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Sample records for 16s-23s rrna intergenic

  1. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  2. A report of cat scratch disease in Korea confirmed by PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region of Bartonella henselae.

    PubMed

    Suh, Borum; Chun, Jin-Kyoung; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Yang Soon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Dong Soo

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of cat scratch disease in an 8-yr-old girl who presented with fever and enlargement of both axillary lymph nodes. Both aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the lymph node aspirate were negative for microbial growth. Gram staining and Warthin-Starry silver staining did not reveal any organism. Purified DNA from the PCR-amplicon of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region was sequenced and showed 99.7% identity with the corresponding sequence of Bartonella henselae strain Houston-1. Our findings suggest that the internal transcribed spacer is a reliable region for PCR identification of Bartonella species. In patients with lymphadenitis, a history of contact with cats or dogs necessitates the use of diagnostic approaches that employ not only the conventional staining and culture but also molecular methods to detect B. henselae.

  3. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  4. Differentiation of Acinetobacter baumannii biotypes by amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Montoya, R; Bello, H; Gonzalez, G; Dominguez, M; Zemelman, R

    1996-01-01

    Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (32 strains) from blood samples obtained from patients in five Chilean hospitals were identified and biotyped according to their phenotypic properties. They were also submitted to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using eight randomly designed 10-mers and the core sequence of M13 phage (15-mers) as well as amplification of the spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. With some primers, RAPD discriminated between biotypes, whereas with others each isolate showed a particular profile. When amplification of spacer regions was performed, a clear correlation between patterns and biotypes was found. This last technique allowed correct biotyping of clinical isolates. Both genetic methods might be used for the identification of A. baumannii biotypes.

  5. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  6. Sequence diversity in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons in representatives of the Escherichia coli ECOR collection.

    PubMed

    Antón, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1998-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA multigene family in Escherichia coli comprises seven rrn operons of similar, but not identical, sequence. Four operons (rrnC, B, G, and E) contain genes in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) for tRNA(Glu-2) and three (rrnA, D, and H) contain genes for tRNA(Ile-1) and tRNA(Ala-1B). To increase our understanding of their molecular evolution, we have determined the ISR sequence of the seven operons in a set of 12 strains from the ECOR collection. Each operon was specifically amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from genes or open reading frames located upstream of the 16S rRNA genes in E. coli K12. With a single exception (ECOR 40), ISRs containing one or two tRNA genes were found at the same respective loci as those of strain K12. Intercistronic heterogeneity already found in K12 was representative of most variation among the strains studied and the location of polymorphic sites was the same. Dispersed nucleotide substitutions were very few but 21 variable sites were found grouped in a stem-loop, although the secondary structure was conserved. Some regions were found in which a stretch of nucleotides was substituted in block by one alternative, apparently unrelated, sequence (as illustrated by the known putative insertion of rsl in K12). Except for substitutions of different sizes and insertions/deletions found in the ISR, the pattern of nucleotide variation is very similar to that found for the 16S rRNA gene in E. coli. Strains K12 and ECOR 40 showed the highest intercistronic heterogeneity. Most strains showed a strong tendency to homogenization. Concerted evolution could explain the notorious conservation of this region that is supposed to have low functional restrictions.

  7. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola.

  8. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola. PMID:8979356

  9. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here.

  10. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  11. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  12. RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB) gene and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region (ITS) as complementary molecular markers in addition to the 16S rRNA gene for phylogenetic analysis and identification of the species of the family Mycoplasmataceae.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Simonyan, Vahan; Davidson, Maureen K; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2012-01-01

    Conventional classification of the species in the family Mycoplasmataceae is mainly based on phenotypic criteria, which are complicated, can be difficult to measure, and have the potential to be hampered by phenotypic deviations among the isolates. The number of biochemical reactions suitable for phenotypic characterization of the Mycoplasmataceae is also very limited and therefore the strategy for the final identification of the Mycoplasmataceae species is based on comparative serological results. However, serological testing of the Mycoplasmataceae species requires a performance panel of hyperimmune sera which contains anti-serum to each known species of the family, a high level of technical expertise, and can only be properly performed by mycoplasma-reference laboratories. In addition, the existence of uncultivated and fastidious Mycoplasmataceae species/isolates in clinical materials significantly complicates, or even makes impossible, the application of conventional bacteriological tests. The analysis of available genetic markers is an additional approach for the primary identification and phylogenetic classification of cultivable species and uncultivable or fastidious organisms in standard microbiological laboratories. The partial nucleotide sequences of the RNA polymerase β-subunit gene (rpoB) and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) were determined for all known type strains and the available non-type strains of the Mycoplasmataceae species. In addition to the available 16S rRNA gene data, the ITS and rpoB sequences were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among these species and to enable identification of the Mycoplasmataceae isolates to the species level. The comparison of the ITS and rpoB phylogenetic trees with the 16S rRNA reference phylogenetic tree revealed a similar clustering patterns for the Mycoplasmataceae species, with minor discrepancies for a few species that demonstrated higher divergence of their ITS and rpoB in

  13. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  14. Intra- and Interpatient Variability of the hsp65 and 16S-23S Intergenic Gene Region in Mycobacterium abscessus Strains from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    König, Brigitte; Tammer, Ina; Sollich, Veronika; König, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    To establish the exact pathogenic role of Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis (CF), molecular tests are required for accurate identification. Forty-eight M. abscessus isolates from seven patients with CF were analyzed by sequence analysis for sequence variants within the hsp65 gene and the 16S-23S intergenic sequence (ITS). We detected two different hsp65 genes and correspondingly two ITS sequevars belonging to M. abscessus type I and type II. PMID:16000490

  15. Rapid Identification and Differentiation of the Soft Rot Erwinias by 16S-23S Intergenic Transcribed Spacer-PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toth, I. K.; Avrova, A. O.; Hyman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current identification methods for the soft rot erwinias are both imprecise and time-consuming. We have used the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) to aid in their identification. Analysis by ITS-PCR and ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism was found to be a simple, precise, and rapid method compared to current molecular and phenotypic techniques. The ITS was amplified from Erwinia and other genera using universal PCR primers. After PCR, the banding patterns generated allowed the soft rot erwinias to be differentiated from all other Erwinia and non-Erwinia species and placed into one of three groups (I to III). Group I comprised all Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum isolates. Group II comprised all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, subsp. odorifera, and subsp. wasabiae and E. cacticida isolates, and group III comprised all E. chrysanthemi isolates. To increase the level of discrimination further, the ITS-PCR products were digested with one of two restriction enzymes. Digestion with CfoI identified E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum (group I) and E. chrysanthemi (group III) isolates, while digestion with RsaI identified E. carotovora subsp. wasabiae, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. odorifera/carotovora and E. cacticida isolates (group II). In the latter case, it was necessary to distinguish E. carotovora subsp. odorifera and subsp. carotovora using the α-methyl glucoside test. Sixty suspected soft rot erwinia isolates from Australia were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. chrysanthemi, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and non-soft rot species. Ten “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. betavasculorum and non-soft rot species, and two “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and subsp. atroseptica. PMID:11526007

  16. Detection of two Bartonella tamiae-like sequences in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) using 16S-23S intergenic spacer region-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Sarah A; Miller, Melissa K; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Levy, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Four hundred and sixty-six questing Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) from Carolina County, VA, and 98 questing A. americanum from Chatham County, NC, were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the Bartonella 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Two amplicons, approximately 270-280 bp, were detected in two ticks from Virginia. Based upon PCR and sequencing, an adult male and adult female tick harbored DNA sequences closely related to Bartonella tamiae (DQ395180). Bartonella DNA was not detected in A. americanum from North Carolina. Potential transmission of Bartonella spp. by A. americanum should be the focus of future experimental studies.

  17. Identification to the species level of Lactobacillus isolated in probiotic prospecting studies of human, animal or food origin by 16S-23S rRNA restriction profiling

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, João Luiz S; Mota, Rodrigo M; Horta, Maria F; Teixeira, Santuza MR; Neumann, Elisabeth; Nicoli, Jacques R; Nunes, Álvaro C

    2005-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of Lactobacillus and other co-isolated bacteria during microbial ecological studies of ecosystems such as the human or animal intestinal tracts and food products is a hard task by phenotypic methods requiring additional tests such as protein and/or lipids profiling. Results Bacteria isolated in different probiotic prospecting studies, using de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe medium (MRS), were typed at species level by PCR amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers using universal primers that anneal within 16S and 23S genes, followed by restriction digestion analyses of PCR products. The set of enzymes chosen differentiates most species of Lactobacillus genus and also co-isolated bacteria such as Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Weissella, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia species. The in silico predictions of restriction patterns generated by the Lactobacillus shorter spacers digested with 11 restriction enzymes with 6 bp specificities allowed us to distinguish almost all isolates at the species level but not at the subspecies one. Simultaneous theoretical digestions of the three spacers (long, medium and short) with the same set of enzymes provided more complex patterns and allowed us to distinguish the species without purifying and cloning of PCR products. Conclusion Lactobacillus isolates and several other strains of bacteria co-isolated on MRS medium from gastrointestinal ecosystem and fermented food products could be identified using DNA fingerprints generated by restriction endonucleases. The methodology based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) is easier, faster and more accurate than the current methodologies based on fermentation profiles, used in most laboratories for the purpose of identification of these bacteria in different prospecting studies. PMID:15788104

  18. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  19. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  1. Direct detection of Brucella spp. in raw milk by PCR and reverse hybridization with 16S-23S rRNA spacer probes.

    PubMed Central

    Rijpens, N P; Jannes, G; Van Asbroeck, M; Rossau, R; Herman, L M

    1996-01-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA spacer regions of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis were cloned and subcloned after PCR amplification. Sequence analysis of the inserts revealed a spacer of about 800 bp with very high ( > 99%) homology among the three species examined. Two genus-specific primer pairs, BRU-P5-BRU-P8 and BRU-P6-BRU-P7, that could be used in a nested PCR format and three genus-specific DNA probes, BRU-ICG2, BRU-ICG3, and BRU-ICG4, were deduced from this spacer. The specificity and sensitivity of both primer sets and probes were examined by testing them against a collection of 18 Brucella strains and 56 strains from other relevant taxa by using PCR and the Line Probe Assay (LiPA), respectively. A method for direct detection of Brucella spp. in 1 ml of raw milk was developed on the basis of enzymatic treatment of the milk components and subsequent PCR and LiPA hybridization. After a single PCR, sensitivities of 2.8 x 10(5) and 2.8 x 10(4) CFU/ml were obtained for detection by agarose gel electrophoresis and LiPA, respectively. Nested PCR yielded a sensitivity of 2.8 x 10(2) CFU/ml for both methods. PMID:8633866

  2. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  3. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  5. Novel Diagnostic Algorithm for Identification of Mycobacteria Using Genus-Specific Amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA Gene Spacer and Restriction Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andreas; Reischl, Udo; Streubel, Anna; Naumann, Ludmila; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Habicht, Marion; Fischer, Marga; Mauch, Harald

    2000-01-01

    A novel genus-specific PCR for mycobacteria with simple identification to the species level by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was established using the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) spacer as a target. Panspecificity of primers was demonstrated on the genus level by testing 811 bacterial strains (122 species in 37 genera from 286 reference strains and 525 clinical isolates). All mycobacterial isolates (678 strains among 48 defined species and 5 indeterminate taxons) were amplified by the new primers. Among nonmycobacterial isolates, only Gordonia terrae was amplified. The RFLP scheme devised involves estimation of variable PCR product sizes together with HaeIII and CfoI restriction analysis. It yielded 58 HaeIII patterns, of which 49 (84%) were unique on the species level. Hence, HaeIII digestion together with CfoI results was sufficient for correct identification of 39 of 54 mycobacterial taxons and one of three or four of seven RFLP genotypes found in Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium kansasii, respectively. Following a clearly laid out diagnostic algorithm, the remaining unidentified organisms fell into five clusters of closely related species (i.e., the Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus) that were successfully separated using additional enzymes (TaqI, MspI, DdeI, or AvaII). Thus, next to slowly growing mycobacteria, all rapidly growing species studied, including M. abscessus, M. chelonae, Mycobacterium farcinogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium peregrinum, and Mycobacterium senegalense (with a very high 16S rDNA sequence similarity) were correctly identified. A high intraspecies sequence stability and the good discriminative power of patterns indicate that this method is very suitable for rapid and cost-effective identification of a wide variety of mycobacterial species without the need for sequencing. Phylogenetically, spacer sequence data stand in good agreement with 16S r

  6. Touchdown Enzyme Time Release-PCR for Detection and Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci Using the 16S and 16S-23S Spacer rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Quinn, Thomas C.; Boman, Jens; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2000-01-01

    Three touchdown enzyme time release (TETR)-PCR assays were used to amplify different DNA sequences in the variable regions of the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes specific for Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Chlamydia psittaci as improved tests for sensitive diagnosis and rapid species differentiation. The TETR-PCR protocol used 60 cycles of amplification, which provided improved analytical sensitivity (0.004 to 0.063 inclusion-forming unit of Chlamydia species per PCR). The sensitivity of TETR-PCR with primer set CTR 70-CTR 71 was 96.7%, and the specificity was 99.6%, compared to those of the AMPLICOR PCR for the detection of C. trachomatis in vaginal swab samples. TETR-PCR for C. pneumoniae with primer set CPN 90-CPN 91 was 90% sensitive and 93.3% specific compared with a nested PCR with primer set CP1/2-CPC/D for clinical respiratory samples. TETR-PCR for C. psittaci with primer set CPS 100-CPS 101 showed substantial agreement with cell culturing (κ, 0.78) for animal tissue samples. Primer sets were then combined into a single multiplex TETR-PCR test. The respective 315-, 195-, and 111-bp DNA target products were precisely amplified when DNA from each of the respective Chlamydia species or combinations of them was used. Multiplex chlamydia TETR-PCR correctly identified one strain of each of the 15 serovars of C. trachomatis, 22 isolates of C. pneumoniae, and 20 isolates of C. psittaci. The primer sets were specific for each species. No target products were amplified when DNA from C. pecorum or a variety of other microorganisms was tested for specificity. TETR-PCR with primers selected for specific sequences in the 16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA genes is a valuable test that could be used either with individual primers or in a multiplex assay for the identification and differentiation of Chlamydia species from culture isolates or for the detection of chlamydiae in clinical samples. PMID:10699002

  7. Updates on quick identification of acetic acid bacteria with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer and the analysis of cell proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Barja, François

    2015-03-02

    Acetic acid bacteria have attracted much attention over the past few years, due mainly to their metabolic traits that are of interest to the biotechnology industry. In addition, it turns out that their ecological habitats are almost unlimited since they have been found as symbionts in different insects and also as emerging opportunistic human pathogens. Very surprising is the finding that they colonize niches considered anaerobic, disproving the generalized statement that they are strict aerobes. Since they have taken on different biological roles in our environment, more and more people are charged with the task of identifying them. However, this turns out to be not always easy, especially if we are using phenotypic approaches for identification. A substantial step forward in making the identification of acetic acid bacteria easier was made possible using molecular biological methods, which have been extensively tested since 2000. However, some molecular methods require expensive machines and experienced staff, and moreover the level of their discrimination varies. All these factors must be considered when selecting the most appropriate approach for identifying acetic acid bacteria. With this objective in mind, this review article discusses the benefits and drawbacks of molecular biological methods for identification of acetic acid bacteria, with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions and the recently described alternative method for identification of acetic acid bacteria, MALDI-TOF MS.

  8. Ralstonia paucula (Formerly CDC Group IV c-2): Unsuccessful Strain Differentiation with PCR-Based Methods, Study of the 16S-23S Spacer of the rRNA Operon, and Comparison with Other Ralstonia Species (R. eutropha, R. pickettii, R. gilardii, and R. solanacearum)

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Bidet, Philippe; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Arlet, Guillaume; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) can cause serious human infections. Confronted in 1995 with five cases of nosocomial bacteremia, we found that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis could not distinguish between the isolates and that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was poorly discriminatory. In this study, we used PCR-ribotyping and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the spacer 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA); both methods were unable to differentiate R. paucula isolates. Eighteen strains belonging to other Ralstonia species (one R. eutropha strain, six R. pickettii strains, three R. solanacearum strains, and eight R. gilardii strains) were also tested by PCR-ribotyping, which failed to distinguish between the four species. The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of R. paucula contains the tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes, which are identical to genes described for R. pickettii and R. solanacearum. PMID:11136807

  9. Ralstonia paucula (Formerly CDC group IV c-2): unsuccessful strain differentiation with PCR-based methods, study of the 16S-23S spacer of the rRNA operon, and comparison with other Ralstonia species (R. eutropha, R. pickettii, R. gilardii, and R. solanacearum).

    PubMed

    Moissenet, D; Bidet, P; Garbarg-Chenon, A; Arlet, G; Vu-Thien, H

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) can cause serious human infections. Confronted in 1995 with five cases of nosocomial bacteremia, we found that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis could not distinguish between the isolates and that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was poorly discriminatory. In this study, we used PCR-ribotyping and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the spacer 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA); both methods were unable to differentiate R. paucula isolates. Eighteen strains belonging to other Ralstonia species (one R. eutropha strain, six R. pickettii strains, three R. solanacearum strains, and eight R. gilardii strains) were also tested by PCR-ribotyping, which failed to distinguish between the four species. The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of R. paucula contains the tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) genes, which are identical to genes described for R. pickettii and R. solanacearum.

  10. The use of 16S and 16S-23S rDNA to easily detect and differentiate common Gram-negative orchard epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Jeng, R S; Svircev, A M; Myers, A L; Beliaeva, L; Hunter, D M; Hubbes, M

    2001-02-01

    The identification of Gram-negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria commonly isolated from an orchard phylloplane may result in a time consuming and tedious process for the plant pathologist. The paper provides a simple "one-step" protocol that uses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify intergenic spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes and a portion of 16S gene in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. Amplified 16S rDNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) following EcoRI digestion produced band patterns that readily distinguished between the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora (causal agent of fire blight in pear and apple) and the orchard epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans (formerly E. herbicola). The amplified DNA patterns of 16S-23S spacer regions may be used to differentiate E. amylovora at the intraspecies level. Isolates of E. amylovora obtained from raspberries exhibited two major fragments while those obtained from apples showed three distinct amplified DNA bands. In addition, the size of the 16S-23S spacer region differs between Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The RFLP pattern generated by HaeIII digestion may be used to provide a rapid and accurate identification of these two common orchard epiphytes.

  11. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  12. 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions in four Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Zhemin; Wen, Shaoping; Rozalski, Antoni; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-01

    Proteus is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium. In this study, 813 Proteus 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were determined from 46 Proteus strains, including 388 ITS from 22 P. mirabilis strains, 211 ITS from 12 P. vulgaris strains, 169 ITS from 10 P. penneri strains, and 45 ITS from 2 P. myxofaciens strains. The Proteus strains carry mainly two types of ITS, ITS(Glu) (containing tRNA(Glu (UUC)) gene) and ITS(Ile+Ala) (containing tRNA(Ile (GAU)) and tRNA(Ala (UGC)) gene), and are in the forms of 28 variants with 25 genomic origins. The ITS sequences are a mosaic-like structure consisting of three conservative regions and two variable regions. The nucleotide identity of ITS subtypes in strains of the same species ranges from 96.2% to 100%. The divergence of Proteus ITS divergence was most likely due to intraspecies recombinations or horizontal transfers of sequence blocks. The phylogenetic relationship deduced from the second variable region of ITS sequences of the three facultative human pathogenic species P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. penneri is similar with that based on 16S rDNA sequences, but has higher resolution to differentiate closely related P. vulgaris and P. penneri. This study is the first comprehensive study of ITS in four Proteus species and laid solid foundation for the development of high-throughput technology for quick and accurate identification of the important foodborne and nosocomial pathogens.

  13. Precise molecular weight determination of PCR products of the rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus, closely related species of bacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Y A; Nagpal, M; Krahmer, M T; Fox, K F; Fox, A

    2000-05-01

    Assessment of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequence variability is an important supplement to 16S rRNA sequencing for differentiating closely related bacterial species. Species differentiation can also be achieved by determination of approximate size of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) products of ISRs, based on their relative electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Closely-related species can have ISR PCR products that are similar in size. More precise molecular weight (M.W.) determination of these products might allow improved discrimination of such species. Electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-MS) has the potential to provide such precision. For ESI-Q-MS analysis, size limitation of PCR products is currently limited to around 130 base pairs (bp). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus atrophaeus are two closely related species with few distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. B. subtilis has recently been sub-divided into two subgroups, W23 (type strain, W23) and 168 (type strain, 168). PCR products amplified from the ISR including the 5' terminal end of the 23S rRNA and a conserved portion of the ISR were analyzed by ESI-Q-MS. A 119 or 120 bp PCR product was produced for B. atrophaeus strains. However, strains of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 each produced 114 bp products. In summary, a mass spectrometry method was developed for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus. Also, the genetic similarity of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 was confirmed. Accurate determination of the molecular weight of PCR products from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry has great potential as a general technique for characterizing closely related bacterial species.

  14. Long-Term Stability of Mercury-Reducing Microbial Biofilm Communities Analyzed by 16S-23S rDNA Interspacer Region Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Canstein, H.F.; Li, Y.; Felske, A.; Wagner-Döbler, I.

    2001-12-01

    The composition of mercury-reducing communities in two bioreactors retaining Hg(II) from chloralkali electrolysis wastewater for 485 days was analyzed based on effluent community DNA. Packed bed bioreactors with lava chips as carrier of the biofilm were inoculated with nine Hg(II)-resistant isolates that belonged to the alpha and gamma subdivisions of the proteobacteria. A rapid DNA-fingerprinting method was applied, using the intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the 16S-23S rDNA for analysis of the community composition. This allowed discrimination of the inoculum strains down to subspecies level. A merA specific PCR permitted the discrimination of the community's merA genes. During the 485 days of operation, the bioreactors were exposed to various physical stresses (mixing, gas bubbles, temperature increase up to 41 degrees C, increased flow velocity) and repeated high mercury inflow concentrations, resulting in reduced bioreactor performance and decreased culturable cell numbers in the reactor effluent. Nevertheless, the composition of the microbial community remained rather stable throughout the investigated time period. Of the inoculum strains, two could be detected throughout, whereas three were sometimes present with varying periods of nondetection. Two inoculum strains were only detected within the first month. Two strains of gamma-proteobacteria that were able to reduce ionic mercury invaded the bioreactor community. They did not outcompete established strains and had no negative effect on the Hg(II)-retention activity of the bioreactors. The community comprised diverse merA genes. The abundance of merA genes matched the abundance of their respective strains as confirmed by ISR community analysis. The continuously high selection pressure for mercury resistance maintained a stable and highly active mercury-reducing microbial community within the bioreactors.

  15. Sequence organization of the Acanthamoeba rRNA intergenic spacer: identification of transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The primary sequence of the entire 2330 bp intergenic spacer of the A.castellanii ribosomal RNA gene was determined. Repeated sequence elements averaging 140 bp were identified and found to bind a protein required for optimum initiation at the core promoter. These repeated elements were shown to stimulate rRNA transcription by RNA polymerase I in vitro. The repeats inhibited transcription when placed in trans, and stimulated transcription when in cis, in either orientation, but only when upstream of the core promoter. Thus, these repeated elements have characteristics similar to polymerase I enhancers found in higher eukaryotes. The number of rRNA repeats in Acanthamoeba cells was determined to be 24 per haploid genome, the lowest number so far identified in any eukaryote. However, because Acanthamoeba is polyploid, each cell contains approximately 600 rRNA genes. Images PMID:7984432

  16. The 5S rRNA and the rRNA intergenic spacer of the two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Fan, M; Chen, L C; Ragan, M A; Gutell, R R; Warner, J R; Currie, B P; Casadevall, A

    1995-01-01

    The intergenic spacers (IGS) separating the 23S-like and 16S-like rDNAs of the two varieties of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The C. neoformans var. neoformans IGS was 2421 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1228-1345 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. The C. neoformans var. gattii IGS was 2480 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1268-1385 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. For both varieties the 5S rDNA genes were in the same orientation as the 16S-5.8-23S genes and encode a 118 nt molecule of identical sequence. Phylogenetic comparison of C. neoformans 5S rDNA with that of other fungi placed this fungus in close relationship with other basidiomycetes including Tremella mesenterica, Bullera alba, and Cryptococcus laurentii. A secondary structure model for the deduced 5S rRNA was constructed by comparative sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified IGS of 12 C. neoformans var. neoformans strains revealed extensive size variation ranging from 100 to 300 nt. Size variation between strains in the length of the IGS may be useful for distinguishing strains. Structurally, the IGS were characterized by the presence of occasional short direct GC-rich 19-nt repeats. Overall IGS sequence identity between the C. neoformans varieties was only 78.5%, in sharp contrast to the identical or nearly identical sequences for the rDNA genes, and suggests rapid evolution for IGS sequences.

