substantially increased the messenger activity of the product RNA, suggesting a requirement for methylation. Fractionation by oligodeoxythymidylic acid-cellulose chromatography revealed that the RNA required a polyadnylic acid tract for messenger activity. Images PMID:191633

  1. Satellite-tagged transcribing sequences in Bubalus bubalis genome undergo programmed modulation in meiocytes: possible implications for transcriptional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, M; Gangadharan, S; Kapur, V; Azfer, M A; Prakash, B; Ali, S

    2001-09-01

    We cloned and sequenced a 1378 bp BamHI satellite DNA fraction from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis and have studied its expression in different tissues. The GC-rich sequences of the resultant contig pDS5 crosshybridize only with bovid DNA and are not conserved evolutionarily. Typing of buffalo genomic DNA using pDS5 with several restriction enzymes revealed multilocus monomorphic bands. Similar typing of cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, and gaur genomic DNA revealed variations in copy number and allele length giving rise to species-specific band patterns. Expression study of pDS5 in bubaline samples by RNA slot-blot, Northern blot, and RT-PCR showed various levels of signal in all the somatic tissues and germline cells except heart. A GenBank database search revealed homology of pDS5 sequences in the 5' region from nt 1-1261 with collagen gene. An AluI typing analysis of DNA from bubaline semen samples showed consistent loss of two bands. The presence of corresponding bands in somatic tissues suggests a sequence modulation within the pDS5 array in meiocytes during spermatogenesis, which is restored in the somatic cells after fertilization. Modulation of the satellite-tagged transcribing sequence in the meiocytes may be a mechanism of its inactivation.

  2. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses.

  3. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S. A.; Cooper, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8248136

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  5. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Walters , William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada , Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, Greg; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob

    2015-12-22

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of datasets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here we examine the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and ITS primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with non-aquatic samples. We moved primer barcodes to the 5’-end, allowing for a range of different 3’ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4-5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrate that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies.

  6. Molecular detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania spp. in some desert lizards from Northwest China by using internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Rong; Guo, Xian-Guang; Liu, Jin-Long; Zhou, Tian-He; Gong, Xiong; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania is still endemic in Northwest China. It has been thought that reptiles could be a reservoir for mammalian leishmaniasis. However, data are still scarce on natural infection of lizards with Leishmania spp. in China. The present study deals with detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania parasites at species and intraspecies levels isolated from six desert lizard species from 10 geographical locations in Northwest China using amplification and sequencing of ITS-rDNA. In total, 83 haplotypes were found among 137 ITS1 sequences obtained from up to 64.6% of all captured lizards. Representative sequences of Leishmania available in GenBank were compiled for comparison with the obtained haplotypes. Tree-based species delimitation was achieved by using Bayesian phylogenitc analyses and maximum parsimony approach. Phylogenetic trees congruently supported that the haplotypes were found to belong to three Leishmania species including L. (sauroleishmania) sp., Leishmania tropica and Leishmania donovani complex. A network approach revealed paraphyletic populations of L. (sauroleishmania) sp. and L. tropica at intraspecies level regarding geographical origin and low host specificity. Chinese L. tropica from lizards showed significant heterogeneity as the obtained haplotypes were distributed in different clusters from other countries. Common ancestry was observed between some sequences of L. tropica from lizards and other sequence types from clinical samples from other countries. This may lend support to the potential reservoir role of lizards for human leishmaniasis. Our results appear to be the first molecular evidence for natural infection of lizards in Northwest China with reptilian Leishmania and mammalian Leishmania species. Desert lizards may be considered as putative reservoir hosts for Leishmania in China. Further studies on persistence of the Leishmania parasites in lizards and sandflies are recommended for the better understanding of their epidemiological involvement.

  7. Detection of Dicrocoelium dendriticum larval stages in mollusc and ant intermediate hosts by PCR, using mitochondrial and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) sequences.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ibeas, A M; Martínez-Valladares, M; González-Lanza, C; Miñambres, B; Manga-González, M Y

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, perfect and validate the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technique using mitochondrial (mt) and ribosomal (ITS-2) DNA for the accurate identification of Dicrocoelium dendriticum in molluscs and ants, the first and second intermediate hosts, and their early detection. The first primers that were designed amplified a 169 pb mtDNA fragment of D. dendriticum permitted the detection of a single D. dendriticum metacercaria from the Formica rufibarbis and Formica pratensis abdomen, as well as the detection of the brainworm in the head of the ants collected in tetania. Although these primers did not amplify Dicrocoelium chinensis DNA and permitted detected D. dendriticum in the molluscs, they did not discriminate Brachylaimidae metacercariae found in the same mollusc. The PCR that was designed to amplify a 93 bp fragment of the ITS-2 is D. dendriticum specific as it did not amplify D. chinensis, Brachylaimidae and other trematodes. This technique is very sensitive since it permitted the detection of D. dendriticum in the molluscs from the first day post-infection, the brainworm in the head of the ants and only 1 D. dendriticum metacercaria from the abdomen of the ants. Both techniques are important, mainly the latter.

  8. Molecular detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania spp. in some desert lizards from Northwest China by using internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Rong; Guo, Xian-Guang; Liu, Jin-Long; Zhou, Tian-He; Gong, Xiong; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania is still endemic in Northwest China. It has been thought that reptiles could be a reservoir for mammalian leishmaniasis. However, data are still scarce on natural infection of lizards with Leishmania spp. in China. The present study deals with detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania parasites at species and intraspecies levels isolated from six desert lizard species from 10 geographical locations in Northwest China using amplification and sequencing of ITS-rDNA. In total, 83 haplotypes were found among 137 ITS1 sequences obtained from up to 64.6% of all captured lizards. Representative sequences of Leishmania available in GenBank were compiled for comparison with the obtained haplotypes. Tree-based species delimitation was achieved by using Bayesian phylogenitc analyses and maximum parsimony approach. Phylogenetic trees congruently supported that the haplotypes were found to belong to three Leishmania species including L. (sauroleishmania) sp., Leishmania tropica and Leishmania donovani complex. A network approach revealed paraphyletic populations of L. (sauroleishmania) sp. and L. tropica at intraspecies level regarding geographical origin and low host specificity. Chinese L. tropica from lizards showed significant heterogeneity as the obtained haplotypes were distributed in different clusters from other countries. Common ancestry was observed between some sequences of L. tropica from lizards and other sequence types from clinical samples from other countries. This may lend support to the potential reservoir role of lizards for human leishmaniasis. Our results appear to be the first molecular evidence for natural infection of lizards in Northwest China with reptilian Leishmania and mammalian Leishmania species. Desert lizards may be considered as putative reservoir hosts for Leishmania in China. Further studies on persistence of the Leishmania parasites in lizards and sandflies are recommended for the better understanding of their epidemiological involvement. PMID:27338182

  9. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures of Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA): finding the molecular and morphological gap in Caribbean gorgonian corals

    PubMed Central

    Grajales, Alejandro; Aguilar, Catalina; Sánchez, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    Background Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics, not found in the primary sequence, that give "morphological" information. Despite the number of recent molecular studies on octocorals, there is no consensus opinion about a region that carries enough phylogenetic resolution to solve intrageneric or close species relationships. Moreover, intrageneric morphological information by itself does not always produce accurate phylogenies; intra-species comparisons can reveal greater differences than intra-generic ones. The search for new phylogenetic approaches, such as by RNA secondary structure analysis, is therefore a priority in octocoral research. Results Initially, twelve predicted RNA secondary structures were reconstructed to provide the basic information for phylogenetic analyses; they accorded with the 6 helicoidal ring model, also present in other groups of corals and eukaryotes. We obtained three similar topologies for nine species of the Caribbean gorgonian genus Eunicea (candelabrum corals) with two sister taxa as outgroups (genera Plexaura and Pseudoplexaura) on the basis of molecular morphometrics of ITS2 RNA secondary structures only, traditional primary sequence analyses and maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics; each data partition was allowed to have a different evolution rate. In addition, each helix was partitioned as if it had evolved at a distinct rate. Plexaura flexuosa was found to group within Eunicea; this was best supported by both the molecular morphometrics and combined analyses. We suggest Eunicea flexuosa (Lamouroux, 1821) comb. nov., and we present a new species description including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of morphological characteristics (sclerites). Eunicea flexuosa, E. pallida, E. laxispica and E. mammosa formed a separate clade in the molecular phylogenies, and were reciprocally monophyletic with respect to other Eunicea (Euniceopsis subgenus, e.g. E. tourneforti and E. laciniata) in the molecular morphometrics tree, with the exception of E. fusca. Moreover, we suggest a new diagnostic character for Eunicea, also present in E. flexuosa: middle layer sclerites > 1 mm in length. Conclusion ITS2 was a reliable sequence for intrageneric studies in gorgonian octocorals because of the amount of phylogenetic signal, and was corroborated against morphological characters separating Eunicea from Plexaura. The ITS2 RNA secondary structure approach to phylogeny presented here did not rely on alignment methods such as INDELS, but provided clearly homologous characters for partition analysis and RNA molecular morphometrics. These approaches support the divergence of Eunicea flexuosa comb. nov. from the outgroup Plexaura, although it has been considered part of this outgroup for nearly two centuries because of morphological resemblance. PMID:17562014

  10. Sequence Analysis of the Second Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS2) Region of rDNA for Species Identification of Trichostrongylus Nematodes Isolated From Domestic Livestock in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemikhah, R; Sharbatkhori, M; Mobedi, I; Kia, EB; Harandi, M Fasihi; Mirhendi, H

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectivity of herbivores with Trichostrongylus nematodes is widespread in many countries, having a major economic impact on breeding, survivability, and productivity of domestic livestock. This study was carried out on Trichostrongylus species isolated from domestic livestock in order to develop an easy-to-perform method for species identification. Methods Trichostrongylus isolates were collected from sheep, goat, cattle, and buffaloes in Khuzestan Province, southwest Iran. Primary species identification was carried out based on morphological characterization of male worms. PCR amplification of ITS2-rDNA region was performed on genomic DNA and the products were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence data was conducted employing Bayesian Inference approach. Consequently, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profile was designed to differentiate Trichostrongylus species. Results A consensus sequence of 238 nucleotides was deposited in the GenBank for Iranian isolates of Trichostrongylus species including T. colubriformis, T. capricola, T. probolurus and T. vitrinus. The designated RFLP using restriction enzyme TasI could readily differentiate among species having different ITS2 sequence. The molecular analysis was in concordance with morphological findings. Conclusion Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close relationship among the sequences obtained in this study and reference sequence of relevant species. ITS2-RFLP with TasI is recommended for molecular differentiation of common Trichostrongylus species. PMID:23109944

  11. Combinatory Microarray and SuperSAGE Analyses Identify Pairing-Dependently Transcribed Genes in Schistosoma mansoni Males, Including Follistatin

    PubMed Central

    Leutner, Silke; Oliveira, Katia C.; Rotter, Björn; Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Hahnel, Steffen; Kitajima, Joao P.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Winter, Peter; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst) was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction analyses with potential binding partners. Conclusions/Significance Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM) and pairing-unexperienced males (UM), our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst). First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct) and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP), and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGFβ-pathway for

  12. Human-mouse hybrids with an embryonal carcinoma phenotype continue to transcribe HLA-A,B,C.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, F J; Quintero, M A; Goodfellow, P N

    1983-01-01

    We previously constructed a hybrid cell line, MCP6, which contains an X/6 translocation chromosome as its sole human genetic component in a mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell background. This chromosome, which carries the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) originated from a human B cell which expresses class I and class II MHC antigens. EC cells do not express class I or class II antigens on their cell surface. Northern blot analysis has now shown that in the MCP6 hybrid, human class I genes, i.e., HLA-A,B,C, continued to be transcribed, and cellular levels of the transcripts were similar to, or only slightly lower than, levels in hybrids with a non-EC phenotype. However, very low levels of mRNA species recognised by a mouse class I gene (H-2) probe were also detected in EC cells and EC hybrids. Comparison of the relative levels of H-2 and HLA class I gene transcripts in the EC hybrids and non-EC hybrids indicated that the introduced HLA-A,B,C genes were not appropriately regulated in the EC cell but were subject at least in part to cis control. In contrast to the class I genes, no class II gene (i.e. HLA-DR alpha) transcripts were detected in MCP6. Hybrid EC lines thus provide a system to investigate the different levels of control of MHC gene expression during development and may help to elucidate mechanisms whereby the embryonic genome programs expression of differentiated cell functions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6641706

  13. A transcribed ultraconserved noncoding RNA, Uc.173, is a key molecule for the inhibition of lead-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nan, Aruo; Zhou, Xinke; Chen, Lijian; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Li; Luo, Yuanwei; Liu, Zhenzhong; Dai, Lijun; Jiang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    As a common toxic metal, lead has significant neurotoxicity to brain development. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) function in multiple biological processes. However, whether lncRNAs are involved in lead-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Uc.173 is a lncRNA from a transcribed ultra-conservative region (T-UCR) of human, mouse and rat genomes. We established a lead-induced nerve injury mouse model. It showed the levels of Uc.173 decreased significantly in hippocampus tissue and serum of the model. We further tested the expression of Uc.173 in serum of lead-exposed children, which also showed a tendency to decrease. To explore the effects of Uc.173 on lead-induced nerve injury, we overexpressed Uc.173 in an N2a mouse nerve cell line and found Uc.173 had an inhibitory effect on lead-induced apoptosis of N2a. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of Uc.173 in apoptosis associated with lead-induced nerve injury, we predicted the target microRNAs of Uc.173 by using miRanda, TargetScan and RegRNA. After performing quantitative real-time PCR and bioinformatics analysis, we showed Uc.173 might inter-regulate with miR-291a-3p in lead-induced apoptosis and regulate apoptosis-associated genes. Our study suggests Uc.173 significantly inhibits the apoptosis of nerve cells, which may be mediated by inter-regulation with miRNAs in lead-induced nerve injury.

  14. A PCR-based diagnostic assay for the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae in Crassostrea virginica affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloy, A.P.; Barber, B.J.; Boettcher, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a PCR-assay for the diagnosis of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) based on the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae directly from affected oysters. Species-specific primers are used to amplify the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of R. crassostreae, and confirmation of product identity is accomplished by restriction enzyme analysis. No false positives were obtained with either closely related bacterial species or from other DNAs present in oyster samples. The assay has the potential to detect as few as 10 cells of R. crassostreae per oyster when samples are taken from the inner valve surfaces of the animal. Inclusion of material from soft body surfaces is not necessary, and may reduce sensitivity approximately 10-fold. In a JOD-affected population, a positive PCR result was obtained from all oysters from which these bacteria were subsequently cultured. The assay also detected the presence of R. crassostreae in 2 oysters from which no R. crassostreae isolates were recovered. No R. crassostreae was detected by either PCR or bacteriology in oysters from a population that was not exhibiting JOD-signs. This assay is expected to advance regional disease management efforts and provide valuable insights into the disease process and epizootiology of JOD. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  15. Skin lesion-associated pathogens from Octopus vulgaris: first detection of Photobacterium swingsii, Lactococcus garvieae and betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Perrucci, S; Vanni, A; Cersini, A; Lenzi, C; De Wolf, T; Fronte, B; Guarducci, M; Susini, F

    2015-07-23

    The common octopus Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1798 is extremely important in fisheries and is a useful protein source in most Mediterranean countries. Here we investigated pathogens associated with skin lesions in 9 naturally deceased specimens that included both cultured and wild common octopus. Within 30 min after death, each octopus was stored at 4°C and microbiologically examined within 24 h. Bacterial colonies, cultured from swabs taken from the lesions, were examined using taxonomical and biochemical analyses. Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were only isolated from cultured animals. A conventional PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and sequencing were performed on 2 bacterial isolates that remained unidentified after taxonomical and biochemical analysis. The sequence results indicated that the bacteria had a 99% identity with Lactococcus garvieae and Photobacterium swingsii. L. garvieae was confirmed using a specific PCR based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region, while P. swingsii was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Although all animals examined were found to be infected by the protozoan species Aggregata octopiana localised in the intestines, it was also present in skin lesions of 2 of the animals. Betanodavirus was detected in both cultured and wild individuals by cell culture, PCR and electron microscopy. These findings are the first report of L. garvieae and betanodavirus from skin lesions of common octopus and the first identification of P. swingsii both in octopus skin lesions and in marine invertebrates in Italy. PMID:26203886

  16. Expanding the mycobacterial diversity of metalworking fluids (MWFs): evidence showing MWF colonization by Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2012-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in machinists. Only two species of NTM, namely Mycobacterium immunogenum and Mycobacterium chelonae, have been reported thus far to have the ability to colonize contaminated metalworking fluids (MWFs). Here, we report, for the first time, the presence and characterization (phenotypic and genotypic) of a third species, Mycobacterium abscessus, colonizing these harsh alkaline machining fluids. Two Mycobacterium morphotypes, smooth (S) and rough (R), were isolated (two isolates each) from an in-use industrial MWFs. Biocide susceptibility analysis using triclosan as a model yielded the same minimal inhibitory concentration for the two morphotypes. PCR-restriction analysis-based speciation of the morphotypes confirmed their identity as M. abscessus. Genotyping based on partial DNA sequences corresponding to the variable regions of the hsp65 gene and 16S-23S rRNA operon internal transcribed spacer region and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis showed that both morphotypes belong to a single genotype. In addition, we isolated and confirmed two novel mycobacterial genotypes, one each of M. immunogenum and M. chelonae from additional in-use MWF screening. Taken together, this study expands the known mycobacterial species- and strain-diversity colonizing MWF. Furthermore, the study emphasizes the need for including M. abscessus species in the existing mycobacterial screening of contaminated MWF. PMID:22092754

  17. Coexistence of Bartonella henselae and B. clarridgeiae in populations of cats and their fleas in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Rizzo, Maria Fernanda; Alvarez, Danilo; Moran, David; Peruski, Leonard F; Kosoy, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cats and their fleas collected in Guatemala were investigated for the presence of Bartonella infections. Bartonella bacteria were cultured from 8.2% (13/159) of cats, and all cultures were identified as B. henselae. Molecular analysis allowed detection of Bartonella DNA in 33.8% (48/142) of cats and in 22.4% (34/152) of cat fleas using gltA, nuoG, and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer targets. Two Bartonella species, B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae, were identified in cats and cat fleas by molecular analysis, with B. henselae being more common than B. clarridgeiae in the cats (68.1%; 32/47 vs 31.9%; 15/47). The nuoG was found to be less sensitive for detecting B. clarridgeiae compared with other molecular targets and could detect only two of the 15 B. clarridgeiae-infected cats. No significant differences were observed for prevalence between male and female cats and between different age groups. No evident association was observed between the presence of Bartonella species in cats and in their fleas.

  18. Cloning and characterization of a novel oligoalginate lyase from a newly isolated bacterium Sphingomonas sp. MJ-3.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwan Hee; Kam, Natania; Lee, Eun Yeol; Kim, Hee Sook

    2012-04-01

    A bacterium possessing alginate-degrading activity was isolated from marine brown seaweed soup liquefied by salted and fermented anchovy. The isolated strain was designated as Sphingomonas sp. MJ-3 based on the analyses of 16S ribosomal DNA sequences, 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, biochemical characteristics, and cellular fatty acid composition. A novel alginate lyase gene was cloned from genomic DNA library and then expressed in Escherichia coli. When the deduced amino acid sequence was compared with the sequences on the databases, interestingly, the cloned gene product was predicted to consist of AlgL (alginate lyase L)-like and heparinase-like protein domain. The MJ-3 alginate lyase gene shared below 27.0% sequence identity with exolytic alginate lyase of Sphingomonas sp. A1. The optimal pH and temperature for the recombinant MJ-3 alginate lyase were 6.5 and 50°C, respectively. The final degradation products of alginate oligosaccharides were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and proved to be alginate monosaccharides. Based on the results, the recombinant alginate lyase from Sphingomonas sp. MJ-3 is regarded as an oligoalginate lyase that can degrade oligoalginate and alginate into alginate monosaccharides.