  17. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  18. Development of a PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer for identification of strictly anaerobic bacterium Zymophilus.

    PubMed

    Felsberg, Jurgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Kubizniaková, Petra; Matoulková, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    PCR-primers were designed for identification of strictly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Zymophilus based on genus-specific sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. The specificity of the primers was tested against 37 brewery-related non-target microorganisms that could potentially occur in the same brewery specimens. None DNA was amplified from any of the non-Zymophilus strains tested including genera from the same family (Pectinatus, Megasphaera, Selenomonas), showing thus 100% specificity. PCR assay developed in this study allows an extension of the spectra of detected beer spoilage microorganisms in brewery laboratories.

  19. Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region for rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Yamamoto, K; Amimoto, K; Kojima, A; Ogikubo, Y; Norimatsu, M; Ogata, H; Tamura, Y

    2001-12-01

    Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and C septicum. To assess its specificity, PCR was performed with total DNA from 42 strains of clostridia and three strains of other genera. PCR products specific to C chauvoei or to C septicum were generated from homologous cultures only. Clostridium chauvoer-specific or C septicum-specific amplicons were also generated from tissues of cows experimentally infected with C chauvoei or C septicum and in DNA samples from cows clinically diagnosed as having blackleg or malignant oedema. These results suggest that a species-specific PCR may be useful for the rapid and direct detection of C chauvoei and C septicum in clinical specimens.

  20. Rapid and direct detection of clostridium chauvoei by PCR of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region and partial 23S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Yamamoto, K; Kojima, A; Tetsuka, Y; Norimatsu, M; Tamura, Y

    2000-12-01

    Clostridium chauvoei causes blackleg, which is difficult to distinguish from the causative clostridia of malignant edema. Therefore, a single-step PCR system was developed for specific detection of C. chauvoei DNA using primers derived from the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region and partial 23S rDNA sequences. The specificity of the single-step PCR system was demonstrated by testing 37 strains of clostridia and 3 strains of other genera. A 509 bp PCR product, which is a C. choauvoei-specific PCR product, could be amplified from all of the C. chauvoei strains tested, but not from the other strains. Moreover, this single-step PCR system specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA in samples of muscle from mice 24 hr after inoculation with 100 spores of C. chauvoei, and in clinical materials from a cow affected with blackleg. These results suggest that our single-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection of C. chauvoei in culture and in clinical materials from animals affected with blackleg.

  1. Homoduplex and Heteroduplex Polymorphisms of the Amplified Ribosomal 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacers Describe Genetic Relationships in the “Bacillus cereus Group”

    PubMed Central

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Borin, Sara

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus weihenstephanensis are closely related in phenotype and genotype, and their genetic relationship is still open to debate. The present work uses amplified 16S-23S internal transcribed spacers (ITS) to discriminate between the strains and species and to describe the genetic relationships within the “B. cereus group,” advantage being taken of homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. One hundred forty-one strains belonging to the six species were investigated, and 73 ITS-HHP pattern types were distinguished by MDE, a polyacrylamide matrix specifically designed to resolve heteroduplex and single-strand conformation polymorphisms. The discriminating bands were confirmed as ITS by Southern hybridization, and the homoduplex or heteroduplex nature was identified by single-stranded DNA mung bean nuclease digestion. Several of the ITS-HHP types corresponded to specific phenotypes such as B. anthracis or serotypes of B. thuringiensis. Unweighted pair group method arithmetic average cluster analysis revealed two main groups. One included B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. The second included B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis appeared as a lineage of B. cereus. PMID:11097928

  2. Molecular analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) and truncated tRNA(Ala) gene segments in Campylobacter lari.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Tazumi, A; Nakanishi, S; Nakajima, T; Matsubara, K; Ueno, H; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M

    2012-06-01

    Following PCR amplification and sequencing, nucleotide sequence alignment analyses demonstrated the presence of two kinds of 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer regions (ISRs), namely, long length ISRs of 837-844 base pair (bp) [n = six for urease-negative (UN) Campylobacter lari isolates, UN C. lari JCM2530(T), RM2100, 176, 293, 299 and 448] and short length ISRs of 679-725 bp [n = six for UN C. lari: n = 14 for urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) isolates]. The analyses also indicated that the short length ISRs mainly lacked the 156 bp sequence from the nucleotide positions 122-277 bp in long length ISRs for UN C. lari JCM2530(T). The 156 bp sequences shared 94.9-96.8 % sequence similarity among six isolates. Surprisingly, atypical tRNA(Ala) gene segment (5' end 35 bp), which was extremely truncated, occurred within the 156 bp sequences in the long length ISRs, as an unexpected tRNA(Ala) pseudogene. An order of the intercistronic tRNA genes within the short nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ala)-tRNA(Ile)-23S rDNA-3' occurred in all the C. lari isolates examined.

  3. A Bartonella vinsonii berkhoffii typing scheme based upon 16S-23S ITS and Pap31 sequences from dog, coyote, gray fox, and human isolates.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Chomel, Bruno; Hegarty, Barbara C; Henn, Jennifer; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2006-04-01

    Since the isolation of Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii from a dog with endocarditis in 1993, this organism has emerged as an important pathogen in dogs and as an emerging pathogen in people. Current evidence indicates that coyotes, dogs and gray foxes potentially serve as reservoir hosts. Based upon sequence differences within the 16S-23S ITS region and Pap31 gene, we propose a classification scheme that divides B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii isolates into four distinct types. Two conserved sequences, of 37 and 18 bp, respectively, are differentially present within the ITS region of each of the four B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii types. To date, B. vinsonii berkhoffii types I, II, and III have been identified in the US, type III in Europe and type IV in Canada. Based upon the proposed genotyping scheme, the geographic distribution of B. vinsonii berkhoffii types needs to be more thoroughly delineated in future molecular epidemiological studies involving Bartonella infection in coyotes, dogs, gray foxes, human beings and potentially other animals or in arthropod vectors. Strain typing may help to better define the reservoir potential, carriership patterns, modes of transmission, and geographic distribution for each B. vinsonii berkhoffii type.

  4. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J.; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I–V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC. PMID:27749897

  5. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I-V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC.

  6. Characterization of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 rRNA gene clusters and cloning of rrnA.

    PubMed Central

    La Farina, M; Stira, S; Mancuso, R; Grisanti, C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 harbors seven rRNA gene clusters which can be distinguished by BglII digestion. The three rRNA genes present in each set are closely linked with the general structure 16S-23S-5S. We cloned rrnA and sequenced the 16S-23S spacer region and the region downstream of the 5S rRNA gene. No tRNA gene was found in these regions. PMID:8631730

  7. Characterization of Bacterial and Fungal Soil Communities by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints: Biological and Methodological Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ranjard, L.; Poly, F.; Lata, J.-C.; Mougel, C.; Thioulouse, J.; Nazaret, S.

    2001-01-01

    Automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to characterise bacterial (B-ARISA) and fungal (F-ARISA) communities from different soil types. The 16S-23S intergenic spacer region from the bacterial rRNA operon was amplified from total soil community DNA for B-ARISA. Similarly, the two internal transcribed spacers and the 5.8S rRNA gene (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) from the fungal rRNA operon were amplified from total soil community DNA for F-ARISA. Universal fluorescence-labeled primers were used for the PCRs, and fragments of between 200 and 1,200 bp were resolved on denaturing polyacrylamide gels by use of an automated sequencer with laser detection. Methodological (DNA extraction and PCR amplification) and biological (inter- and intrasite) variations were evaluated by comparing the number and intensity of peaks (bands) between electrophoregrams (profiles) and by multivariate analysis. Our results showed that ARISA is a high-resolution, highly reproducible technique and is a robust method for discriminating between microbial communities. To evaluate the potential biases in community description provided by ARISA, we also examined databases on length distribution of ribosomal intergenic spacers among bacteria (L. Ranjard, E. Brothier, and S. Nazaret, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:5334–5339, 2000) and fungi. PMID:11571146

  8. Activated levels of rRNA synthesis in fission yeast are driven by an intergenic rDNA region positioned over 2500 nucleotides upstream of the initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Zhao, A; Chen, L; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I-catalyzed synthesis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe approximately 37S pre-rRNAs was shown to be sensitive to regulatory sequences located several kilobases upstream of the initiation site for the rRNA gene. An in vitro transcription system for RNA polymerase I-catalyzed RNA synthesis was established that supports correct and activated transcription from templates bearing a full S. pombe rRNA gene promoter. A 780 bp region starting at -2560 significantly stimulates transcription of ac is-located rDNA promoter and competes with an rDNA promoter in trans, thus displaying some of the activities of rDNA transcriptional enhancers in vitro. Deletion of a 30 bp enhancer-homologous domain in this 780 bp far upstream region blocked its cis-stimulatory effect. The sequence of the S. pombe 3.5 kb intergenic spacer was determined and its organization differs from that of vertebrate, Drosophila, Acanthamoeba and plant intergenic rDNA spacers: it does not contain multiple, imperfect copies of the rRNA gene promoter nor repetitive elements of 140 bp, as are found in vertebrate rDNA enhancers. PMID:9016610

  9. Insertions or Deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS) Compromise the Typing and Identification of Strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) Complex and Closely Related Members

    PubMed Central

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2–13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species. PMID:25141005

  10. Unusual features of the sequences of copies of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions of Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi arise from horizontal gene transfer events.

    PubMed

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The highly variable nature of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) has been claimed to represent an ideal target for designing species-specific probes/primers capable of differentiating between closely related Acinetobacter species. However, several Acinetobacter species contain multiple ITS copies of variable lengths, and these include Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi. This study shows these length variations result from inter-genomic insertion/deletion events (indels) involving horizontal transfer of ITS fragments of other Acinetobacter species and possibly unrelated bacteria, as shown previously by us. In some instances, indel incorporation results in the loss of probe target sites in the recipient cell ITS. In other cases, some indel sequences contain target sites for probes designed from a single ITS sequence to target other Acinetobacter species. Hence, these can generate false positives. The largest of the indels that remove probe sites is 683 bp (labelled bay/i1-0), and it derives from the horizontal transfer of a complete ITS between A. bereziniae BCRC15423(T) and A. baylyi strain ADP1. As a consequence, ITS sequencing or fingerprinting cannot be used to distinguish between the 683 bp ITS in these two strains.

  11. Nucleotide sequencing and analysis of 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) of Taylorella equigenitalis, as an important pathogen for contagious equine metritis (CEM).

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Nagano, Y; Tazumi, A; Murayama, O; Millar, B C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M

    2006-05-01

    The primer set for 16S rDNA amplified an amplicon of about 1500 bp in length for three strains of Taylorella equigenitalis (NCTC11184(T), Kentucky188 and EQ59). Sequence differences of the 16S rDNA among the six sequences, including three reference sequences, occurred at only a few nucleotide positions and thus, an extremely high sequence similarity of the 16S rDNA was first demonstrated among the six sequences. In addition, the primer set for 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) amplified two amplicons about 1300 bp and 1200 bp in length for the three strains. The ISRs were estimated to be about 920 bp in length for large ISR-A and about 830 bp for small ISR-B. Sequence alignment of the ISR-A and ISR-B demonstrated about 10 base differences between NCTC11184(T) and EQ59 and between Kentucky188 and EQ59. However, only minor sequence differences were demonstrated between the ISR-A and ISR-B from NCTC11184(T) and Kentucky188, respectively. A typical order of the intercistronic tRNAs with the 29 nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ile)-tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-3' was demonstrated in the all ISRs. The ISRs may be useful for the discrimination amongst isolates of T. equigenitalis if sequencing is employed.

  12. Identification of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using a simple set of biochemical tests correlating with 16S-23S interspace region molecular weight patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Martison; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus spp. not only as human pathogens, but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants, requires the development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification in medically important samples. The aim of this study was to compare three phenotypic methods for the identification of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using the PCR of the 16S-23S interspace region generating molecular weight patterns (ITR-PCR) as reference. All 57 S. saprophyticus studied were correctly identified using only the novobiocin disk. A rate of agreement of 98.0% was obtained for the simplified battery of biochemical tests in relation to ITR-PCR, whereas the Vitek I system and novobiocin disk showed 81.2% and 89.1% agreement, respectively. No other novobiocin-resistant non-S. saprophyticus strain was identified. Thus, the novobiocin disk is a feasible alternative for the identification of S. saprophyticus in urine samples in laboratories with limited resources. ITR-PCR and the simplified battery of biochemical tests were more reliable than the commercial systems currently available. This study confirms that automated systems are still unable to correctly differentiate CoNS species and that simple, reliable and inexpensive methods can be used for routine identification.

  13. An assessment of the phylogenetic relationship among sugarcane and related taxa based on the nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y B; Burner, D M; Legendre, B L

    2000-01-01

    5S rRNA intergenic spacers were amplified from two elite sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids) cultivars and their related taxa by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 5S rDNA consensus primers. Resulting PCR products were uniform in length from each accession but exhibited some degree of length variation among the sugarcane accessions and related taxa. These PCR products did not always cross hybridize in Southern blot hybridization experiments. These PCR products were cloned into a commercial plasmid vector PCR 2.1 and sequenced. Direct sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed spacer length of 231-237 bp for S. officinarum, 233-237 for sugarcane cultivars, 228-238 bp for S. spontaneum, 239-252 bp for S. giganteum, 385-410 bp for Erianthus spp., 226-230 bp for Miscanthus sinensis Zebra, 206-207 bp for M. sinensis IMP 3057, 207-209 bp for Sorghum bicolor, and 247-249 bp for Zea mays. Nucleotide sequence polymorphism were found at both the segment and single nucleotide level. A consensus sequence for each taxon was obtained by Align X. Multiple sequences were aligned and phylogenetic trees constructed using Align X. CLUSTAL and DNAMAN programs. In general, accessions of the following taxa tended to group together to form distinct clusters: S. giganteum, Erianthus spp., M. sinensis, S. bicolor, and Z. mays. However, the two S. officinarum clones and two sugarcane cultivars did not form distinct clusters but interrelated within the S. spontaneum cluster. The disclosure of these 5S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences will facilitate marker-assisted breeding in sugarcane.

  14. Organization, Structure, and Variability of the rRNA Operon of the Whipple's Disease Bacterium (Tropheryma whippelii)

    PubMed Central

    Maiwald, Matthias; von Herbay, Axel; Lepp, Paul W.; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic disorder associated with a cultivation-resistant, poorly characterized actinomycete, Tropheryma whippelii. We determined a nearly complete rRNA operon sequence of T. whippelii from specimens from 3 patients with Whipple's disease, as well as partial operon sequences from 43 patients. Variability was observed in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer sequences, leading to the description of five distinct sequence types. One specimen contained two spacer sequence types, raising the possibility of a double infection. Secondary structure models for the primary rRNA transcript and mature rRNAs revealed rare or unique features. PMID:10809715

  15. Differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida famata by rRNA gene intergenic spacer fingerprinting and reassessment of phylogenetic relationships among D. hansenii, C. famata, D. fabryi, C. flareri (=D. subglobosus) and D. prosopidis: description of D. vietnamensis sp. nov. closely related to D. nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Gaillardin, Claude; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2009-06-01

    The intergenic spacer rDNA amplification and AluI fingerprinting (IGSAF) method detected four distinct groups among 170 Debaryomyces hansenii strains: D. hansenii var. hansenii; Candida famata var. famata; D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri. IGS sequence comparison of representative strains showed that D. hansenii var. hansenii and C. famata var. famata belonged to one species, whereas D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri belonged to two different ones. This confirmed the following three species recently reinstated: D. hansenii (=C. famata), Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus (=Candida flareri). Accordingly, growth at 37 degrees C may no longer be used to differentiate D. hansenii from D. fabryi. Riboflavin production is more specific for D. fabryi and D. subglobosus strains. IGSAF identified all the other 17 species of the genus Debaryomyces, six of them sharing with D. hansenii an rRNA gene unit harbouring two 5S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree established with IGS sequences was congruent with the one based on ACT1, GPD1 and COX2 sequences depicting a distinct D. hansenii clade close to the D. subglobosus, Debaryomyces prosopidis and D. fabryi clade. Description of Debaryomyces vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10535(T), MUCL 51648(T)), closely related to Debaryomyces nepalensis is given.

  16. Molecular method for Bartonella species identification in clinical and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    García-Esteban, Coral; Gil, Horacio; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Gerrikagoitia, Xeider; Barandika, Jesse; Escudero, Raquel; Jado, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Barral, Marta; García-Pérez, Ana L; Bhide, Mangesh; Anda, Pedro

    2008-02-01

    A new, efficient molecular method for detection of Bartonella, based on the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA amplification by multiplex PCR combined with reverse line blotting, was designed. This assay could simultaneously detect 20 different known species and other Bartonella species not described previously.

  17. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence region (ISR) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA gene sequences. However, the intergenic sequence region (ISR) that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarit...

  18. Role of Escherichia coli YbeY, a highly conserved protein, in rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Köhrer, Caroline; Jacob, Asha I.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Aleman, Lourdes M.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    The UPF0054 protein family is highly conserved with homologs present in nearly every sequenced bacterium. In some bacteria, the respective gene is essential, while in others its loss results in a highly pleiotropic phenotype. Despite detailed structural studies, a cellular role for this protein family has remained unknown. We report here that deletion of the Escherichia coli homolog, YbeY, causes striking defects that affect ribosome activity, translational fidelity and ribosome assembly. Mapping of 16S, 23S and 5S rRNA termini reveals that YbeY influences the maturation of all three rRNAs, with a particularly strong effect on maturation at both the 5′- and 3′-ends of 16S rRNA as well as maturation of the 5′-termini of 23S and 5S rRNAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate strong genetic interactions between ybeY and rnc (encoding RNase III), ybeY and rnr (encoding RNase R), and ybeY and pnp (encoding PNPase), further suggesting a role for YbeY in rRNA maturation. Mutation of highly conserved amino acids in YbeY, allowed the identification of two residues (H114, R59) that were found to have a significant effect in vivo. We discuss the implications of these findings for rRNA maturation and ribosome assembly in bacteria. PMID:20807199

  19. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-05-26

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies.

  20. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies. PMID:26016433

  1. Mycoplasmas hyorhinis in different regions of cuba. diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Evelyn; Poveda, Carlos; Gupta, Rakesh; Suarez, Alejandro; Hernández, Yenney; Ramírez, Ana; Poveda, José B.

    2011-01-01

    M. hyorhinis is considered one of the etiological agents of arthritis in sucking pigs, but recently as seen, some strains can produce pneumonia that could not be distinguished from the mycoplasmosis caused by M. hyopneumoniae. The study was conducted to research the presence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis ) in different regions of the country from exudates of pig lungs with typical EP lesions. Exudates from 280 pig lungs with typical EP lesions were studied using molecular techniques such as PCR, real time PCR and amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA. It was detected that the 66% of the samples studied resulted positive to M. hyorhinis, and the presence of this species was detected in all the provinces. Amplification and studies on the intergenic region 16S-23S of M. hyorhinis rRNA demonstrated the existing variability among strains of a same species. This study is the first report on M. hyorhinis detection in Cuba. PMID:24031686

  2. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  3. Molecular analysis of a NOR site polymorphism in brown trout (Salmo trutta): organization of rDNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Sánchez, L; Martínez, P; Lucchini, S D; Nardi, I

    1997-12-01

    Using restriction endonuclease mapping, we have analyzed the organization of rDNA (DNA coding for ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) units in the salmonid fish Salmo trutta, as an initial step toward understand the molecular basis of a nucleolar organizer region (NOR) site polymorphism detected in this species. The size of the rDNA units ranged between 15 and 23 kb, with remarkable variation both within individuals and between populations. Three regions of internal tandem repetitiveness responsible for this length polymorphism were located to the intergenic spacers. NOR site polymorphic individuals showed a higher number of length classes, in some cases forming a complete 1 kb fragment ladder. The amount of rRNA genes was as much as 8-fold higher in polymorphic individuals compared with standard individuals. All individuals from the most polymorphic population showed a 14-kb insertion of unknown nature in a small proportion (below 25%) of the 28S rRNA genes.

  4. Use of PCR primers and probes based on the 23S rRNA and internal transcription spacer (ITS) gene sequence for the detection and enumerization of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum in feed supplements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Yu, Bi; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-06-01

    Novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from the 16S-23S internal transcription spacer (ITS) rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, respectively, were used for the specific detection of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Molecular weights of the PCR products were 221 and 599 bp, respectively. Strains of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum obtained from the culture center, dairy products, infant stool and other samples, could be identified with these PCR primers. DNAs from other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species including strains of Lactobacillus pentosus which was closely related to L. plantarum, and bacteria species other than LAB, would not generate the false positive results. When this PCR primer set was used for the detection of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum in feed supplement or feed starter samples, reliable results were obtained. Furthermore, when these L. acidophilus or L. plantarum specific primers were used as DNA probes for the colony hybridization of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum, the viable cells of these LAB species in culture and feed supplements or starter products could be identified and enumerized. The method described here thus offers a rapid and economic way to inspect and assure the quality of the feed supplements or fermentation starters.

  5. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA.

  6. Arabidopsis Chloroplast Mini-Ribonuclease III Participates in rRNA Maturation and Intron Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Hotto, Amber M.; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B.

    2015-01-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3′ end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3′ extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation. PMID:25724636

  7. Arabidopsis chloroplast mini-ribonuclease III participates in rRNA maturation and intron recycling.

    PubMed

    Hotto, Amber M; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B

    2015-03-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3' extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation.

  8. Enterococcus lactis sp. nov., from Italian raw milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Stefano; Cremonesi, Paola; Povolo, Milena; Brasca, Milena

    2012-08-01

    Ten atypical Enterococcus strains were isolated from Italian raw milk cheeses. The 16S rRNA gene, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase alpha subunit (pheS), RNA polymerase alpha subunit (rpoA) and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR and the phenotypic properties revealed that the isolates represent a novel enterococcal species. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely related to Enterococcus hirae ATCC 8043(T), Enterococcus durans CECT 411(T) and Enterococcus faecium ATCC 19434(T), with 98.8, 98.9 and 99.4% sequence similarity, respectively. On the basis of sequence analysis of the housekeeping gene pheS, the reference strain, BT159(T), occupied a position separate from E. faecium LMG 16198. The group of isolates could be easily differentiated from recognized species of the genus Enterococcus by 16S-23S rRNA ITS analysis, RAPD-PCR and phenotypic characteristics. The name Enterococcus lactis sp. nov. is proposed, with BT159(T) ( = DSM 23655(T) = LMG 25958(T)) as the type strain.

  9. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  10. Intergenic transcription through a polycomb group response element counteracts silencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2005-03-15

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) mediate the mitotic inheritance of gene expression programs and thus maintain determined cell fates. By default, PREs silence associated genes via the targeting of Polycomb group (PcG) complexes. Upon an activating signal, however, PREs recruit counteracting trithorax group (trxG) proteins, which in turn maintain target genes in a transcriptionally active state. Using a transgenic reporter system, we show that the switch from the silenced to the activated state of a PRE requires noncoding transcription. Continuous transcription through the PRE induced by an actin promoter prevents the establishment of PcG-mediated silencing. The maintenance of epigenetic activation requires transcription through the PRE to proceed at least until embryogenesis is completed. At the homeotic bithorax complex of Drosophila, intergenic PRE transcripts can be detected not only during embryogenesis, but also at late larval stages, suggesting that transcription through endogenous PREs is required continuously as an anti-silencing mechanism to prevent the access of repressive PcG complexes to the chromatin. Furthermore, all other PREs outside the homeotic complex we tested were found to be transcribed in the same tissue as the mRNA of the corresponding target gene, suggesting that anti-silencing by transcription is a fundamental aspect of the cellular memory system.

  11. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Johanna F.B.; Ensink, Wim A.; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P.; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J.; Dekker, Rob J.

    2017-01-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. PMID:28003516

  12. Population dynamics of Vibrio spp. associated with marine sponge microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maria; Fischer, Markus; Ottesen, Andrea; McCarthy, Peter J; Lopez, Jose V; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2010-12-01

    Vibrio is a diverse genus of marine-associated bacteria with at least 74 species and more expected as additional marine ecospheres are interrogated. This report describes a phylogenetic reconstruction of Vibrio isolates derived from one such unique ecosystem, marine sponges (Phylum Porifera) collected from depths of 150 to 1242 feet. 16S rRNA gene sequencing along with molecular typing of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions clustered many sponge-associated Vibrio (spp) with current known species. That is, several benthic Vibrio species commensal with Porifera sponges seemed genetically linked to vibrios associated with coastal or shallow-water communities, signalling a panmictic population structure among seemingly ecologically disparate strains. Conversely, phylogenetic analysis provided evidence for at least two novel Vibrio speciation events within this specific sponge microcosm. Collectively, these findings earmark this still relatively unknown environment as a bastion of taxonomic and phylogenetic variability for the genus and probably other bacterial taxa.

  13. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  14. Authentication of Saussurea lappa, an endangered medicinal material, by ITS DNA and 5S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Chan, Ho-Yin Edwin; Wong, Ka-Lok; Wang, Jun; Yu, Man-Tang; But, Paul Pui-Hay; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2008-06-01

    Wild SAUSSUREA LAPPA in the family Asteraceae is a highly endangered plant. On the other hand, the dried root of cultivated S. LAPPA (Radix Aucklandia, Muxiang) is a popular medicinal material for treating various gastrointestinal diseases. In the market, several medicinal plants including VLADIMIRIA BERARDIOIDEA, V. SOULIEI, V. SOULIEI var. MIRABILIS, INULA HELENIUM and I. RACEMOSA in the family Asteraceae and ARISTOLOCHIA DEBILIS in the family Aristolochiaceae have the trade name of Muxiang. To manage the concerned medicinal material, we investigated if the ITS and 5S rRNA intergenic spacers are effective for discriminating S. LAPPA from its substitutes and adulterants. Sequencing results showed that the similarities of ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5S rRNA intergenic spacers among S. LAPPA and related species were 56.3 - 97.8 %, 58.5 - 97.0 %, and 26.4 - 77.9 %, respectively. The intraspecific variation was much lower. There are also several unique changes in the S. LAPPA sequences that may be used as differentiation markers.

  15. Use of the CP and CPm Intergene Sequences to Discriminate CTV Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop a rapid assay to distinguish potentially mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus. Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains (VT, ...

  16. Detection and molecular characterization of an aster yellows phytoplasma in poker statice and Queen Anne's lace in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kan-Fa; Hwang, Sheau-Fang; Khadhair, Abdul-Hameed; Kawchuk, Lawrence; Howard, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Queen Anne's lace and poker statice plants were found with a yellows-type disease with typical phytoplasma symptoms in an experimental farm near Brooks, Alberta in 1996. Phytoplasma bodies were detected by transmission electron microscopy in phloem cells of symptomatic plants, but not in healthy plants. The presence of a phytoplasma was confirmed by analysis with the polymerase chain reaction. Using a pair of universal primer sequences derived from phytoplasma 16S rRNA, an amplified product of the expected size (1.2 kb) was observed in samples from infected plants, but not in asymptomatic plants. Sequence analysis of the PCR products from the 16S/23S rDNA intergenic spacer region indicated that the two phytoplasma isolates in Queen Anne's lace and poker statice are genetically closely related to the western aster yellows phytoplasma.

  17. Identification and characterization of novel Mycoplasma spp. belonging to the hominis group from griffon vultures.

    PubMed

    Lecis, R; Chessa, B; Cacciotto, C; Addis, M F; Coradduzza, E; Berlinguer, F; Muzzeddu, M; Lierz, M; Carcangiu, L; Pittau, M; Alberti, A

    2010-08-01

    Mycoplasmas are commensals and pathogens of various avian species, and are also regularly found in birds of prey, although their significance to birds' health remains unclear. Here we describe two novel Mycoplasma isolated from the upper respiratory tract of four Eurasian griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) housed in a wildlife recovery centre in Sardinia (Italy). By sequencing the 16S rRNA gene and the entire 16S/23S intergenic spacer region, the new strains were classified within the Mycoplasma taxonomy at the group and cluster levels, showing that the two isolates fall into the Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hominis clusters of the hominis group, respectively. We combined molecular tools and immunoblotting methods in order to further characterize these isolates, and antigenic analyses overall confirmed the molecular findings. Different levels of pathogenicity and prevalence of these strains might have different implications for the conservation and reintroduction of vultures.

  18. Molecular detection of Bartonella alsatica in European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Andalusia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Francisco J

    2010-10-01

    A sample of 279 European wild rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus (141 males, 138 females), captured alive in Andalusia (Spain) and belonging to the two haplotype classes previously described for this species (230 and 49 corresponding with haplotypes A and B, respectively), were tested for the presence of Bartonella alsatica DNA. Two species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction assays targeting for 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and RNA polymerase β subunit genes have been developed. Forty-eight (17.20%) rabbits were infected with B. alsatica. Two-way contingency table analyses and the calculation of Cramer's V statistic showed no differences in infection rate, considering haplotype lineage or sex. The risk of infection of human population, especially for hunters in close contact with this demonstrated human pathogen, should be considered.

  19. Genetic diversity of nodulating and non-nodulating rhizobia associated with wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) in different ecoregions of China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li Juan; Wang, Hai Qing; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2011-06-01

    A total of 99 bacterial isolates that originated from root nodules of Glycine soja were characterized with restriction analyses of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (ITS), and sequence analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB, atpD, recA and nodC genes. When tested for nodulation of G. soja, 72 of the isolates were effective symbionts, and these belonged to five species: Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and Sinorhizobium fredii. All of these, except some B. yuanmingense strains, also formed effective nodules on the domesticated soybean Glycine max. The remaining 27 isolates did not nodulate either host, but were identified as Rhizobium. Phylogeny nodC in the G. soja symbionts suggested that this symbiosis gene was mainly maintained by vertical gene transfer. Different nodC sublineages and rrs-ITS clusters reflected the geographic origins of isolates in this study.

  20. Genetic diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with Caragana species in three ecological regions of China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang Li; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, En Tao; Guan, Su Hua; Yan, Xue Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2009-08-01

    Twenty-two genospecies belonging mainly to Mesorhizobium, and occasionally to Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium, were defined among the 174 rhizobia strains isolated from Caragana species. Highly similar nodC genes were found in the sole Bradyrhizobium strain and among all the detected Mesorhizobium strains. A clear correlation between rhizobial genospecies and the eco-regions where they were isolated was found using homogeneity analysis. All these results demonstrated that Caragana species had stringently selected the rhizobia symbiotic genotype, but not the genomic background; lateral transfer of symbiotic genes from Mesorhizobium to Bradyrhizobium and among the Mesorhizobium species has happened in the Caragana rhizobia; and biogeography of Caragana rhizobia exists. Furthermore, a combined cluster analysis, based upon the patterns obtained from amplified 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S intergenic spacer restriction analyses, BOX PCR and SDS-PAGE of proteins, was reported to be an efficient method to define the genospecies.

  1. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Yan, Chao-Chao; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-09-16

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3'UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5'UTRs > CDSs > 3'UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions.

  2. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-01-01

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3′UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5′UTRs > CDSs > 3′UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions. PMID:27644032

  3. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes.

  4. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment. PMID:28262684

  5. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    SciTech Connect

    Coquelet, H.; Tebabi, P.; Pays, A.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E. )

    1989-09-01

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model.

  6. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  7. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-06

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  8. Intergenic and Repeat Transcription in Human, Chimpanzee and Macaque Brains Measured by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Li, Mingfeng; Fu, Xing; Yan, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Menzel, Corinna; Li, Na; Somel, Mehmet; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20–28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20–23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40–48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20%) represents 3′UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits. PMID:20617162

  9. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  10. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Xu, Augix Guohua; He, Liu; Li, Zhongshan; Xu, Ying; Li, Mingfeng; Fu, Xing; Yan, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Menzel, Corinna; Li, Na; Somel, Mehmet; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2010-07-01

    Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20%) represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  11. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  12. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus suis strains by 16S–23S intergenic spacer polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    PubMed Central

    Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Kobisch, Marylène

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We developed a new molecular method of typing Streptococcus suis based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a large fragment of rRNA genes, including a part of the 16S and 23S genes and the 16S–23S intergenic spacer region (ISR), followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with RsaI or MboII endonuclease. The 16S–23S ISRs of 5 S. suis isolates were sequenced and compared. Size and sequence polymorphisms were observed between the S735 reference strain and the 4 wild-type strains. The genetic relationships between 138 independent S. suis strains belonging to various serotypes, isolated from swine or human cases, were determined. The discriminatory power of the method was > 0.95, the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (0.954 with RsaI and 0.984 with RsaI plus MboII). The in vitro reproducibility was 100%. The strains isolated from humans were less genetically diverse than the strains isolated from pigs. For the first time, 2 molecular patterns (R6, M9) were significantly associated with S. suis serotype 2 strains. This genetic tool could be valuable in distinguishing individual isolates of S. suis during epidemiologic investigations. PMID:16639941

  13. Patterns of variation in the intergenic spacers of ribosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster support a model for genetic exchanges during X-Y pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, C; González, A I; Dover, G A

    2000-01-01

    Detailed analysis of variation in intergenic spacer (IGS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA drawn from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster has revealed contrasting patterns of homogenization although both spacers are located in the same rDNA unit. On the basis of the role of IGS regions in X-Y chromosome pairing, we proposed a mechanism of single-strand exchanges at the IGS regions, which can explain the different evolutionary trajectories followed by the IGS and the ITS regions. Here, we provide data from the chromosomal distribution of selected IGS length variants, as well as the detailed internal structure of a large number of IGS regions obtained from specific X and Y chromosomes. The variability found in the different internal subrepeat regions of IGS regions isolated from X and Y chromosomes supports the proposed mechanism of genetic exchanges and suggests that only the "240" subrepeats are involved. The presence of a putative site for topoisomerase I at the 5' end of the 18S rRNA gene would allow for the exchange between X and Y chromosomes of some 240 subrepeats, the promoter, and the ETS region, leaving the rest of the rDNA unit to evolve along separate chromosomal lineages. The phenomenon of localized units (modules) of homogenization has implications for multigene family evolution in general. PMID:10880483

  14. Intergenic GWAS SNPs are key components of the spatial and regulatory network for human growth.

    PubMed

    Schierding, William; Antony, Jisha; Cutfield, Wayne S; Horsfield, Julia A; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2016-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has resulted in the identification of hundreds of genetic variants associated with growth and stature. Determining how these genetic variants influence growth is important, but most are non-coding, and there is little understanding of how these variants contribute to adult height. To determine the mechanisms by which human variation contributes to growth, we combined spatial genomic connectivity (high-throughput conformation capture) with functional (gene expression, expression Quantitative Trait Loci) data to determine how non-genic loci associated with infant length, pubertal and adult height and contribute to gene regulatory networks. This approach identified intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ∼85 kb upstream of FBXW11 that spatially connect with distant loci. These regulatory connections are reinforced by evidence of SNP-enhancer effects and altered expression in genes influencing the action of human growth hormone. Functional assays provided evidence for enhancer activity of the intergenic region near FBXW11 that harbors SNP rs12153391, which is associated with an expression Quantitative Trait Loci. Our results suggest that variants in this locus have genome-wide effects as key modifiers of growth (both overgrowth and short stature) acting through a regulatory network. We believe that the genes and pathways connected with this regulatory network are potential targets that could be investigated for diagnostic, prenatal and carrier testing for growth disorders. Finally, the regulatory networks we generated illustrate the power of using existing datasets to interrogate the contribution of intergenic SNPs to common syndromes/diseases.

  15. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 weeks) compared to both immature (4 weeks) and old (70 weeks) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  16. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥ 200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 week) compared to both immature (4 week) and old (70 week) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  17. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  18. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  19. Pentamer vocabularies characterizing introns and intron-like intergenic tracts from Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bultrini, Emanuele; Pizzi, Elisabetta; Del Giudice, Paolo; Frontali, Clara

    2003-01-30

    Overall compositional properties at the level of bases, dinucleotides and longer oligos characterize genomes of different species. In Caenorhabditis elegans, using recurrence analysis, we recognized the existence of a long-range correlation in the oligonucleotide usage of introns and intergenic regions. Through correlation analysis, this is confirmed here to be a genome-wide property of C. elegans non-coding portions. We then investigate the possibility of extracting a typical vocabulary through statistical analysis of experimentally confirmed introns of sufficient length (>1 kb), deprived of known splice signals, the focus being on distributed lexical features rather than on localized motifs. Lexical preferences typical of introns could be exposed using principal component analysis of pentanucleotide frequency distributions, both in C. elegans and in Drosophila melanogaster. In either species, the introns' pentamer preferences are largely shared by intergenic tracts. The pentamer vocabularies extracted for the two species exhibit interesting symmetry properties and overlap in part. A more extensive investigation of the interspecies relationship at the level of oligonucleotide preferences in non-coding regions, not related by sequence similarity, might form the basis of new approaches for the study of the evolutionary behaviour of these regions.

  20. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  1. Genome-wide analyses in bacteria show small-RNA enrichment for long and conserved intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael; Contreras, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms.

  2. Genome-Wide Analyses in Bacteria Show Small-RNA Enrichment for Long and Conserved Intergenic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms. PMID:25313390

  3. Limitations and benefits of ARISA intra-genomic diversity fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Popa, Radu; Popa, Rodica; Mashall, Matthew J; Nguyen, Hien; Tebo, Bradley M; Brauer, Suzanna

    2009-08-01

    Monitoring diversity changes and contamination in mixed cultures and simple microcosms is challenged by fast community structure dynamics, and the need for means allowing fast, cost-efficient and accurate identification of microorganisms at high phylogenetic resolution. The method we explored is a variant of Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis based on Intra-Genomic Diversity Fingerprinting (ARISA-IGDF), and identifies phylotypes with multiple 16S-23S rRNA gene Intergenic Transcribed Spacers. We verified the effect of PCR conditions (annealing temperature, duration of final extension, number of cycles, group-specific primers and formamide) on ARISA-IGD fingerprints of 44 strains of Shewanella. We present a digitization algorithm and data analysis procedures needed to determine confidence in strain identification. Though using stringent PCR conditions and group-specific primers allow reasonably accurate identification of strains with three ARISA-IGD amplicons within the 82-1000 bp size range, ARISA-IGDF is best for phylotypes with >or=4 unambiguously different amplicons. This method allows monitoring the occurrence of culturable microbes and can be implemented in applications requiring high phylogenetic resolution, reproducibility, low cost and high throughput such as identifying contamination and monitoring the evolution of diversity in mixed cultures and low diversity microcosms and periodic screening of small microbial culture libraries.

  4. The callipyge mutation enhances bidirectional long-range DLK1-GTL2 intergenic transcription in cis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Smit, Maria; Hiard, Samuel; Tordoir, Xavier; Cockett, Noelle; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2006-01-01

    The callipyge mutation (CLPG) is an A to G transition that affects a muscle-specific long-range control element located in the middle of the 90-kb DLK1-GTL2 intergenic (IG) region. It causes ectopic expression of a 327-kb cluster of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle, resulting in the callipyge muscular hypertrophy and its non-Mendelian inheritance pattern known as polar overdominance. We herein demonstrate that the CLPG mutation alters the muscular epigenotype of the DLK1-GTL2 IG region in cis, including hypomethylation, acquisition of novel DNase-I hypersentivite sites, and, most strikingly, strongly enhanced bidirectional, long-range IG transcription. The callipyge phenotype thus emerges as a unique model to study the functional significance of IG transcription, which recently has proven to be a widespread, yet elusive, feature of the mammalian genome. PMID:16690740

  5. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors—Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level. PMID:27790225

  6. Use of the Coat Protein (CP) and minor CP Intergene Sequence to Discriminate Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid assay is a needed to differentiate mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains generally associated wit...

  7. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergeni...

  8. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty six (36) unique sequences which varied in length from 258bp to 530bp were found for Salmonella enterica strains and isolates that are not present in public databases following BLAST analysis searches for similarity. The sequences were found by application of Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping (IS...

  9. Intergenic variants may predispose to major depression disorder through regulation of long non-coding RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ning; Rao, Shuquan; Du, Tingfu; Hu, Huiling; Liu, Zeyue; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-02-15

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous genetic variants for major depressive disorder (MDD) although most of the genetic variants are intergenic. It has been found that approximately 54% of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are located in the intergenic regions. We hypothesized that intergenic variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of MDD through regulating the expression of lncRNAs where these variants are located. In this study, several MDD-associated SNPs in three known intergenic lncRNAs were initially genotyped among 978 patients with MDD and 1176 controls, and the real-time PCR assay was performed to quantify the expression of LINC01108 and LINC00578 in peripheral blood cells from 20 MDD patients and 20 controls. The results showed that rs12526133 present in LINC01108 was strongly associated with MDD (χ(2)=11.68, P=6.3E-04), and LINC01108 expression was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (FC=1.90, P<0.001). The expression of LINC00998 was significantly lower in MDD patients than controls based on microarray analysis (FC=0.11, P<0.001), so that its tag SNPs were genotyped and rs2272260 in LINC00998 was found to be associated with MDD (χ(2)=26.39, P=2.8E-07). This work suggests that non-coding variants may play an important role in conferring risk of MDD.

  10. Ecological significance of microdiversity: identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can be found in bacteria with highly divergent genomes and ecophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Elke; Overmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    A combination of cultivation-based methods with a molecular biological approach was used to investigate whether planktonic bacteria with identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can represent distinct eco- and genotypes. A set of 11 strains of Brevundimonas alba were isolated from a bacterial freshwater community by conventional plating or by using a liquid most-probable-number (MPN) dilution series. These strains had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and represented the dominant phylotype in the plateable fraction, as well as in the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series. However, internally transcribed spacer and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR fingerprinting analyses, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, revealed great genetic diversity among the 11 strains. Each strain utilized a specific combination of 59 carbon substrates, and the niche overlap indices were low, suggesting that each strain occupied a different ecological niche. In dialysis cultures incubated in situ, each strain had a different growth rate and cell yield. We thus demonstrated that the B. alba strains represent distinct populations with genetically determined adaptations and probably occupy different ecological niches. Our results have implications for assessment of the diversity and biogeography of bacteria and increase the perception of natural diversity beyond the level of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  11. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  12. Detection of Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum in dairy cattle from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, Pablo J; Estanguet, Abel A; Maito, Julia; Tirante, Liliana; Pol, Martin; Giraudo, José A

    2014-01-01

    Different species of Mycoplasma can affect bovine cattle, causing several diseases. PCR sequencing and further analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA ITS region have shown a significant interspecies variability among Mollicutes. Sixteen suspected isolates of Mycoplasma spp. obtained from milk samples from dairy herds were amplified (16S-23S rRNA ITS region). Fourteen out of those 16 suspected Mycoplasma spp. isolates were PCR-positive. To confirm the identity of Mycoplasma bovis, these 14 isolates were tested by another species-specific PCR. Seven of the isolates rendered a positive result. The products of 16S-23S rRNA ITS PCR from one isolate that was identified as M. bovis and from two other isolates, identified as non- M. bovis were randomly selected, sequenced and analyzed. The three sequences (A, B and C) showed 100% similarity with M. bovis, Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum respectively.

  13. Explaining the disease phenotype of intergenic SNP through predicted long range regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingqi; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of disease-associated SNPs (daSNPs) are located in intergenic regions (IGR), making it difficult to understand their association with disease phenotypes. Recent analysis found that non-coding daSNPs were frequently located in or approximate to regulatory elements, inspiring us to try to explain the disease phenotypes of IGR daSNPs through nearby regulatory sequences. Hence, after locating the nearest distal regulatory element (DRE) to a given IGR daSNP, we applied a computational method named INTREPID to predict the target genes regulated by the DRE, and then investigated their functional relevance to the IGR daSNP's disease phenotypes. 36.8% of all IGR daSNP-disease phenotype associations investigated were possibly explainable through the predicted target genes, which were enriched with, were functionally relevant to, or consisted of the corresponding disease genes. This proportion could be further increased to 60.5% if the LD SNPs of daSNPs were also considered. Furthermore, the predicted SNP-target gene pairs were enriched with known eQTL/mQTL SNP-gene relationships. Overall, it's likely that IGR daSNPs may contribute to disease phenotypes by interfering with the regulatory function of their nearby DREs and causing abnormal expression of disease genes. PMID:27280978

  14. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom.

  15. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom. PMID:28154490

  16. A Discrete Class of Intergenic DNA Dictates Meiotic DNA Break Hotspots in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Hugh P; Farah, Joseph A; Grewal, Shiv I. S; Smith, Gerald R

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast), which becomes covalently linked to the DSB ends. Like recombination events, DSBs occur at hotspots in the genome, but the genetic factors responsible for most hotspots have remained elusive. Here we describe in fission yeast the genome-wide distribution of meiosis-specific Rec12-DNA linkages, which closely parallel DSBs measured by conventional Southern blot hybridization. Prominent DSB hotspots are located ∼65 kb apart, separated by intervals with little or no detectable breakage. Most hotspots lie within exceptionally large intergenic regions. Thus, the chromosomal architecture responsible for hotspots in fission yeast is markedly different from that of budding yeast, in which DSB hotspots are much more closely spaced and, in many regions of the genome, occur at each promoter. Our analysis in fission yeast reveals a clearly identifiable chromosomal feature that can predict the majority of recombination hotspots across a whole genome and provides a basis for searching for the chromosomal features that dictate hotspots of meiotic recombination in other organisms, including humans. PMID:17722984

  17. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  18. Dysregulated long intergenic non-coding RNA modules contribute to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fulong; Lan, Yujia; Xu, Jinyuan; Pang, Bo; Han, Dong; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules involved in diseases including heart failure. However, little is known about how the lincRNAs work together with protein-coding genes (PCGs) contributing to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive transcriptome profile of lincRNAs, PCGs and miRNAs using RNA-seq and miRNA-seq data of 16 heart failure patients (HFs) and 8 non-failing individuals (NFs). Through integrating lincRNA and PCG expression profiles, we identified HF-associated lincRNA modules. We identified a heart-specific lincRNA module which was significantly enriched for differentially expressed lincRNAs and PCGs. This module was associated with heart failure rather than with other clinical traits such as sex, age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the module was significantly correlated with certain indicators of left ventricular function like ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, implying the potential of its components as crucial biomarkers. Apart from enhancer-like function, lincRNAs in this module could act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to regulate genes which were associated with left-ventricular systolic function. Our work provided deep insights into the critical roles of lincRNAs in the pathology of heart failure and suggested that they could be valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:28040802

  19. Comparative Mitogenomic Analyses of Praying Mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): Origin and Evolution of Unusual Intergenic Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Ye, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Praying mantises are a diverse group of predatory insects. Although some Mantodea mitogenomes have been reported, a comprehensive comparative and evolutionary genomic study is lacking for this group. In the present study, four new mitogenomes were sequenced, annotated, and compared to the previously published mitogenomes of other Mantodea species. Most Mantodea mitogenomes share a typical set of mitochondrial genes and a putative control region (CR). Additionally, and most intriguingly, another large non-coding region (LNC) was detected between trnM and ND2 in all six Paramantini mitogenomes examined. The main section in this common region of Paramantini may have initially originated from the corresponding control region for each species, whereas sequence differences between the LNCs and CRs and phylogenetic analyses indicate that LNC and CR are largely independently evolving. Namely, the LNC (the duplicated CR) may have subsequently degenerated during evolution. Furthermore, evidence suggests that special intergenic gaps have been introduced in some species through gene rearrangement and duplication. These gaps are actually the original abutting sequences of migrated or duplicated genes. Some gaps (G5 and G6) are homologous to the 5' and 3' surrounding regions of the duplicated gene in the original gene order, and another specific gap (G7) has tandem repeats. We analysed the phylogenetic relationships of fifteen Mantodea species using 37 concatenated mitochondrial genes and detected several synapomorphies unique to species in some clades. PMID:28367101

  20. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  1. α-MSH regulates intergenic splicing of MC1R and TUBB3 in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dalziel, Martin; Kolesnichenko, Marina; das Neves, Ricardo Pires; Iborra, Francisco; Goding, Colin; Furger, André

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing enables higher eukaryotes to increase their repertoire of proteins derived from a restricted number of genes. However, the possibility that functional diversity may also be augmented by splicing between adjacent genes has been largely neglected. Here, we show that the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a critical component of the facultative skin pigmentation system, has a highly complex and inefficient poly(A) site which is instrumental in allowing intergenic splicing between this locus and its immediate downstream neighbour tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). These transcripts, which produce two distinct protein isoforms localizing to the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, seem to be restricted to humans as no detectable chimeric mRNA could be found in MC1R expressing mouse melanocytes. Significantly, treatment with the MC1R agonist α-MSH or activation of the stress response kinase p38-MAPK, both key molecules associated with ultraviolet radiation dermal insult and subsequent skin tanning, result in a shift in expression from MC1R in favour of chimeric MC1R-TUBB3 isoforms in cultured melanocytes. We propose that these chimeric proteins serve to equip melanocytes with novel cellular phenotypes required as part of the pigmentation response. PMID:21071418

  2. Exploiting identifiability and intergene correlation for improved detection of differential expression.

    PubMed

    Deller, J R; Radha, Hayder; McCormick, J Justin

    2013-01-01

    Accurate differential analysis of microarray data strongly depends on effective treatment of intergene correlation. Such dependence is ordinarily accounted for in terms of its effect on significance cutoffs. In this paper, it is shown that correlation can, in fact, be exploited to share information across tests and reorder expression differentials for increased statistical power, regardless of the threshold. Significantly improved differential analysis is the result of two simple measures: (i) adjusting test statistics to exploit information from identifiable genes (the large subset of genes represented on a microarray that can be classified a priori as nondifferential with very high confidence], but (ii) doing so in a way that accounts for linear dependencies among identifiable and nonidentifiable genes. A method is developed that builds upon the widely used two-sample t-statistic approach and uses analysis in Hilbert space to decompose the nonidentified gene vector into two components that are correlated and uncorrelated with the identified set. In the application to data derived from a widely studied prostate cancer database, the proposed method outperforms some of the most highly regarded approaches published to date. Algorithms in MATLAB and in R are available for public download.