  19. Combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent molecular methods for the determination of bacterial community of iru, a fermented Parkia biglobosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Adewumi, Gbenga A; Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A; Keisam, Santosh; Romi, Wahengbam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    In this study, bacterial composition of iru produced by natural, uncontrolled fermentation of Parkia biglobosa seeds was assessed using culture-independent method in combination with culture-based genotypic typing techniques. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed similarity in DNA fragments with the two DNA extraction methods used and confirmed bacterial diversity in the 16 iru samples from different production regions. DNA sequencing of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes obtained from PCR-DGGE identified species related to Bacillus subtilis as consistent bacterial species in the fermented samples, while other major bands were identified as close relatives of Staphylococcus vitulinus, Morganella morganii, B. thuringiensis, S. saprophyticus, Tetragenococcus halophilus, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Brevibacillus parabrevis, Salinicoccus jeotgali, Brevibacterium sp. and uncultured bacteria clones. Bacillus species were cultured as potential starter cultures and clonal relationship of different isolates determined using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) combined with 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR amplification, restriction analysis (ITS-PCR-RFLP), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR). This further discriminated B. subtilis and its variants from food-borne pathogens such as B. cereus and suggested the need for development of controlled fermentation processes and good manufacturing practices (GMP) for iru production to achieve product consistency, safety quality, and improved shelf life.

  20. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk powders by cross-priming amplification combined with immunoblotting analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Shaolong; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is frequently isolated from a wide variety of foods and can cause human yersiniosis. Biochemical and culture-based assays are common detection methods, but require a long incubation time and easily misidentify Y. enterocolitica as other non-pathogenic Yersinia species. Alternatively, cross-priming amplification (CPA) under isothermal conditions combined with immunoblotting analysis enables a more sensitive detection in a relatively short time period. A set of specific displacement primers, cross primers and testing primers was designed on the basis of six specific sequences in Y. enterocolitica 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer. Under isothermal condition, amplification and hybridization were conducted simultaneously at 63°C for 60 min. The specificity of CPA was tested for 96 different bacterial strains and 165 commercial milk powder samples. Two red lines were developed on BioHelix Express strip for all of the Y. enterocolitica strains, and one red line was shown for non-Y. enterocolitica strains. The limit of detection of CPA was 10(0)fg for genomic DNA (1000 times more sensitive than PCR assay), 10(1) CFU/ml for pure bacterial culture, and 10(0) CFU per 100 g milk powder with pre-enrichment at 37°C for 24 h. CPA combined with immunoblotting analysis can achieve highly specific and sensitive detection of Y. enterocolitica in milk powder in 90 min after pre-enrichment. PMID:26253307

  1. Identification of acetic acid bacteria in traditionally produced vinegar and mother of vinegar by using different molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Yetiman, Ahmet E; Kesmen, Zülal

    2015-07-01

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were combined for the investigation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations in traditionally produced vinegars and mother of vinegar samples obtained from apple and grape. The culture-independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, which targeted the V7-V8 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, showed that Komagataeibacter hansenii and Komagataeibacter europaeus/Komagataeibacter xylinus were the most dominant species in almost all of the samples analyzed directly. The culture-independent GTG5-rep PCR fingerprinting was used in the preliminary characterization of AAB isolates and species-level identification was carried out by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S rDNA internally transcribed to the spacer (ITS) region and tuf gene. Acetobacter okinawensis was frequently isolated from samples obtained from apple while K. europaeus was identified as the dominant species, followed by Acetobacter indonesiensis in the samples originating from grape. In addition to common molecular techniques, real-time PCR intercalating dye assays, including DNA melting temperature (Tm) and high resolution melting analysis (HRM), were applied to acetic acid bacterial isolates for the first time. The target sequence of ITS region generated species-specific HRM profiles and Tm values allowed discrimination at species level.

  2. Genetic variability analysis of Zymomonas mobilis strains from the UFPEDA microorganisms collection.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C N; Araújo, J M; Azevedo, J L; Padilha, R J S A; Yara, R

    2015-02-02

    Zymomonas mobilis is a Gram-negative bacterium that has drawn attention in the bioethanol industry. Besides bioethanol, this bacterium also produces other biotechnological products such as levans, which show antitumor activity. Molecular studies involving Z. mobilis have advanced to the point that allows us to characterize interspecies genetic diversity and understand their metabolism, and these data are essential for better utilization of this species. In this study, the genetic diversity of 24 strains from the Microorganisms Collection of Departamento de Antibióticos (UFPEDA) from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco were characterized. The methods used were amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and diversity analysis of the internally transcribed 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR). These analyses revealed low genetic variability of the 16S rDNA gene. These data confirm that these isolates are, or are closely related to, Z. mobilis. Moreover, the analysis of the ISR confirmed the genetic variability of strains deposited in the UFPEDA collection of microorganisms and grouped these strains into ten ribotypes, which can be used in the future for breeding programs and for the preservation of biodiversity. Furthermore, this study characterized the genetic variability between the UFPEDA 205/ ZAP, UFPEDA 98/AG11, and ZAG strains, which were obtained by spheroplast fusion among them. The data also indicate that there is genetic variability among the UFPEDA 202/CP4 and UFPEDA 633/ ZM4 strains, demonstrating that these important Z. mobilis strains are distinct, as suggested in previous studies.

  3. Skin lesion-associated pathogens from Octopus vulgaris: first detection of Photobacterium swingsii, Lactococcus garvieae and betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Perrucci, S; Vanni, A; Cersini, A; Lenzi, C; De Wolf, T; Fronte, B; Guarducci, M; Susini, F

    2015-07-23

    The common octopus Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1798 is extremely important in fisheries and is a useful protein source in most Mediterranean countries. Here we investigated pathogens associated with skin lesions in 9 naturally deceased specimens that included both cultured and wild common octopus. Within 30 min after death, each octopus was stored at 4°C and microbiologically examined within 24 h. Bacterial colonies, cultured from swabs taken from the lesions, were examined using taxonomical and biochemical analyses. Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were only isolated from cultured animals. A conventional PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and sequencing were performed on 2 bacterial isolates that remained unidentified after taxonomical and biochemical analysis. The sequence results indicated that the bacteria had a 99% identity with Lactococcus garvieae and Photobacterium swingsii. L. garvieae was confirmed using a specific PCR based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region, while P. swingsii was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Although all animals examined were found to be infected by the protozoan species Aggregata octopiana localised in the intestines, it was also present in skin lesions of 2 of the animals. Betanodavirus was detected in both cultured and wild individuals by cell culture, PCR and electron microscopy. These findings are the first report of L. garvieae and betanodavirus from skin lesions of common octopus and the first identification of P. swingsii both in octopus skin lesions and in marine invertebrates in Italy.

  4. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk powders by cross-priming amplification combined with immunoblotting analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Shaolong; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is frequently isolated from a wide variety of foods and can cause human yersiniosis. Biochemical and culture-based assays are common detection methods, but require a long incubation time and easily misidentify Y. enterocolitica as other non-pathogenic Yersinia species. Alternatively, cross-priming amplification (CPA) under isothermal conditions combined with immunoblotting analysis enables a more sensitive detection in a relatively short time period. A set of specific displacement primers, cross primers and testing primers was designed on the basis of six specific sequences in Y. enterocolitica 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer. Under isothermal condition, amplification and hybridization were conducted simultaneously at 63°C for 60 min. The specificity of CPA was tested for 96 different bacterial strains and 165 commercial milk powder samples. Two red lines were developed on BioHelix Express strip for all of the Y. enterocolitica strains, and one red line was shown for non-Y. enterocolitica strains. The limit of detection of CPA was 10(0)fg for genomic DNA (1000 times more sensitive than PCR assay), 10(1) CFU/ml for pure bacterial culture, and 10(0) CFU per 100 g milk powder with pre-enrichment at 37°C for 24 h. CPA combined with immunoblotting analysis can achieve highly specific and sensitive detection of Y. enterocolitica in milk powder in 90 min after pre-enrichment.

  5. Caldora penicillata gen. nov., comb. nov. (cyanobacteria), a pantropical marine species with biomedical relevance.

    PubMed

    Engene, Niclas; Tronholm, Ana; Salvador-Reyes, Lilibeth A; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J

    2015-08-01

    Many tropical marine cyanobacteria are prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites with ecological relevance and promising pharmaceutical applications. One species of chemically rich, tropical marine cyanobacteria that was previously identified as Symploca hydnoides or Symploca sp. corresponds to the traditional taxonomic definition of Phormidium penicillatum. In this study, we clarified the taxonomy of this biomedically and ecologically important cyanobacterium by comparing recently collected specimens with the original type material and the taxonomic description of P. penicillatum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions showed that P. penicillatum formed an independent clade sister to the genus Symploca, and distantly related to Phormidium and Lyngbya. We propose the new genus Caldora for this clade, with Caldora penicillata comb. nov. as the type species and designate as the epitype the recently collected strain FK13-1. Furthermore, the production of bioactive secondary metabolites among various geographically dispersed collections of C. penicillata showed that this species consistently produced the metabolite dolastatin 10 and/or the related compound symplostatin 1, which appear to be robust autapomorphic characters and chemotaxonomic markers for this taxon. PMID:26327714

  6. Combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent molecular methods for the determination of bacterial community of iru, a fermented Parkia biglobosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Adewumi, Gbenga A; Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A; Keisam, Santosh; Romi, Wahengbam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    In this study, bacterial composition of iru produced by natural, uncontrolled fermentation of Parkia biglobosa seeds was assessed using culture-independent method in combination with culture-based genotypic typing techniques. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed similarity in DNA fragments with the two DNA extraction methods used and confirmed bacterial diversity in the 16 iru samples from different production regions. DNA sequencing of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes obtained from PCR-DGGE identified species related to Bacillus subtilis as consistent bacterial species in the fermented samples, while other major bands were identified as close relatives of Staphylococcus vitulinus, Morganella morganii, B. thuringiensis, S. saprophyticus, Tetragenococcus halophilus, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Brevibacillus parabrevis, Salinicoccus jeotgali, Brevibacterium sp. and uncultured bacteria clones. Bacillus species were cultured as potential starter cultures and clonal relationship of different isolates determined using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) combined with 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR amplification, restriction analysis (ITS-PCR-RFLP), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR). This further discriminated B. subtilis and its variants from food-borne pathogens such as B. cereus and suggested the need for development of controlled fermentation processes and good manufacturing practices (GMP) for iru production to achieve product consistency, safety quality, and improved shelf life. PMID:23316189

  7. Seasonal and spatial diversity of picocyanobacteria community in the Great Mazurian Lakes derived from DGGE analyses of ITS region of rDNA and cpcBAIGS [corrected] markers.

    PubMed

    Jasser, Iwona; Królicka, Adriana; Jakubiec, Katarzyna; Chróst, Ryszard J

    2013-06-28

    The seasonal and spatial diversity of picocyanobacteria (Pcy) in lakes of the Great Mazurian Lakes (GLM) system was examined by DGGE analysis of molecular markers derived from the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal operon and the phycocyanin operon (cpcBA-IGS). The study of nine lakes, ranging from mesotrophy to hypereutrophy, demonstrated seasonal variance of Pcy. The richness and Shannon diversity index calculated on the basis of both markers were higher in spring and lower in early and late summer. No statistically significant relationships were found between the markers and trophic status of the studied lakes or Pcy abundance. There were, however, statistically significant relationships between the diversity indices and sampling time. The analysis pointed to a different distribution of the two markers. The ITS marker exhibited more unique sequences in time and space, whereas a greater role for common and ubiquitous sequences was indicated by the cpcBA-IGS data. Examination of the Pcy community structure demonstrated that communities were grouped in highly similar clusters according to sampling season/time rather than to the trophic status of the lake. Our results suggest that time is more important than trophic status in shaping the diversity and structure of Pcy communities. The seasonal changes in picocyanobacteria and differences in diversity and community structures are discussed in the context of well-established ecological hypotheses: the PEG model, intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH), and horizontal gene transfer (HGT).

  8. Use of a DNA Microarray for Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Fishery Products▿

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Li, Rongrong; Xiong, Songjin; Yao, Fangfang; Liu, Xiangqian; Wang, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    We established a microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of diverse putative pathogens often associated with fishery products by targeting specific genes of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Shigella, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Yersinia enterocolitica and the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris. The microarray contained 26 specific probes and was tested against a total of 123 target bacterial strains that included 55 representative strains, 68 clinical isolates, and 45 strains of other bacterial species that belonged to 8 genera and 34 species, and it was shown to be specific and reproducible. A detection sensitivity of 10 ng DNA or 10 CFU/ml for pure cultures of each target organism demonstrated that the assay was highly sensitive and reproducible. Mock and real fishery product samples were tested by the microarray, and the accuracy was 100%. The DNA microarray method described in this communication is specific, sensitive, and reliable and has several advantages over traditional methods of bacterial culture and antiserum agglutination assays. PMID:21965411

  9. PCR characterization and typing of Klebsiella pneumoniae using capsular type-specific, variable number tandem repeat and virulence gene targets.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Perry, Claire; Elgohari, Suzanne; Hampton, Catherine V

    2010-05-01

    A multiplex PCR is described which detects capsular types K1, K2, K5, K54 and K57, which are those most associated with invasive disease or pathogenicity, a further capsular type (K20), two putative virulence factors (rmpA and wcaG) and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer unit of Klebsiella pneumoniae, facilitating identification of this organism. wcaG encodes capsular fucose production and was associated with capsular types K1 and K54, but was also found in strains of other capsular types; 18 of the 543 isolates screened were PCR-positive for this gene. An eight-locus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) scheme was designed, which provided discrimination at a level similar to that afforded by PFGE among a panel of 36 isolates representing 29 PFGE types. All isolates tested of the virulent K1 clone of CC23, associated with pyogenic liver abscesses, shared the same VNTR profile, which may be helpful in identifying this clone; such isolates were also PCR-positive for allS. These methods provide a rapid means of characterizing and typing isolates of this important agent of community-acquired and nosocomial infection.

  10. Cyanobacterial diversity and a new acaryochloris-like symbiont from Bahamian sea-squirts.

    PubMed

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Song, Bongkeun; Bosch, Manel; Pawlik, Joseph R; Turon, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions between ascidians (sea-squirts) and microbes are poorly understood. Here we characterized the cyanobacteria in the tissues of 8 distinct didemnid taxa from shallow-water marine habitats in the Bahamas Islands by sequencing a fragment of the cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene and the entire 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and by examining symbiont morphology with transmission electron (TEM) and confocal microscopy (CM). As described previously for other species, Trididemnum spp. mostly contained symbionts associated with the Prochloron-Synechocystis group. However, sequence analysis of the symbionts in Lissoclinum revealed two unique clades. The first contained a novel cyanobacterial clade, while the second clade was closely associated with Acaryochloris marina. CM revealed the presence of chlorophyll d (chl d) and phycobiliproteins (PBPs) within these symbiont cells, as is characteristic of Acaryochloris species. The presence of symbionts was also observed by TEM inside the tunic of both the adult and larvae of L. fragile, indicating vertical transmission to progeny. Based on molecular phylogenetic and microscopic analyses, Candidatus Acaryochloris bahamiensis nov. sp. is proposed for this symbiotic cyanobacterium. Our results support the hypothesis that photosymbiont communities in ascidians are structured by host phylogeny, but in some cases, also by sampling location.

  11. Morphological and molecular characterization within 26 strains of the genus Cylindrospermum (Nostocaceae, Cyanobacteria), with descriptions of three new species.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jeffrey R; Bohunická, Markéta; Lukešová, Alena; Hrčková, Kristýna; Vaccarino, Melissa A; Chesarino, Nicholas M

    2014-02-01

    Twenty-six strains morphologically identified as Cylindrospermum as well as the closely related taxon Cronbergia siamensis were examined microscopically as well as phylogenetically using sequence data for the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed three distinct clades. The clade we designate as Cylindrospermum sensu stricto contained all five of the foundational species, C. maius, C. stagnale, C. licheniforme, C. muscicola, and C. catenatum. In addition to these taxa, three species new to science in this clade were described: C. badium, C. moravicum, and C. pellucidum. Our evidence indicated that Cronbergia is a later synonym of Cylindrospermum. The phylogenetic position of Cylindrospermum within the Nostocaceae was not clearly resolved in our analyses. Cylindrospermum is unusual among cyanobacterial genera in that the morphological diversity appears to be more evident than sequence divergence. Taxa were clearly separable using morphology, but had very high percent similarity among ribosomal sequences. Given the high diversity we noted in this study, we conclude that there is likely much more diversity remaining to be described in this genus. PMID:26988018

  12. High temporal but low spatial heterogeneity of bacterioplankton in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Wang, Kui; Evans, Sarah E; Chen, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Compared to freshwater and the open ocean, less is known about bacterioplankton community structure and spatiotemporal dynamics in estuaries, particularly those with long residence times. The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, but despite its ecological and economic significance, little is known about its microbial community composition. A rapid screening approach, ITS (internal transcribed spacer)-LH (length heterogeneity)-PCR, was used to screen six rRNA operon (16S rRNA-ITS-23S rRNA) clone libraries constructed from bacterioplankton collected in three distinct regions of the Chesapeake Bay over two seasons. The natural length variation of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region, as well as the presence and location of tRNA-alanine coding regions within the ITS, was determined for 576 clones. Clones representing unique ITS-LH-PCR sizes were sequenced and identified. Dramatic shifts in bacterial composition (changes within subgroups or clades) were observed for the Alphaproteobacteria (Roseobacter clade, SAR11), Cyanobacteria (Synechococcus), and Actinobacteria, suggesting strong seasonal variation within these taxonomic groups. Despite large gradients in salinity and phytoplankton parameters, a remarkably homogeneous bacterioplankton community was observed in the bay in each season. Stronger seasonal, rather than spatial, variation of the bacterioplankton population was also supported by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and LH-PCR analyses, indicating that environmental parameters with stronger seasonal, rather than regional, dynamics, such as temperature, might determine bacterioplankton community composition in the Chesapeake Bay.