  3. A long-term demasculinization of X-linked intergenic noncoding RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Vibranovski, Maria D; Zhang, Li; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yong E; Li, Xinmin; Zhang, Wenxia; Fan, Qichang; VanKuren, Nicholas W; Long, Manyuan; Wei, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles of noncoding RNAs in sex-related pathways, but little is known about the evolutionary forces acting on these noncoding RNAs. Profiling the transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster with whole-genome tiling arrays found that 15% of male-biased transcribed fragments are intergenic noncoding RNAs (incRNAs), suggesting a potentially important role for incRNAs in sex-related biological processes. Statistical analysis revealed a paucity of male-biased incRNAs and coding genes on the X chromosome, suggesting that similar evolutionary forces could be affecting the genomic organization of both coding and noncoding genes. Expression profiling across germline and somatic tissues further suggested that both male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and sexual antagonism could contribute to the chromosomal distribution of male-biased incRNAs. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the evolutionary age of male-biased incRNAs is a significant predictor of their chromosomal locations. In addition to identifying abundant sex-biased incRNAs in the fly genome, our work unveils a global picture of the complex interplay between noncoding RNAs and sexual chromosome evolution.

  4. Comparative Expression Dynamics of Intergenic Long Noncoding RNAs in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Kevin G.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been annotated in eukaryotic genomes, but comparative transcriptomic approaches are necessary to understand their biological impact and evolution. To facilitate such comparative studies in Drosophila, we identified and characterized lncRNAs in a second Drosophilid—the evolutionary model Drosophila pseudoobscura. Using RNA-Seq and computational filtering of protein-coding potential, we identified 1,589 intergenic lncRNA loci in D. pseudoobscura. We surveyed multiple sex-specific developmental stages and found, like in Drosophila melanogaster, increasingly prolific lncRNA expression through male development and an overrepresentation of lncRNAs in the testes. Other trends seen in D. melanogaster, like reduced pupal expression, were not observed. Nonrandom distributions of female-biased and non-testis-specific male-biased lncRNAs between the X chromosome and autosomes are consistent with selection-based models of gene trafficking to optimize genomic location of sex-biased genes. The numerous testis-specific lncRNAs, however, are randomly distributed between the X and autosomes, and we cannot reject the hypothesis that many of these are likely to be spurious transcripts. Finally, using annotated lncRNAs in both species, we identified 134 putative lncRNA homologs between D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster and find that many have conserved developmental expression dynamics, making them ideal candidates for future functional analyses. PMID:27189981

  5. Combined eukaryotic and bacterial community fingerprinting of natural freshwater biofilms using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Lise C; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Gaubert, Philippe; Bouchez, Théodore; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2010-12-01

    Biofilms are complex communities playing an important role in aquatic ecosystems. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) has been used successfully to explore biofilm bacterial diversity. However, a gap remains to be filled as regards its application to biofilm eukaryotic populations. The aim of this study is to use ARISA to detect eukaryotic population shifts in biofilm. We designed a new set of primers to focus specifically on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of diatoms and tested it on natural biofilms. Additionally, we tested universal primers, used previously to perform ARISA on fungal communities. Cloning and sequencing showed that the universal primer set amplified various eukaryotes, whereas the new set was diatom specific. The new set amplified a wider variety of diatoms. Therefore, the universal set is appropriate to study the general eukaryotic population shifts in biofilms, whereas the new set is more appropriate to study diatoms specifically. We used both primer sets, along with a bacterial set, to study the population shifts in natural river biofilms. Principal component analysis of the ARISA fingerprints revealed seasonal shifts that did not coincide for bacterial and eukaryotic communities. Therefore, the use of both eukaryotic and bacterial primers provides a useful insight to assess microbial succession in biofilms.

  6. Molecular typing of isolates of Rickettsia rickettsii by use of DNA sequencing of variable intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Karpathy, Sandor E; Dasch, Gregory A; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-08-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is found throughout the Americas, where it is associated with different animal reservoirs and tick vectors. No molecular typing system currently exists to allow for the robust differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. Analysis of eight completed genome sequences of rickettsial species revealed a high degree of sequence conservation within the coding regions of chromosomes in the genus. Intergenic regions between coding sequences should be under less selective pressure to maintain this conservation and thus should exhibit greater nucleotide polymorphisms. Utilizing these polymorphisms, we developed a molecular typing system that allows for the genetic differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. This typing system was applied to a collection of 38 different isolates collected from humans, animals, and tick vectors from different geographic locations. Serotypes 364D, from Dermacentor occidentalis ticks, and Hlp, from Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks, appear to be distinct genotypes that may not belong to the species R. rickettsii. We were also able to differentiate 36 historical isolates of R. rickettsii into three different phylogenetic clades containing seven different genotypes. This differentiation correlated well, but not perfectly, with the geographic origin and likely tick vectors associated with the isolates. The few apparent typing discrepancies found suggest that the molecular ecology of R. rickettsii needs more investigation.

  7. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of ‘breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes. PMID:26521696

  8. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  9. CtBP Levels Control Intergenic Transcripts, PHO/YY1 DNA Binding, and PcG Recruitment to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arindam; Atchison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a well-known corepressor of several DNA binding transcription factors in Drosophila as well as in mammals. CtBP is implicated in Polycomb Group (PcG) complex-mediated transcriptional repression because it can bind to some PcG proteins, and mutation of the ctbp gene in flies results in lost PcG protein recruitment to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and lost PcG repression. However, the mechanism of reduced PcG DNA binding in CtBP mutant backgrounds is unknown. We show here that in a Drosophila CtBP mutant background, intergenic transcripts are induced across several PRE sequences and this corresponds to reduced DNA binding by PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (PHO) and Polycomb (Pc), and reduced trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27, a hallmark of PcG repression. Restoration of CtBP levels by expression of a CtBP transgene results in repression of intergenic transcripts, restored PcG binding, and elevated trimethylation of H3 on lysine 27. Our results support a model in which CtBP regulates expression of intergenic transcripts that controls DNA binding by PcG proteins and subsequent histone modifications and transcriptional activity. PMID:20082324

  10. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Intergenic Enhancers in Arabidopsis Using Open Chromatin Signatures[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are important regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. Enhancers function independently of their distance and orientation to the promoters of target genes. Thus, enhancers have been difficult to identify. Only a few enhancers, especially distant intergenic enhancers, have been identified in plants. We developed an enhancer prediction system based exclusively on the DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. A set of 10,044 DHSs located in intergenic regions, which are away from any gene promoters, were predicted to be putative enhancers. We examined the functions of 14 predicted enhancers using the β-glucuronidase gene reporter. Ten of the 14 (71%) candidates were validated by the reporter assay. We also designed 10 constructs using intergenic sequences that are not associated with DHSs, and none of these constructs showed enhancer activities in reporter assays. In addition, the tissue specificity of the putative enhancers can be precisely predicted based on DNase I hypersensitivity data sets developed from different plant tissues. These results suggest that the open chromatin signature-based enhancer prediction system developed in Arabidopsis may serve as a universal system for enhancer identification in plants. PMID:26373455

  11. Species-level identification of Bacillus strains isolates from marine sediments by conventional biochemical, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and inter-tRNA gene sequence lengths analysis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Catia A C; Martins, Orlando B; Clementino, Maysa Mandetta

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of commonly used conventional biochemical tests, sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes and tDNA-intergenic spacer length polymorphism (tDNA-PCR) to identify species of the genus Bacillus recovered from marine sediments. While biochemical tests were not sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between the 23 marine strains analyzed, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences allowed a correct identification, clustering them into four species belonging to Bacillus licheniformis (n = 6), Bacillus cereus (n = 9), Bacillus subtilis (n = 7) and Bacillus pumilus (n = 1). The identification results obtained with 16S rRNA sequencing were validated by tDNA-PCR analysis of 23 marine isolates that were identified by the similarities of their fingerprints to those of reference strains. tDNA-PCR fingerprinting was as discriminatory as 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Although it was not able to distinguish among the species of the B. cereus and B. subtilis groups, it should be considered a rapid and easy approach for the reliable identification of unknown Bacillus isolates or at least for the primary differentiation of Bacillus groups.

  12. Identification of Streptococcus canis Isolated from Milk of Dairy Cows with Subclinical Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Abdulwahed Ahmed; Akineden, Ömer; Usleber, Ewald

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus canis was isolated from 31 milk samples from 11 cows in a dairy herd (with 49 lactating cows) affected by subclinical mastitis in north Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Thirty-one isolates from the infected udder quarters were further characterized for their phenotypic and molecular properties. Most isolates (83.9%) produced α-galactosidase, and all were negative for β-d-glucuronidase. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene by the PCR method and digestion with the restriction enzymes RsaI, MspI, and AvaII yielded species-specific patterns. Additional identification by species-specific amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region, the CAMP factor-encoding gene cfg, and the internal fragments of the sodA gene was consistent with S. canis. Macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that the S. canis isolates originated from a single clone or were very closely related. PMID:15750089

  13. Adenovirus and mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Szilvia L; Gál, János

    2009-07-02

    A female, adult ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) with fatty liver was submitted for virologic examination in Hungary. Signs of an adenovirus infection including degeneration of the liver cells, enlarged nuclei and intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an adenovirus was later confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this novel chelonian adenovirus was distinct from previously described reptilian adenoviruses, not belonging to any of the recognized genera of the family Adenoviridae. As a part of the routine diagnostic procedure for chelonians the detection of herpes-, rana- and iridoviruses together with Mycoplasma spp. was attempted. Amplicons were generated by a general mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S/23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) intergenic spacer region, as well as, a specific Mycoplasma agassizii PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the analyses of partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, the Mycoplasma sp. of the ornate box turtle seemed to be identical with the recently described eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) Mycoplasma sp. This is the first report of a novel chelonian adenovirus and a mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (T. ornata ornata) in Europe.

  14. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqin; Wu, Bin; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  15. The music of trees: the intergenerative tie between primary care and public health

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stories help us frame and understand complex ideas and challenges. Metaphors are particularly powerful linguistic devices that guide and extend our thinking by bridging conceptual domains, for example to consider the brain as a digital computer. Trees are widely used as metaphors for broad concepts like evolution, history, society, and even life itself, i.e. ‘the tree of life’. Tree-like diagrams of roots and branches are used to demonstrate historical and cultural relationships, for example, between different species or different languages. In this paper, we describe a theatrical character called a tree doctor which is a living metaphor. A human being, namely the author, lectures, acts or dances as a tree and offers lessons to Homo Sapiens about ‘holistic’ ideas of health. The character teaches us to not only see the value of our relationships to trees, but the importance of seeing forests as well the individual trees. The metaphorical statement that we should not ‘miss the forest for the trees’ means we should learn to think of health embedded in systems and communities. In medicine, we too often focus on individual molecules, pharmaceuticals, or even patients and miss the bigger picture of public and environmental health. In a time of great ecological system change, the tree doctor points to broad ethical responsibility for each other and future generations of humans and other living creatures. The character embraces arts and particularly music as a powerful way of infusing purpose and improving the qualities of our lives together, especially as we age. The tree doctor knows the value of intergenerational relationships. But it also points to intergenerative innovations across many cultural domains, disciplines and professions. The tree doctor supports primary care and empowers the value of intergenerational relationships, art and music in the recommendations doctors make to patients to improve their health and well-being. PMID:28250826

  16. Systematically characterizing dysfunctional long intergenic non-coding RNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Li, Feng; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Lan, Yujia; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhao, Tingting; Xu, Chaohan; Xu, Chun; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are severe neuropsychiatric disorders with serious impact on patients, together termed “major psychosis”. Recently, long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were reported to play important roles in mental diseases. However, little was known about their molecular mechanism in pathogenesis of SZ and BD. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on 82 post-mortem brain tissues from three brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex (BA11), anterior cingulate cortex (BA24) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9)) of patients with SZ and BD and control subjects, generating over one billion reads. We characterized lincRNA transcriptome in the three brain regions and identified 20 differentially expressed lincRNAs (DELincRNAs) in BA11 for BD, 34 and 1 in BA24 and BA9 for SZ, respectively. Our results showed that these DELincRNAs exhibited brain region-specific patterns. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we revealed that DELincRNAs together with other genes can function as modules to perform different functions in different brain regions, such as immune system development in BA24 and oligodendrocyte differentiation in BA9. Additionally, we found that DNA methylation alteration could partly explain the dysregulation of lincRNAs, some of which could function as enhancers in the pathogenesis of major psychosis. Together, we performed systematical characterization of dysfunctional lincRNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis, which provided a valuable resource to understand their roles in SZ and BD pathology and helped to discover novel biomarkers. PMID:27661005

  17. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Repeats in Yersiniae: Genomic Organization and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Silvestro, Giustina; Petrillo, Mauro; Carlomagno, Maria Stella; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses carried out in silico revealed that the DNA repeats called enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences (ERICs), which are present in several Enterobacteriaceae, are overrepresented in yersiniae. From the alignment of DNA regions from the wholly sequenced Yersinia enterocolitica 8081 and Yersinia pestis CO92 strains, we could establish that ERICs are miniature mobile elements whose insertion leads to duplication of the dinucleotide TA. ERICs feature long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and can fold as RNA into hairpin structures. The proximity to coding regions suggests that most Y. enterocolitica ERICs are cotranscribed with flanking genes. Elements which either overlap or are located next to stop codons are preferentially inserted in the same (or B) orientation. In contrast, ERICs located far apart from open reading frames are inserted in the opposite (or A) orientation. The expression of genes cotranscribed with A- and B-oriented ERICs has been monitored in vivo. In mRNAs spanning B-oriented ERICs, upstream gene transcripts accumulated at lower levels than downstream gene transcripts. This difference was abolished by treating cells with chloramphenicol. We hypothesize that folding of B-oriented elements is impeded by translating ribosomes. Consequently, upstream RNA degradation is triggered by the unmasking of a site for the RNase E located in the right-hand TIR of ERIC. A-oriented ERICs may act in contrast as upstream RNA stabilizers or may have other functions. The hypothesis that ERICs act as regulatory RNA elements is supported by analyses carried out in Yersinia strains which either lack ERIC sequences or carry alternatively oriented ERICs at specific loci. PMID:16291667

  18. The music of trees: the intergenerative tie between primary care and public health.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stories help us frame and understand complex ideas and challenges. Metaphors are particularly powerful linguistic devices that guide and extend our thinking by bridging conceptual domains, for example to consider the brain as a digital computer. Trees are widely used as metaphors for broad concepts like evolution, history, society, and even life itself, i.e. 'the tree of life'. Tree-like diagrams of roots and branches are used to demonstrate historical and cultural relationships, for example, between different species or different languages. In this paper, we describe a theatrical character called a tree doctor which is a living metaphor. A human being, namely the author, lectures, acts or dances as a tree and offers lessons to Homo Sapiens about 'holistic' ideas of health. The character teaches us to not only see the value of our relationships to trees, but the importance of seeing forests as well the individual trees. The metaphorical statement that we should not 'miss the forest for the trees' means we should learn to think of health embedded in systems and communities. In medicine, we too often focus on individual molecules, pharmaceuticals, or even patients and miss the bigger picture of public and environmental health. In a time of great ecological system change, the tree doctor points to broad ethical responsibility for each other and future generations of humans and other living creatures. The character embraces arts and particularly music as a powerful way of infusing purpose and improving the qualities of our lives together, especially as we age. The tree doctor knows the value of intergenerational relationships. But it also points to intergenerative innovations across many cultural domains, disciplines and professions. The tree doctor supports primary care and empowers the value of intergenerational relationships, art and music in the recommendations doctors make to patients to improve their health and well-being.

  19. Systematically profiling and annotating long intergenic non-coding RNAs in human embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While more and more long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were identified to take important roles in both maintaining pluripotency and regulating differentiation, how these lincRNAs may define and drive cell fate decisions on a global scale are still mostly elusive. Systematical profiling and comprehensive annotation of embryonic stem cells lincRNAs may not only bring a clearer big picture of these novel regulators but also shed light on their functionalities. Results Based on multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically identified 300 human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs (hES lincRNAs). Of which, one forth (78 out of 300) hES lincRNAs were further identified to be biasedly expressed in human ES cells. Functional analysis showed that they were preferentially involved in several early-development related biological processes. Comparative genomics analysis further suggested that around half of the identified hES lincRNAs were conserved in mouse. To facilitate further investigation of these hES lincRNAs, we constructed an online portal for biologists to access all their sequences and annotations interactively. In addition to navigation through a genome browse interface, users can also locate lincRNAs through an advanced query interface based on both keywords and expression profiles, and analyze results through multiple tools. Conclusions By integrating multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically characterized and annotated 300 hES lincRNAs. A full functional web portal is available freely at http://scbrowse.cbi.pku.edu.cn. As the first global profiling and annotating of human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs, this work aims to provide a valuable resource for both experimental biologists and bioinformaticians. PMID:24564552

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3′ RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<−0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum. PMID:24932683

  1. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  2. Functional Characterization of MC1R-TUBB3 Intergenic Splice Variants of the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Olivares, Conchi; Castejón-Griñán, Maria; Abrisqueta, Marta; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) expressed in melanocytes is a major determinant of skin pigmentation. It encodes a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). Human MC1R has an inefficient poly(A) site allowing intergenic splicing with its downstream neighbour Tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). Intergenic splicing produces two MC1R isoforms, designated Iso1 and Iso2, bearing the complete seven transmembrane helices from MC1R fused to TUBB3-derived C-terminal extensions, in-frame for Iso1 and out-of-frame for Iso2. It has been reported that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) might promote an isoform switch from canonical MC1R (MC1R-001) to the MC1R-TUBB3 chimeras, which might lead to novel phenotypes required for tanning. We expressed the Flag epitope-tagged intergenic isoforms in heterologous HEK293T cells and human melanoma cells, for functional characterization. Iso1 was expressed with the expected size. Iso2 yielded a doublet of Mr significantly lower than predicted, and impaired intracellular stability. Although Iso1- and Iso2 bound radiolabelled agonist with the same affinity as MC1R-001, their plasma membrane expression was strongly reduced. Decreased surface expression mostly resulted from aberrant forward trafficking, rather than high rates of endocytosis. Functional coupling of both isoforms to cAMP was lower than wild-type, but ERK activation upon binding of αMSH was unimpaired, suggesting imbalanced signaling from the splice variants. Heterodimerization of differentially labelled MC1R-001 with the splicing isoforms analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation was efficient and caused decreased surface expression of binding sites. Thus, UVR-induced MC1R isoforms might contribute to fine-tune the tanning response by modulating MC1R-001 availability and functional parameters.

  3. Identification and detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by using a DNA amplification fingerprint obtained from the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed Central

    González, N; Galindo, I; Guevara, P; Novak, E; Scorza, J V; Añez, N; Da Silveira, J F; Ramírez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We designed a PCR assay targeted on repeated elements of the ribosomal intergenic spacer which produces highly polymorphic DNA band patterns for different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. By labeling the PCR products with digoxigenin and by chemiluminescence detection, we improved the assay sensitivity by three orders of magnitude to get T. cruzi strain fingerprints in feces of the trypanosome-infected triatomine bug vector. We also developed a capture assay for the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products that allowed us to detect T. cruzi in triatomine bug vector feces and in human serum samples with a solid support. Images PMID:8126172

  4. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  5. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  6. Rhizobium vignae sp. nov., a symbiotic bacterium isolated from multiple legume species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da Wei; Chen, Wen Feng; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-03-01

    A group of rhizobial strains isolated from nodules of multiple legume species grown in different geographical regions of China had identical 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the novel strains formed a subclade in the genus Rhizobium together with Rhizobium galegae, Rhizobium huautlense and Rhizobium alkalisoli, with 99.8  % gene sequence similarity between the strains. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between the representative strain CCBAU 05176(T) and R. galegae ATCC 43677(T), R. huautlense S02(T) and R. alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T) were 22.6  %, 8.9  % and 15.9  %, respectively. The novel strains were distinguished from recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by using a polyphasic approach, including PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS), phenotypic and physiological tests, sequence comparisons of housekeeping genes and cellular fatty acid profiles. Therefore, it is suggested that this group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Rhizobium vignae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CCBAU 05176(T) (=HAMBI 3039(T)=LMG 25447(T)).

  7. Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov., novel members of coccoid Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gama, Watson Arantes; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Branco, Luis Henrique Zanini; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Fiore, Marli Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Two Cyanobacteria isolated from South Atlantic Ocean continental shelf deep water and from a marine green algae inhabiting the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica were investigated based on morphological and ultrastructural traits, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, secondary structure of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions and phylogenomic analyses. The majority of these evaluations demonstrated that both strains differ from the genera of cyanobacteria with validly published names and, therefore, supported the description of the novel genus as Aliterella gen. nov. The identity and phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with the secondary structure of D1D1' and BoxB intergenic regions, further supported the two strains representing distinct species: Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type SP469036, strain CENA595T) and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov. (type SP469035, strain CENA408T). The phylogenomic analysis of A. atlantica sp. nov. CENA595T, based on 21 protein sequences, revealed that this genus belongs to the cyanobacterial order Chroococcidiopsidales. The isolation and cultivation of two geographically distant unicellular members of a novel cyanobacterial genus and the sequenced genome of the type strain bring new insights into the current classification of the coccoid group, and into the reconstruction of their evolutionary history.

  8. Porphyromonas loveana sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of Australian marsupials.

    PubMed

    Bird, Philip S; Trott, Darren J; Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Hillman, Kristine M; Burrell, Paul C; Blackall, Linda L

    2016-10-01

    An obligatory anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative coccobacillus with black-pigmented colonies was isolated from the oral cavity of selected Australian marsupial species. Phenotypic and molecular criteria showed that this bacterium was a distinct species within the genus Porphyromonas, and was closely related to Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas gulae. This putative novel species and P. gulae could be differentiated from P. gingivalis by catalase activity. Further characterization by multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis of glutamate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase enzyme mobility and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS showed that this putative novel species could be differentiated phenotypically from P. gingivalis and P. gulae. Definitive identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this bacterium belonged to a unique monophyletic lineage, phylogenetically distinct from P. gingivalis (94.9 % similarity) and P. gulae (95.5 %). This also was supported by 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and glutamate dehydrogenase gene sequencing. A new species epithet, Porphyromonas loveana sp. nov., is proposed for this bacterium, with DSM 28520T (=NCTC 13658T=UQD444T=MRK101T), isolated from a musky rat kangaroo, as the type strain.

  9. Isolates of 'Candidatus Nostocoida limicola' Blackall et al. 2000 should be described as three novel species of the genus Tetrasphaera, as Tetrasphaera jenkinsii sp. nov., Tetrasphaera vanveenii sp. nov. and Tetrasphaera veronensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, C M; Seviour, E M; Schumann, P; Maszenan, A M; Liu, J-R; Webb, R I; Monis, P; Saint, C P; Steiner, U; Seviour, R J

    2006-10-01

    Despite differences in their morphologies, comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high levels of similarity (>94 %) between strains of the filamentous bacterium 'Candidatus Nostocoida limicola' and the cocci Tetrasphaera australiensis and Tetrasphaera japonica and the rod Tetrasphaera elongata, all isolated from activated sludge. These sequence data and their chemotaxonomic characters, including cell wall, menaquinone and lipid compositions and fingerprints of their 16S-23S rRNA intergenic regions, support the proposition that these isolates should be combined into a single genus containing six species, in the family Intrasporangiaceae in the Actinobacteria. This suggestion receives additional support from DNA-DNA hybridization data and when partial sequences of the rpoC1 gene are compared between these strains. Even though few phenotypic characterization data were obtained for these slowly growing isolates, it is proposed, on the basis of the extensive chemotaxonomic and molecular evidence presented here, that 'Candidatus N. limicola' strains Ben 17, Ben 18, Ben 67, Ben 68 and Ben 74 all be placed into the species Tetrasphaera jenkinsii sp. nov. (type strain Ben 74(T)=DSM 17519(T)=NCIMB 14128(T)), 'Candidatus N. limicola' strain Ben 70 into Tetrasphaera vanveenii sp. nov. (type strain Ben 70(T)=DSM 17518(T)=NCIMB 14127(T)) and 'Candidatus N. limicola' strains Ver 1 and Ver 2 into Tetrasphaera veronensis sp. nov. (type strain Ver 1(T)=DSM 17520(T)=NCIMB 14129(T)).