  13. Identification of acetic acid bacteria in traditionally produced vinegar and mother of vinegar by using different molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Yetiman, Ahmet E; Kesmen, Zülal

    2015-07-01

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were combined for the investigation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations in traditionally produced vinegars and mother of vinegar samples obtained from apple and grape. The culture-independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, which targeted the V7-V8 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, showed that Komagataeibacter hansenii and Komagataeibacter europaeus/Komagataeibacter xylinus were the most dominant species in almost all of the samples analyzed directly. The culture-independent GTG5-rep PCR fingerprinting was used in the preliminary characterization of AAB isolates and species-level identification was carried out by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S rDNA internally transcribed to the spacer (ITS) region and tuf gene. Acetobacter okinawensis was frequently isolated from samples obtained from apple while K. europaeus was identified as the dominant species, followed by Acetobacter indonesiensis in the samples originating from grape. In addition to common molecular techniques, real-time PCR intercalating dye assays, including DNA melting temperature (Tm) and high resolution melting analysis (HRM), were applied to acetic acid bacterial isolates for the first time. The target sequence of ITS region generated species-specific HRM profiles and Tm values allowed discrimination at species level. PMID:25828705

  14. Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov., novel members of coccoid Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gama, Watson Arantes; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Branco, Luis Henrique Zanini; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Fiore, Marli Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Two Cyanobacteria isolated from South Atlantic Ocean continental shelf deep water and from a marine green algae inhabiting the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica were investigated based on morphological and ultrastructural traits, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, secondary structure of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions and phylogenomic analyses. The majority of these evaluations demonstrated that both strains differ from the genera of cyanobacteria with validly published names and, therefore, supported the description of the novel genus as Aliterella gen. nov. The identity and phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with the secondary structure of D1D1' and BoxB intergenic regions, further supported the two strains representing distinct species: Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type SP469036, strain CENA595T) and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov. (type SP469035, strain CENA408T). The phylogenomic analysis of A. atlantica sp. nov. CENA595T, based on 21 protein sequences, revealed that this genus belongs to the cyanobacterial order Chroococcidiopsidales. The isolation and cultivation of two geographically distant unicellular members of a novel cyanobacterial genus and the sequenced genome of the type strain bring new insights into the current classification of the coccoid group, and into the reconstruction of their evolutionary history. PMID:27054834

  15. Acetic acid bacteria isolated from grapes of South Australian vineyards.

    PubMed

    Mateo, E; Torija, M J; Mas, A; Bartowsky, E J

    2014-05-16

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) diversity from healthy, mould-infected and rot-affected grapes collected from three vineyards of Adelaide Hills (South Australia) was analyzed by molecular typing and identification methods. Nine different AAB species were identified from the 624 isolates recovered: Four species from Gluconobacter genus, two from Asaia and one from Acetobacter were identified by the analysis of 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer. However, the identification of other isolates that were assigned as Asaia sp. and Ameyamaea chiangmaiensis required more analysis for a correct species classification. The species of Gluconobacter cerinus was the main one identified; while one genotype of Asaia siamensis presented the highest number of isolates. The number of colonies recovered and genotypes identified was strongly affected by the infection status of the grapes; the rot-affected with the highest number. However, the species diversity was similar in all the cases. High AAB diversity was detected with a specific genotype distribution for each vineyard.

  16. Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov., novel members of coccoid Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gama, Watson Arantes; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Branco, Luis Henrique Zanini; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Fiore, Marli Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Two Cyanobacteria isolated from South Atlantic Ocean continental shelf deep water and from a marine green algae inhabiting the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica were investigated based on morphological and ultrastructural traits, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, secondary structure of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions and phylogenomic analyses. The majority of these evaluations demonstrated that both strains differ from the genera of cyanobacteria with validly published names and, therefore, supported the description of the novel genus as Aliterella gen. nov. The identity and phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with the secondary structure of D1D1' and BoxB intergenic regions, further supported the two strains representing distinct species: Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type SP469036, strain CENA595T) and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov. (type SP469035, strain CENA408T). The phylogenomic analysis of A. atlantica sp. nov. CENA595T, based on 21 protein sequences, revealed that this genus belongs to the cyanobacterial order Chroococcidiopsidales. The isolation and cultivation of two geographically distant unicellular members of a novel cyanobacterial genus and the sequenced genome of the type strain bring new insights into the current classification of the coccoid group, and into the reconstruction of their evolutionary history.

  17. [CpcHID operon as a new tool for classification and identification of Arthrospira platensis strains].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling-yong; Wang, Zhi-ping; Cao, Xue-cheng; Chen, Xiao-yan; Xu, Bu-jin; Li, Xue-bin; Huang, Hui

    2006-12-01

    Arthrospira is a photoautotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium belonging to the family Oscillatoriaceae, phylum Cyanophyta. Morphological criteria alone were inadequate for classification of Arthrospira . To develop new molecular markers, in this study, the cpcHID operon, 16S rRNA and 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer (ITS) of seven Arthrospira platensis strains, Sp-10, Sp-2, Sp-9, Sp-1, Sp-1ll, Sp-3 and Sp-5, were cloned and sequenced. And the results of bioinformatics and molecular phylogenetics analyses with BioEdit 7.0, Clustal X 1.81 and Phylip 3.65 were as follows: (1) The sequences of cpcHID operon, 16S rRNA and ITS from the seven strains were highly homologous to the each corresponding gene based on multiple pair-wise comparison. (2) The mean absolute deviation of the G + C content, the ratio of different sites and the genetic distance coefficient based on the sequences of cpcHID operon in the seven strains were generally greater than that based on 16S rRNA and ITS region. (3) The phylogenetic dendrogram based on the sequences of cpcHID operon was almost same with that based on the sequences of 16S rRNA and ITS region. Therefore, it revealed that cpcHID operon could be applied as a new molecular marker to classification and identification of cyanobacterium, and more appropriate for species or strains determination due to its abundant information. PMID:17302170

  18. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris Have Characteristics in Common with Sinorhizobium meliloti Isolates from Mainland Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurdo-Piñeiro, José Luis; García-Fraile, Paula; Rivas, Raúl; Peix, Alvaro; León-Barrios, Milagros; Willems, Anne; Mateos, Pedro Francisco; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna; van Berkum, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The stable, low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA fractions of several rhizobial isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in the soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canary Islands, were identical to a less-common pattern found within Sinorhizobium meliloti (assigned to group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northern Spain. The P. vulgaris isolates and the group II LMW RNA S. meliloti isolates also were distinguishable in that both had two conserved inserts of 20 and 46 bp in the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region that were not present in other strains of S. meliloti. The isolates from P. vulgaris nodulated bean but not Medicago sativa, while those recovered from Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. nodulated both host legumes. The bean isolates also were distinguished from those of Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. by nodC sequence analysis. The nodC sequences of the bean isolates were most similar to those reported for S. meliloti bv. mediterranense and Sinorhizobium fredii bv. mediterranense (GenBank accession numbers DQ333891 and AF217267, respectively). None of the evidence placed the bean isolates from Lanzarote in the genus Rhizobium, which perhaps is inconsistent with seed-borne transmission of Rhizobium etli from the Americas to the Canaries as an explanation for the presence of bean-nodulating rhizobia in soils of Lanzarote. PMID:19218416

  19. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway in Mucor mucedo, is constitutively transcribed but its activity is differently regulated in (+) and (-) mating types.

    PubMed

    Schimek, Christine; Petzold, Annett; Schultze, Kornelia; Wetzel, Jana; Wolschendorf, Frank; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase (TDH) converts the (+) mating type sex pheromone 4-dihydromethyltrisporate into methyltrisporate. In Mucor mucedo, this conversion is required only in the (-) mating type. Expression of the TDH encoding TSP1 gene was analyzed qualitatively using reverse-transcribed PCR. TSP1 is constitutively transcribed in the (+) and in the (-) mating type, irrespective of the mating situation. By immunodetection, the translation product is also formed constitutively. In contrast to gene expression, TDH enzyme activity depends on the sexual status of the mycelium. Activity is restricted to the sexually stimulated (-) mating type. Non-stimulated (-), as well as stimulated and non-stimulated (+) mycelia exhibit no activity and do not influence activity in stimulated (-) mycelia. Time course analysis shows strongly increased enzyme activity at 80 min after stimulation. Low activity exists from the onset of stimulation, indicating that additional regulation mechanisms are involved in TDH function.

  20. Preferential repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of a gene in yeast chromosomes and plasmids is dependent on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sweder, K S; Hanawalt, P C

    1992-01-01

    While preferential repair of the transcribed strands within active genes has been demonstrated in organisms as diverse as humans and Escherichia coli, it has not previously been shown to occur in chromosomal genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the expressed RPB2 gene in the chromosome of a repair-proficient strain is much more rapid than that in the nontranscribed strand. Furthermore, a copy of the RPB2 gene borne on a centromeric ARS1 plasmid showed the same strand bias in repair. To investigate the relation of this strand bias to transcription, we studied repair in a yeast strain with the temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. When exponentially growing rpb1-1 cells are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, they rapidly cease mRNA synthesis. At the permissive temperature, both rpb1-1 and the wild-type, parental cells exhibited rapid, proficient repair in the transcribed strand of chromosomal and plasmid-borne copies of the RPB2 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature, the rate of repair in the transcribed strand in rpb1-1 cells was reduced to that in the nontranscribed strand. These findings establish the dependence of strand bias in repair on transcription by RNA polymerase II in the chromosomes and in plasmids, and they validate the use of plasmids for analysis of the relation of repair to transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1438266

  1. Subunits I and II of Dictyostelium cytochrome c oxidase are specified by a single open reading frame transcribed into a large polycistronic RNA.

    PubMed

    Pellizzari, R; Anjard, C; Bisson, R

    1997-05-16

    A single open reading frame (ORF) encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and II (cox1/2) was identified in the mitochondrial genome of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The cox1 coding region shares intron positions with its counterparts in fungi and algae. Northern blot analysis, using exon and intron-specific probes, suggests that the cox1/2 gene is transcribed as part of a large, efficiently processed, polycistronic RNA. PMID:9186775

  2. Oral Academic Discourse Socialisation: Challenges Faced by International Undergraduate Students in a Malaysian Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative study which examines the challenges faced by six international undergraduate students in their socialisation of oral academic discourse in a Malaysian public university. Data were collected employing interviews. Students' presentations were also collected. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and…

  3. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Crosby, John, IV; Haycock, Ken; Oh, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following international reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Trends and Issues in Library and Information Services in Canada, 1998. (AEF)

  4. Ecotypes of planktonic actinobacteria with identical 16S rRNA genes adapted to thermal niches in temperate, subtropical, and tropical freshwater habitats.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Pöckl, Matthias

    2005-02-01

    Seven strains with identical 16S rRNA genes affiliated with the Luna2 cluster (Actinobacteria) were isolated from six freshwater habitats located in temperate (Austria and Australia), subtropical (People's Republic of China), and tropical (Uganda) climatic zones. The isolates had sequence differences at zero to five positions in a 2,310-nucleotide fragment of the ribosomal operon, including part of the intergenic spacer upstream of the 16S rRNA gene, the complete 16S rRNA gene, the complete 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS1), and a short part of the 23S rRNA gene. Most of the few sequence differences found were located in the internal transcribed spacer sequences. Two isolates obtained from habitats in Asia and Europe, as well as two isolates obtained from different habitats in the People's Republic of China, had identical sequences for the entire fragment sequenced. In spite of minimal sequence differences in the part of the ribosomal operon investigated, the strains exhibited significant differences in their temperature response curves (with one exception), as well as pronounced differences in their temperature optima (25.0 to 35.6 degrees C). The observed differences in temperature adaptation were generally in accordance with the thermal conditions in the habitats where the strains were isolated. Strains obtained from temperate zone habitats had the lowest temperature optima, strains from subtropical habitats had intermediate temperature optima, and a strain from a tropical habitat had the highest temperature optimum. Based on the observed temperature responses, we concluded that the strains investigated are well adapted to the thermal conditions in their home habitats. Consequently, these closely related strains represent different ecotypes adapted to different thermal niches.

  5. The N-Terminally Truncated µ3 and µ3-Like Opioid Receptors Are Transcribed from a Novel Promoter Upstream of Exon 2 in the Human OPRM1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fladvad, Torill; Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The human µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, produces a multitude of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding full-length or truncated receptor variants with distinct pharmacological properties. The majority of these transcripts are transcribed from the main promoter upstream of exon 1, or from alternate promoters associated with exons 11 and 13. Two distinct transcripts encoding six transmembrane domain (6TM) hMOR receptors, µ3 and µ3-like, have been reported, both starting with the first nucleotide in exon 2. However, no mechanism explaining their initiation at exon 2 has been presented. Here we have used RT-PCR with RNA from human brain tissues to demonstrate that the µ3 and µ3-like transcripts contain nucleotide sequences from the intron 1-exon 2 boundary and are transcribed from a novel promoter located upstream of exon 2. Reporter gene assays confirmed the ability of the novel promoter to drive transcription in human cells, albeit at low levels. We also report the identification of a “full-length” seven transmembrane domain (7TM) version of µ3, hMOR-1A2, which also contains exon 1, and a novel transcript, hMOR-1Y2, with the potential to encode the previously reported hMOR-1Y receptor, but with exon Y spliced to exon 4 instead of exon 5 as in hMOR-1Y. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged hMOR variants in HEK 293 cells showed that both 6TM receptors were retained in the intracellular compartment and were unresponsive to exogenous opioid exposure as assessed by their ability to redistribute or affect cellular cAMP production, or to promote intracellular Ca2+ release. Co-staining with an antibody specific for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) indicated that the µ3-like receptor was retained at the ER after synthesis. 7TM receptors hMOR-1A2 and hMOR-1Y2 resided in the plasma membrane, and were responsive to opioids. Notably, hMOR-1A2 exhibits novel functional properties in that it did not internalize in response to the opioid peptide [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5

  6. Ty1 Integrase Interacts with RNA Polymerase III-specific Subcomplexes to Promote Insertion of Ty1 Elements Upstream of Polymerase (Pol) III-transcribed Genes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephanie; Ma, Lina; Chan, Patrick H W; Hu, Hui-Lan; Mayor, Thibault; Chen, Hung-Ta; Measday, Vivien

    2016-03-18

    Retrotransposons are eukaryotic mobile genetic elements that transpose by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and are derived from retroviruses. The Ty1 retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ty1/Copia superfamily, which is present in every eukaryotic genome. Insertion of Ty1 elements into the S. cerevisiae genome, which occurs upstream of genes transcribed by RNA Pol III, requires the Ty1 element-encoded integrase (IN) protein. Here, we report that Ty1-IN interacts in vivo and in vitro with RNA Pol III-specific subunits to mediate insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. Purification of Ty1-IN from yeast cells followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis identified an enrichment of peptides corresponding to the Rpc82/34/31 and Rpc53/37 Pol III-specific subcomplexes. GFP-Trap purification of multiple GFP-tagged RNA Pol III subunits from yeast extracts revealed that the majority of Pol III subunits co-purify with Ty1-IN but not two other complexes required for Pol III transcription, transcription initiation factors (TF) IIIB and IIIC. In vitro binding studies with bacterially purified RNA Pol III proteins demonstrate that Rpc31, Rpc34, and Rpc53 interact directly with Ty1-IN. Deletion of the N-terminal 280 amino acids of Rpc53 abrogates insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of the hot spot SUF16 tRNA locus and abolishes the interaction of Ty1-IN with Rpc37. The Rpc53/37 complex therefore has an important role in targeting Ty1-IN to insert Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. PMID:26797132

  7. Re-feeding rats a high-sucrose diet after 3 days of starvation enhances histone H3 acetylation in transcribed region and expression of jejunal GLUT5 gene.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kazue; Masuda, Yuriko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Fasting for 3 days leads to reduction in the expression of GLUT5 and SGLT1 genes in jejunum. Re-feeding a high-sucrose diet in fasted rats enhanced mRNA levels and histone H3 acetylation on transcribed region of GLUT5 gene within 24 h, but not in SGLT1. Responsiveness of jejunal GLUT5 gene is associated with changes in histone H3 acetylation on transcribed region.

  8. Detection of cleavage products from an in vivo transcribed cis hairpin ribozyme in turnips using the CaMV plant virus.

    PubMed

    Borneman, J; Tritz, R; Hampel, A; Altschuler, M

    1995-07-01

    In order to examine ribozyme (Rz) activity in vivo, we have adapted a virus to deliver Rz to plants. DNA fragments that code for both active and mutant cis-hairpin Rz were cloned into the double-stranded DNA plant virus, cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). These Rz constructs successfully infected Brassica campestris rapa (turnip). The plants that were infected with the active-Rz construct showed, on average, a one-week delay in the appearance of viral symptoms, when compared to the mutant-Rz control. Since CaMV replicates through reverse transcription of a full-length RNA intermediate, Rz cloned into the CaMV DNA should be transcribed within this viral RNA. If these Rz constructs cleave, the amount of intact virus RNA should be reduced, resulting in attenuated viral symptoms. In addition, lysate RNase protection assays showed fragments corresponding to the sizes of both the 5' and 3' cis cleavage products in the active Rz tissue. No cleavage products were observed from plant tissue infected with the mutant Rz. Both the attenuated systemic viral symptoms and the cleavage products from the protection assay strongly support in vivo transcription and cleavage of this hairpin Rz. This is the first report of an in vivo transcribed Rz showing cleaved products by direct RNA analysis (non-PCR) in plants or animals.

  9. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-01

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  10. Topoisomerase 1-dependent deletions initiated by incision at ribonucleotides are biased to the non-transcribed strand of a highly activated reporter

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Eun; Kim, Nayun; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases incorporate ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs) into genomic DNA at a low level and such rNMPs are efficiently removed in an error-free manner by ribonuclease (RNase) H2. In the absence of RNase H2 in budding yeast, persistent rNMPs give rise to short deletions via a mutagenic process initiated by Topoisomerase 1 (Top1). We examined the activity of a 2-bp, rNMP-dependent deletion hotspot [the (TG)2 hotspot] when on the transcribed or non-transcribed strand (TS or NTS, respectively) of a reporter placed in both orientations near a strong origin of replication. Under low-transcription conditions, hotspot activity depended on whether the (TG)2 sequence was part of the newly synthesized leading or lagging strand of replication. In agreement with an earlier study, deletions occurred at a much higher rate when (TG)2 was on the nascent leading strand. Under high-transcription conditions, however, hotspot activity was not dependent on replication direction, but rather on whether the (TG)2 sequence was on the TS or NTS of the reporter. Deletion rates were several orders of magnitude higher when (TG)2 was on the NTS. These results highlight the complex interplay between replication and transcription in regulating Top1-dependent genetic instability. PMID:26271994

  11. Recovery of RNA synthesis from the DHFR gene following UV-irradiation precedes the removal of photolesions from the transcribed strand.

    PubMed

    Ljungman, M

    1999-03-01

    It is thought that recovery of RNA synthesis following UV-irradiation is closely related to the removal of UV-induced lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. To test this hypothesis, nascent RNA synthesis from three different locations within the DHFR gene in CHO cells was assessed following exposure to UV light (254 nm). Using both in vivo RNA labeling as well as the nuclear run-on technique, it was found that RNA synthesis from the middle and the 3'-end of the gene was inhibited within 20 min by approximately 30 and 70%, respectively, while RNA synthesis from the 5'-end of the DHFR gene was enhanced. RNA synthesis from the middle portion of the gene fully recovered within 30-45 min of post-UV incubation, while recovery was slower from the 3'-end of the gene. Compared with previously published data for the kinetics of removal of UV-induced DNA lesions from the 5'-half of the DHFR gene in these cells, it is concluded that RNA synthesis resumed significantly faster in this region than could be accounted for by the removal of photolesions from the transcribed strand. Thus, although RNA synthesis was initially inhibited by UV-induced photolesions, the results suggest that RNA polymerase II was able to bypass these lesions prior to their removal.