  10. A rapid fingerprinting approach to distinguish between closely related strains of Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Flood, Beverly; McCrow, John P; Kim, Ji S; Tan, Lynette; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2011-07-01

    One of the big operational problems facing laboratories today is the ability to rapidly distinguish between strains of bacteria that, while physiologically distinct, are nearly impossible to separate based on 16S rRNA gene sequence differences. Here we demonstrate that ITS-DGGE provides a convenient approach to distinguishing between closely related strains of Shewanella, some of which were impossible to separate and identify by 16 rRNA gene sequence alone. Examined Shewanella genomes contain 8-11 copies of rrn (ribosomal RNA gene) operons, and variable size and sequence of 16S-23S ITS (intergenic transcribed spacer) regions which result in distinct ITS-DGGE profiles. Phylogenetic constructions based on ITS are congruent with the genomic trees generated from concatenated core genes as well as with those based on conserved indels, suggesting that ITS patterns appear to be linked with evolutionary lineages and physiology. In addition, three new Shewanella strains (MFC 2, MFC 6, and MFC 14) were isolated from microbial fuel cells enriched from wastewater sludge and identified by ITS-DGGE. Subsequent physiological and electrochemical studies of the three isolates confirmed that each strain is phenotypically/genotypically distinct. Thus, this study validates ITS-DGGE as a quick fingerprint approach to identifying and distinguishing between closely related but novel Shewanella ecotypes.

  11. Microcosm enrichment of biphenyl-degrading microbial communities from soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner-Doebler, I.; Bennasar, A.; Stroempl, C.; Bruemmer, I.; Eichner, C.; Grammel, I.; Moore, E.R.B.; Vancanneyt, M.

    1998-08-01

    A microcosm enrichment approach was employed to isolate bacteria which are representative of long-term biphenyl-adapted microbial communities. Growth of microorganisms was stimulated by incubating soil and sediment samples from polluted and nonpolluted sites with biphenyl crystals. After 6 months, stable population densities between 8 {times} 10{sup 9} and 2 {times} 10{sup 11} CFU/ml were established in the microcosms, and a large percentage of the organisms were able to grow on biphenyl-containing minimal medium plates. A total of 177 biphenyl-degrading strains were subsequently isolated and characterized by their ability to grow on biphenyl in liquid culture and to accumulate a yellow meta cleavage product when they were sprayed with dihydroxy-biphenyl. Isolates were identified by using a polyphasic approach, including fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell proteins, and genomic fingerprinting based on sequence variability in the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer region. In all of the microcosms, isolates identified as Rhodococcus opacus dominated the cultivable microbial community, comprising a cluster of 137 isolates with very similar FAME profiles (Euclidean distances, <10) and identical 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  12. Control of rRNA transcription in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1995-01-01

    The control of rRNA synthesis in response to both extra- and intracellular signals has been a subject of interest to microbial physiologists for nearly four decades, beginning with the observations that Salmonella typhimurium cells grown on rich medium are larger and contain more RNA than those grown on poor medium. This was followed shortly by the discovery of the stringent response in Escherichia coli, which has continued to be the organism of choice for the study of rRNA synthesis. In this review, we summarize four general areas of E. coli rRNA transcription control: stringent control, growth rate regulation, upstream activation, and anti-termination. We also cite similar mechanisms in other bacteria and eukaryotes. The separation of growth rate-dependent control of rRNA synthesis from stringent control continues to be a subject of controversy. One model holds that the nucleotide ppGpp is the key effector for both mechanisms, while another school holds that it is unlikely that ppGpp or any other single effector is solely responsible for growth rate-dependent control. Recent studies on activation of rRNA synthesis by cis-acting upstream sequences has led to the discovery of a new class of promoters that make contact with RNA polymerase at a third position, called the UP element, in addition to the well-known -10 and -35 regions. Lastly, clues as to the role of antitermination in rRNA operons have begun to appear. Transcription complexes modified at the antiterminator site appear to elongate faster and are resistant to the inhibitory effects of ppGpp during the stringent response. PMID:8531889

  13. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Fu, Liyuan; Koganti, Prasanthi P; Wang, Lei; Hand, Jacqelyn M; Ma, Hao; Yao, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergenic regions of genomes. To date, no lincRNAs in non-model teleost fish have been reported. In this report, we present the first reference catalog of 9674 rainbow trout lincRNAs based on analysis of RNA-Seq data from 15 tissues. Systematic analysis revealed that lincRNAs in rainbow trout share many characteristics with those in other mammalian species. They are shorter and lower in exon number and expression level compared with protein-coding genes. They show tissue-specific expression pattern and are typically co-expressed with their neighboring genes. Co-expression network analysis suggested that many lincRNAs are associated with immune response, muscle differentiation, and neural development. The study provides an opportunity for future experimental and computational studies to uncover the functions of lincRNAs in rainbow trout.

  14. Highly rearranged and size-variable chloroplast genomes in conifers II clade (cupressophytes): evolution towards shorter intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2014-04-01

    Although conifers are of immense ecological and economic value, bioengineering of their chloroplasts remains undeveloped. Understanding the chloroplast genomic organization of conifers can facilitate their bioengineering. Members of the conifer II clade (or cupressophytes) are highly diverse in both morphologic features and chloroplast genomic organization. We compared six cupressophyte chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) that represent four of the five cupressophyte families, including three genomes that are first reported here (Agathis dammara, Calocedrus formosana and Nageia nagi). The six cupressophyte cpDNAs have lost a pair of large inverted repeats (IRs) and vary greatly in size, organization and tRNA copies. We demonstrate that cupressophyte cpDNAs have evolved towards reduced size, largely due to shrunken intergenic spacers. In cupressophytes, cpDNA rearrangements are capable of extending intergenic spacers, and synonymous mutations are negatively associated with the size and frequency of rearrangements. The variable cpDNA sizes of cupressophytes may have been shaped by mutational burden and genomic rearrangements. On the basis of cpDNA organization, our analyses revealed that in gymnosperms, cpDNA rearrangements are phylogenetically informative, which supports the 'gnepines' clade. In addition, removal of a specific IR influences the minimal rearrangements required for the gnepines and cupressophyte clades, whereby Pinaceae favours the removal of IRB but cupressophytes exclusion of IRA. This result strongly suggests that different IR copies have been lost from conifers I and II. Our data help understand the complexity and evolution of cupressophyte cpDNAs.

  15. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  16. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  17. An Escherichia coli strain with all chromosomal rRNA operons inactivated: complete exchange of rRNA genes between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Zaporojets, D; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1999-03-02

    Current global phylogenies are built predominantly on rRNA sequences. However, an experimental system for studying the evolution of rRNA is not readily available, mainly because the rRNA genes are highly repeated in most experimental organisms. We have constructed an Escherichia coli strain in which all seven chromosomal rRNA operons are inactivated by deletions spanning the 16S and 23S coding regions. A single E. coli rRNA operon carried by a multicopy plasmid supplies 16S and 23S rRNA to the cell. By using this strain we have succeeded in creating microorganisms that contain only a foreign rRNA operon derived from either Salmonella typhimurium or Proteus vulgaris, microorganisms that have diverged from E. coli about 120-350 million years ago. We also were able to replace the E. coli rRNA operon with an E. coli/yeast hybrid one in which the GTPase center of E. coli 23S rRNA had been substituted by the corresponding domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that, contrary to common belief, coevolution of rRNA with many other components in the translational machinery may not completely preclude the horizontal transfer of rRNA genes.

  18. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  19. Genome-wide CpG island methylation and intergenic demethylation propensities vary among different tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic landscape of cancer includes both focal hypermethylation and broader hypomethylation in a genome-wide manner. By means of a comprehensive genomic analysis on 6637 tissues of 21 tumor types, we here show that the degrees of overall methylation in CpG island (CGI) and demethylation in intergenic regions, defined as ‘backbone’, largely vary among different tumors. Depending on tumor type, both CGI methylation and backbone demethylation are often associated with clinical, epidemiological and biological features such as age, sex, smoking history, anatomic location, histological type and grade, stage, molecular subtype and biological pathways. We found connections between CGI methylation and hypermutability, microsatellite instability, IDH1 mutation, 19p gain and polycomb features, and backbone demethylation with chromosomal instability, NSD1 and TP53 mutations, 5q and 19p loss and long repressive domains. These broad epigenetic patterns add a new dimension to our understanding of tumor biology and its clinical implications. PMID:26464434

  20. Capturing intergenerativity: the use of student reflective journals to identify learning within an undergraduate course in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Davies, Susan M; Reitmaier, Amy B; Smith, Linda Reveling; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The benefits of intergenerational contact between older and young adults have been demonstrated; yet, nursing programs have underexplored the potential of such relationships for enhancing student learning. This article presents an analysis of student reflective journals as part of an evaluation of an undergraduate gerontological nursing course. The course aims to create positive learning experiences by involving older adults as partners in student learning. Older adults are recruited to receive visits from a designated student to share aspects of their life and experiences. Students write reflective journals based on these visits as a method of evaluating their learning. A framework analysis of 80 journals completed by 59 students identified four major themes representing the impact of these visits on student learning: becoming aware, making connections, seeing the unique person, and valuing intergenerational relationships. The analysis suggests the relevance of the concept of intergenerativity in illuminating shared benefits of the practicum experience.

  1. Comparison of the small 16S to 23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons of some Escherichia coli strains of the ECOR collection and E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, J; Martínez-Murcia, A; Antón, A I; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1996-11-01

    Several 16S to 23S spacers of 354 bp have been sequenced from six Escherichia coli strains belonging to the ECOR collection. Four phylogenetically informative variable sites were identified. The results of their comparison confirm the existence of two major phylogenetic branches in this species, as previously reported. Remarkable intercistronic heterogeneity was found in strain ECOR35 and its closest relatives, in which at least one of the operons has suffered a major mutagenic event or has an independent phylogenetic origin.

  2. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3’end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region. PMID:27936158

  3. Diversification of the light-harvesting complex gene family via intra- and intergenic duplications in the coral symbiotic alga Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shinichiro; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Satoh, Nori; Minagawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex (LHC) is an essential component in light energy capture and transduction to facilitate downstream photosynthetic reactions in plant and algal chloroplasts. The unicellular dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium is an endosymbiont of cnidarian animals, including corals and sea anemones, and provides carbohydrates generated through photosynthesis to host animals. Although Symbiodinium possesses a unique LHC gene family, called chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC), its genome-level diversity and evolutionary trajectories have not been investigated. Here, we describe a phylogenetic analysis revealing that many of the LHCs are encoded by highly duplicated genes with multi-subunit polyprotein structures in the nuclear genome of Symbiodinium minutum. This analysis provides an extended list of the LHC gene family in a single organism, including 80 loci encoding polyproteins composed of 145 LHC subunits recovered in the phylogenetic tree. In S. minutum, 5 phylogenetic groups of the Lhcf-type gene family, which is exclusively conserved in algae harboring secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Moreover, 5 groups of the Lhcr-type gene family, of which members are known to be associated with PSI in red algal plastids and secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Notably, members classified within a phylogenetic group of the Lhcf-type (group F1) are highly duplicated, which may explain the presence of an unusually large number of LHC genes in this species. Some gene units were homologous to other units within single loci of the polyprotein genes, whereas intergenic homologies between separate loci were conspicuous in other cases, implying that gene unit 'shuffling' by gene conversion and/or genome rearrangement might have been a driving force for diversification. These results suggest that vigorous intra- and intergenic gene duplication events have resulted in the genomic framework of

  4. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  5. Contribution of Rapid Evolution of the luxR-luxI Intergenic Region to the Diverse Bioluminescence Outputs of Vibrio fischeri Strains Isolated from Different Environments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jeffrey L.; Wollenberg, Michael S.; Colton, Deanna M.; Mandel, Mark J.; Septer, Alecia N.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri serves as a valuable model of bacterial bioluminescence, its regulation, and its functional significance. Light output varies more than 10,000-fold in wild-type isolates from different environments, yet dim and bright strains have similar organization of the light-producing lux genes, with the activator-encoding luxR divergently transcribed from luxICDABEG. By comparing the genomes of bright strain MJ11 and the dimmer ES114, we found that the lux region has diverged more than most shared orthologs, including those flanking lux. Divergence was particularly high in the intergenic sequence between luxR and luxI. Analysis of the intergenic lux region from 18 V. fischeri strains revealed that, with one exception, sequence divergence essentially mirrored strain phylogeny but with relatively high substitution rates. The bases conserved among intergenic luxR-luxI sequences included binding sites for known regulators, such as LuxR and ArcA, and bases of unknown significance, including a striking palindromic repeat. By using this collection of diverse luxR-luxI regions, we found that expression of PluxI-lacZ but not PluxR-lacZ transcriptional reporters correlated with the luminescence output of the strains from which the promoters originated. We also found that exchange of a small stretch of the luxI-luxR intergenic region between two strains largely reversed their relative brightness. Our results show that the luxR-luxI intergenic region contributes significantly to the variable luminescence output among V. fischeri strains isolated from different environments, although other elements of strain backgrounds also contribute. Moreover, the lux system appears to have evolved relatively rapidly, suggesting unknown environment-specific selective pressures. PMID:21317265

  6. Communication between binding sites is required for YqjI regulation of target promoters within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suning; Blahut, Matthew; Wu, Yun; Philipkosky, Katherine E; Outten, F Wayne

    2014-09-01

    The nickel-responsive transcription factor YqjI represses its own transcription and transcription of the divergent yqjH gene, which encodes a novel ferric siderophore reductase. The intergenic region between the two promoters is complex, with multiple sequence features that may impact YqjI-dependent regulation of its two target promoters. We utilized mutagenesis and DNase I footprinting to characterize YqjI regulation of the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region. The results show that YqjI binding results in an extended footprint at the yqjI promoter (site II) compared to the yqjH promoter (site I). Mutagenesis of in vivo gene reporter constructs revealed that the two YqjI binding sites, while separated by nearly 200 bp, appear to communicate in order to provide full YqjI-dependent regulation at the two target promoters. Thus, YqjI binding at both promoters is required for full repression of either promoter, suggesting that the two YqjI binding sites cooperate to control transcription from the divergent promoters. Furthermore, internal deletions that shorten the total length of the intergenic region disrupt the ability of YqjI to regulate the yqjH promoter. Finally, mutagenesis of the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region shows that these sequences are not required for YqjI regulation. These studies provide a complex picture of novel YqjI transcriptional regulation within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region and suggest a possible model for communication between the YqjI binding sites at each target promoter.

  7. Microdiversity of deep-sea Bacillales isolated from Tyrrhenian sea sediments as revealed by ARISA, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and BOX-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ettoumi, Besma; Guesmi, Amel; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Borin, Sara; Najjari, Afef; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-01-01

    With respect to their terrestrial relatives, marine Bacillales have not been sufficiently investigated. In this report, the diversity of deep-sea Bacillales, isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations at 3,425 to 3,580 m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea, was investigated using PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The isolate collection (n=120) was de-replicated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), and phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives of each ARISA haplotype (n=37). Phylogenetic analysis of isolates showed their affiliation to six different genera of low G+C% content Gram-positive Bacillales: Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Terribacillus. Bacillus was the dominant genus represented by the species B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. firmus, typically isolated from marine sediments. The most abundant species in the collection was B. licheniformis (n=85), which showed seven distinct ARISA haplotypes with haplotype H8 being the most dominant since it was identified by 63 isolates. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting to the B. licheniformis sub-collection allowed their separation into five distinct BOX genotypes, suggesting a high level of intraspecies diversity among marine B. licheniformis strains. This species also exhibited distinct strain distribution between seamount and non-seamount stations and was shown to be highly prevalent in non-seamount stations. This study revealed the great microdiversity of marine Bacillales and contributes to understanding the biogeographic distribution of marine bacteria in deep-sea sediments.

  8. Microdiversity of Deep-Sea Bacillales Isolated from Tyrrhenian Sea Sediments as Revealed by ARISA, 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing and BOX-PCR Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ettoumi, Besma; Guesmi, Amel; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Borin, Sara; Najjari, Afef; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-01-01

    With respect to their terrestrial relatives, marine Bacillales have not been sufficiently investigated. In this report, the diversity of deep-sea Bacillales, isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations at 3,425 to 3,580 m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea, was investigated using PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The isolate collection (n=120) was de-replicated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), and phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives of each ARISA haplotype (n=37). Phylogenetic analysis of isolates showed their affiliation to six different genera of low G+C% content Gram-positive Bacillales: Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Terribacillus. Bacillus was the dominant genus represented by the species B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. firmus, typically isolated from marine sediments. The most abundant species in the collection was B. licheniformis (n=85), which showed seven distinct ARISA haplotypes with haplotype H8 being the most dominant since it was identified by 63 isolates. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting to the B. licheniformis sub-collection allowed their separation into five distinct BOX genotypes, suggesting a high level of intraspecies diversity among marine B. licheniformis strains. This species also exhibited distinct strain distribution between seamount and non-seamount stations and was shown to be highly prevalent in non-seamount stations. This study revealed the great microdiversity of marine Bacillales and contributes to understanding the biogeographic distribution of marine bacteria in deep-sea sediments. PMID:24005887

  9. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  10. High prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda and their identification using sizes of intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryo; Qiu, Yongjin; Igarashi, Manabu; Magona, Joseph W; Zhou, Lijia; Ito, Kimihito; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-12-01

    The spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several tick-borne rickettsioses in humans worldwide. This study was intended to determine the prevalence of SFG rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from 7 districts across Uganda. In addition to sequencing of gltA and ompA genes, identification of Rickettsia species based on the sizes of highly variable intergenic spacers, namely, dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet) was carried out. Application of multiplex PCR for simultaneous amplification of 3 spacers combined with capillary electrophoresis separation allowed simple, accurate, and high-throughput fragment sizing with considerable time and cost savings. Rickettsia genus-specific real-time PCR detected 136 positives out of 140 samples, giving an overall prevalence of 97.1%. Most samples (n=113) had a size combination of 225, 195, and 341 bp for dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet), respectively, which was identical to that of R. africae, a causative agent of African tick bite fever. In addition, several samples had size variants in either dksA-xerC or rpmE-tRNA(fMet). Nonetheless, the partial sequences of gltA and ompA genes of samples of all size combinations showed the greatest similarity to R. africae (99.3-100% for gltA and 98.1-100% for ompA). Given these results, it is highly possible that the tested ticks were infected with R. africae or closely related species. This is a first report on molecular genetic detection of R. africae and its high endemicity in Uganda. Clinicians in this country should be aware of this pathogen as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness. This study provided a starting point for the development of Rickettsia species identification based on the sizes of intergenic spacers. The procedure is simple, rapid, and cost-effective to perform; hence it might be particularly well suited for preliminary species identification in epidemiological investigations. The results

  11. [Identification of Salvia shandongensis new species based on sequences of the plastid psbA-trnH intergenic region].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Juan; Han, Jian-Ping; Li, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia; Gu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Yong-Qing

    2013-08-01

    To identify Salvia shandongensis and its relatives at molecular level, the psbA-trnH intergenic region of three species including Salvia shandongensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were amplified and sequenced. Sequences were assembled with CodonCode Aligner. The K2P genetic distances between Salvia shandongensis and its relatives were calculated and UPGMA tree was performed by MEGA5.0. The results indicated that the lengths of psbA-trnH regions of Salvia shandongensis were about 391 bp, while the lengths of psbA-trnH regions of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were about 386 bp. The psbA-trnH sequences showed considerable variations between species and thus were revealed as a promising candidate for barcoding of Salvia shandongensis and its relatives. The intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia shandongensis were 0, while the intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were 0.002 and 0.001 respectively. Additionally, the genetic distance of Salvia shandongensis and Salvia miltiorrhiza ranged from 0.034 to 0.04, and the genetic distance of Salvia shandongensis and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba ranged from 0.005 to 0.008, the intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia shandongensis were much smaller than that of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba; clustering results showed that there were obvious differences between Salvia shandongensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba, which was consistent with morphological characteristics. This study not only firstly provides the scientific basis for establishing the taxonomy position in molecular level and revealing their genetic relationships of S. shandongensis, S. miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba; but also provides DNA molecular identification scientific basis for the development of new medicinal plant resources of Salvia shandongensis. Our results suggest that the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer region can be used as a

  12. Detection and identification of Bartonella sp. in fleas from carnivorous mammals in Andalusia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Márquez, F J; Millán, J; Rodríguez-Liébana, J J; García-Egea, I; Muniain, M A

    2009-12-01

    A total of 559 fleas representing four species (Pulex irritans, Ctenocephalides felis, Ctenocephalides canis and Spilopsyllus cuniculi) collected on carnivores (five Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus, six European wildcat Felis silvestris, 10 common genet Genetta genetta, three Eurasian badger Meles meles, 22 red fox Vulpes vulpes, 87 dogs and 23 cats) in Andalusia, southern Spain, were distributed in 156 pools of monospecific flea from each carnivore, and tested for Bartonella infection in an assay based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the 16 S-23 S rRNA intergenic spacer region. Twenty-one samples (13.5%) were positive and the sequence data showed the presence of four different Bartonella species. Bartonella henselae was detected in nine pools of Ctenocephalides felis from cats and dogs and in three pools of Ctenocephalides canis from cats; Bartonella clarridgeiae in Ctenocephalides felis from a cat, and Bartonella alsatica in Spilopsyllus cuniculi from a wildcat. DNA of Bartonella sp., closely related to Bartonella rochalimae, was found in seven pools of Pulex irritans from foxes. This is the first detection of B. alsatica and Bartonella sp. in the Iberian Peninsula. All of these Bartonella species have been implicated as agents of human diseases. The present survey confirms that carnivores are major reservoirs for Bartonella spp.

  13. Diversity and Antimicrobial Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Rhizosphere of Olive Trees and Desert Truffles of Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Afef; Turki, Yousra; Jaballah, Sana; Boudabous, Abdelatif; Ouzari, Hadda

    2013-01-01

    A total of 119 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated, by culture-dependant method, from rhizosphere samples of olive trees and desert truffles and evaluated for different biotechnological properties. Using the variability of the intergenic spacer 16S-23S and 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates were identified as the genera Lactococcus, Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Weissella, and Enterococcus. All the strains showed proteolytic activity with variable rates 42% were EPS producers, while only 10% showed the ability to grow in 9% NaCl. In addition, a low rate of antibiotic resistance was detected among rhizospheric enterococci. Furthermore, a strong antibacterial activity against plant and/or pathogenic bacteria of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pantoea agglomerans, Pseudomonas savastanoi, the food-borne Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes was recorded. Antifungal activity evaluation showed that Botrytis cinerea was the most inhibited fungus followed by Penicillium expansum, Verticillium dahliae, and Aspergillus niger. Most of the active strains belonged to the genera Enterococcus and Weissella. This study led to suggest that environmental-derived LAB strains could be selected for technological application to control pathogenic bacteria and to protect food safety from postharvest deleterious microbiota. PMID:24151598

  14. Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus and Bartonella species in stray cats on St Kitts, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick J; Moura, Lenita; Miller, Tanya; Thurk, Jaime; Perreault, Nicole; Weil, Adriana; Maggio, Ricardo; Lucas, Helene; Breitschwerdt, Edward

    2010-06-01

    Stray cats trapped in various areas of Basseterre, the capital of St Kitts in the West Indies, were tested for infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) using commercial kits. Of 99 (51 male and 48 female) cats trapped in 2006/7, 15% (12 males and three females) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Of 72 (41 males and 31 females) cats trapped in 2009, 14% (nine males and one female) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed DNA of Bartonella species in whole blood collected from 60/95 (63%) cats trapped in 2006/7. Sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of a convenience sample of nine amplicons and the 11 isolates made from 43 blood samples which were cultured using Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria (BAPGM) enrichment medium revealed B henselae (14) and B clarridgeiae (six).

  15. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for monitoring Streptococcus agalactiae colonization and tissue tropism in experimentally infected tilapia.

    PubMed

    Su, Y-L; Feng, J; Li, Y-W; Bai, J-S; Li, A-X

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has become one of the most important emerging pathogens in the aquaculture industry and has resulted in large economic losses for tilapia farms in China. In this study, three pairs of specific primers were designed and tested for their specificities and sensitivities in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs) after optimization of the annealing temperature. The primer pair IGS-s/IGS-a, which targets the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, was finally chosen, having a detection limit of 8.6 copies of S. agalactiae DNA in a 20 μL reaction mixture. Bacterial tissue tropism was demonstrated by qPCR in Oreochromis niloticus 5 days post-injection with a virulent S. agalactiae strain. Bacterial loads were detected at the highest level in brain, followed by moderately high levels in kidney, heart, spleen, intestines, and eye. Significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in muscle, gill and liver. In addition, significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in the brain of convalescent O. niloticus 14 days post-injection with several different S. agalactiae strains. The qPCR for the detection of S. agalactiae developed in this study provides a quantitative tool for investigating bacterial tissue tropism in infected fish, as well as for monitoring bacterial colonization in convalescent fish.

  16. Mycoplasma corogypsi-associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus).

    PubMed

    Van Wettere, A J; Ley, D H; Scott, D E; Buckanoff, H D; Degernes, L A

    2013-03-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi.

  17. Bacterial Functional Redundancy along a Soil Reclamation Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bei; Crowley, David; Sparovek, Gerd; De Melo, Wanderley Jose; Borneman, James

    2000-01-01

    A strategy to measure bacterial functional redundancy was developed and tested with soils collected along a soil reclamation gradient by determining the richness and diversity of bacterial groups capable of in situ growth on selected carbon substrates. Soil cores were collected from four sites along a transect from the Jamari tin mine site in the Jamari National Forest, Rondonia, RO, Brazil: denuded mine spoil, soil from below the canopy of invading pioneer trees, revegetated soil under new growth on the forest edge, and the forest floor of an adjacent preserved forest. Bacterial population responses were analyzed by amending these soil samples with individual carbon substrates in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was then subjected to a 16S-23S rRNA intergenic analysis to depict the actively growing bacteria from each site. The number and diversity of bacterial groups responding to four carbon substrates (l-serine, l-threonine, sodium citrate, and α-lactose hydrate) increased along the reclamation-vegetation gradient such that the preserved forest soil samples contained the highest functional redundancy for each substrate. These data suggest that bacterial functional redundancy increases in relation to the regrowth of plant communities and may therefore represent an important aspect of the restoration of soil biological functionality to reclaimed mine spoils. They also suggest that bacterial functional redundancy may be a useful indicator of soil quality and ecosystem functioning. PMID:11010883

  18. Phylogeny and Virulence of Naturally Occurring Type III Secretion System-Deficient Pectobacterium Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T.; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2009-01-01

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers. PMID:19411432

  19. Phylogeny and virulence of naturally occurring type III secretion system-deficient Pectobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T; Charkowski, Amy O

    2009-07-01

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers.

  20. Direct visualization of the novel pathogen, Spiroplasma eriocheiris, in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z F; Xia, S Y; Xue, H; Tang, J Q; Ren, Q; Gu, W; Meng, Q G; Wang, W

    2015-09-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is the first spiroplasma strain known to be pathogenic to freshwater crustaceans. It has caused considerable economic losses both in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) and in some other crustaceans. The monitoring of the pathogen in crustacean populations and study of its behaviour in the laboratory require the development of reliable diagnostic tools. In this article, we improved microscopic identification of S. eriocheiris by combining in situ hybridization with specific fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. The established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed simultaneous visualization, identification and localization of S. eriocheiris in the tissues of diseased crayfish P. clarkii and exhibited low background autofluorescence and ideal signal-to-noise ratio. With the advantages of better tissue penetration, potentially more specific and stable, we designed three species-specific oligonucleotide probes utilizing the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of S. eriocheiris. Positive hybridization signals were visualized in haemocytes and connective tissues of hepatopancreas, cardiac muscle and gill from diseased crayfish. This unique distribution pattern matched the pathological changes when diagnosed by H&E staining and indicated that S. eriocheiris probably spread throughout the tissues in P. clarkii by hemokinesis. This assay will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of S. eriocheiris and enhance the early diagnosis of the novel pathogen.

  1. The analysis of core and symbiotic genes of rhizobia nodulating Vicia from different continents reveals their common phylogenetic origin and suggests the distribution of Rhizobium leguminosarum strains together with Vicia seeds.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Martínez, Estela R; Valverde, Angel; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Tejedor, Carmen; Mateos, Pedro F; Santillana, Nery; Zúñiga, Doris; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we analysed the core and symbiotic genes of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia sativa in three soils from the Northwest of Spain, and compared them with other Vicia endosymbionts isolated in other geographical locations. The analysis of rrs, recA and atpD genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer showed that the Spanish strains nodulating V. sativa are phylogenetically close to those isolated from V. sativa and V. faba in different European, American and Asian countries forming a group related to Rhizobium leguminosarum. The analysis of the nodC gene of strains nodulating V. sativa and V. faba in different continents showed they belong to a phylogenetically compact group indicating that these legumes are restrictive hosts. The results of the nodC gene analysis allow the delineation of the biovar viciae showing a common phylogenetic origin of V. sativa and V. faba endosymbionts in several continents. Since these two legume species are indigenous from Europe, our results suggest a world distribution of strains from R. leguminosarum together with the V. sativa and V. faba seeds and a close coevolution among chromosome, symbiotic genes and legume host in this Rhizobium-Vicia symbiosis.

  2. Molecular identification and typing of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei: when is enough enough?

    PubMed

    Antonov, Valery A; Tkachenko, Galina A; Altukhova, Viktoriya V; Savchenko, Sergey S; Zinchenko, Olga V; Viktorov, Dmitry V; Zamaraev, Valery S; Ilyukhin, Vladimir I; Alekseev, Vladimir V

    2008-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are highly pathogenic microorganisms for both humans and animals. Moreover, they are regarded as potential agents of bioterrorism. Thus, rapid and unequivocal detection and identification of these dangerous pathogens is critical. In the present study, we describe the use of an optimized protocol for the early diagnosis of experimental glanders and melioidosis and for the rapid differentiation and typing of Burkholderia strains. This experience with PCR-based identification methods indicates that single PCR targets (23S and 16S rRNA genes, 16S-23S intergenic region, fliC and type III secretion gene cluster) should be used with caution for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, and need to be used alongside molecular methods such as gene sequencing. Several molecular typing procedures have been used to identify genetically related B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates, including ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. However, these methods are time consuming and technically challenging for many laboratories. RAPD, variable amplicon typing scheme, Rep-PCR, BOX-PCR and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis have been recommended by us for the rapid differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains.

  3. Application of four molecular typing methods for analysis of Mycobacterium fortuitum group strains causing post-mammaplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, J L M; Chimara, E; Ferrazoli, L; da Silva Telles, M A; Del Guercio, V M F; Jericó, Z V N; Miyashiro, K; Fortaleza, C M C B; Padoveze, M C; Leão, S C

    2006-02-01

    A cluster of cases of post-augmentation mammaplasty surgical site infections occurred between 2002 and 2004 in Campinas, in the southern region of Brazil. Rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from samples from 12 patients. Eleven isolates were identified as Mycobacterium fortuitum and one as Mycobacterium porcinum by PCR-restriction digestion of the hsp65 gene. These 12 isolates, plus six additional M. fortuitum isolates from non-related patients, were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and three PCR-based techniques: 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotyping; randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR; and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. Four novel M. fortuitum allelic variants were identified by restriction analysis of the ITS fragment. One major cluster, comprising six M. fortuitum isolates, and a second cluster of two isolates, were identified by the four methods. RAPD-PCR and ITS genotyping were less discriminative than ERIC-PCR. ERIC-PCR was comparable to PFGE as a valuable complementary tool for investigation of this type of outbreak.

  4. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii with a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Li; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Yang, Su-Pen; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii are clinically relevant members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (Acb) complex and important nosocomial pathogens. These three species are genetically closely related and phenotypically similar; however, they differ in their epidemiology, antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. In this study, we investigated the use of a multiplex PCR-based assay designed to detect internal fragments of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region and the gyrB and recA genes. The assay was capable of differentiating A. baumannii, A. nosocomialis and A. pittii in a reliable manner. In 23 different reference strains and 89 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species, the assay accurately identified clinically relevant Acb complex species except those 'between 1 and 3' or 'close to 13TU'. None of the non-Acb complex species was misidentified. In an analysis of 1034 positive blood cultures, the assay had a sensitivity of 92.4 % and specificity of 98.2 % for Acb complex identification. Our results show that a single multiplex PCR assay can reliably differentiate clinically relevant Acb complex species. Thus, this method may be used to better understand the clinical differences between infections caused by these species.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-10-28

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels.

  6. The genetic properties of the primary endosymbionts of mealybugs differ from those of other endosymbionts of plant sap-sucking insects.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Linda; Thao, MyLo Ly; Hess, Justin M; Johnson, Marshall W; Baumann, Paul

    2002-07-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Pseudococcidae), like aphids and psyllids, are plant sap-sucking insects that have an obligate association with prokaryotic endosymbionts that are acquired through vertical, maternal transmission. We sequenced two fragments of the genome of Tremblaya princeps, the endosymbiont of mealybugs, which is a member of the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Each of the fragments (35 and 30 kb) contains a copy of 16S-23S-5S rRNA genes. A total of 37 open reading frames were detected, which corresponded to putative rRNA proteins, chaperones, and enzymes of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA replication, protein translation, and RNA synthesis. The genome of T. princeps has a number of properties that distinguish it from the genomes of Buchnera aphidicola and Carsonella ruddii, the endosymbionts of aphids and psyllids, respectively. Among these properties are a high G+C content (57.1 mol%), the same G+C content in intergenic spaces and structural genes, and similar G+C contents of the genes encoding highly and poorly conserved proteins. The high G+C content has a substantial effect on protein composition; about one-third of the residues consist of four amino acids with high-G+C-content codons. Sequence analysis of DNA fragments containing the rRNA operon and adjacent regions from endosymbionts of several mealybug species suggested that there was a single duplication of the rRNA operon and the adjacent genes in an ancestor of the present T. princeps. Subsequently, in one mealybug lineage rpS15, one of the duplicated genes, was retained, while in another lineage it decayed. These results extend the diversity of the types of endosymbiotic associations found in plant sap-sucking insects.

  7. A comparison of fungal communities from four salt marsh plants using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA).

    PubMed

    Torzilli, Albert P; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Chalkley, David; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2006-01-01

    Fungal decomposers are important contributors to the detritus-based food webs of salt marsh ecosystems. Knowing the composition of salt marsh fungal communities is essential in understanding how detritus processing is affected by changes in community dynamics. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to examine the composition of fungal communities associated with four temperate salt marsh plants, Spartina alterniflora (short and tall forms), Juncus roemerianus, Distichlis spicata and Sarcocornia perennis. Plant tissues were homogenized and subjected to a particle-filtration protocol that yielded 106 microm particulate fractions, which were used as a source of fungal isolates and fungal DNA. Genera identified from sporulating cultures demonstrated that the 106 microm particles from each host plant were reliable sources of fungal DNA for ARISA. Analysis of ARISA data by principal component analysis (PCA), principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and species diversity comparisons indicated that the fungal communities from the two grasses, S. alterniflora and D. spicata were more similar to each other than they were to the distinct communities associated with J. roemerianus and S. perennis. Principal component analysis also showed no consistent, seasonal pattern in the composition of these fungal communities. Comparisons of ARISA fingerprints from the different fungal communities and those from pure cultures of selected Spartina ascomycetes supported the host/substrate specificity observed for the fungal communities.

  8. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation.

  9. Large intergenic non-coding RNA-ROR reverses gemcitabine-induced autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Min; Liu, Yu; Wei, Hai-Yan; Lv, Ke-Zhen; Fu, Pei-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the potential role of long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (linc-ROR) in gemcitabine (Gem)-induced autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown Linc-ROR expression in the presence of Gem. Gem treatment alone decreased cell survival and increased both apoptosis and autophagy. Gem treatment also increased the expression of LC3-II, Beclin 1, NOTCH1 and Bcl-2, but decreased expression of p62 and p53. Untreated MDA-MB-231 cell lines strongly expressed linc-ROR, but linc-ROR knockdown decreased cell viability and expression of p62 and p53 while increasing apoptosis. Linc-ROR knockdown also increased LC3-II/β-actin, Beclin 1, NOTCH1, and Bcl-2 expression, as well as the number of autophagic vesicles in MDA-MB-231 cells. Linc-ROR negatively regulated miR-34a expression by inhibiting histone H3 acetylation in the miR-34a promoter. We conclude that linc-ROR suppresses Gem-induced autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells by silencing miR-34a expression. PMID:27449099

  10. Correlation of maple sap composition with bacterial and fungal communities determined by multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA).

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2011-08-01

    During collection, maple sap is contaminated by bacteria and fungi that subsequently colonize the tubing system. The bacterial microbiota has been more characterized than the fungal microbiota, but the impact of both components on maple sap quality remains unclear. This study focused on identifying bacterial and fungal members of maple sap and correlating microbiota composition with maple sap properties. A multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA) method was developed to presumptively identify bacterial and fungal members of maple sap samples collected from 19 production sites during the tapping period. Results indicate that the fungal community of maple sap is mainly composed of yeast related to Mrakia sp., Mrakiella sp., Guehomyces pullulans, Cryptococcus victoriae and Williopsis saturnus. Mrakia, Mrakiella and Guehomyces peaks were identified in samples of all production sites and can be considered dominant and stable members of the fungal microbiota of maple sap. A multivariate analysis based on MARISA profiles and maple sap chemical composition data showed correlations between Candida sake, Janthinobacterium lividum, Williopsis sp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Mrakia sp., Rhodococcus sp., Pseudomonas tolaasii, G. pullulans and maple sap composition at different flow periods. This study provides new insights on the relationship between microbial community and maple sap quality.

  11. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  12. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Crystal M.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2015-01-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The Excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. PMID:26212728

  13. DNA Hypomethylation in Intragenic and Intergenic Enhancer Chromatin of Muscle-Specific Genes Usually Correlates with their Expression.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Paterson, Heather L; Lacey, Michelle; Ehrlich, Melanie

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-specific enhancers are critical for gene regulation. In this study, we help elucidate the contribution of muscle-associated differential DNA methylation to the enhancer activity of highly muscle-specific genes. By bioinformatic analysis of 44 muscle-associated genes, we show that preferential gene expression in skeletal muscle (SkM) correlates with SkM-specific intragenic and intergenic enhancer chromatin and overlapping foci of DNA hypomethylation. Some genes, e.g., CASQ1 and FBXO32, displayed broad regions of both SkM- and heart-specific enhancer chromatin but exhibited focal SkM-specific DNA hypomethylation. Half of the genes had SkM-specific super-enhancers. In contrast to simple enhancer/gene-expression correlations, a super-enhancer was associated with the myogenic MYOD1 gene in both SkM and myoblasts even though SkM has < 1 percent as much MYOD1 expression. Local chromatin differences in this super-enhancer probably contribute to the SkM/myoblast differential expression. Transfection assays confirmed the tissue-specificity of the 0.3-kb core enhancer within MYOD1's super-enhancer and demonstrated its repression by methylation of its three CG dinucleotides. Our study suggests that DNA hypomethylation increases enhancer tissue-specificity and that SkM super-enhancers sometimes are poised for physiologically important, rapid up-regulation.

  14. DNA Hypomethylation in Intragenic and Intergenic Enhancer Chromatin of Muscle-Specific Genes Usually Correlates with their Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Paterson, Heather L.; Lacey, Michelle; Ehrlich, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific enhancers are critical for gene regulation. In this study, we help elucidate the contribution of muscle-associated differential DNA methylation to the enhancer activity of highly muscle-specific genes. By bioinformatic analysis of 44 muscle-associated genes, we show that preferential gene expression in skeletal muscle (SkM) correlates with SkM-specific intragenic and intergenic enhancer chromatin and overlapping foci of DNA hypomethylation. Some genes, e.g., CASQ1 and FBXO32, displayed broad regions of both SkM- and heart-specific enhancer chromatin but exhibited focal SkM-specific DNA hypomethylation. Half of the genes had SkM-specific super-enhancers. In contrast to simple enhancer/gene-expression correlations, a super-enhancer was associated with the myogenic MYOD1 gene in both SkM and myoblasts even though SkM has < 1 percent as much MYOD1 expression. Local chromatin differences in this super-enhancer probably contribute to the SkM/myoblast differential expression. Transfection assays confirmed the tissue-specificity of the 0.3-kb core enhancer within MYOD1’s super-enhancer and demonstrated its repression by methylation of its three CG dinucleotides. Our study suggests that DNA hypomethylation increases enhancer tissue-specificity and that SkM super-enhancers sometimes are poised for physiologically important, rapid up-regulation. PMID:28018137

  15. A New Intergenic α-Globin Deletion (α-αΔ125) Found in a Kabyle Population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Lacan, Philippe; Cadet, Estelle; Bignet, Patricia; Dumesnil, Cécile; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Joly, Philippe; Rochette, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We have identified a deletion of 125 bp (α-α(Δ125)) (NG_000006.1: g.37040_37164del) in the α-globin gene cluster in a Kabyle population. A combination of singlex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have been used to identify the molecular defect. Sequencing of the abnormal PCR amplification product revealed a novel α1-globin promoter deletion. The endpoints of the deletion were characterized by sequencing the deletion junctions of the mutated allele. The observed deletion was located 378 bp upstream of the α1-globin gene transcription initiation site and leaves the α2 gene intact. In some patients, the α-α(Δ125) deletion was shown to segregate with Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) and/or Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) or a β-thalassemic allele. The α-α(Δ125) deletion has no discernible effect on red cell indices when inherited with no other abnormal globin genes. The family study demonstrated that the deletion is heritable. This is the only example of an intergenic α2-α1 non coding DNA deletion, leaving the α2-globin gene and the α1 coding part intact.

  16. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  17. Genome-wide analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in chickpea and their potential role in flower development

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Niraj; Singh, Vikash Kumar; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs constitute a major portion of the transcriptome in most of eukaryotes. Long non-coding transcripts originating from the DNA segment present between the protein coding genes are termed as long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). Several evidences suggest the role of lincRNAs in regulation of various biological processes. In this study, we identified a total of 2248 lincRNAs in chickpea using RNA-seq data from eight successive stages of flower development and three vegetative tissues via an optimized pipeline. Different characteristic features of lincRNAs were studied and compared with those of predicted mRNAs in chickpea. Further, we utilized a method using network propagation algorithm to reveal the putative function of lincRNAs in plants. In total, at least 79% of the identified chickpea lincRNAs were assigned with a putative function. A comprehensive expression profiling revealed differential expression patterns and tissue specificity of lincRNAs in different stages of flower development in chickpea. In addition, potential lincRNAs-miRNA interactions were explored for the predicted lincRNAs in chickpea. These findings will pave the way for understanding the role of lincRNAs in the regulatory mechanism underlying flower development in chickpea and other legumes. PMID:27628568

  18. Identification and functional analysis of long intergenic noncoding RNA genes in porcine pre-implantation embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingyu; Gao, Zhengling; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptome studies have identified thousands of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), some of which play important roles in pre-implantation embryonic development (PED). Pig is an ideal model for reproduction, however, porcine lincRNAs are still poorly characterized and it is unknown if they are associated with porcine PED. Here we reconstructed 195,531 transcripts in 122,007 loci, and identified 7,618 novel lincRNAs from 4,776 loci based on published RNA-seq data. These lincRNAs show low exon number, short length, low expression level, tissue-specific expression and cis-acting, which is consistent with previous reports in other species. By weighted co-expression network analysis, we identified 5 developmental stages specific co-expression modules. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these specific co-expression modules suggested that many lincRNAs are associated with cell cycle regulation, transcription and metabolism to regulate the process of zygotic genome activation. Futhermore, we identified hub lincRNAs in each co-expression modules, and found two lincRNAs TCONS_00166370 and TCONS_00020255 may play a vital role in porcine PED. This study systematically analyze lincRNAs in pig and provides the first catalog of lincRNAs that might function as gene regulatory factors of porcine PED. PMID:27922056

  19. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  20. Polyphasic taxonomic revision of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex: proposal to emend the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and reclassify current R. syzygii strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. syzygii subsp. nov., R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov., banana blood disease bacterium strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. and R. solanacearum phylotype I and III strains as Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Safni, Irda; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Fegan, Mark; Sly, Lindsay; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex has long been recognized as a group of phenotypically diverse strains that can be subdivided into four phylotypes. Using a polyphasic taxonomic approach on an extensive set of strains, this study provides evidence for a taxonomic and nomenclatural revision of members of this complex. Data obtained from phylogenetic analysis of 16S-23S rRNA ITS gene sequences, 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) region sequences and partial endoglucanase (egl) gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations demonstrate that the R. solanacearum species complex comprises three genospecies. One of these includes the type strain of Ralstonia solanacearum and consists of strains of R. solanacearum phylotype II only. The second genospecies includes the type strain of Ralstonia syzygii and contains only phylotype IV strains. This genospecies is subdivided into three distinct groups, namely R. syzygii, the causal agent of Sumatra disease on clove trees in Indonesia, R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains isolated from different host plants mostly from Indonesia, and strains of the blood disease bacterium (BDB), the causal agent of the banana blood disease, a bacterial wilt disease in Indonesia that affects bananas and plantains. The last genospecies is composed of R. solanacearum strains that belong to phylotypes I and III. As these genospecies are also supported by phenotypic data that allow the differentiation of the three genospecies, the following taxonomic proposals are made: emendation of the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and descriptions of Ralstonia syzygii subsp. nov. (type strain R 001(T) = LMG 10661(T) = DSM 7385(T)) for the current R. syzygii strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 464(T) = LMG 27703(T) = DSM 27478(T)) for the current R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 627(T

  1. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  2. The rRNA evolution and procaryotic phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of ribosomal RNA primary structure allow reconstruction of phylogenetic trees for prokaryotic organisms. Such studies reveal major dichotomy among the bacteria that separates them into eubacteria and archaebacteria. Both groupings are further segmented into several major divisions. The results obtained from 5S rRNA sequences are essentially the same as those obtained with the 16S rRNA data. In the case of Gram negative bacteria the ribosomal RNA sequencing results can also be directly compared with hybridization studies and cytochrome c sequencing studies. There is again excellent agreement among the several methods. It seems likely then that the overall picture of microbial phylogeny that is emerging from the RNA sequence studies is a good approximation of the true history of these organisms. The RNA data allow examination of the evolutionary process in a semi-quantitative way. The secondary structures of these RNAs are largely established. As a result it is possible to recognize examples of local structural evolution. Evolutionary pathways accounting for these events can be proposed and their probability can be assessed.

  3. Higher-order structure of rRNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative search for phylogenetically covarying basepair replacements within potential helices has been the only reliable method to determine the correct secondary structure of the 3 rRNAs, 5S, 16S, and 23S. The analysis of 16S from a wide phylogenetic spectrum, that includes various branches of the eubacteria, archaebacteria, eucaryotes, in addition to the mitochondria and chloroplast, is beginning to reveal the constraints on the secondary structures of these rRNAs. Based on the success of this analysis, and the assumption that higher order structure will also be phylogenetically conserved, a comparative search was initiated for positions that show co-variation not involved in secondary structure helices. From a list of potential higher order interactions within 16S rRNA, two higher-order interactions are presented. The first of these interactions involves positions 570 and 866. Based on the extent of phylogenetic covariation between these positions while maintaining Watson-Crick pairing, this higher-order interaction is considered proven. The other interaction involves a minimum of six positions between the 1400 and 1500 regions of the 16S rRNA. Although these patterns of covariation are not as striking as the 570/866 interaction, the fact that they all exist in an anti-parallel fashion and that experimental methods previously implicated these two regions of the molecule in tRNA function suggests that these interactions be given serious consideration.

  4. MexZ-mediated regulation of mexXY multidrug efflux pump expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by binding on the mexZ-mexX intergenic DNA.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Eda, Shima; Gotoh, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Eisaku; Nakae, Taiji

    2004-09-01

    MexZ is a transcriptional regulator of the mexXY multidrug transporter operon, which confers aminoglycoside resistance on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Highly purified MexZ showed direct binding with a specific site of the mexZ-mexX intergenic DNA when probed by a gel retardation assay. Both in vitro chemical cross-linking experiments and an in vivo two-hybrid expression system showed that the active form of MexZ, which is capable of binding the intergenic DNA, appeared to be a dimer. These results explain the mechanism by which MexZ represses transcription of the mexXY operon, but do not explain the substrate-induced hyperproduction of MexXY. The presence of inducer antibiotic in the gel-retardation assay mixture failed to detect altered MexZ-probe DNA interaction suggesting the possible involvement of an additional regulator.

  5. Inferring a role for methylation of intergenic DNA in the regulation of genes aberrantly expressed in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Almamun, Md; Kholod, Olha; Stuckel, Alexei J; Levinson, Benjamin T; Johnson, Nathan T; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2017-01-17

    A complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of pre-B ALL is lacking. In this study, we integrated DNA methylation data and gene expression data to elucidate the impact of aberrant intergenic DNA methylation on gene expression in pre-B ALL. We found a subset of differentially methylated intergenic loci that were associated with altered gene expression in pre-B ALL patients. Notably, 84% of these regions were also bound by transcription factors (TF) known to play roles in differentiation and B-cell development in a lymphoblastoid cell line. Further, an overall downregulation of eRNA transcripts was observed in pre-B ALL patients and these transcripts were associated with the downregulation of putative target genes involved in B-cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. The identification of novel putative regulatory regions highlights the significance of intergenic DNA sequences and may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of pre-B ALL.