  12. cis-Acting sequences required for expression of the divergently transcribed Drosophila melanogaster Sgs-7 and Sgs-8 glue protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, A.; Garfinkel, M.D.; Meyerowitz, E.M. )

    1991-06-01

    The Sgs-7 and Sgs-8 glue genes at 68C are divergently transcribed and are separated by 475 bp. Fusion genes with Adh or lacZ coding sequences were constructed, and the expression of these genes, with different amounts of upstream sequences present, was tested by a transient expression procedure and by germ line transformation. A cis-acting element for both genes is located asymmetrically in the intergenic region between {minus}211 and {minus}43 bp relative to Sgs-7. It is required for correct expression of both genes. This element can confer the stage- and tissue-specific expression pattern of glue genes on a heterologous promoter. An 86-bp portion of the element, from {minus}133 to {minus}48 bp relative to Sgs-7, is shown to be capable of enhancing the expression of a truncated and therefore weakly expressed Sgs-3 fusion gene. Recently described common sequence motifs of glue gene regulatory elements.

  13. International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenn; Habermann, Ulla; Chowdhury, Omar Faruque; Guerra, Iraida Manzanilla

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to International Perspectives" (Allen); "Volunteerism in the Welfare State: The Case of Denmark" (Habermann); "Grassroots Organizing in Bangladesh" (Chowdhury); and "Volunteerism in Latin America" (Guerra). (SK)

  14. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  15. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  16. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Stowe, Jennifer L.; Haycock, Ken; Dodd, Frances

    1998-01-01

    Presents three reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Canadian library trends, focusing on information technology and access to information and rights and examining provincial libraries and library education. (PEN)

  17. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  18. Functional nucleotide excision repair is required for the preferential removal of N-ethylpurines from the transcribed strand of the dihydrofolate reductase gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, A; Plitas, G; Wang, W; Scicchitano, D A

    1997-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair of DNA adducts is an essential factor that must be considered when one is elucidating biological endpoints resulting from exposure to genotoxic agents. Alkylating agents comprise one group of chemical compounds which modify DNA by reacting with oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the bases of the double helix. To discern the role of transcription-coupled DNA repair of N-ethylpurines present in discrete genetic domains, Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, and the clearance of the damage from the dihydrofolate reductase gene was investigated. The results indicate that N-ethylpurines were removed from the dihydrofolate reductase gene of nucleotide excision repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary cells; furthermore, when repair rates in the individual strands were determined, a statistically significant bias in the removal of ethyl-induced, alkali-labile sites was observed, with clearance occurring 30% faster from the transcribed strand than from its nontranscribed counterpart at early times after exposure. In contrast, removal of N-ethylpurines was observed in the dihydrofolate reductase locus in cells that lacked nucleotide excision repair, but both strands were repaired at the same rate, indicating that transcription-coupled clearance of these lesions requires the presence of active nucleotide excision repair. PMID:9001209

  19. The intergenic region between the divergently transcribed niiA and niaD genes of Aspergillus nidulans contains multiple NirA binding sites which act bidirectionally.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, P J; Strauss, J; Smit, R; Kinghorn, J R; van den Hondel, C A; Scazzocchio, C

    1995-01-01

    The niaD and niiA genes of Aspergillus nidulans, which code, respectively, for nitrate and nitrite reductases, are divergently transcribed, and their ATGs are separated by 1,200 bp. The genes are under the control of the positively acting NirA transcription factor, which mediates nitrate induction. The DNA binding domain of NirA was expressed as a fusion protein with the glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. Gel shift and footprint experiments have shown that in the intergenic region there are four binding sites for the NirA transcription factor. These sites can be represented by the nonpalindromic consensus 5'CTCCGHGG3'. Making use of a bidirectional expression vector, we have analyzed the role of each of the sites in niaD and niiA expression. The sites were numbered from the niiA side. It appeared that site 1 is necessary for the inducibility of niiA only, while sites 2, 3, and to a lesser extent 4 (which is nearer to and strongly affects niaD) act bidirectionally. The results also suggest that of the 10 binding sites for the AreA protein, which mediates nitrogen metabolite repression, those which are centrally located are physiologically important. The insertion of an unrelated upstream activating sequence into the intergenic region strongly affected the expression of both genes, irrespective of the orientation in which the element was inserted. PMID:7565720

  20. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  1. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three reports discuss the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; the Frankfurt Book Fair, focusing on electronics; and Canadian library trends, including resource sharing, technology projects, information policy, censorship, services for persons with disabilities, construction projects, and library education and…

  2. International Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue begins with a conceptual introduction to economic specialization, exports and imports, and the importance of international trade. Four instructional units follow this introduction, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit called "Traders and Travelers," which involves young students in five activities that illustrate our…

  3. Rapid and accurate identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and common non-tuberculous mycobacteria by multiplex real-time PCR targeting different housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria isolates from primary culture is important due to timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Conventional methods for identification of Mycobacterium species based on biochemical tests needs several weeks and may remain inconclusive. In this study, a novel multiplex real-time PCR was developed for rapid identification of Mycobacterium genus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and the most common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria species including M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and the M. gordonae in three reaction tubes but under same PCR condition. Genetic targets for primer designing included the 16S rDNA gene, the dnaJ gene, the gyrB gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Multiplex real-time PCR was setup with reference Mycobacterium strains and was subsequently tested with 66 clinical isolates. Results of multiplex real-time PCR were analyzed with melting curves and melting temperature (T (m)) of Mycobacterium genus, MTC, and each of non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species were determined. Multiplex real-time PCR results were compared with amplification and sequencing of 16S-23S rDNA ITS for identification of Mycobacterium species. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primers were each 100 % for MTC, M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primer for genus Mycobacterium was 96 and 100 %, respectively. According to the obtained results, we conclude that this multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis and these novel primers can be used for rapid and accurate identification of genus Mycobacterium, MTC, and the most common non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species.

  4. Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., two rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Chen, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Ji-Cheng; Jiang, Yi; Xiong, Zhi; Li, Wen-jun

    2013-11-01

    Two novel isolates of rapidly growing, Gram-stain-positive, non-chromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium, strain YIM M13028(T) from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea (19° 30.261' N 111° 0.247' E) at a depth of 42 m and strain YIM 121001(T) from a coastal zone sand sample collected in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were obtained in our laboratory. Their taxonomic positions were determined by a polyphasic approach. Good growth of the two strains was observed at 28 °C and pH 7.0 with 0-2 % NaCl on tryptic soy agar medium. Both strains formed round orange-red colonies, strain YIM M13028(T) had a rough surface, while YIM 121001(T) was smooth. Cellular fatty acids, whole-cell protein profiles and TLC analysis of their mycolic acids show significant differences from reference stains. Phenotypic characteristics and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, rpoB and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicated that both strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) belong to the genus Mycobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization values revealed a low relatedness (<70 %) of the two isolates with the type strains Mycobacterium neoaurum DSM 44074(T) and Mycobacterium hodleri DSM 44183(T). The low DNA-DNA hybridization values (40.4±3.5 %) between strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) and phenotypic distinctiveness indicated that the two strains were representatives of different novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The names proposed for these novel species are Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., and the type strains are YIM M13028(T) ( = DSM 45643(T) = KCTC 19999(T)) and YIM 121001(T) ( = DSM 45768(T) = JCM 18538(T)), respectively.

  5. Bartonella species in bats (Chiroptera) and bat flies (Nycteribiidae) from Nigeria, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Joshua; Baneth, Gad; Mitchell, Mark; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Harrus, Shimon

    2014-09-01

    Previous and ongoing studies have incriminated bats as reservoirs of several emerging and re-emerging zoonoses. Most of these studies, however, have focused on viral agents and neglected important bacterial pathogens. To date, there has been no report investigating the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in bats and bat flies from Nigeria, despite the fact that bats are used as food and for cultural ritual purposes by some ethnic groups in Nigeria. To elucidate the role of bats as reservoirs of bartonellae, we screened by molecular methods 148 bats and 34 bat flies, Diptera:Hippoboscoidea:Nycteribiidae (Cyclopodia greeffi) from Nigeria for Bartonella spp. Overall, Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in 76 out of 148 (51.4%) bat blood samples tested and 10 out of 24 (41.7%) bat flies tested by qPCR targeting the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) locus. Bartonella was isolated from 23 of 148 (15.5%) bat blood samples, and the isolates were genetically characterized. Prevalence of Bartonella spp. culture-positive samples ranged from 0% to 45.5% among five bat species. Micropterus spp. bats had a significantly higher relative risk of 3.45 for being culture positive compared to Eidolon helvum, Epomophorus spp., Rhinolophus spp., and Chaerephon nigeriae. Bartonella spp. detected in this study fall into three distinct clusters along with other Bartonella spp. isolated from bats and bat flies from Kenya and Ghana, respectively. The isolation of Bartonella spp. in 10.0-45.5% of four out of five bat species screened in this study indicates a widespread infection in bat population in Nigeria. Further investigation is warranted to determine the role of these bacteria as a cause of human and animal diseases in Nigeria.

  6. Novel lineages of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the global oceans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sijun; Wilhelm, Steven W; Harvey, H Rodger; Taylor, Karen; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Picocyanobacteria represented by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus have an important role in oceanic carbon fixation and nutrient cycling. In this study, we compared the community composition of picocyanobacteria from diverse marine ecosystems ranging from estuary to open oceans, tropical to polar oceans and surface to deep water, based on the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). A total of 1339 ITS sequences recovered from 20 samples unveiled diverse and several previously unknown clades of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Six high-light (HL)-adapted Prochlorococcus clades were identified, among which clade HLVI had not been described previously. Prochlorococcus clades HLIII, HLIV and HLV, detected in the Equatorial Pacific samples, could be related to the HNLC clades recently found in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC), iron-depleted tropical oceans. At least four novel Synechococcus clades (out of six clades in total) in subcluster 5.3 were found in subtropical open oceans and the South China Sea. A niche partitioning with depth was observed in the Synechococcus subcluster 5.3. Members of Synechococcus subcluster 5.2 were dominant in the high-latitude waters (northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea), suggesting a possible cold-adaptation of some marine Synechococcus in this subcluster. A distinct shift of the picocyanobacterial community was observed from the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea, which reflected the change of water temperature. Our study demonstrates that oceanic systems contain a large pool of diverse picocyanobacteria, and further suggest that new genotypes or ecotypes of picocyanobacteria will continue to emerge, as microbial consortia are explored with advanced sequencing technology. PMID:21955990

  7. Acetobacter malorum and Acetobacter cerevisiae identification and quantification by Real-Time PCR with TaqMan-MGB probes.

    PubMed

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2013-10-01

    The identification and quantification of Acetobacter malorum and Acetobacter cerevisiae in wine and vinegar were performed using the Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) with two TaqMan-MGB probes designed to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region between the 16S-23S rRNA genes. The primers and probes were highly specific, with a detection limit of 10² cells/ml for both species, and the efficiency of the technique was >80%. The RT-PCR technique with these two new TaqMan-MGB probes, together with the five (Acetobacter aceti, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Gluconacetobacter hansenii and Gluconacetobacter europaeus) that are already available (Torija et al., 2010), were validated on known concentrations of Acetic Acid Bacteria (AAB) grown in glucose medium (GY) and in inoculated matrices of wine and vinegar. Furthermore, this technique was applied to evaluate the AAB population in real wine samples collected in the Canary Islands. PCR enrichment performed prior to RT-PCR increased the accuracy of quantification and produced results similar to those detected with SYBR-Green. In real wine samples, the total AAB enumeration ranged from 9 × 10² to 10⁶ cells/ml, and the seven AAB species tested were detected in more than one sample. However, AAB recovery on plates was poor; the isolates obtained on plates were A. malorum, G. oxydans, A. cerevisiae and A. pasteurianus species. RT-PCR with TaqMan-MGB probes is an accurate, specific and fast method for the identification and quantification of AAB species commonly found in wine and vinegar.

  8. Bartonellae in domestic and stray cats from Israel: comparison of bacterial cultures and high-resolution melt real-time PCR as diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Morick, Danny; Gross, Ifat; Winkler, Ronen; Abdeen, Ziad; Harrus, Shimon

    2013-12-01

    To determine the occurrence of feline bartonellosis in Israel, blood samples were collected from 179 stray and 155 domestic cats from 18 cities or villages in central and northcentral Israel. Samples were screened for Bartonella infection by culture isolation and molecular detection using high-resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR assay targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). All positive samples were confirmed by two additional HRM real-time PCR assays targeting two fragments of the β-subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) and the 16S rRNA genes. The prevalence of Bartonella spp. infection in the general tested population was 25.1% (84/334). A higher prevalence was detected in the stray (30.7%; 55/179) than the domestic cats (18.7%; 29/155). Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae were highly prevalent in both cat populations, however their distribution among the two populations varied significantly (p=0.016). B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae were found to be more prevalent in stray than domestic cats, whereas B. henselae was evenly distributed. Co-infection with two or more different Bartonella spp. was determined in 2.1% (7) of the cats. The ITS HRM real-time PCR assay used in this study was shown to have a greater screening power than bacterial isolation, detecting 94.0% (79/84) compared to 35.7% (30/84), respectively, of all positive samples. The high prevalence of these zoonotic Bartonella species, coupled with the overpopulation of stray cats, and increased numbers of domestic cats in the major urban centers in Israel represent a significant threat for the public health in this country.

  9. Strategies to develop strain-specific PCR based assays for probiotics.

    PubMed

    Treven, P

    2015-01-01

    Since health benefits conferred by probiotics are strain-specific, identification to the strain level is mandatory to allow the monitoring of the presence and the abundance of specific probiotic in a product or in a gastrointestinal tract. Compared to standard plate counts, the reduced duration of the assays and higher specificity makes PCR-based methods (standard PCR and quantitative PCR) very appropriate for detection or quantification of probiotics. Development of strain-specific assay consists of 4 main stages: (1) strain-specific marker identification; (2) construction of potential strain-specific primers; (3) validation on DNA from pure cultures of target and related strains; and (4) validation on spiked samples. The most important and also the most challenging step is the identification of strain-specific sequences, which can be subsequently targeted by specific primers or probes. Such regions can be identified on sequences derived from 16S-23S internally transcribed spacers, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, representational difference analysis and suppression subtractive hybridisation. Already known phenotypic or genotypic characteristics of the target strain can also be used to develop the strain-specific assay. However, the initial stage of strain-specific assay development can be replaced by comparative genomics analysis of target genome with related genomes in public databases. Advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have resulted in a cost reduction for bacterial genome sequencing and consequently have made this approach available to most laboratories. In the present paper I reviewed the available literature on PCR and qPCR assays developed for detection of a specific probiotic strain and discussed future WGS and comparative genomics-based approaches.

  10. Rhizobia Indigenous to the Okavango Region in Sub-Saharan Africa: Diversity, Adaptations, and Host Specificity.

    PubMed

    Grönemeyer, Jann L; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Berkelmann, Dirk; Hurek, Thomas; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The rhizobial community indigenous to the Okavango region has not yet been characterized. The isolation of indigenous rhizobia can provide a basis for the formulation of a rhizobial inoculant. Moreover, their identification and characterization contribute to the general understanding of species distribution and ecology. Isolates were obtained from nodules of local varieties of the pulses cowpea, Bambara groundnut, peanut, hyacinth bean, and common bean. Ninety-one of them were identified by BOX repetitive element PCR (BOX-PCR) and sequence analyses of the 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer (ITS) and the recA, glnII, rpoB, and nifH genes. A striking geographical distribution was observed. Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi dominated at sampling sites in Angola which were characterized by acid soils and a semihumid climate. Isolates from the semiarid sampling sites in Namibia were more diverse, with most of them being related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and Bradyrhizobium daqingense. Host plant specificity was observed only for hyacinth bean, which was nodulated by rhizobia presumably representing yet-undescribed species. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized with respect to their adaptation to high temperatures, drought, and local host plants. The adaptation experiments revealed that the Namibian isolates shared an exceptionally high temperature tolerance, but none of the isolates showed considerable adaptation to drought. Moreover, the isolates' performance on different local hosts showed variable results, with most Namibian isolates inducing better nodulation on peanut and hyacinth bean than the Angolan strains. The local predominance of distinct genotypes implies that indigenous strains may exhibit a better performance in inoculant formulations. PMID:25239908

  11. A New Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  12. Effect of incubation temperature on the detection of thermophilic campylobacter species from freshwater beaches, nearby wastewater effluents, and bird fecal droppings.

    PubMed

    Khan, Izhar U H; Hill, Stephen; Nowak, Eva; Edge, Thomas A

    2013-12-01

    This large-scale study compared incubation temperatures (37°C versus 42°C) to study the detection of thermophilic Campylobacter species, including Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari, in various surface water samples and bird fecal droppings around Hamilton Harbor, Lake Ontario. The putative culture isolates obtained from incubation temperatures of 37 and 42°C were confirmed by Campylobacter genus- and species-specific triplex PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. A total of 759 water, wastewater, and bird fecal dropping samples were tested. Positive amplification reactions for the genus Campylobacter were found for 454 (60%) samples incubated at 37°C, compared to 258 (34%) samples incubated at 42°C. C. jejuni (16%) and C. lari (12%) were detected significantly more frequently at the 42°C incubation temperature than at 37°C (8% and 5%, respectively). In contrast, significantly higher rates of C. coli (14%) and other Campylobacter spp. (36%) were detected at the 37°C incubation temperature than at 42°C (8% and 7%, respectively). These results were consistent across surface water, wastewater, and bird fecal dropping samples. At times, Campylobacter spp. were recovered and detected at 37°C (3% for C. jejuni, 10% for C. coli, and 3% for C. lari) when the same samples incubated at 42°C were negative. A significantly higher rate of other Campylobacter spp. was detected only at 37°C (32%) than only at 42°C (3%). These results indicate that incubation temperature can significantly influence the culturability and detection of thermophilic and other fastidious Campylobacter spp. and that a comprehensive characterization of the Campylobacter spp. in surface water, wastewaters, or bird fecal droppings will require incubation at both 37 and 42°C.

  13. Effect of Rj genotype and cultivation temperature on the community structure of soybean-nodulating bradyrhizobia.

    PubMed

    Shiro, Sokichi; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Umehara, Yosuke; Hayashi, Masaki; Yoshida, Naoto; Nishiwaki, Aya; Yamakawa, Takeo; Saeki, Yuichi

    2012-02-01

    The nodulation tendency and community structure of indigenous bradyrhizobia on Rj genotype soybean cultivars at cultivation temperatures of 33/28°C, 28/23°C, and 23/18°C for 16/8 h (day/night degrees, hours) were investigated using 780 bradyrhizobial DNA samples from an Andosol with 13 soybean cultivars of four Rj genotypes (non-Rj, Rj(2)Rj(3), Rj(4), and Rj(2)Rj(3)Rj(4)). A dendrogram was constructed based on restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR products (PCR-RFLP) of the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region. Eleven Bradyrhizobium U.S. Department of Agriculture strains were used as a reference. The dendrogram indicated seven clusters based on similarities among the reference strains. The occupancy rate of the Bj123 cluster decreased with increasing cultivation temperature, whereas the occupancy rates of the Bj110 cluster, Be76 cluster, and Be94 cluster increased with increasing cultivation temperature. In particular, the Rj(2)Rj(3)Rj(4) genotype soybeans were infected with a number of Bj110 clusters, regardless of the increasing cultivation temperature, compared to other Rj genotype soybean cultivars. The ratio of beta diversity to gamma diversity (H'(β)/H'(γ)), which represents differences in the bradyrhizobial communities by pairwise comparison among cultivation temperature sets within the same soybean cultivar, indicated that the bradyrhizobial communities tended to be different among cultivation temperatures. Multidimensional scaling analysis indicated that the infection of the Bj110 cluster and the Bj123 cluster by host soybean genotype and the cultivation temperature affected the bradyrhizobial communities. These results suggested that the Rj genotypes and cultivation temperatures affected the nodulation tendency and community structures of soybean-nodulating bradyrhizobia.