  6. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  7. Organization and nucleotide sequence analysis of a ribosomal RNA gene cluster from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Gagnat, J; Guérineau, M

    1989-06-30

    The Streptomyces ambofaciens genome contains four rRNA gene clusters. These copies are called rrnA, B, C and D. The complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of rrnD has been determined. These genes possess striking similarity with other eubacterial rRNA genes. Comparison with other rRNA sequences allowed the putative localization of the sequences encoding mature rRNAs. The structural genes are arranged in the order 16S-23S-5S and are tightly linked. The mature rRNAs are predicted to contain 1528, 3120 and 120 nt, for the 16S, 23S and 5S rRNAs, respectively. The 23S rRNA is, to our knowledge, the longest of all sequenced prokaryotic 23S rRNAs. When compared to other large rRNAs it shows insertions at positions where they are also present in archaebacterial and in eukaryotic large rRNAs. Secondary structure models of S. ambofaciens rRNAs are proposed, based upon those existing for other bacterial rRNAs. Positions of putative transcription start points and of a termination signal are suggested. The corresponding putative primary transcript, containing the 16S, 23S and 5S rRNAs plus flanking regions, was folded into a secondary structure, and sequences possibly involved in rRNA maturation are described. The G + C content of the rRNA gene cluster is low (57%) compared with the overall G + C content of Streptomyces DNA (73%).

  8. Species identification through mitochondrial rRNA genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Tan, Zongqing; Wang, Daren; Xue, Ling; Guan, Min-xin; Huang, Taosheng; Li, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Inter-species and intraspecific variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were observed in a bioinformatics analysis of the mitochondrial genomic sequences of 11 animal species. Some highly conserved regions were identified in the mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of these species. To test whether these sequences are universally conserved, primers were designed to target the conserved regions of these two genes and were used to amplify DNA from 21 animal tissues, including two of unknown origin. By sequencing these PCR amplicons and aligning the sequences to a database of non-redundant nucleotide sequences, it was confirmed that these amplicons aligned specifically to mtDNA sequences from the expected species of origin. This molecular technique, when combined with bioinformatics, provides a reliable method for the taxonomic classification of animal tissues. PMID:24522485

  9. Mutations in the embC-embA Intergenic Region Contribute to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistance to Ethambutol

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhenling; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Song; Yang, Hua; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol (EMB) threatens the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). We investigated the role of mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region (IGR) in EMB-resistant clinical strains from east China. A total of 767 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were collected and analyzed for their drug susceptibility to EMB using the MGIT 960 system and MIC assay, and the embC-embA IGRs of these strains were sequenced. The transcriptional activity of the embC-embA IGR mutations was examined by reporter gene assays in recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains, and the effect of IGR mutations on its binding to EmbR, a transcription regulator of embAB, was analyzed by gel mobility shift assays. Correlation coefficient analysis showed that the embC-embA IGR mutation is associated with EMB resistance. The clinical strains carrying IGR mutations had a much higher level of embA and embB mRNA as well as higher MICs to EMB. IGR mutations had higher transcriptional activity when transformed into M. smegmatis strains. Mutated IGRs bound to EmbR with much higher affinity than wild-type fragments. The sensitivity of molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) with IGR mutations as an additional marker increased from 65.5% to 73.5%. Mutations of the embC-embA IGR enhance the binding of EmbR to the promoter region of embAB and increase the expression of embAB, thus contributing to EMB resistance. Therefore, identification of IGR mutations as markers of EMB resistance could increase the sensitivity of molecular DST. PMID:25182646

  10. Mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region contribute to Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenling; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Song; Yang, Hua; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi; Ge, Baoxue

    2014-11-01

    The rapid increase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethambutol (EMB) threatens the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). We investigated the role of mutations in the embC-embA intergenic region (IGR) in EMB-resistant clinical strains from east China. A total of 767 M. tuberculosis clinical strains were collected and analyzed for their drug susceptibility to EMB using the MGIT 960 system and MIC assay, and the embC-embA IGRs of these strains were sequenced. The transcriptional activity of the embC-embA IGR mutations was examined by reporter gene assays in recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains, and the effect of IGR mutations on its binding to EmbR, a transcription regulator of embAB, was analyzed by gel mobility shift assays. Correlation coefficient analysis showed that the embC-embA IGR mutation is associated with EMB resistance. The clinical strains carrying IGR mutations had a much higher level of embA and embB mRNA as well as higher MICs to EMB. IGR mutations had higher transcriptional activity when transformed into M. smegmatis strains. Mutated IGRs bound to EmbR with much higher affinity than wild-type fragments. The sensitivity of molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) with IGR mutations as an additional marker increased from 65.5% to 73.5%. Mutations of the embC-embA IGR enhance the binding of EmbR to the promoter region of embAB and increase the expression of embAB, thus contributing to EMB resistance. Therefore, identification of IGR mutations as markers of EMB resistance could increase the sensitivity of molecular DST.

  11. Nested PCR targeting intergenic spacer (IGS) in genotyping of Giardia duodenalis isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic infected Egyptian school children.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Eman M; Ismail, Ola A; Mokhtar, Amira B; Mohamed, Samer E; Saad, Rania M

    2017-02-01

    Distinct sequences of Giardia duodenalis assemblages raised the hypothesis that certain assemblages may contribute to its clinical outcome. However, sequences analysis is time consuming, expensive, and needs many manual operations. Nested PCR targeting intergenic spacer (IGS) region was applied successfully to genotype G. duodenalis. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of G. duodenalis assemblages among giardiasis school children and its relation to the presence of symptoms using nested IGS/PCR. Of 65 microscopically confirmed Giardia-positive samples, 65 samples were genotyped proving high sensitivity (92.3%) of IGS/PCR. Negative IGS/PCR samples were also negative for β-giardin gene. Subassemblage AI was the commonest with 66.6% (20/30) among asymptomatic children compared to 53.3% (16/30) of symptomatic, while assemblage B was found in 40% (12/30) of symptomatic compared to 20% (6/30) of asymptomatic. The difference was significant. AII was only found in asymptomatic with 13.4% (4/30), while mixed infections (AI&B) were recorded only in 6.6% (2/30) of symptomatic group. A significant relation was found between younger children susceptibility for AI and B infections as presented in 77.7 (12/16) and 83.3% (10/12) of symptomatic, respectively, and 80 (16/80) and 33.4% (2/4) of asymptomatic, respectively. Significant relations were found between AI with intermittent diarrhea and B with chronic. A significant relation was found between assemblage distributions and heavy infection intensity. In conclusion, higher incidence of assemblage B among symptomatic children compared to asymptomatic could denote its possible pathogenic potential.

  12. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, Kayvan; Asad, Sultan; Zhang, Guangmei; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them. PMID:27760142

  13. Sequence subfamilies of satellite repeats related to rDNA intergenic spacer are differentially amplified on Vicia sativa chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Macas, Jiri; Navrátilová, Alice; Mészáros, Tibor

    2003-10-01

    We cloned and sequenced the Vicia sativa 25S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) and the satellite repeat S12, thought to be related to the spacer sequence. The spacer was shown to contain three types of subrepeats (A, B, and C) with monomers of 173 bp (A), 10 bp (B), and 66 bp (C), separated by unique or partially duplicated sequences. Two spacer variants were detected in V. sativa that differed in length (2990 and 3168 bp) owing to an extra copy of the subrepeat A. The A subrepeats were also shown to be highly homologous to the satellite repeat S12, which is located in large clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 6, and is not associated with the rDNA loci. Sequencing of additional S12 clones retrieved from a shotgun genomic library allowed definition of three subfamilies of this repeat based on minor differences in their nucleotide sequences. Two of these subfamilies could be discriminated from the rest of the S12 sequences as well as from the IGS A subrepeats using specific oligonucleotide primers that labeled only a subset of the S12 loci when used in the primed in situ DNA labeling (PRINS) reaction on mitotic chromosomes. These experiments showed that, in spite of the high overall similarity of the IGS A subrepeats and the S12 satellite repeats, there are S12 subfamilies that are divergent from the common consensus and are present at only some of the chromosomes containing the S12 loci. Thus, the subfamilies may have evolved at these loci following the spreading of the A subrepeats from the IGS to genomic regions outside the rDNA clusters.

  14. Microbial analysis of bite marks by sequence comparison of streptococcal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Darnell M; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; García, José A; Mason, Chris; Rand, Christy J; Kieser, Jules A; Tompkins, Geoffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Bite mark injuries often feature in violent crimes. Conventional morphometric methods for the forensic analysis of bite marks involve elements of subjective interpretation that threaten the credibility of this field. Human DNA recovered from bite marks has the highest evidentiary value, however recovery can be compromised by salivary components. This study assessed the feasibility of matching bacterial DNA sequences amplified from experimental bite marks to those obtained from the teeth responsible, with the aim of evaluating the capability of three genomic regions of streptococcal DNA to discriminate between participant samples. Bite mark and teeth swabs were collected from 16 participants. Bacterial DNA was extracted to provide the template for PCR primers specific for streptococcal 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene, 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB). High throughput sequencing (GS FLX 454), followed by stringent quality filtering, generated reads from bite marks for comparison to those generated from teeth samples. For all three regions, the greatest overlaps of identical reads were between bite mark samples and the corresponding teeth samples. The average proportions of reads identical between bite mark and corresponding teeth samples were 0.31, 0.41 and 0.31, and for non-corresponding samples were 0.11, 0.20 and 0.016, for 16S rRNA, ITS and rpoB, respectively. The probabilities of correctly distinguishing matching and non-matching teeth samples were 0.92 for ITS, 0.99 for 16S rRNA and 1.0 for rpoB. These findings strongly support the tenet that bacterial DNA amplified from bite marks and teeth can provide corroborating information in the identification of assailants.

  15. Insights into the phylogenetic positions of photosynthetic bacteria obtained from 5S rRNA and 16S rRNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of complete 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences established that the secondary structure of these molecules is highly conserved. Earlier work with 5S rRNA secondary structure revealed that when structural conservation exists the alignment of sequences is straightforward. The constancy of structure implies minimal functional change. Under these conditions a uniform evolutionary rate can be expected so that conditions are favorable for phylogenetic tree construction.

  16. Symbiotic diversity of Ensifer meliloti strains recovered from various legume species in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, Bacem; Badri, Yazid; Saïdi, Sabrine; de Lajudie, Philippe; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2009-12-01

    Ensifer meliloti (formerly Sinorhizobium meliloti) was first considered as a specific microsymbiont of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella. However, strains of E. meliloti were recovered from root nodules of various legume species and their symbiotic status still remains unclear. Here, we further investigate the specificity of these strains. A collection of 47 E. meliloti strains isolated in Tunisia from root nodules of Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa, Medicago ciliaris, Medicago laciniata, Medicago marina, Medicago scutellata, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum, Argyrolobium uniflorum, Lotus creticus, Lotus roudairei, Ononis natrix, Retama raetam, Genista saharae, Acacia tortilis, Hedysarum carnosum and Hippocrepis bicontorta were examined by REP-PCR fingerprinting, PCR-RFLPs of the 16S-23S rDNA IGS, the nifH gene and nifD-K intergenic spacer, and sequencing of 16S rRNA and nodA genes. Their nodulation range was also assessed by cross-inoculation experiments. No clear correlation was found between chromosomal backgrounds and host plants of origin. The nodulation polyvalence of the species E. meliloti was associated with a high symbiotic heterogeneity. On the basis of PCR-RFLP data from the nifH gene and nifD-K intergenic spacer, E. meliloti strains isolated from non-Medicago legumes harboured distinct genes and possessed wider host ranges. Some strains did not nodulate Medicago species. On the basis of nodA phylogeny, the majority of the Tunisian strains, including strains from Medicago, harboured distinct nodA alleles more related to those found in E. medicae than those found in E. meliloti. However, more work is still needed to characterize this group further. The diversity observed among M. laciniata isolates, which was supported by nodA phylogeny, nifH typing and the efficiency profile on M. ciliaris, indicated that what was thought to be bv. medicaginis is certainly heterogeneous.

  17. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  18. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza; Waxman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  19. [Effects of intergenic interaction of the high pigmentation gene hp-2(dg) (high pigment-2 dark green) with the gene B (beta-carotene) in tomato].

    PubMed

    Kuzemenskiĭ, A V

    2008-01-01

    It was shown that during intergenic interaction of genes hp-2(dg) and B in dihomozygote an additive factor is formed activating biogenesis of beta-carotene in tomato fruits. In the genotype B/B//hp-2(dg)/hp-2(dg) there is preserved the positive effects of the gene hp-2(dg) on the content of ascorbic acid and the negative one on the content of titrated acids. With this stabilization of the gene hp-2(dg) genetic depression is observed, which is manifested in the increased productivity of B/B//hp-2(dg)/hp-2(dg)-genotypes.

  20. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  1. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  2. Specific binding of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans RbcR to the intergenic sequence between the rbc operon and the rbcR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, T; Sugawara, K

    1993-01-01

    The presence of two sets (rbcL1-rbcS1 and rbcL2-rbcS2) of rbc operons has been demonstrated in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Fe1 (T. Kusano, T. Takeshima, C. Inoue, and K. Sugawara, J. Bacteriol. 173:7313-7323, 1991). A possible regulatory gene, rbcR, 930 bp long and possibly translated into a 309-amino-acid protein, was found upstream from the rbcL1 gene as a single copy. The gene is located divergently to rbcL1 with a 144-bp intergenic sequence. As in the cases of the Chromatium vinosum RbcR and Alcaligenes eutrophus CfxR, T. ferrooxidans RbcR is thought to be a new member of the LysR family, and these proteins share 46.5 and 42.8% identity, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays showed that T. ferrooxidans RbcR, produced in Escherichia coli, binds specifically to the intergenic sequence between rbcL1 and rbcR. Footprinting and site-directed mutagenesis experiments further demonstrated that RbcR binds to overlapping promoter elements of the rbcR and rbcL1 genes. The above data strongly support the participation of RbcR in regulation of the rbcL1-rbcS1 operon and the rbcR gene in T. ferrooxidans. Images PMID:8432695

  3. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  4. Identification of SmtB/ArsR cis elements and proteins in archaea using the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED)

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Michael; Slick, David; Sarto, Mickey J.; Roberts, David; Roberts, Jacqueline; Barber, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects have revealed an apparently wide distribution of SmtB/ArsR metal-responsive transcriptional regulators among prokaryotes. Using a position-dependent weight matrix approach, prokaryotic genome sequences were screened for SmtB/ArsR DNA binding sites using data derived from intergenic sequences upstream of orthologous genes encoding these regulators. Sixty SmtB/ArsR operators linked to metal detoxification genes, including nine among various archaeal species, are predicted among 230 annotated and draft prokaryotic genome sequences. Independent multiple sequence alignments of putative operator sites and corresponding winged helix-turn-helix motifs define sequence signatures for the DNA binding activity of this SmtB/ArsR subfamily. Prediction of an archaeal SmtB/ArsR based upon these signature sequences is confirmed using purified Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A protein and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Tools used in this study have been incorporated into a web application, the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED; http://bioinformatics.uwp.edu/~PIGED/home.htm), facilitating comparable studies. Use of this tool and establishment of orthology based on DNA binding signatures holds promise for deciphering potential cellular roles of various archaeal winged helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators. PMID:16877320

  5. Sequencing Bands of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints for Characterization and Microscale Distribution of Soil Bacterium Populations Responding to Mercury Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Ranjard, Lionel; Brothier, Elisabeth; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    Two major emerging bands (a 350-bp band and a 650-bp band) within the RISA (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) profile of a soil bacterial community spiked with Hg(II) were selected for further identification of the populations involved in the response of the community to the added metal. The bands were cut out from polyacrylamide gels, cloned, characterized by restriction analysis, and sequenced for phylogenetic affiliation of dominant clones. The sequences were the intergenic spacer between the rrs and rrl genes and the first 130 nucleotides of the rrl gene. Comparison of sequences derived from the 350-bp band to The GenBank database permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to low G+C firmicutes (Clostridium-like genera), while the 650-bp band permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to β-proteobacteria (Ralstonia-like genera). Oligonucleotide probes specific for the identified dominant bacteria were designed and hybridized with the RISA profiles derived from the control and spiked communities. These studies confirmed the contribution of these populations to the community response to the metal. Hybridization of the RISA profiles from subcommunities (bacterial pools associated with different soil microenvironments) also permitted to characterize the distribution and the dynamics of these populations at a microscale level following mercury spiking. PMID:11097911

  6. Characteristics of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) rRNA genes of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera): structure, organization, and retrotransposable elements

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J J; Johnston, J S; Cannone, J J; Gutell, R R

    2006-01-01

    As an accompanying manuscript to the release of the honey bee genome, we report the entire sequence of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences (rDNA) and related internally and externally transcribed spacer regions of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Apocrita). Additionally, we predict secondary structures for the mature rRNA molecules based on comparative sequence analyses with other arthropod taxa and reference to recently published crystal structures of the ribosome. In general, the structures of honey bee rRNAs are in agreement with previously predicted rRNA models from other arthropods in core regions of the rRNA, with little additional expansion in non-conserved regions. Our multiple sequence alignments are made available on several public databases and provide a preliminary establishment of a global structural model of all rRNAs from the insects. Additionally, we provide conserved stretches of sequences flanking the rDNA cistrons that comprise the externally transcribed spacer regions (ETS) and part of the intergenic spacer region (IGS), including several repetitive motifs. Finally, we report the occurrence of retrotransposition in the nuclear large subunit rDNA, as R2 elements are present in the usual insertion points found in other arthropods. Interestingly, functional R1 elements usually present in the genomes of insects were not detected in the honey bee rRNA genes. The reverse transcriptase products of the R2 elements are deduced from their putative open reading frames and structurally aligned with those from another hymenopteran insect, the jewel wasp Nasonia (Pteromalidae). Stretches of conserved amino acids shared between Apis and Nasonia are illustrated and serve as potential sites for primer design, as target amplicons within these R2 elements may serve as novel phylogenetic markers for Hymenoptera. Given the impending completion of the sequencing of the Nasonia genome

  7. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  8. Trans-splicing and RNA editing of LSU rRNA in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Kiethega, Georgette N.; Burger, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) often display reduced size and deviant secondary structure, and sometimes are fragmented, as are their corresponding genes. Here we report a mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt-LSU rRNA) with unprecedented features. In the protist Diplonema, the rnl gene is split into two pieces (modules 1 and 2, 534- and 352-nt long) that are encoded by distinct mitochondrial chromosomes, yet the rRNA is continuous. To reconstruct the post-transcriptional maturation pathway of this rRNA, we have catalogued transcript intermediates by deep RNA sequencing and RT-PCR. Gene modules are transcribed separately. Subsequently, transcripts are end-processed, the module-1 transcript is polyuridylated and the module-2 transcript is polyadenylated. The two modules are joined via trans-splicing that retains at the junction ∼26 uridines, resulting in an extent of insertion RNA editing not observed before in any system. The A-tail of trans-spliced molecules is shorter than that of mono-module 2, and completely absent from mitoribosome-associated mt-LSU rRNA. We also characterize putative antisense transcripts. Antisense-mono-modules corroborate bi-directional transcription of chromosomes. Antisense-mt-LSU rRNA, if functional, has the potential of guiding concomitantly trans-splicing and editing of this rRNA. Together, these findings open a window on the investigation of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate multiple and biochemically diverse post-transcriptional events. PMID:24259427

  9. rRNA promoter activity in the fast-growing bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Sarah E; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2002-03-01

    The bacterium Vibrio natriegens can double with a generation time of less than 10 min (R. G. Eagon, J. Bacteriol. 83:736-737, 1962), a growth rate that requires an extremely high rate of protein synthesis. We show here that V. natriegens' high potential for protein synthesis results from an increase in ribosome numbers with increasing growth rate, as has been found for other bacteria. We show that V. natriegens contains a large number of rRNA operons, and its rRNA promoters are extremely strong. The V. natriegens rRNA core promoters are at least as active in vitro as Escherichia coli rRNA core promoters with either E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) or V. natriegens RNAP, and they are activated by UP elements, as in E. coli. In addition, the E. coli transcription factor Fis activated V. natriegens rrn P1 promoters in vitro. We conclude that the high capacity for ribosome synthesis in V. natriegens results from a high capacity for rRNA transcription, and the high capacity for rRNA transcription results, at least in part, from the same factors that contribute most to high rates of rRNA transcription in E. coli, i.e., high gene dose and strong activation by UP elements and Fis.

  10. Chromatin endogenous cleavage and psoralen crosslinking assays to analyze rRNA gene chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griesenbeck, Joachim; Wittner, Manuel; Charton, Romain; Conconi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes co-exist in two different chromatin states: actively transcribed (nucleosome depleted) chromatin, and nontranscribed (nucleosomal) chromatin. The presence of two rRNA gene populations compromises the interpretation of analyses obtained by the standard biochemical methods that are used to study chromatin structure (e.g., nuclease digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation). Here, we provide a protocol to investigate the specific association of proteins with the two rRNA gene chromatin populations in vivo, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of rRNA gene clusters in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among multigene families, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the most frequently studied and have been explored as cytogenetic markers to study the evolutionary history of karyotypes among animals and plants. In this report, we applied cytogenetic and genomic methods to investigate the organization of rRNA genes among cichlid fishes. Cichlids are a group of fishes that are of increasing scientific interest due to their rapid and convergent adaptive radiation, which has led to extensive ecological diversity. Results The present paper reports the cytogenetic mapping of the 5S rRNA genes from 18 South American, 22 African and one Asian species and the 18S rRNA genes from 3 African species. The data obtained were comparatively analyzed with previously published information related to the mapping of rRNA genes in cichlids. The number of 5S rRNA clusters per diploid genome ranged from 2 to 15, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 chromosomes bearing a 5S rDNA cluster. Regarding 18S rDNA mapping, the number of sites ranged from 2 to 6, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 sites per diploid genome. Furthermore, searching the Oreochromis niloticus genome database led to the identification of a total of 59 copies of 5S rRNA and 38 copies of 18S rRNA genes that were distributed in several genomic scaffolds. The rRNA genes were frequently flanked by transposable elements (TEs) and spread throughout the genome, complementing the FISH analysis that detect only clustered copies of rRNA genes. Conclusions The organization of rRNA gene clusters seems to reflect their intense and particular evolutionary pathway and not the evolutionary history of the associated taxa. The possible role of TEs as one source of rRNA gene movement, that could generates the spreading of ribosomal clusters/copies, is discussed. The present paper reinforces the notion that the integration of cytogenetic data and genomic analysis provides a more complete picture for

  12. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  13. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  14. Rhizobium borbori sp. nov., aniline-degrading bacteria isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo Xia; Ren, Sui Zhou; Xu, Mei Ying; Zeng, Guo Qu; Luo, Hui Dong; Chen, Jin Lin; Tan, Zhi Yuan; Sun, Guo Ping

    2011-04-01

    Three aniline-degrading bacteria, strains DN316(T), DN316-1 and DN365, were isolated from activated sludge. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis, the isolates belonged to the genus Rhizobium, with Rhizobium ( = Agrobacterium) radiobacter LMG 140(T) as the closest relative, with 96.5 % sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the representative strain DN316(T) using sequences of the glnA, thrC and recA genes and the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region confirmed the phylogenetic arrangement obtained from analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. DNA-DNA relatedness between DN316(T) and R. radiobacter LMG 140(T) was 43.7 %, clearly indicating that the representative strain DN316(T) represents a novel species. Phenotypic and biochemical characterization of the isolates and insertion sequence-PCR fingerprinting patterns showed several distinctive features that differentiated them from closely related species. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C(18 : 1)ω7c (57.10 %), C(16 : 0) (11.31 %) and C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (10.13 %). Based on our taxonomic analysis, the three isolates from activated sludge represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium borbori sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DN316(T) ( = CICC 10378(T)  = LMG 23925(T)).

  15. Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov., isolated from faeces of Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Amselle, Megan; Beck, Brian J; Popham, David L; Whittaker, Paul; Wang, Hua; Kerrigan, Elizabeth; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2012-09-01

    Three strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the faeces of apparently healthy wild Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in 2010 by cultivating faecal LAB on Rogosa SL agar under aerobic conditions. These three isolates were found to share 99.9 % gene sequence similarity of their 16S rRNA, their 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer region (ITS), partial 23S rRNA, rpoB, rpoC, rpoA and pheS gene sequences. However, the three strains exhibited lower levels of sequence similarity of these genetic targets to all known LAB, and the phylogenetically closest species to the geese strains were Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus saniviri. In comparison to L. casei ATCC 393(T), L. paracasei ATCC 25302(T), L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469(T) and L. saniviri DSM 24301(T), the novel isolates reacted uniquely in tests for cellobiose, galactose, mannitol, citric acid, aesculin and dextrin, and gave negative results in tests for l-proline arylamidase and l-pyrrolydonyl-arylamidase, and in the Voges-Proskauer test. Biochemical tests for cellobiose, aesculin, galactose, gentiobiose, mannitol, melezitose, ribose, salicin, sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, turanose, amygdalin and arbutin could be used for differentiation between L. saniviri and the novel strains. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, and phylogenetic data, the three isolates represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SL1108(T) (= ATCC BAA-2142(T) = LMG 26001(T) = DSM 23927(T)) and two additional strains are SL1170 and SL60106.