  14. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future.

  15. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  16. Prevalence, Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Bartonella Species in Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ko, S; Kang, J-G; Kim, H-C; Klein, T A; Choi, K-S; Song, J-W; Youn, H-Y; Chae, J-S

    2016-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of Bartonella species and identify which species of Bartonella naturally infects the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius) in the Republic of Korea (ROK), spleens from 200 mice were assayed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) targeting the RNA polymerase subunit beta (rpoB) gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for members of the genus Bartonella. Utilizing PCR techniques, the prevalence of Bartonella spp. ranged from 31.5% (63/200) to 62.0% (124/200) for the rpoB and ITS gene fragments, respectively. The most prevalent species, Bartonella grahamii, was assigned to 17 genotypes and closely related to the zoonotic pathogens, B. taylorii, B. tribocorum, B. phoceensis and B. henselae, which also were detected. Two Bartonella isolates (KRBG28 and KRBG32) were recovered from blood of A. agrarius captured in Gyeonggi Province, ROK. Comparison of the 16S rRNA, hemin-binding protein E (hbpE), glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (gdh1), invasion-associated protein B (ialB), cell division protein (ftsZ), citrate synthase (gltA), 60 kDa heat shock protein (groEL), rpoB gene fragments and the ITS region sequences from the isolates with GenBank was confirmed as B. grahamii. Phylogenetic analysis based on the alignment of concatenated sequences (4933 bp) of KRBG28 and KRBG32 clustered with B. grahamii, forming an independent clade between Asian and American/European B. grahamii genogroups.

  17. Comprehensive Genomic Analyses of the OM43 Clade, Including a Novel Species from the Red Sea, Indicate Ecotype Differentiation among Marine Methylotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Infante, Francy; Ngugi, David Kamanda; Vinu, Manikandan; Alam, Intikhab; Kamau, Allan Anthony; Blom, Jochen; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    The OM43 clade within the family Methylophilaceae of Betaproteobacteria represents a group of methylotrophs that play important roles in the metabolism of C1 compounds in marine environments and other aquatic environments around the globe. Using dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, we successfully isolated a novel species of this clade (here designated MBRS-H7) from the ultraoligotrophic open ocean waters of the central Red Sea. Phylogenomic analyses indicate that MBRS-H7 is a novel species that forms a distinct cluster together with isolate KB13 from Hawaii (Hawaii-Red Sea [H-RS] cluster) that is separate from the cluster represented by strain HTCC2181 (from the Oregon coast). Phylogenetic analyses using the robust 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer revealed a potential ecotype separation of the marine OM43 clade members, which was further confirmed by metagenomic fragment recruitment analyses that showed trends of higher abundance in low-chlorophyll and/or high-temperature provinces for the H-RS cluster but a preference for colder, highly productive waters for the HTCC2181 cluster. This potential environmentally driven niche differentiation is also reflected in the metabolic gene inventories, which in the case of the H-RS cluster include those conferring resistance to high levels of UV irradiation, temperature, and salinity. Interestingly, we also found different energy conservation modules between these OM43 subclades, namely, the existence of the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex I (NUO) system in the H-RS cluster and the nonhomologous NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) system in the HTCC2181 cluster, which might have implications for their overall energetic yields. PMID:26655752

  18. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  19. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  20. Phenotypic and Genotypic Comparison of Symbiotic and Free-Living Cyanobacteria from a Single Field Site

    PubMed Central

    West, N. J.; Adams, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    PCR amplification techniques were used to compare cyanobacterial symbionts from a cyanobacterium-bryophyte symbiosis and free-living cyanobacteria from the same field site. Thirty-one symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from the hornwort Phaeoceros sp. at several closely spaced locations, and 40 free-living cyanobacteria were isolated from the immediate vicinity of the same plants. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously known to form bryophyte symbioses, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Of the free-living strains, two were Calothrix spp., three were Chlorogloeopsis spp. and the rest were Nostoc spp. All of the symbiotic and all but one of the free-living strains were able to reconstitute the symbiosis with axenic cultures of both Phaeoceros and the liverwort Blasia sp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the regions flanking the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer. With one exception, the two techniques produced complementary results and confirmed for the first time that a diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria infect Phaeoceros in the field. Symbionts from adjacent colonies were different as often as they were the same, showing that the same thallus could be infected with many different cyanobacterial strains. Strains found to be identical by the techniques employed here were often found as symbionts in different thalli at the same locale but were never found free-living. Only one of the free-living strains, and none of the symbiotic strains, was found at more than one sample site, implying a highly localized distribution of strains. PMID:16535734

  1. Rhizobia Indigenous to the Okavango Region in Sub-Saharan Africa: Diversity, Adaptations, and Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Grönemeyer, Jann L.; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Berkelmann, Dirk; Hurek, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The rhizobial community indigenous to the Okavango region has not yet been characterized. The isolation of indigenous rhizobia can provide a basis for the formulation of a rhizobial inoculant. Moreover, their identification and characterization contribute to the general understanding of species distribution and ecology. Isolates were obtained from nodules of local varieties of the pulses cowpea, Bambara groundnut, peanut, hyacinth bean, and common bean. Ninety-one of them were identified by BOX repetitive element PCR (BOX-PCR) and sequence analyses of the 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer (ITS) and the recA, glnII, rpoB, and nifH genes. A striking geographical distribution was observed. Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi dominated at sampling sites in Angola which were characterized by acid soils and a semihumid climate. Isolates from the semiarid sampling sites in Namibia were more diverse, with most of them being related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and Bradyrhizobium daqingense. Host plant specificity was observed only for hyacinth bean, which was nodulated by rhizobia presumably representing yet-undescribed species. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized with respect to their adaptation to high temperatures, drought, and local host plants. The adaptation experiments revealed that the Namibian isolates shared an exceptionally high temperature tolerance, but none of the isolates showed considerable adaptation to drought. Moreover, the isolates' performance on different local hosts showed variable results, with most Namibian isolates inducing better nodulation on peanut and hyacinth bean than the Angolan strains. The local predominance of distinct genotypes implies that indigenous strains may exhibit a better performance in inoculant formulations. PMID:25239908

  2. Uneven distribution of Halobacillus trueperi species in arid natural saline systems of Southern Tunisian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Amel; Ettoumi, Besma; El Hidri, Darine; Essanaa, Jihene; Cherif, Hanene; Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-11-01

    The genetic diversity of a collection of 336 spore-forming isolates recovered from five salt-saturated brines and soils (Chott and Sebkhas) mainly located in the hyper-arid regions of the southern Tunisian Sahara has been assessed. Requirements and abilities for growth at a wide range of salinities\\ showed that 44.3 % of the isolates were extremely halotolerant, 23 % were moderate halotolerant, and 32.7 % were strict halophiles, indicating that they are adapted to thrive in these saline ecosystems. A wide genetic diversity was documented based on 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer fingerprinting profiles (ITS) and 16S rRNA gene sequences that clustered the strains into seven genera: Bacillus, Gracilibacillus, Halobacillus, Oceanobacillus, Paenibacillus, Pontibacillus, and Virgibacillus. Halobacillus trueperi was the most encountered species in all the sites and presented a large intraspecific diversity with a multiplicity of ITS types. The most frequent ITS type included 42 isolates that were chosen for assessing of the intraspecific diversity by BOX-PCR fingerprinting. A high intraspecific microdiversity was documented by 14 BOX-PCR genotypes whose distribution correlated with the strain geographic origin. Interestingly, H. trueperi isolates presented an uneven geographic distribution among sites with the highest frequency of isolation from the coastal sites, suggesting a marine rather than terrestrial origin of the strains. The high frequency and diversity of H. trueperi suggest that it is a major ecosystem-adapted microbial component of the Tunisian Sahara harsh saline systems of marine origin. PMID:23949950

  3. Novel lineages of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the global oceans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijun; Wilhelm, Steven W; Harvey, H Rodger; Taylor, Karen; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Picocyanobacteria represented by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus have an important role in oceanic carbon fixation and nutrient cycling. In this study, we compared the community composition of picocyanobacteria from diverse marine ecosystems ranging from estuary to open oceans, tropical to polar oceans and surface to deep water, based on the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). A total of 1339 ITS sequences recovered from 20 samples unveiled diverse and several previously unknown clades of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Six high-light (HL)-adapted Prochlorococcus clades were identified, among which clade HLVI had not been described previously. Prochlorococcus clades HLIII, HLIV and HLV, detected in the Equatorial Pacific samples, could be related to the HNLC clades recently found in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC), iron-depleted tropical oceans. At least four novel Synechococcus clades (out of six clades in total) in subcluster 5.3 were found in subtropical open oceans and the South China Sea. A niche partitioning with depth was observed in the Synechococcus subcluster 5.3. Members of Synechococcus subcluster 5.2 were dominant in the high-latitude waters (northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea), suggesting a possible cold-adaptation of some marine Synechococcus in this subcluster. A distinct shift of the picocyanobacterial community was observed from the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea, which reflected the change of water temperature. Our study demonstrates that oceanic systems contain a large pool of diverse picocyanobacteria, and further suggest that new genotypes or ecotypes of picocyanobacteria will continue to emerge, as microbial consortia are explored with advanced sequencing technology.

  4. Genetic diversity of picocyanobacteria in tibetan lakes: assessing the endemic and universal distributions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijun; Liu, Yongqin; Hu, Anyi; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Feng; Yao, Tandong; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-12-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of picocyanobacteria in seven alkaline lakes on the Tibetan Plateau was analyzed using the molecular marker 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequence. A total of 1,077 environmental sequences retrieved from the seven lakes were grouped into seven picocyanobacterial clusters, with two clusters newly described here. Each of the lakes was dominated by only one or two clusters, while different lakes could have disparate communities, suggesting low alpha diversity but high beta diversity of picocyanobacteria in these high-altitude freshwater and saline lakes. Several globally distributed clusters were found in these Tibetan lakes, such as subalpine cluster I and the Cyanobium gracile cluster. Although other clusters likely exhibit geographic restriction to the plateau temporally, reflecting endemicity, they can indeed be distributed widely on the plateau. Lakes with similar salinities may have similar genetic populations despite a large geographic distance. Canonical correspondence analysis identified salinity as the only environmental factor that may in part explain the diversity variations among lakes. Mantel tests suggested that the community similarities among lakes are independent of geographic distance. A portion of the picocyanobacterial clusters appear to be restricted to a narrow salinity range, while others are likely adapted to a broad range. A seasonal survey of Lake Namucuo across 3 years did not show season-related variations in diversity, and depth-related population partitioning was observed along a vertical profile of the lake. Our study emphasizes the high dispersive potential of picocyanobacteria and suggests that the regional distribution may result from adaptation to specified environments.

  5. Is the distribution of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus ecotypes in the Mediterranean Sea affected by global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella-Flores, D.; Mazard, S.; Humily, F.; Partensky, F.; Mahé, F.; Bariat, L.; Courties, C.; Marie, D.; Ras, J.; Mauriac, R.; Jeanthon, C.; Mahdi Bendif, E.; Ostrowski, M.; Scanlan, D. J.; Garczarek, L.

    2011-09-01

    Biological communities populating the Mediterranean Sea, which is situated at the northern boundary of the subtropics, are often claimed to be particularly affected by global warming. This is indicated, for instance, by the introduction of (sub)tropical species of fish or invertebrates that can displace local species. This raises the question of whether microbial communities are similarly affected, especially in the Levantine basin where sea surface temperatures have significantly risen over the last 25 years (0.50 ± 0.11 °C in average per decade, P < 0.01). In this paper, the genetic diversity of the two most abundant members of the phytoplankton community, the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, was examined during two cruises through both eastern and western Mediterranean Sea basins held in September 1999 (PROSOPE cruise) and in June-July 2008 (BOUM cruise). Diversity was studied using dot blot hybridization with clade-specific 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes and/or clone libraries of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region, with a focus on the abundance of clades that may constitute bioindicators of warm waters. During both cruises, the dominant Prochlorococcus clade in the upper mixed layer at all stations was HLI, a clade typical of temperate waters, whereas the HLII clade, the dominant group in (sub)tropical waters, was only present at very low concentrations. The Synechococcus community was dominated by clades I, III and IV in the northwestern waters of the Gulf of Lions and by clade III and groups genetically related to clades WPC1 and VI in the rest of the Mediterranean Sea. In contrast, only a few sequences of clade II, a group typical of warm waters, were observed. These data indicate that local cyanobacterial populations have not yet been displaced by their (sub)tropical counterparts.

  6. Is the distribution of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus ecotypes in the Mediterranean Sea affected by global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella-Flores, D.; Mazard, S.; Humily, F.; Partensky, F.; Mahé, F.; Bariat, L.; Courties, C.; Marie, D.; Ras, J.; Mauriac, R.; Jeanthon, C.; Bendif, E. M.; Ostrowski, M.; Scanlan, D. J.; Garczarek, L.

    2011-05-01

    Biological communities populating the Mediterranean Sea, which is situated at the northern boundary of the subtropics, are often claimed to be particularly affected by global warming. This is indicated, for instance, by the introduction of (sub)tropical species of fish or invertebrates that can displace local species. This raises the question of whether microbial communities are similarly affected, especially in the Levantine basin where sea surface temperatures have risen in recent years. In this paper, the genetic diversity of the two most abundant members of the phytoplankton community, the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, was examined on a transect from the South coast of France to Cyprus in the summer of 2008 (BOUM cruise). Diversity was studied using dot blot hybridization with clade-specific 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes and clone libraries of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region. Data were compared with those obtained during the PROSOPE cruise held almost a decade earlier, with a focus on the abundance of clades that may constitute bioindicators of warm waters. During both cruises, the dominant Prochlorococcus clade in the upper mixed layer at all stations was HLI, a clade typical of temperate waters, whereas the HLII clade, the dominant group in (sub)tropical waters, was only present at very low concentrations. The Synechococcus community was dominated by clades I, III and IV in the northwestern waters of the Gulf of Lions and by clade III and groups genetically related to clades WPC1 and VI in the rest of the Mediterranean Sea. In contrast, only a few sequences of clade II, a group typical of warm waters, were observed. These data indicate that local cyanobacterial populations have not yet been displaced by their (sub)tropical counterparts. This is discussed in the context of the low phosphorus concentrations found in surface waters in the eastern Mediterranean basin, as this may constitute a barrier to

  7. Identification of an miRNA candidate reflects the possible significance of transcribed microsatellites in the hairpin precursors of black pepper.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2012-06-01

    Plant miRNAs (18-24nt) are generated by the RNase III-type Dicer endonuclease from the endogenous hairpin precursors ('pre-miRNAs') with significant regulatory functions. The transcribed regions display a higher frequency of microsatellites, when compared to other regions of the genomic DNA. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) resulting from replication slippage occurring in transcripts affect the expression of genes. The available experimental evidence for the incidence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors is limited. Considering the potential significance of SSRs in the miRNA genes, we carried out a preliminary analysis to verify the presence of SSRs in the pri-miRNAs of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). We isolated a (CT) dinucleotide SSR bearing transcript using SMART strategy. The transcript was predicted to be a 'pri-miRNA candidate' with Dicer sites based on miRNA prediction tools and MFOLD structural predictions. The presence of this 'miRNA candidate' was confirmed by real-time TaqMan assays. The upstream sequence of the 'miRNA candidate' by genome walking when subjected to PlantCARE showed the presence of certain promoter elements, and the deduced amino acid showed significant similarity with NAP1 gene, which affects the transcription of many genes. Moreover the hairpin-like precursor overlapped the neighbouring NAP1 gene. In silico analysis revealed distinct putative functions for the 'miRNA candidate', of which majority were related to growth. Hence, we assume that this 'miRNA candidate' may get activated during transcription of NAP gene, thereby regulating the expression of many genes involved in developmental processes. PMID:22367484

  8. Host-derived 5' ends and overlapping complementary 3' ends of the two mRNAs transcribed from the ambisense S segment of Uukuniemi virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, J F; Pettersson, R F

    1991-01-01

    Two mRNAs, coding for the N and NSS proteins, are transcribed from the small (S) Uukuniemi virus RNA segment by an ambisense strategy (J. F. Simons, U. Hellman, and R. F. Pettersson, J. Virol. 64:247-255, 1990). In this report, we describe the analysis of the 5' and 3' ends of the two mRNAs. Primer extension as well as cloning and sequencing of individual mRNAs showed that the 5' ends of both mRNAs contained nonviral sequences ranging from 7 to 25 residues in length (mean, 12 residues), indicating a cap-snatching mechanism similar to the one originally described for priming of influenza virus mRNA synthesis. In 35% of the cases, the first virion-specified nucleotide (an A residue) was substituted with a G residue. Between the translation termination codons of N and NSS, there is a 74-residue-long noncoding intergenic region (Simons et al., J. Virol. 64:247-255, 1990). Nuclease protection assays using both RNA and DNA hybridization probes showed that the 3' ends of the N and NSS mRNAs overlap each other by about 100 nucleotides. The 3' end of the NSS mRNA extends into the coding sequence of the N mRNA, whereas the N mRNA is terminated just prior to the stop codon of NSS. To our knowledge, this is the first example of overlapping complementary mRNAs in viruses with an ambisense coding strategy. No obvious transcription termination sequence was identified. However, because of a short palindromic sequence in the intergenic region, the 3' ends of both mRNAs (and consequently also the template RNAs) can be folded into an A/U-rich hairpin structure. It remains to be determined whether this structure plays any role in transcription termination. Images PMID:1831239

  9. NOVEL SPLICED VARIANTS OF IONOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR GLUR6 IN NORMAL HUMAN FIBROBLAST AND BRAIN CELLS ARE TRANSCRIBED BY TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTERS

    PubMed Central

    Zhawar, Vikramjit K.; Kaur, Gurpreet; deRiel, Jon K.; Kaur, G. Pal; Kandpal, Raj P.; Athwal, Raghbir S.

    2010-01-01

    The members of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, namely, a-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are important mediators of the rapid synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. We have investigated the splicing pattern and expression of the kainate receptor subunit GluR6 in human fibroblast cell lines and brain tissue. We demonstrate the expression of GluR6A variant specifically in brain, and four variants, namely, GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E in fibroblast cell lines. The variants GluR6D and GluR6E have not been described before, and appear to be specific for non-neuronal cells. Genomic analysis and cloning of the sequence preceding the transcribed region led to the identification of two tissue specific promoters designated as neuronal promoter PN and non-neuronal promoter PNN. We have used RNA ligase mediated RACE and in silico analyses to locate two sets of transcription start sites, and confirmed specific transcripts initiated by PN and PNN in brain cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The domain structure of variants GluR6D and GluR6E revealed the absence of three transmembrane domains. The lack of these domains suggests that the mature receptors arising from these variant subunits may not function as active channels. Based on these structural features in GluR6D and GluR6E, and the observations that GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E are exclusively expressed in non-neuronal cells, it is likely that these receptor subunits function as non-channel signaling proteins. PMID:20230879

  10. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Svensson, J Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C; Allshire, Robin C; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation.

  11. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, J. Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation–exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation. PMID:25778913

  12. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  13. A Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Transcribing an Alphavirus Replicon and Expressing Alphavirus Structural Proteins Leads to Packaging of Alphavirus Infectious Single Cycle Particles

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M.; Lorenzo, María M.; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses. PMID:24130722

  14. (001–002) Proposals to amend Art. 32.2, 23.5, and 24.2 to clarify the treatment of transcribed Greek terminations of epithets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants is revised every six years to incorporate decisions of the Nomenclature Section of successive International Botanical Congresses (IBC) on proposals to amend the Code. The proposals in this paper will be considered at the IBC in Shenz...

  15. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  16. Healthcare international.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S; Jaklevic, M C; Rauber, C; Weissenstein, E; Moore, J D; Shinkman, R; Pallarito, K; Katzman, C N; Hallam, K; Morrissey, J

    1998-11-01

    How people are treated when they need medical care depends on where in the world they are. In deciding which tools of the medical trade are used to treat disease and when they're used, location is paramount. A country's social policy, healthcare payment systems and cultural factors bear heavily on the utilization of medical technology. The cover story kicks off the magazine's third international healthcare section. PMID:10186352

  17. Rotary International.

    PubMed

    Young, Janis

    2008-01-01

    Rotary International is the oldest United States service organization and one of the largest volunteer groups in the world. There are hundreds of educational, health, and humanitarian activities, almost all of which are conducted locally in order to ensure that Rotary clubs meet the needs of the communities they serve. Club membership requires regular active participation and offers Rotarians multiple opportunities for involvement. PMID:18551844

  18. International cooperation.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    As the most densely populated country in the world, China actively conducts international exchanges and cooperation. It takes every opportunity to publicize its family planning policies and practices during international forums. Moreover, the country's State Family Planning Commission has been collaborating with the United Nations Population Fund in implementing health and family planning programs. This program covers public awareness campaigns, technical services, sex education for the youth, and social marketing. For years, China has also been cooperating with WHO in the area of family planning and reproductive health, and has established partnership with the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning. In addition, the State Family Planning Commission has worked with the Public Media Center of the US as well as with the Rockefeller Foundation and Ford Foundation in introducing "contraceptive methods by informed choice" and "male participation in family planning" in the rural areas of the country. China has also worked closely with many other developing countries on population issues. In October 1998, China collaborated with the Partners in Population and Development for a reporting mission that was attended by journalists from 11 countries.

  19. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  20. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  1. Column internals

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    In the fields of distillation, absorption, stripping and extraction, theory and technology go hand in hand. The thermodynamic principles of phase equilibrium and the concepts of mass transfer and fluid flow are of primary importance in all of these operations. The engineer must understand these phenomena to select equipment effectively. This article discusses the latest in commercial technology in column internals for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid contacting. The principles of operation are explained vis-a-vis the characteristics of the applications in which they are used. The focus is on moderate-to-large columns for refining and chemical applications. Guidelines for selecting the most appropriate type of device are presented, and examples of typical applications are described.

  2. International Education for Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moebius, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Describes an international trade education program offered by Waukesha (WI) County Technical College. The program includes international business principles, international marketing, cultural awareness, business Spanish, international documentation, transportation, and finance. (JOW)

  3. Molecular investigations of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) in the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, in northern Europe and implications for its transmission between laying poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Oines, O; Brännström, S

    2011-12-01

    Samples of Dermanyssus gallinae (DeGeer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae) from more than 49 Norwegian and Swedish laying poultry farms, and additional samples collected from Scottish, Finnish, Danish and Dutch layer farms, were compared genetically. Analysis of partial mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences of mites from Norway and Sweden revealed 32 haplotypes. Only single haplotypes were found on most farms, which suggests that infections are recycled within farms and that transmission routes are few. Both Norwegian and Swedish isolates were found in the two major haplogroups, but no haplotypes were shared between Norway and Sweden, indicating little or no recent exchange of mites between these countries. There appears to be no link between haplotypes and geographical location as identical haplotypes were found in both the northern and southern Swedish locations, and haplotypes were scattered in locations between these extremes. The current data suggest that wild birds in Sweden are not a reservoir for D. gallinae infection of layer farms as their mites were genetically distinct from D. gallinae of farm layer birds. Transmission of the poultry red mite in Scandinavia is thus likely to depend on synantropic factors such as the exchange of contaminated material or infested birds between farms or facilities.

  4. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus (L) from north-east India as revealed by meiosis, and molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hynniewta, Marlykynti; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2014-12-01

    The north-eastern region of India is reported to be the center of origin and rich in diversity of Citrus (L.) species, where some wild and endangered species namely Citrus indica, Citrus macroptera, Citrus latipes, Citrus ichagensis and Citrus assamensis exist in their natural and undisturbed habitat. In order to have comprehensive information about the extent of genetic variability and the occurrence of cryptic genomic hybridity between and within various Citrus species, a combined approach involving morphological, cytogenetical and molecular approaches were adopted in the present study. Cytogenetic approaches are known to resolve taxonomic riddles in a more efficient manner, by clearly delineating taxa at species and sub species levels. Male meiotic studies revealed a gametic chromosome number of n = 9, without any evidence of numerical variations. Bivalents outnumbered all other types of associations in pollen mother cells (PMCs) analyzed at diplotene, diakinesis and metaphase I. Univalents were frequently encountered in nine species presently studied, though their presence appropriately did not influence the distributional pattern of the chromosomes at anaphases I and II. The molecular approaches for phylogenetic analysis based on sequence data related to ITS 1, ITS 2 and ITS 1 + 5.8 s + ITS 2 of rDNA using maximum parsimony method and Bayesian inference have thrown light on species inter-relationship and evolution of Citrus species confirming our cytogenetical interpretations. The three true basic species i.e. Citrus medica, Citrus maxima and Citrus reticulata with their unique status have been resolved into distinct clades with molecular approaches as well. C. indica which occupies a unique position in the phylogenetic ladder of the genus Citrus has been resolved as a distinct clade and almost behaving as an out-group. The presences of quadrivalents in C. indica also echo and support its unique position. From our study it is amply clear that C. reticulata also has close relation to C. ichagensis, as these species have clustered together, denoting their close genetic relationship. On the other hand, our studies did not demonstrate a clear differentiation between subgenera Citrus and Papeda at the rDNA level. The combined approach of cytogenetical and molecular analysis did complement our early karyological findings and helped in resolving many a taxonomic riddles. PMID:25606407

  5. The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Lactarius deliciosus and Pinus sylvestris in forest soil samples: symbiotic efficiency and development on roots of a rDNA internal transcribed spacer-selected isolate of L. deliciosus.

    PubMed

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Conventi, Serge; Ruiz, Guy; Plassard, Claude; Mousain, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    The effect on plant growth of pre-inoculation of Pinus sylvestris with the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) edible basidiomycete Lactarius deliciosus (isolate D45) under controlled conditions, and the development on roots of this basidiomycete, were investigated in gamma-irradiated and unsterilized containers containing different forest soil cores or a perlite-vermiculite mixture. Five months after planting, L. deliciosus mycorrhizal plants exhibited greater growth than the non-mycorrhizal ones in all soil types, i.e. up to a 325% increase in shoot height in the sterilized soils. The experiment demonstrated the dependency of P. sylvestris seedlings upon ECM symbiosis for their survival in gamma-irradiated, microbiologically disturbed soil samples. Furthermore, in two soils, the growth of L. deliciosus-inoculated seedlings was greater in the sterilized soil samples than in the non-sterilized ones, i.e. 46% and 132% increase in shoot height under sterilized soil conditions. In containers randomly sampled from each soil type, the degree of root colonization by the inoculated isolate, calculated as the number of mycorrhizal root tips divided by the total number of root tips x100, ranged from 80% to 35%. Within the short term, the inoculated isolate developed rapidly on roots, dominated, and hampered ectomycorrhiza formation by various unidentified (but not Lactarius) resident ECM fungi in unsterilized soil types. Results indicate that the ECM species L. deliciosus is worth investigating to ascertain if other isolates benefit pine growth like the isolate D45, and are therefore also attractive candidates for forestry applications in the Mediterranean area. PMID:12634915

  6. Use of PCR Targeting of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions and Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of Sequence Variation in Different Regions of rRNA Genes in Fungi for Rapid Diagnosis of Mycotic Keratitis†

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    The increased incidence of fungal infections in the recent past has been attributed to the increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus-positive and AIDS patients. Early diagnosis of mycoses in patients is crucial for prompt antifungal therapy. Immunological methods of diagnosis have not been found to be satisfactory, and recent research has been diverted to the use of PCR for the sensitive and early diagnosis at the molecular level. In the present study we targeted different regions of the rRNA gene to diagnose cases of mycotic keratitis and identify the causal agents. Six fungus-specific primers (primers ITS1, ITS2, ITS3, ITS4, invSR1R, and LR12R) were used, and the amplified products were analyzed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Dendrograms of these SSCP patterns, prepared on the basis of Jaccard's coefficient, indicated that the PCR products obtained with primer pair ITS1 and ITS2 were the best for the identification of fungi. The results were confirmed by sequencing of the PCR products, and the approach was successfully tested experimentally for the detection of mycotic keratitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and was used for the diagnosis of fungal corneal ulcers in patients. PMID:15695661

  7. Enterococcus lactis sp. nov., from Italian raw milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Stefano; Cremonesi, Paola; Povolo, Milena; Brasca, Milena

    2012-08-01

    Ten atypical Enterococcus strains were isolated from Italian raw milk cheeses. The 16S rRNA gene, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase alpha subunit (pheS), RNA polymerase alpha subunit (rpoA) and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR and the phenotypic properties revealed that the isolates represent a novel enterococcal species. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely related to Enterococcus hirae ATCC 8043(T), Enterococcus durans CECT 411(T) and Enterococcus faecium ATCC 19434(T), with 98.8, 98.9 and 99.4% sequence similarity, respectively. On the basis of sequence analysis of the housekeeping gene pheS, the reference strain, BT159(T), occupied a position separate from E. faecium LMG 16198. The group of isolates could be easily differentiated from recognized species of the genus Enterococcus by 16S-23S rRNA ITS analysis, RAPD-PCR and phenotypic characteristics. The name Enterococcus lactis sp. nov. is proposed, with BT159(T) ( = DSM 23655(T) = LMG 25958(T)) as the type strain.

  8. Community College Internal Auditors: Internal Audit Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ronna; And Others

    This guidebook includes information compiled by the "Audit Manual" committee of Community College Internal Auditors (CCIA) from several California community college districts regarding their internal auditing practices. The first section of the guidebook discusses the purpose of internal audits, indicating that audits assist members of the…

  9. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression.

  10. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression. PMID:24673292

  11. The internal dynamics of international migration systems.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, B

    1996-04-01

    "In this paper I provide a conceptualization of international migration networks, which can be used to identify and integrate the internal components of migration systems, and formalize the relationships in an analytic model of the internal network dynamic. With the use of the operationalized model, and microlevel and macrolevel data for guestworkers in Germany during the period 1970 to 1989, we can empirically test the relative influence of internal network variables versus external forces on the attraction of immigrants over time. The empirical results suggest that--as the system matures--network variables have an increasing impact on the attraction of immigrants, while the impact of economic factors declines. The research is concluded with a series of simulations that further highlight the internal dynamic of international migration systems."

  12. Theme: International Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Consists of seven articles focusing on international agricultural education. Topics discussed include (1) international curriculum development, (2) programs for rural youth, (3) experiential training in international agriculture, (4) university/high school global exchange, (5) international development, and (5) the Association of International…

  13. Improving Internal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  14. Fishbone and internal kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.; Park, W.; Monticello, D.; Izzo, R.; White, R.; McGuire, K.; Manickam, J.; Goldston, R.

    1983-07-01

    The internal-kink mode, combined with neutral-beam heating and beam losses, appears to be responsible for the fishbone soft x-ray oscillations in PDX. Nonlinear simulations of both ideal and resistive kinks are presented and shown to be consistent with experimental observations. The internal kink may also be important in low-beta internal disruptions.

  15. Children and International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Childhood Education International, Washington, DC.

    Developed as a plan of action in international education for teachers and students, this portfolio emphasizes the importance of developing a knowledge and appreciation of others, the acquaintance of resources for planning experiences of international understanding, and the participation in international programs to encourage an understanding of…

  16. Neurology and international organizations.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  17. Transcribing Speech: Practicalities, Philosophies and Prophesies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahilly, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the main practical and philosophical developments which have contributed to current approaches to phonetic transcription. Particular contributions from scholars in the field are highlighted as seminal in shaping transcription work. Consideration is also given to the ways in which insights from clinical transcription impact…

  18. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  19. Wdr82 is a C-terminal domain-binding protein that recruits the Setd1A Histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complex to transcription start sites of transcribed human genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G

    2008-01-01

    Histone H3-Lys4 trimethylation is associated with the transcription start site of transcribed genes, but the molecular mechanisms that control this distribution in mammals are unclear. The human Setd1A histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complex was found to physically associate with the RNA polymerase II large subunit. The Wdr82 component of the Setd1A complex interacts with the RNA recognition motif of Setd1A and additionally binds to the Ser5-phosphorylated C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is involved in initiation of transcription, but does not bind to an unphosphorylated or Ser2-phosphorylated C-terminal domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Setd1A is localized near the transcription start site of expressed genes. Small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Wdr82 leads to decreased Setd1A expression and occupancy at transcription start sites and reduced histone H3-Lys4 trimethylation at these sites. However, neither RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) occupancy nor target gene expression levels are altered following Wdr82 depletion. Hence, Wdr82 is required for the targeting of Setd1A-mediated histone H3-Lys4 trimethylation near transcription start sites via tethering to RNA polymerase II, an event that is a consequence of transcription initiation. These results suggest a model for how the mammalian RNAP II machinery is linked with histone H3-Lys4 histone methyltransferase complexes at transcriptionally active genes. PMID:17998332

  20. Internal auditing in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Don; Kusel, Jim; Oxner, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyzed two national surveys to determine answers for two basic questions: How do the roles of internal auditors compare with those of their counterparts in other industries and to what extent over the past 6 years have the activities of internal auditors changed? Internal auditors in hospitals allocate their time primarily to financial/compliance and operational types of audits, as do their counterparts. The current trend is toward more operational types of audits. In the early years of employment, staff turnover in hospitals is significantly higher than in all combined industries, often leading to internal auditors' filling other positions in the organization. Hospital staff salaries are higher than are salaries in other industries combined. Staff composition continues to reflect the growing presence of women in the field. The majority of internal auditing directors believe that their salaries are fair, would recommend internal auditing as a career position, and are treated as valued consultants in the organization.

  1. International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.; Harrison, R.; Poland, A.; St.Cyr, O. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Rabin, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882-83 and 1932-33, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. The IGY involved about 60,000 scientists from 66 nations, working at thousands of stations, from pole to pole to obtain simultaneous, global observations on Earth and in space. There had never been anything like it before. The fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year will occur in 2007. We propose to organize an international program of scientific collaboration for this time period called the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Like it predecessors, the IHY will focus on fundamental global questions of Earth science.

  2. The International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882 and 1932, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. Fifty years later, the world s space science community will again come together for international programs of scientific collaboration: the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY), and the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007. This time, research will extend out into the Heliosphere to focus on solar-terrestrial-planetary interactions. The ambitious plans for the IHY, eGY and IPY incorporate the activities of scientists in 191 nations, as well as the IGY Gold Historical Preservation initiative, plus a series of coordinated campaigns involving more than 100 instruments and models, education and public outreach programs, a developing nations instrument development program, and opportunities for supported research worldwide. The presentation will focus on the efforts and operations which will make these activities possible.

  3. International safeguards data authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, R.B.; Smith, C.E.; DeLand, S.M.; Manatt, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    The International Safeguards community is becoming increasingly reliant on information stored in electronic form. In international monitoring and related activities it must be possible to verify and maintain the integrity of this electronic information. This paper discusses the use of data authentication technology to assist in accomplishing this task. The paper provides background information, identifies the relevance to international safeguards, discusses issues related to export controls, algorithm patents, key management and the use of commercial vs. custom software.

  4. International environmental policy

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a survey of the global international movement for protection of the human environment. It describes the expanding dimensions of international environmental policy, clarifies that policy's present status, and provides a record of events of continuing historical significance. The author calls attention to the need for international agreements and proposals for such vital global environmental issues as climate change, disintegration of the stratospheric ozone layer, and long-range trans-boundary air pollution.

  5. The International Space University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaerts, Roger; Peeters, Walter

    2006-05-01

    The International Space University (ISU) offers, with the support of the world space community and within an international and intercultural environment, interdisciplinary post-graduate programmes in space studies. These graduate programmes prepare professionals from all sectors to meet the challenges of international space cooperation and the restructuring of the space sector. Although it was created as recently as 1987, the ISU is remarkably successful: by 2005 it had around 2400 alumni, forming a strong network in the space community.

  6. Ethics of international collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  7. International Comparisions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    International Comparisions Database (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons Database (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit� International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison database. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.

  8. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  9. International migration, international relations and foreign policy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C

    1989-01-01

    Recent literature on migration, international relations, and foreign policy is reviewed in this article, stressing applications of global systems paradigms, studies of state entry and exit rules, and anatomies of domestic policy-setting processes on migration. After a concise assessment of the contemporary theory of global political economy, the paper argues for seeking mid-range generalizations on the international relations of migration. It also suggests that analysis begin with the policy-setting processes of the state. Especially through the use of comparative perspectives available from domestic policy making studies and from the field of international comparative public policy, this approach offers the opportunity to fix empirically the political roles of transnational social forces, which often present themselves as participants in domestic policy contests. Promising future directions in the study of state-to-state relations are also evaluated, with the anticipation that verifying regional or other intermediate patterns of world migration politics may contribute to more general theories of international political economy.

  10. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  11. The international lithosphere program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinn, Edward A.

    The International Lithosphere Program is a new international interdisciplinary research program in the solid earth sciences that has been established by the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) at the joint request of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS). Its goal is a better understanding of the development of the earth, particularly those aspects upon which human society depends for its well-being.The International Lithosphere Program (ILP) is a natural sequel to a series of international cooperative projects in the geosciences that began with the International Geophysical Year in 1957-58 and continued with the Upper Mantle Project in the 1960's and the International Geodynamics Project (IGP) in the 1970's. In 1977, IUGG and IUGS established an inter-union task group to consider the possibility of a successor to the IGP for the 1980's. The task group, under cochairmen Carl Kisslinger (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado), foreign secretary of the American Geophysical Union, and J. Henning Illies (Geophysical Institute, University of Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany), invited suggestions and comments from the two unions and the national committees in the member countries. Their report, which was completed late in 1978, proposed a new project on the dynamics, origin, and evolution of the lithosphere. This proposal was approved by the IUGS Executive Committee in December 1979 and by the IUGS Council in June 1980. An inter-union steering committee, established in 1979 under the joint chairmanship of Kisslinger and Illies, developed the organizational framework and constitution of the new program. These were approved by resolution of the ICSU Governing Board in September 1980, and the Inter-Union Commission on the Lithosphere (ICL) was established to implement the program. National members of ICSU were urged to establish

  12. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  13. International Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Richard F.

    In response to global changes and a growing focus on international affairs, Foothill and De Anza Colleges have developed a number of international education programs. Since their beginnings, both colleges have hosted full-time students from other countries under the F-1 Visa Program. Another program, Campus Abroad, is a partnership arrangement…

  14. International Education (Working Paper).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruson, Edward S.

    The history, objectives, and funding patterns for international education are discussed. Attention is directed toward the language and area study centers of the U.S. Office of Education, undergraduate/graduate and scholarly exchange programs, and the support of advanced research in international studies. The main source of funds for language and…

  15. Discipline and Internalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Martin L.

    1994-01-01

    Although Grusec and Goodnow make interesting suggestions concerning discipline variables that may affect internalization, their ideas are not integrated into a theory, and their definition of internalization is limited because parent-child similarity may result from children's attributing their values to parents. A theory linking discipline and…

  16. Teaching International Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, James M.

    The accelerated pace of society suggests that social education be clearly formulated from a conceptual golobal framework, recognizing the oneness of earth and man's sharing of a common fate, and that the curriculum be designed from a point of view toward improving international understanding. Effective approaches in international relations…

  17. BWR internal cracking issues

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.E. Jr.; Lund, A.L.

    1999-07-01

    The regulatory issues associated with cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals is being addressed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and is the subject of a voluntary industry initiative. The lessons learned from this effort will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals cracking issues.

  18. Internal Evaluation, Historically Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The author analyzes the growth and nature of internal evaluation from the 1960s to the present and suggests that internal evaluation has been on the increase because of its perceived importance. Although the 1960s were characterized by a rich intellectual development of evaluation theory and practice, the fiscal conservatism of the 1980s ushered…

  19. International. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "The Management of Technological Change within Faculties in International American Schools" (Martine Audeoud); (2) "Going Global: Using a Website Development Project To Teach Technology…

  20. Alberta's International Education Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

    Globalization is driving rapid change in knowledge, skills, and innovation. The economic well-being of future generations of Albertans depends on investment in education today to ensure that the knowledge and skills acquired continues to be in demand in international communities. International student recruitment in both the basic education and…

  1. The International Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jeanne Marcum, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Looks at the missions and goals of the International Assembly of the National Council of Teachers of English, a global multicultural network promoting communication and cooperation for international exchange of teaching practices, literature, literacy, curriculum development, and research in English. Suggests some criteria to look at when…

  2. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  3. Global analysis of saliva as a source of bacterial genes for insights into human population structure and migration studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of the human microbiome holds great potential for shedding light on the history of our ancestors. Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent example as its analysis allowed a fine-scale resolution of past migration patterns including some that could not be distinguished using human genetic markers. However studies of H. pylori require stomach biopsies, which severely limits the number of samples that can be analysed. By focussing on the house-keeping gene gdh (coding for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), on the virulence gene gtf (coding for the glucosyltransferase) of mitis-streptococci and on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum-group we here tested the hypothesis that bacterial genes from human saliva have the potential for distinguishing human populations. Results Analysis of 10 individuals from each of seven geographic regions, encompassing Africa, Asia and Europe, revealed that the genes gdh and ITS exhibited the highest number of polymorphic sites (59% and 79%, respectively) and most OTUs (defined at 99% identity) were unique to a given country. In contrast, the gene gtf had the lowest number of polymorphic sites (21%), and most OTUs were shared among countries. Most of the variation in the gdh and ITS genes was explained by the high clonal diversity within individuals (around 80%) followed by inter-individual variation of around 20%, leaving the geographic region as providing virtually no source of sequence variation. Conversely, for gtf the variation within individuals accounted for 32%, between individuals for 57% and among geographic regions for 11%. This geographic signature persisted upon extension of the analysis to four additional locations from the American continent. Pearson correlation analysis, pairwise Fst-cluster analysis as well as UniFrac analyses consistently supported a tree structure in which the European countries clustered tightly

  4. Divergence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes could be driven by the host: diversity of Borrelia strains isolated from ticks feeding on a single bird

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The controversy surrounding the potential impact of birds in spirochete transmission dynamics and their capacity to serve as a reservoir has existed for a long time. The majority of analyzed bird species are able to infect larval ticks with Borrelia. Dispersal of infected ticks due to bird migration is a key to the establishment of new foci of Lyme borreliosis. The dynamics of infection in birds supports the mixing of different species, the horizontal exchange of genetic information, and appearance of recombinant genotypes. Methods Four Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains were cultured from Ixodes minor larvae and four strains were isolated from Ixodes minor nymphs collected from a single Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus). A multilocus sequence analysis that included 16S rRNA, a 5S-23S intergenic spacer region, a 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer, flagellin, p66, and ospC separated 8 strains into 3 distinct groups. Additional multilocus sequence typing of 8 housekeeping genes, clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA was used to resolve the taxonomic status of bird-associated strains. Results Results of analysis of 14 genes confirmed that the level of divergence among strains is significantly higher than what would be expected for strains within a single species. The presence of cross-species recombination was revealed: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto housekeeping gene nifS was incorporated into homologous locus of strain, previously assigned to B. americana. Conclusions Genetically diverse Borrelia strains are often found within the same tick or same vertebrate host, presenting a wide opportunity for genetic exchange. We report the cross-species recombination that led to incorporation of a housekeeping gene from the B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain into a homologous locus of another bird-associated strain. Our results support the hypothesis that recombination maintains a majority of sequence polymorphism within Borrelia

  5. Phylogeny and molecular signatures for the phylum Fusobacteria and its distinct subclades.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Sethi, Mohit

    2014-08-01

    The members of the phylum Fusobacteria and its two families, Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae, are distinguished at present mainly on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA gene trees and analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences in the 16S-23S rDNA. However, no biochemical or molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by all of most members of these groups of bacteria. We report here detailed phylogenetic and comparative analyses on 45 sequenced Fusobacteria genomes to examine their evolutionary relationships and to identify molecular markers that are specific for the members of this phylum. In phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences or concatenated sequences for 17 conserved proteins, members of the families Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae formed strongly supported clades and were clearly distinguished. In these trees, the species from the genus Fusobacterium also formed a number of well-supported clades. In parallel, comparative analyses on Fusobacteria genomes have identified 44 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions that are either specific for the phylum Fusobacteria or a number of distinct subclades within this phylum. Seven of these CSIs in important proteins are uniquely present in the protein homologs of all sequenced Fusobacteria and they provide potential molecular markers for this phylum. Six and three other CSIs in other protein sequences are specific for members of the families Fusobacteriaceae and Leptotrichiaceae, respectively, and they provide novel molecular means for distinguishing members of these two families. Fourteen additional CSIs in different proteins, which are specific for either members of the genera Fusobacterium or Leptotrichia, or a number of other well-supported clades of Fusobacteria at multiple phylogenetic levels, provide molecular markers for these groups and information regarding the evolutionary relationships among the

  6. Gluconacetobacter medellinensis sp. nov., cellulose- and non-cellulose-producing acetic acid bacteria isolated from vinegar.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cristina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Trcek, Janja; Zuluaga, Robin; De Vos, Paul; Caro, Gloria; Aguirre, Ricardo; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Gañán, Piedad

    2013-03-01

    The phylogenetic position of a cellulose-producing acetic acid bacterium, strain ID13488, isolated from commercially available Colombian homemade fruit vinegar, was investigated. Analyses using nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated the micro-organism to the genus Gluconacetobacter, and more precisely to the Gluconacetobacter xylinus group. Moreover, the data suggested that the micro-organism belongs to a novel species in this genus, together with LMG 1693(T), a non-cellulose-producing strain isolated from vinegar by Kondo and previously classified as a strain of Gluconacetobacter xylinus. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed this finding, revealing a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 81 % between strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T), and values <70 % between strain LMG 1693(T) and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbours. Additionally, the classification of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) into a single novel species was supported by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and (GTG)5-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) could be differentiated from closely related species of the genus Gluconacetobacter by their ability to produce 2- and 5-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to produce acid from sucrose, but not from 1-propanol, and their ability to grow on 3 % ethanol in the absence of acetic acid and on ethanol, d-ribose, d-xylose, sucrose, sorbitol, d-mannitol and d-gluconate as carbon sources. The DNA G+C content of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) was 58.0 and 60.7 mol%, respectively. The major ubiquinone of LMG 1693(T) was Q-10. Taken together these data indicate that strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) represent a novel species of the genus Gluconacetobacter for which the name Gluconacetobacter

  7. Bombella intestini gen. nov., sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from bumble bee crop.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Praet, Jessy; Borremans, Wim; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of a bumble bee gut microbiota study, acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were isolated using a combination of direct isolation methods and enrichment procedures. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of the isolates and a comparison of these profiles with profiles of established AAB species identified most isolates as Asaia astilbis or as 'Commensalibacter intestini', except for two isolates (R-52486 and LMG 28161(T)) that showed an identical profile. A nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain LMG 28161(T) was determined and showed the highest pairwise similarity to Saccharibacter floricola S-877(T) (96.5%), which corresponded with genus level divergence in the family Acetobacteraceae. Isolate LMG 28161(T) was subjected to whole-genome shotgun sequencing; a 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence as well as partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB were extracted for phylogenetic analyses. The obtained data confirmed that this isolate is best classified into a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae. The DNA G+C content of strain LMG 28161(T) was 54.9 mol%. The fatty acid compositions of isolates R-52486 and LMG 28161(T) were similar to those of established AAB species [with C18:1ω7c (43.1%) as the major component], but the amounts of fatty acids such as C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 and C14:0 2-OH enabled to differentiate them. The major ubiquinone was Q-10. Both isolates could also be differentiated from the known genera of AAB by means of biochemical characteristics, such as their inability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid, negligible acid production from melibiose, and notable acid production from d-fructose, sucrose and d-mannitol. In addition, they produced 2-keto-d-gluconate, but not 5-keto-d-gluconate from d-glucose. Therefore, the name Bombella intestini gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this new taxon, with LMG 28161(T) ( =DSM 28636(T) =R-52487(T)) as the type strain of the type species.

  8. Clinical and laboratory aspects of the diagnosis and management of cutaneous and subcutaneous infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kothavade, R J; Dhurat, R S; Mishra, S N; Kothavade, U R

    2013-02-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are known to cause pulmonary, extra-pulmonary, systemic/disseminated, and cutaneous and subcutaneous infections. The erroneous detection of RGM that is based solely on microscopy, solid and liquid cultures, Bactec systems, and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may produce misleading results. Thus, inappropriate therapeutic measures may be used in dermatologic settings, leading to increased numbers of skin deformity cases or recurrent infections. Molecular tools such as the sequence analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65 or PCR restriction enzyme analyses, and the alternate gene sequencing of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene, dnaJ, the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS), secA, recA1, dnaK, and the 32-kDa protein gene have shown promising results in the detection of RGM species. PCR restriction enzyme analyses (PRA) work better than conventional methods at identifying species that are closely related. Recently introduced molecular tools such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), pyrosequencing, DNA chip technology, and Beacon probes-combined PCR probes have shown comparable results in the detection of various species of RGM. Closely related RGM species (e.g., Mycobacterium fortuitum, M. chelonae, and M. abscessus) must be clearly differentiated using accurate molecular techniques because their therapeutic responses are species-specific. Hence, this paper reviews the following aspects of RGM: (i) its sources, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations, and concomitant fungal infections; (ii) the risks of misdiagnoses in the management of RGM infections in dermatological settings; (iii) the diagnoses and outcomes of treatment responses in common and uncommon infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; (iv) conventional versus current molecular methods for the detection of RGM; (v) the basic principles of a promising MALDI-TOF MS

  9. Bombella intestini gen. nov., sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from bumble bee crop.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Praet, Jessy; Borremans, Wim; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of a bumble bee gut microbiota study, acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were isolated using a combination of direct isolation methods and enrichment procedures. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of the isolates and a comparison of these profiles with profiles of established AAB species identified most isolates as Asaia astilbis or as 'Commensalibacter intestini', except for two isolates (R-52486 and LMG 28161(T)) that showed an identical profile. A nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain LMG 28161(T) was determined and showed the highest pairwise similarity to Saccharibacter floricola S-877(T) (96.5%), which corresponded with genus level divergence in the family Acetobacteraceae. Isolate LMG 28161(T) was subjected to whole-genome shotgun sequencing; a 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence as well as partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB were extracted for phylogenetic analyses. The obtained data confirmed that this isolate is best classified into a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae. The DNA G+C content of strain LMG 28161(T) was 54.9 mol%. The fatty acid compositions of isolates R-52486 and LMG 28161(T) were similar to those of established AAB species [with C18:1ω7c (43.1%) as the major component], but the amounts of fatty acids such as C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 and C14:0 2-OH enabled to differentiate them. The major ubiquinone was Q-10. Both isolates could also be differentiated from the known genera of AAB by means of biochemical characteristics, such as their inability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid, negligible acid production from melibiose, and notable acid production from d-fructose, sucrose and d-mannitol. In addition, they produced 2-keto-d-gluconate, but not 5-keto-d-gluconate from d-glucose. Therefore, the name Bombella intestini gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this new taxon, with LMG 28161(T) ( =DSM 28636(T) =R-52487(T)) as the type strain of the type species. PMID:25336723

  10. Marine Mesocosm Bacterial Colonisation of Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, V.; Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Kueppers, U.; Erpenbeck, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Woerheide, G.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local or regional scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, ash deposition may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, it is currently unknown which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, chemistry, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. We have tested the effect of substrate properties on bacterial diversity and abundance colonising five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash from the Sakurajima volcano (Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size - by incubation in a controlled marine mesocosm (coral reef aquarium) under low light conditions for three months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis Of Similarity supports significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community and carried the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community

  11. A microdiversity study of anammox bacteria reveals a novel Candidatus Scalindua phylotype in marine oxygen minimum zones.

    PubMed

    Woebken, Dagmar; Lam, Phyllis; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Naqvi, S Wajih A; Kartal, Boran; Strous, Marc; Jetten, Mike S M; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf

    2008-11-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) contributes significantly to the global loss of fixed nitrogen and is carried out by a deep branching monophyletic group of bacteria within the phylum Planctomycetes. Various studies have implicated anammox to be the most important process responsible for the nitrogen loss in the marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) with a low diversity of marine anammox bacteria. This comprehensive study investigated the anammox bacteria in the suboxic zone of the Black Sea and in three major OMZs (off Namibia, Peru and in the Arabian Sea). The diversity and population composition of anammox bacteria were investigated by both, the 16S rRNA gene sequences and the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Our results showed that the anammox bacterial sequences of the investigated samples were all closely related to the Candidatus Scalindua genus. However, a greater microdiversity of marine anammox bacteria than previously assumed was observed. Both phylogenetic markers supported the classification of all sequences in two distinct anammox bacterial phylotypes: Candidatus Scalindua clades 1 and 2. Scalindua 1 could be further divided into four distinct clusters, all comprised of sequences from either the Namibian or the Peruvian OMZ. Scalindua 2 consisted of sequences from the Arabian Sea and the Peruvian OMZ and included one previously published 16S rRNA gene sequence from Lake Tanganyika and one from South China Sea sediment (97.9-99.4% sequence identity). This cluster showed only

  12. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  13. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  14. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  15. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  16. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  17. International Perspectives on Fieldcourses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairn, Karen; Higgitt, David; Vanneste, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Considers the context of internationalism for the enhancement of fieldwork practices. Discusses whether fieldcourses are valuable experiences. Addresses specific issues affecting internationalisation of fieldcourses, such as financial considerations, sharing courses (staff and resources), overseas fieldtrips and expeditions, safety, and student…

  18. The Internal Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Internal control comprises the plan of organization and all the coordinate methods and measures adopted within a school system to safeguard its assets, check the reliability of its accounting data, promote operational efficiency, and encourage adherence to prescribed policies. (Author)

  19. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  20. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

  1. Globalisation of international health.

    PubMed

    Walt, G

    1998-02-01

    40 years ago, activities in international health were the domain of WHO, governments (based on bilateral agreements), and non-governmental organisations. This has changed. Today, new players (such as the World Bank and, increasingly, the World Trade Organisation) have an influence on international health. As globalisation of trade and markets takes hold, new coalitions and alliances are forming to examine and deal with the direct and indirect consequences on health. This paper examines the changing context of cooperation in international health, and voices concerns about rising potential inequalities in health, both within and between countries. The question of how such changes will affect the actions of organisations working in international health is also addressed.

  2. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  3. International Higher Education Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulat, Y. G-M.

    1988-01-01

    One in a series of bibliographies of articles in international higher education journals lists items on a variety of administrative, financial, faculty, student, curricular, and related issues. Articles on specific geographic regions are categorized separately. (MSE)

  4. Geoscientists for international development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hastings, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Professional societies are usually concerned with the advancement of scientific knowledge, but a relative newcomer to the international scene has a different focus - geoscience development in the Third World. David Hastings, a member of AGID, explains.

  5. (International meetings on ecology)

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

    1990-09-25

    the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

  6. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  7. Criteria for internal auditing.

    PubMed

    Holder, W W; Clay, R J

    1979-01-01

    An effective, inclusive internal auditing endeavor should help assure hospital managements that (1) an adequate system of internal control exists to assure the safeguarding of assets and the reliability of data produced by the financial information system, (2) uneconomic operating practices are detected promptly so they can be remedied, and (3) program results and effectiveness levels are of sufficiently high quality to demonstrate managerial competence.

  8. The international uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, T.

    1984-01-01

    Shortages, glut, political manipulation and worries about security have all marked the international trade in uranium. In this book, the director of the International Energy Studies Program of the MIT Energy Laboratory sorts out these factors, looks closely at the position of a number of countries, and speculates on the future of a market in which supply will exceed demand, costs will vary widely, and governments will continue to be directly involved for as far ahead as anyone can see.

  9. Making short-term international medical volunteer placements work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Elnawawy, Omnia; Lee, Andrew CK; Pohl, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    Background International medical volunteering has grown in recent decades. It has the potential to benefit and harm the volunteer and host countries; but there is a paucity of literature on the impacts of international medical volunteering and a need to find ways to optimise the benefits of such placements. Aim In this study, one example of international medical volunteering was examined involving British GPs on short-term placements in Nepal. The intention was to explore the expectations and experiences of the local health workers, volunteers, and host organisation to try and understand what makes volunteer placements work. Design Qualitative study of key informant interviews. Setting Stakeholders of a short-term international medical volunteer (IMV) placement programme in Nepal. Method Key informant interviews were carried out via face-to-face or telephone/internet interviews with five previous volunteers, three representatives from a non-governmental organisation providing placements, and five local health workers in Nepal who had had contact with the IMVs. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using standard thematic framework approaches. Results All the stakeholders had their own specific motives for participating in the IMV programme. The relationship between volunteers and the Nepalese health workers was complex and characterised by discrepant and occasionally unrealistic expectations. Managing these different expectations was challenging. Conclusion Contextual issues and cultural differences are important considerations in medical volunteer programmes, and this study highlights the importance of robust preparation pre-placement for the volunteer and host to ensure positive outcomes. PMID:24868070

  10. Temporary internal pacing.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Díaz-Miguel, R; Gómez Grande, M L

    2014-12-01

    Technology and insertion techniques for cardiac temporary internal pacing have experienced a remarkable development over the last few years. Despite this fact, the procedure continues to have potentially fatal associated complications. Temporary internal pacing is indicated for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias or tachyarrhythmias refractory to conventional treatment, or arrhythmias causing cardiovascular or clinical instability of the patient. On the other hand, the indications of temporary cardiac pacing are far less well defined than those of permanent pacing. Since the decision of implementing temporary pacing is complex and delicate, it should always be carefully considered, and over-indication should be avoided. We must base these decisions on robust knowledge of the arrhythmias that may benefit from temporary internal pacing, and should also acquire the habit of considering external temporary pacing among other less aggressive treatments, and to make the best use of new technologies such as echocardiography that add accuracy to the procedure. PMID:24786750

  11. The International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded on the premise that any major space program in the future would require international cooperation as a necessary first step toward its successful completion. ISU is devoted to being a leading center for educating future authorities in the world space industry. ISU's background, goals, current form, and future plans are described. The results and benefits of the type of education and experience gained from ISU include technical reports describing the design projects undertaken by the students, an exposure to the many different disciplines which are a part of a large space project, an awareness of the existing activities from around the world in the space community, and an international professional network which spans all aspects of space activities and covers the globe.

  12. International energy annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  13. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  14. [International malpractice law].

    PubMed

    Stellpflug, M H

    2001-10-01

    According to German Civil Law the liability of a physician in telemedicine can be based on the breach of contractual duties or tort. In telemedicine doctor and patient are separated by distance. In the case of cross border telemedicine Medical Malpractice Law becomes an international issue with many new questions arising. The rules and regulations of "private international law" determine which law has to be applied. The German private international law allows the patient to choose either the law of the state in which the doctor acts or that state in which the therapeutical damage is being suffered. Another important question arises in determining the jurisdiction (of a court). The European agreements give the patient the right to choose. A "choice of jurisdiction clause" or a "choice of law clause" can help to decide with binding force which law and what jurisdiction has to be applied. However, various regulations concerned with consumer protection restrict the permission of such agreements.

  15. [International malpractice law].

    PubMed

    Stellpflug, M H

    2001-10-01

    According to German Civil Law the liability of a physician in telemedicine can be based on the breach of contractual duties or tort. In telemedicine doctor and patient are separated by distance. In the case of cross border telemedicine Medical Malpractice Law becomes an international issue with many new questions arising. The rules and regulations of "private international law" determine which law has to be applied. The German private international law allows the patient to choose either the law of the state in which the doctor acts or that state in which the therapeutical damage is being suffered. Another important question arises in determining the jurisdiction (of a court). The European agreements give the patient the right to choose. A "choice of jurisdiction clause" or a "choice of law clause" can help to decide with binding force which law and what jurisdiction has to be applied. However, various regulations concerned with consumer protection restrict the permission of such agreements. PMID:11688223

  16. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  17. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration". PMID:22073693

  18. The international RESPO network

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    Winrock International, with sponsorship from the Center for Environment of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), is building a global network of non-governmental organizations to help catalyze the use of renewable energy technologies for rural energy supply in developing countries. Known as the Renewable Energy Project Support Offices (REPSOs), these in-country facilities are managed by local institutions in coordination with Winrock. REPSOs provide an array of technical and financial support services to help developers identify and evaluate opportunities for renewable energy projects.

  19. (International seminar on limnology)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, B.L.

    1991-03-05

    The traveler attended the Second Week on Limnology, the second of a four-part series of week-long conferences, which collectively will comprise the International Seminar on Limnology. These conferences are being organized and sponsored by the National Water Commission of Mexico for the purpose of upgrading the limnological knowledge, experience, and international contacts of limnologists, water resources scientists, and engineers in Mexico. This particular meeting focused on limnological research, water resources development, water resources problems, and lake restoration efforts occurring throughout the world. The traveler presented an invited lecture entitled Understanding Reservoirs as Aquatic Ecosystems'' and served as the moderator of a day-long session on Selected Topics.''

  20. INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Russell, W.H. Jr.

    1959-06-30

    A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

  1. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  2. Internal combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.L.

    1988-03-08

    In combination with a high-powered reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, an internal combustion cylinder assembly is described comprising: a cylinder head made of weldable material; a cylinder liner for containing and guiding a reciprocating piston of the engine, a coolant jacket adapted to receive a cooling fluid, mounted on and surrounding the cylinder liner, the jacket being attached to the cylinder head and detachably supported by the cylinder liner, and forming a cooling chamber around the cylinder liner; means to supply the cooling fluid to the cooling chamber and to discharge the cooling fluid therefrom.

  3. Internationalism and Globalization as Contexts for International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge, James; Thompson, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    A problem with the construction of an inclusive definition of international education is that the word 'international' has a variety of connotations. It is proposed that the term 'international education' is ambiguous because it appears to refer to contrasting usages in educational studies. International education is frequently discussed in the…

  4. International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is the November 6, 1996 - October 9, 1997, IUE Final Report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive contract. The ultimate objective of this contract is the completion of the archival reprocessing of all IUE data obtained at GSFC between 1978 and 1995.

  5. International Summer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, June

    1979-01-01

    The article describes five summer programs for gifted and talented students offered internationally. The programs outlined are workshops in the publication arts, a study of humanistic development; computer science, writing, and photography workshops; a language study; a historical/social study of English history; and a workshop on photography,…

  6. Simulation in International Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists have long worked to replicate real-world phenomena in their research and teaching environments. Unlike our biophysical science colleagues, we are faced with an area of study that is not governed by the laws of physics and other more predictable relationships. As a result, social scientists, and international studies scholars more…

  7. International Student Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Anne

    In an effort to augment the information needed for decisions regarding policy, funding, programs, and services, Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) conducts periodic studies of its foreign student population. This report profiles international students at M-DCC for closing fall term 1990-91, and provides national data comparisons among…

  8. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  9. Introduction to International Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan M.; Crummett, Jerrie

    This set of student and teacher guides is intended for use in a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in such occupational areas in international trade as business/finance, communications, logistics, and marketing. The following topics are covered in the course's five instructional units: introduction to careers in international…

  10. Internal Leadership Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Christopher A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how camps can cultivate staff from among the camper ranks. Outlines questions to consider in deciding whether internal leadership development (ILD) is appropriate and feasible. Describes elements of successful ILD programs and six training techniques to maximize ILD: leadership by example, delegation of responsibility, role-playing,…

  11. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  12. The International System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Maurice A.

    Designed as a unit for an international relations course, this systems approach paper outlines a learning method which contributes to the student's awareness that the United States is only one of many actors in the world. It also makes the student aware that there are limitations on the U. S. individual actions because of this interdependence and…

  13. Fall 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Fall report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization.…

  14. Internal displacement in Burma.

    PubMed

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced.

  15. International HRD Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on international perspectives on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "Human Resource Development Practices in American and Chinese High-technology Companies in Taiwan" (Hsin-yi Chen), uses quantitative and qualitative data on HRD practices in high-technology companies in the…

  16. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  17. International. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Attitudes of Malaysian Vocational Trainee Teachers towards the Integration of Computer in Teaching" (Ab. Rahim Bakar and Shamsiah Mohamed); (2) "Views from an Asian Bridge: How…

  18. International Study Tour Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John J.; McCaw, William P.; Kero, Patty; Stewart, Courtney; Haddouch, Reda

    2014-01-01

    Using the context of international study tour groups, this study examined the personal and professional transformation that occurred among host faculty and staff at The University of Montana-Missoula as a result of their interactions with traveling academics from other countries. Data were collected from participant responses (n = 27) using a…

  19. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given the Energy Information Administration in Public Law 95-91. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  20. International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassler, Maggie (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) is described in this video, hosted by Marina Sirtis from the 'Star Trek' television show's Starship Enterprise. A complete explanation of what ISU is, how the university functions, and the benefits that the university provides are described. Included are brief comments from former ISU graduates.

  1. International energy outlook 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  2. Internal split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat; ,Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  3. ETV International Brief

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. ETV Program has been active internationally for more than 10 years. Initially these efforts focused on sharing information about the U.S. program. Over the last four years, ETV has formalized working relationships with other countries with the objective of developing a...

  4. Requiem for Cultural Internationalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninkovich, Frank

    1986-01-01

    Reviews Mary Brown Bullock's 1980 book,"An American Transplant: The Rockefeller Foundation and Peking Union Medical College." Far more than a narrow, scholarly history, this book is a case study of the far-reaching cultural impact of international educational exchange efforts. (JDH)

  5. Independence of Internal Auditors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montondon, Lucille; Meixner, Wilda F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 288 college and university auditors investigated patterns in their appointment, reporting, and supervisory practices as indicators of independence and objectivity. Results indicate a weakness in the positioning of internal auditing within institutions, possibly compromising auditor independence. Because the auditing function is…

  6. International Air Transport Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1972-01-01

    The actions of the Civil Aviation Board in providing assistance and advice to the State Department regarding international air transport policy are discussed. The policies and guidelines of the Civil Aviation Board are defined. The relationship with the policies of the Executive Branch of the Government and the interpretations of the Department of Transportation are reported.

  7. International reference ionosphere 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Rawer, K.; Bossy, L.; Kutiev, I.; Oyama, K.-I.; Leitinger, R.; Kazimirovsky, E.

    1990-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere 1990 (IRI-90) is described. IRI described monthly averages of the electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, and ion composition in the altitude range from 50 to 1000 km for magnetically quiet conditions in the non-auroral ionosphere. The most important improvements and new developments are summarized.

  8. Merit Pay International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    American 15-year-olds continue to perform no better than at the industrial-world average in reading and science, and below that in mathematics. According to the results of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests, released in December 2010 by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United…

  9. International Perspectives on Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past year, the Board of Directors of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) has been discussing ways in which AEA can strengthen its relationships and build collaborative partnerships within the international evaluation community as well as increase AEA members' awareness of and capacity to engage issues that shape evaluation…

  10. Spring 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization. There…

  11. Internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudsin, N.

    1984-05-22

    An internal combustion engine wherein the rod connecting the piston to the crankshaft has an enlarged portion defining a track which a crankshaft element cooperatingly engages; the track is topologically shaped so that the effect exerted by the crankshaft element on the connecting rod is reduced and/or cancelled for a given travel distance of the crankshaft element in the track.

  12. International Activities of ASE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symonds, Lynne; Jackson, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The Association for Science Education (ASE) has been involved in exchanges with various countries in a number of ways. Teachers from all over the world visit the Annual Conference and their own associations have often used ASE methods in developing their own programmes. The responsibilities of the International Committee of ASE range from…

  13. FFA International Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Farmers of America, Washington, DC.

    The document provides a list of 10 of the international agriculture activities available for the Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapters' participation: Work Experience Abroad (WEA); Development Projects; FFA Study Seminars; Care, Inc.; Walk for Development; Agriculutural Seminars; Heifer Project; CROP; World Neighbors; and Meals for Millions.…

  14. Internalism, Externalism and Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Philip

    2007-01-01

    I examine some of the issues connected with the internalist/externalist distinction in work on the ontology of language. I note that Chomskyan radical internalism necessarily leads to a passive conception of child language acquisition. I reject that passive conception, and support current versions of constructivism [Tomasello, M., 2001. "The…

  15. Technology in International Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  16. GNU debugger internal architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Nessett, D.; Pizzi, R.

    1993-12-16

    This document describes the internal and architecture and implementation of the GNU debugger, gdb. Topics include inferior process management, command execution, symbol table management and remote debugging. Call graphs for specific functions are supplied. This document is not a complete description but offers a developer an overview which is the place to start before modification.

  17. Intel International Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Wendy; Mandinach, Ellen; Kanaya, Tomoe; Culp, Katie McMillan

    2004-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary data and observations from evaluations of Intel Teach to the Future being conducted around the world, and recommendations for building and refining this evaluation portfolio to ensure that findings will be instructive at the local, national and international level. The data presented here reflect the…

  18. Occupational Standards: International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Joao, Ed.

    These nine papers from a conference of the International Research Network for Training and Development focus on occupational classification, standards, and certification. "Introduction" (Joao Oliveria) presents synopses with highlights from the papers. Part I offers an overview of recent developments in the United States in "Occupational Standards…

  19. International energy indicators. [International and US statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-03-01

    For the international sector, a table of data is first presented followed by corresponding graph of the data for the following: (1) Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to February 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia (same as Iran); (3) OPEC (ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia); capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to January 1980; (4) non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, 1973 to January 1980; (5) oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to 1979; (6) petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973 to October 1979; (7) USSR crude oil production, 1974 to February 1980; (8) Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973 to January 1980. For the United States, the same data format is used for the following: (a) US imports of crude oil and products 1973 to January 1980; (b) landed cost of Saudi Arabia crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, 1974 to October 1979; (c) US trade in coal, 1973 to 1979; (d) summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to January 1980; and (e) US energy/GNP ratio (in 1972 dollars), 1947 to 1979.

  20. Internal audit consider the implications.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Grant D; Hamilton, Angela

    2004-06-01

    Internal audit can not only allay external and internal concerns about appropriateness of business operations, but also help improve efficiency and the bottom line. To get an internal audit function under way, healthcare organizations need to obtain board buy-in, form an audit committee of the board, determine resources needed, perform a risk assessment, and develop an internal audit plan.

  1. Internal Auditing for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    This book provides guidelines for conducting internal audits of school districts. The first five chapters provide an overview of internal auditing and describe techniques that can be used to improve or implement internal audits in school districts. They offer information on the definition and benefits of internal auditing, the role of internal…

  2. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus nsp1 Inhibits Host Gene Expression by Selectively Targeting mRNAs Transcribed in the Nucleus while Sparing mRNAs of Cytoplasmic Origin

    PubMed Central

    Lokugamage, Kumari G.; Narayanan, Krishna; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Terasaki, Kaori; Ramirez, Sydney I.; Tseng, Chien-Te K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) represent highly pathogenic human CoVs that share a property to inhibit host gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Similar to the nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) of SARS-CoV that inhibits host gene expression at the translational level, we report that MERS-CoV nsp1 also exhibits a conserved function to negatively regulate host gene expression by inhibiting host mRNA translation and inducing the degradation of host mRNAs. Furthermore, like SARS-CoV nsp1, the mRNA degradation activity of MERS-CoV nsp1, most probably triggered by its ability to induce an endonucleolytic RNA cleavage, was separable from its translation inhibitory function. Despite these functional similarities, MERS-CoV nsp1 used a strikingly different strategy that selectively targeted translationally competent host mRNAs for inhibition. While SARS-CoV nsp1 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm and binds to the 40S ribosomal subunit to gain access to translating mRNAs, MERS-CoV nsp1 was distributed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm and did not bind stably to the 40S subunit, suggesting a distinctly different mode of targeting translating mRNAs. Interestingly, consistent with this notion, MERS-CoV nsp1 selectively targeted mRNAs, which are transcribed in the nucleus and transported to the cytoplasm, for translation inhibition and mRNA degradation but spared exogenous mRNAs introduced directly into the cytoplasm or virus-like mRNAs that originate in the cytoplasm. Collectively, these data point toward a novel viral strategy wherein the cytoplasmic origin of MERS-CoV mRNAs facilitates their escape from the inhibitory effects of MERS-CoV nsp1. IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a highly pathogenic human CoV that emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012. MERS-CoV has a zoonotic origin and poses a major threat to public health

  3. The international petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.

    1991-01-01

    The petrochemical industry occupies a crucial place in economic, strategic and political terms in the twentieth century. The author explains its growth and international distribution from the 1920s tot he present, relating the particular experience of petrochemicals to the processes that have shaped the long-term evolution of industry in general. The geographical coverage of this book extends from the regional to international scale, and its historical scope embraces one hundred years from the laboratory origins of polymer science and petrochemistry to the massive operations of modern industry. It represents the result of twenty years of research, and reflects the author's privileged access to company sources in both the U.S. and Europe.

  4. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  5. First International Microgravity Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

    This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

  6. First International Microgravity Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

    1990-01-01

    This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

  7. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination.

  8. Frontiers in Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jimenez, F; Luna-Jimenez, M A; Polanczyk, C A; Rohde, L E; Rivera-Moscoso, R; Reza-Albarran, A A; Macias-Hernandez, A E; Obrador, G T; Levey, A S; Mora, R

    1997-01-01

    Clinical research in Internal Medicine has provided many scientific advances during the past few years. However, the newly generated information overrides the time available to read all of the medical literature regarding advances in Internal Medicine. The goal of this review is to summarize some of the most relevant improvements in clinical practice published over the last few years. From Cardiology to Pulmonology, the authors of this review expose in a succinct way what they and many of their peers consider to be the most transcendental information gathered from thousands of publications. The authors of this review article have attempted to avoid sensationalism by including facts instead of just simply optimistic preliminary findings that can mislead clinicians' decision making. The review is focused on information obtained through well-designed, prospective clinical trials and cohorts where the effectiveness of medical interventions and diagnostic procedures were tested. PMID:9428570

  9. International Water Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  10. International Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, James E.

    2012-08-14

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  11. International energy outlook, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-08

    This report presents the current Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessment of the long-term outlook for international energy markets. The historic political and economic changes occurring in Easter Europe and the former Soviet Union will, no doubt, transform regional markets and world trade. This report pays particular attention to energy markets and resources in those countries that were once a part of the Centrally Planned Economies (CPE's) and how prospective changes in these countries might influence the energy outlook for the rest of the world. Several major EIA estimates determine, in large part, the resulting energy projections presented here. These include estimates of the energy intensity of economic activity; oil and natural gas production capacities; nuclear and hydroelectric generation capacities; international coal trade; and the rate of incremental energy requirements met by alternatives to oil.

  12. International energy outlook, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-08

    This report presents the current Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessment of the long-term outlook for international energy markets. The historic political and economic changes occurring in Easter Europe and the former Soviet Union will, no doubt, transform regional markets and world trade. This report pays particular attention to energy markets and resources in those countries that were once a part of the Centrally Planned Economies (CPE`s) and how prospective changes in these countries might influence the energy outlook for the rest of the world. Several major EIA estimates determine, in large part, the resulting energy projections presented here. These include estimates of the energy intensity of economic activity; oil and natural gas production capacities; nuclear and hydroelectric generation capacities; international coal trade; and the rate of incremental energy requirements met by alternatives to oil.

  13. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. PMID:26920587

  14. Genetic discrimination: international perspectives.

    PubMed

    Otlowski, M; Taylor, S; Bombard, Y

    2012-01-01

    Genetic discrimination (GD) is a complex, multifaceted ethical, psychosocial, and legal phenomenon. It is defined as the differential treatment of asymptomatic individuals or their relatives on the basis of their real or assumed genetic characteristics. This article presents an overview of GD within the contemporary international context. It describes the concept of GD and its contextual features, reviews research evidence regarding people's experiences of GD and the impact of GD within a range of domains, and provides an overview of legal and policy responses to GD that have emerged globally. We argue that GD is a significant and internationally established phenomenon that requires multilevel responses to ensure social justice and equitable outcomes for all citizens. Future research should monitor GD and its impacts within the community as well as institutions and should evaluate the effectiveness of legislative, policy, community education, and systemic responses. PMID:22607273

  15. International markets for CCTs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferriter, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The paper begins by describing the role of the International Energy Agency, the importance of coal, what the IEA is doing in the area of clean coal technology, and the role of the IEA Coal Industry Advisory Board. The paper then discusses which coal technologies will be chosen, what the problem areas are, and what can be done to accelerate the take-up of clean coal technologies.

  16. INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    AMADOR, MABLE; KELLER, YVONNE KELLER

    2002-02-22

    This document presents a set of guidelines for authors who wish to express themselves more clearly to foreign readers, or readers whose first language is not American English. Topics include idioms, technical terms, jargon, word meaning, acronyms, and international conventions of measurement. The guidelines will help writers of technical documents present their ideas more effectively to audiences that may include individuals whose first language is not American English, including audiences with individuals from other English-speaking countries.

  17. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This monthly publication provides current data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  18. Internal Waves, Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photograph, taken in sunglint conditions, captures open ocean internal waves which are diffracting around shoals south of the Seychelle islands (4.5S, 55.5E) and recombining to form interference patterns. The clouds to the north of the waves cover two of the Seychelle islands: Silhouette and Mahe. Mahe is the main island of the archipelago. The small rocky island surrounded by reef around which the waves diffract is Platte Island.

  19. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  20. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.