  16. A panel of real-time PCR assays for specific detection of three phytoplasmas from the apple proliferation group.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Petra; Mehle, Natasa; Gruden, Kristina; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2010-10-01

    We report here on the development of combination of assays for fast, reliable, specific and sensitive detection and discrimination of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali', 'Ca. P. prunorum' and 'Ca. P. pyri' from the 16Sr-X (apple proliferation - AP) group. These phytoplasmas are causal agents of diseases of fruit trees within the family Rosaceae, namely apple proliferation (AP), European stone fruit yellows (ESFY) and pear decline (PD). The designed panel of assays uses TaqMan minor groove binder probes (MGB). It comprises the same set of primers and specific probes for species-specific amplification within the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, a set of primers and probes for amplification of the 16S ribosomal DNA region for the universal phytoplasma detection, and an additional set of primers and probe for 18S rRNA as an endogenous quality control of DNA extraction. The performance characteristics of the panel were evaluated. The advantages of new assays were shown in a comparative study with the conventional PCR, which proved their higher sensitivity combined with three-fold shorter time of testing process; and in comparison with two reported multiplex real-time PCR assays for detection of 'Ca. P. mali' or 'Ca. P. pyri'. New panel of assays were tested on the DNA samples of 'Ca. P. mali', 'Ca. P. prunorum', 'Ca. P. pyri', other phytoplasmas and other bacteria isolated from plant material. Additionally, 198 symptomatic and asymptomatic fruit tree field samples collecting during several growing seasons were tested with new assays as well. The results of this study indicate that the combination of three specific assays may be applied in routine phytoplasma surveys and in the certification programs.

  17. Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi sp. nov. and Bradyrhizobium jicamae sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Pachyrhizus erosus.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Peix, Alvaro; Rivas, Raúl; Camacho, María; Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce N; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Willems, Anne; Velázquez, Encarna

    2009-08-01

    Several strains isolated from the legume Pachyrhizus erosus were characterized on the basis of diverse genetic, phenotypic and symbiotic approaches. These novel strains formed two groups closely related to Bradyrhizobium elkanii according to their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strains PAC48T and PAC68T, designated as the type strains of these two groups, presented 99.8 and 99.1% similarity, respectively, in their 16S rRNA gene sequences with respect to B. elkanii USDA 76T. In spite of these high similarity values, the analysis of additional phylogenetic markers such as atpD and glnII genes and the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) showed that strains PAC48T and PAC68T represented two separate novel species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with B. elkanii as their closest relative. Phenotypic differences among the novel strains isolated from Pachyrhizus and B. elkanii were found regarding the assimilation of carbon sources and antibiotic resistance. All these differences were congruent with DNA-DNA hybridization analysis which revealed 21% genetic relatedness between strains PAC48T and PAC68T and 46% and 25%, respectively, between these strains and B. elkanii LMG 6134T. The nodD and nifH genes of strains PAC48T and PAC68T were phylogenetically divergent from those of bradyrhizobia species that nodulate soybean. Soybean was not nodulated by the novel Pachyrhizus isolates. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic data obtained in this study, the new strains represent two novel species for which the names Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi sp. nov. (type strain PAC48T=LMG 24246T=CECT 7396T) and Bradyrhizobium jicamae sp. nov. (type strain PAC68T=LMG 24556T=CECT 7395T) are proposed.

  18. Pantanalinema gen. nov. and Alkalinema gen. nov.: novel pseudanabaenacean genera (Cyanobacteria) isolated from saline-alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Vieira Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Andreote, Ana Paula Dini; Malone, Camila Francieli Silva; Sant'Anna, Célia Leite; Barbiero, Laurent; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The genus Leptolyngbya Anagnostidis & Komárek (1988) was described from a set of strains identified as 'LPP-group B'. The morphology within this group is not particularly informative and underestimates the group's genetic diversity. In the present study, two new pseudanabaenacean genera related to Leptolyngbya morphotypes, Pantanalinema gen. nov. and Alkalinema gen. nov., are described under the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants, based on a polyphasic approach. Pantanalinema gen. nov. (type species Pantanalinema rosaneae sp. nov.) has sheaths and trichomes with slight gliding motility, which distinguish this genus from Alkalinema gen. nov. (type species Alkalinema pantanalense sp. nov.), which possesses trichomes arranged in an ornate (interwoven) pattern. 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema exhibited low identity to each other (≤91.6 %) and to other sequences from known pseudanabaenacean genera (≤94.3 and 93.7 %, respectively). In a phylogenetic reconstruction, six sequences from strains of Pantanalinema and four from strains of Alkalinema formed two separate and robust clades (99 % bootstrap value), with the genera Oculatella and Phormidesmis, respectively, as the closest related groups. 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences and secondary structures of strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema did not correspond to any previous descriptions. The strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema were able to survive and produce biomass at a range of pH (pH 4-11) and were also able to alter the culture medium to pH values ranging from pH 8.4 to 9.9. These data indicate that cyanobacterial communities in underexplored environments, such as the Pantanal wetlands, are promising sources of novel taxa.

  19. Isolation and characterisation of an enterocin P-producing Enterococcus lactis strain from a fresh shrimp (Penaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Ben Braïek, Olfa; Ghomrassi, Hamdi; Cremonesi, Paola; Morandi, Stefano; Fleury, Yannick; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Hani, Khaled; Bel Hadj, Omrane; Ghrairi, Taoufik

    2017-03-07

    Screening for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from fresh shrimp samples (Penaeus vannamei) collected from retail seafood markets in the Tunisian's coast, resulted in the isolation of an Enterococcus strain termed Q1. This strain was selected for its antagonistic activity against pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactococcus garvieae and against fungi (Aspergillus niger and Fusarium equiseti). The Q1 strain was characterised using standard morphological and biochemical tests, growth assays at different temperatures, pH and salinity. 16S rRNA, rpoA and pheS gene sequencing, as well as the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer analyses, were combined to identify strain Q1 as a strain of Enterococcus lactis. The bacteriocin produced by E. lactis Q1 is thermostable, active in the pH range from 4.0 to 9.0 and has a bactericidal mode of action. The enterocin P structural gene was detected by specific PCR in strain E. lactis Q1, which is in good agreement with SDS-PAGE data of the purified bacteriocin. A lack of significant antibiotic resistance genes and virulence determinants was confirmed by specific PCRs. This work provides the first description of an enterocin P producer E. lactis strain isolated from a fresh shrimp. Based on its safety properties (absence of haemolytic activity, virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes), this strain has the potential to be used as a natural additive or adjunct protective culture in food biopreservation and/or probiotic culture.

  20. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  1. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  2. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida.

  3. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  4. An Archaea 5S rRNA analog is stably expressed in Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Mini-genes for 5S-like rRNA were constructed. These genes had a sequence which largely resembles that of the naturally occurring 5S rRNA of a bacterium, Halococcus morrhuae, which phylogenetically belongs to the Archaea. Plasmids carrying the mini-genes were transformed into Escherichia coli (Ec). Ribosomal incorporation was not a prerequisite for stable accumulation of the RNA product. However, only those constructs with a well-base-paired helix I accumulated RNA product. This result strongly implies that this aspect of the structure is likely to be an important condition for stabilizing 5S rRNA-like products. The results are consistent with our current understanding of 5S rRNA processing in Ec. When used in conjunction with rRNA probe technology, the resulting chimeric RNA may be useful as a monitoring tool for genetically engineered microorganisms or naturally occurring organisms that are released into the environment.

  5. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  6. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling.

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of the 23S rRNA gene of the Cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S E; Doolittle, W F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Anacystis nidulans 23S rRNA gene, including the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions has been determined. The gene is 2876 nucleotides long and shows higher primary sequence homology to the 23S rRNAs of plastids (84.5%) than to that of E. coli (79%). The predicted rRNA transcript also shares many secondary structural features with those of plastids, reinforcing the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of these organelles. PMID:6326060

  8. Prevalence of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Min-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA is a hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Of those, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region of the 12S rRNA have been associated with hearing loss. These two mutations account for a significant number of…

  9. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply.

  10. Sequence homologies between eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA and the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNa: evidences for a common evolutionary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, B

    1981-01-01

    The question of the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA was re-examined after the recent publication of the E. coli 23S rRNA sequence (26,40). A region of the 23S RNA located at its 5' end was found to be approximately 50% homologous to four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs. A computer comparison analysis indicates that no other region of the E. coli ribosomal transcription unit (greater than 5 000 nucleotides in length) shares a comparable homology with 5.8S rRNA. Homology between the 5' end of e. coli 23S and four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs falls within the same range as that between E. coli 5S RNA from the same four eukaryotic species. All these data strongly suggest that the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNA and eukaryotic 5.8S RNA have a common evolutionary origin. Secondary structure models are proposed for the 5' region of E. coli 23S RNA. Images PMID:7024907

  11. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  12. A Census of rRNA Genes and Linked Genomic Sequences within a Soil Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Manske, Brian F.; Bintrim, Scott B.; Handelsman, Jo; Goodman, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the diversity of microbial genomes represented in a library of metagenomic DNA from soil. A total of 24,400 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were screened for 16S rRNA genes. The sequences obtained from BAC clones were compared with a collection generated by direct PCR amplification and cloning of 16S rRNA genes from the same soil. The results indicated that the BAC library had substantially lower representation of bacteria among the Bacillus, α-Proteobacteria, and CFB groups; greater representation among the β- and γ-Proteobacteria, and OP10 divisions; and no rRNA genes from the domains Eukaryota and Archaea. In addition to rRNA genes recovered from the bacterial divisions Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, Cytophagales, and OP11, we identified many rRNA genes from the BAC library affiliated with the bacterial division Acidobacterium; all of these sequences were affiliated with subdivisions that lack cultured representatives. The complete sequence of one BAC clone derived from a member of the Acidobacterium division revealed a complete rRNA operon and 20 other open reading frames, including predicted gene products involved in cell division, cell cycling, folic acid biosynthesis, substrate metabolism, amino acid uptake, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. This study is the first step in using genomics to reveal the physiology of as-yet-uncultured members of the Acidobacterium division. PMID:12732537

  13. Evidence for Regulation of ECM3 Expression by Methylation of Histone H3 Lysine 4 and Intergenic Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Joseph A.; Arndt, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of nonprotein-coding DNA is widespread in eukaryotes and plays important regulatory roles for many genes, including genes that are misregulated in cancer cells. Its pervasiveness presents the potential for a wealth of diverse regulatory roles for noncoding transcription. We previously showed that the act of transcribing noncoding DNA (ncDNA) across the promoter of the protein-coding SER3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae positions nucleosomes over the upstream activating sequences, leading to strong repression of SER3 transcription. To explore the possibility of other regulatory roles for ncDNA transcription, we selected six candidate S. cerevisiae genes that express ncRNAs over their promoters and analyzed the regulation of one of these genes, ECM3, in detail. Because noncoding transcription can lead to changes in the local chromatin landscape that impinge on the expression of nearby coding genes, we surveyed the effects of various chromatin regulators on the expression of ECM3. These analyses identified roles for the Paf1 complex in positively regulating ECM3 transcription through methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (K4) and for Paf1 in controlling the pattern of intergenic transcription at this locus. By deleting a putative promoter for the noncoding transcription unit that lies upstream of ECM3, we provide evidence for a positive correlation between intergenic transcription and ECM3 expression. Our results are consistent with a model in which cotranscriptional methylation of histone H3 K4, mediated by the Paf1 complex and noncoding transcription, leads to activation of ECM3 transcription. PMID:27449519

  14. Identification of a novel DRB1 allele through intergenic recombination between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB3∗02 in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijin; Liu, Xiangjun; Li, Erwei; Zhao, Chenyan; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Youchun; Lu, Fengmin

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a novel DRB1 allele was revealed by routine HLA-SBT typing noted for its extensive mismatches to any known DRB1 alleles within the exon 2. Sequences containing the exons 2, 3 of HLA-DRB1, their surrounding introns, and the full-length cDNA of DRB1 were analyzed to determine a possible recombination event. Interestingly, the sequences of entire exon 2 were characterized as DRB3(∗)02:02:01:01/02; while exon 3 were characterized as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. Further analysis of the sequences using Simplot software suggested that an intergenic recombinant event (i.e. exchange of sequence between non-allelic genes) may have occurred between DRB3(∗)02 allele and DRB1(∗)14 like allele, and the recombination sites are located at intron 1 and the boundary of exon 2 and intron 2 of DRB1. There are 5 CGGGG sequences flanking each side of exon 2 could serve as potential recombination site. Moreover, the full-length cDNA of the novel allele has been identified. The exon 1 and exon 3 to exon 6 share the same sequence as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. At the mRNA level, the new allele has no significant difference when compared with the other DRB1 allele. This novel recombinant allele is also found to be paternally inherited. In conclusion, this is the first report of a DRB1 and DRB3 intergenic recombination event involving whole exon 2, which generate a new DRB1(∗)14:141.

  15. An intergenic risk locus containing an enhancer deletion in 2q35 modulates breast cancer risk by deregulating IGFBP5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wyszynski, Asaf; Hong, Chi-Chen; Lam, Kristin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lytle, Christian; Yao, Song; Zhang, Yali; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Wu, Anna H; Van Den Berg, David; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Wong, Tien Y; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Klevebring, Daniel; Czene, Kamila; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Darabi, Hatef; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cox, Angela; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Shah, Mitul; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hamann, Ute; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Bandera, Elisa; Amos, Chris; Ambrosone, Christine; Easton, Douglas F; Cole, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in females. Previous association studies have identified variants on 2q35 associated with the risk of breast cancer. To identify functional susceptibility loci for breast cancer, we interrogated the 2q35 gene desert for chromatin architecture and functional variation correlated with gene expression. We report a novel intergenic breast cancer risk locus containing an enhancer copy number variation (enCNV; deletion) located approximately 400Kb upstream to IGFBP5, which overlaps an intergenic ERα-bound enhancer that loops to the IGFBP5 promoter. The enCNV is correlated with modified ERα binding and monoallelic-repression of IGFBP5 following oestrogen treatment. We investigated the association of enCNV genotype with breast cancer in 1,182 cases and 1,362 controls, and replicate our findings in an independent set of 62,533 cases and 60,966 controls from 41 case control studies and 11 GWAS. We report a dose-dependent inverse association of 2q35 enCNV genotype (percopy OR = 0.68 95%CI 0.55-0.83, P = 0.0002; replication OR = 0.77 95% CI 0.73-0.82, P = 2.1 × 10(-19)) and identify 13 additional linked variants (r(2 )>( )0.8) in the 20Kb linkage block containing the enCNV (P = 3.2 × 10(-15) - 5.6 × 10(-17)). These associations were independent of previously reported 2q35 variants, rs13387042/rs4442975 and rs16857609, and were stronger for ER-positive than ER-negative disease. Together, these results suggest that 2q35 breast cancer risk loci may be mediating their effect through IGFBP5.

  16. Chloroplast Genome Differences between Asian and American Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) and the Origin of the Hypervariable trnY-trnE Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analyses of complete chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences within a species may provide clues to understand the population dynamics and colonization histories of plant species. Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) is a widely distributed fern species in northeastern Asia, Europe, and North America. The complete cp DNA sequences from Asian and American E. arvense individuals were compared in this study. The Asian E. arvense cp genome was 583 bp shorter than that of the American E. arvense. In total, 159 indels were observed between two individuals, most of which were concentrated on the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) in the large single-copy (LSC) region of the cp genome. This IGS region held a series of 19 bp repeating units. The numbers of the 19 bp repeat unit were responsible for 78% of the total length difference between the two cp genomes. Furthermore, only other closely related species of Equisetum also show the hypervariable nature of the trnY-trnE IGS. By contrast, only a single indel was observed in the gene coding regions: the ycf1 gene showed 24 bp differences between the two continental individuals due to a single tandem-repeat indel. A total of 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were recorded between the two cp genomes. Of these, 52 SNPs (31.5%) were distributed in coding regions, 13 SNPs (7.9%) were in introns, and 100 SNPs (60.6%) were in intergenic spacers (IGS). The overall difference between the Asian and American E. arvense cp genomes was 0.12%. Despite the relatively high genetic diversity between Asian and American E. arvense, the two populations are recognized as a single species based on their high morphological similarity. This indicated that the two regional populations have been in morphological stasis. PMID:25157804

  17. Genome-Wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA Interactions Are Enriched in Intergenic Regions and Gene Promoters and Correlate with Infection-Induced Differential Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Sinclair, Sara H.; Pappas-Brown, Valeria; Shetty, Amol C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils, and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: (i) intergenic regions predicted to be MARs; (ii) within predicted lamina-associated domains; and (iii) at promoters ≤ 3000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome “re-organizer.” AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity. PMID:27703927

  18. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  19. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii Strain PP9 Isolated from Antarctic Soil

    PubMed Central

    da Mota, Fábio Faria; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; Jurelevicius, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    The whole genome of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii PP9, isolated from a soil sample from Antarctica, consists of a circular chromosome of 3,412,092 bp and a circular plasmid of 8,647 bp, with 3,244 protein-coding genes, 12 copies of the 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon, 101 tRNA genes, and 6 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). PMID:27231360

  1. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution.

  2. Unstable Inheritance of 45S rRNA Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rabanal, Fernando A.; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Mandáková, Terezie; Novikova, Polina Yu.; Lysak, Martin A.; Mott, Richard; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs). Instead, GWAS implicated a trans-acting locus, as if rRNA gene CNV was a phenotype rather than a genotype. To explain these results, we investigated the inheritance and stability of rRNA gene copy number using the variety of genetic resources available in A. thaliana — F2 crosses, recombinant inbred lines, the multiparent advanced-generation inter-cross population, and mutation accumulation lines. Our results clearly show that rRNA gene CNV can be mapped to the NORs themselves, with both loci contributing equally to the variation. However, NOR size is unstably inherited, and dramatic copy number changes are visible already within tens of generations, which explains why it is not possible to map the NORs using GWAS. We did not find any evidence of trans-acting loci in crosses, which is also expected since changes due to such loci would take very many generations to manifest themselves. rRNA gene copy number is thus an interesting example of “missing heritability”—a trait that is heritable in pedigrees, but not in the general population. PMID:28188182

  3. Histones are required for transcription of yeast rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; French, Sarah L; Oakes, Melanie L; Vu, Loan; Schneider, David A; Beyer, Ann L; Nomura, Masayasu

    2005-07-19

    Nucleosomes and their histone components have generally been recognized to act negatively on transcription. However, purified upstream activating factor (UAF), a transcription initiation factor required for RNA polymerase (Pol) I transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains histones H3 and H4 and four nonhistone protein subunits. Other studies have shown that histones H3 and H4 are associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes. To examine their functional role in Pol I transcription, we constructed yeast strains in which synthesis of H3 is achieved from the glucose-repressible GAL10 promoter. We found that partial depletion of H3 (approximately 50% depletion) resulted in a strong inhibition (>80%) of Pol I transcription. A combination of biochemical analysis and electron microscopic (EM) analysis of Miller chromatin spreads indicated that initiation and elongation steps and rRNA processing were compromised upon histone depletion. A clear decrease in relative amounts of UAF, presumably caused by reduced stability, was also observed under the conditions of H3 depletion. Therefore, the observed inhibition of initiation can be explained, in part, by the decrease in UAF concentration. In addition, the EM results suggested that the defects in rRNA transcript elongation and processing may be a result of loss of histones from rRNA genes rather than (or in addition to) an indirect consequence of effects of histone depletion on expression of other genes. Thus, these results show functional importance of histones associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes.

  4. Deep Sequencing of Subseafloor Eukaryotic rRNA Reveals Active Fungi across Marine Subsurface Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  5. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession

    PubMed Central

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution. PMID:26565722

  6. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface.

  7. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  8. Structure and organization of rRNA operons in the region of the replication origin of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, N; Moriya, S; Yoshikawa, H

    1983-01-01

    Structure and organization of two complete ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sets, rrnO and rrnA, were determined for the first time in Bacillus subtilis. They are located at the region of the replication origin of the chromosome. Each set constitutes a single operon of: two tandem promoters - leader sequence - 16S rRNA gene - Ile-tRNA gene - Ala-tRNA gene - 23S rRNA gene - 5S rRNA gene - termination signal. The first promoter (P1) of rrnO differs from that of rrnA in sequence and function. P1 of rrnO was used very little for transcription either in vivo or in vitro while P1 was predominantly used in rrnA. A putative transcript of the entire operon was determined and constructed into a secondary structure. Analysis of in vivo transcripts by S1 mapping revealed primary processing sites at the loop and stem structure of 16S rRNA in rrnO and rrnA. A unique sequence in the leader region of rrnO can be formed into a highly complexed secondary structure and affects processing of mature 16S rRNA. The sequences of the two spacer tRNA genes are highly conserved between B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. Images PMID:6312418

  9. Gene arrangement and sequence of the 5S rRNA in Filobasidiella neoformans (Cryptococcus neoformans) as a phylogenetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Chang, Y C

    1994-04-01

    We cloned the 5S rRNA gene and determined its organization in the four genes encoding rRNAs in a ribosomal DNA repeat unit of Filobasidiella neoformans, the teleomorph of Cryptococcus neoformans. The 5S rRNA gene contained 118 nucleotides and was located 1 kb upstream from the 18S rRNA gene within the 8.6-kb fragment of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. The sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from F. neoformans was more similar to the sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from Tremella mesenterica than to the sequences of the 5S rRNA genes from Filobasidium species. The arrangement of the rRNA genes in F. neoformans closely resembles the arrangement of the rRNA genes in mushrooms such as Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Coprinus cinereus in that the 5S rRNA-coding region not only is located within the repeat unit that encodes the other rRNAs but also is transcribed in the same direction as the other rRNA genes. This is the first description of the arrangement of rRNA genes in a species belonging to the Heterobasidiomycetes.

  10. Infective Arthritis: Bacterial 23S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Supplementary Diagnostic Method

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Andresen, Keld; Kjerulf, Anne; Salamon, Suheil; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Consecutively collected synovial fluids were examined for presence of bacterial DNA (a 700-bp fragment of the bacterial 23S rRNA gene) followed by DNA sequencing of amplicons, and by conventional bacteriological methods. One or more microorganisms were identified in 22 of the 227 synovial fluids (9,7%) originating from 17 patients. Sixteen of the patients had clinical signs of arthritis. For 11 patients molecular and conventional bacterial examinations were in agreement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, were detected in synovial fluids from 6, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. In 3 patients only 23S rRNA analysis was positive; 2 synovial fluids contained S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and 1 S. pneumoniae). The present study indicates a significant contribution by PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene analysis in recognizing and identification of microorganisms from synovial fluids. PMID:19088916

  11. Changes in rRNA transcription influence proliferation and cell fate within a stem cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Shalaby, Nevine A; Buszczak, Michael

    2014-01-17

    Ribosome biogenesis drives cell growth and proliferation, but mechanisms that modulate this process within specific lineages remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila RNA polymerase I (Pol I) regulatory complex composed of Under-developed (Udd), TAF1B, and a TAF1C-like factor. Disruption of udd or TAF1B results in reduced ovarian germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation. Female GSCs display high levels of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and Udd becomes enriched in GSCs relative to their differentiating daughters. Increasing Pol I transcription delays differentiation, whereas reducing rRNA production induces both morphological changes that accompany multicellular cyst formation and specific decreased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway component Mad. These findings demonstrate that modulating rRNA synthesis fosters changes in the cell fate, growth, and proliferation of female Drosophila GSCs and their daughters.

  12. Specific binding of tRNAMet to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Kintner, C; Lund, E

    1978-01-01

    tRNAMetf binds to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli, forming a complex with a melting temperature of 75 degrees (in 0.6 M NaCl). The regions within the RNAs that bind to each other have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The interacting region in tRNAMetf is 17 nucleotides long, extending from G5 in the acceptor stem to D21 (D = 5.6-dihydrouridine) in the D loop. The sequence in 23S rRNA is complementary to that sequence except for an extra Up in the middle and allowing a Gp.D base pair. We propose that association of these two sequences may play a role in initiation of protein synthesis by tRNAMetf. In addition, part of this sequence in 23S rRNA may also stabilize tRNA binding to the ribosome during elongation of nascent polypeptides. Images PMID:349554

  13. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  14. Networks of intergenic long-range enhancers and snpRNAs drive castration-resistant phenotype of prostate cancer and contribute to pathogenesis of multiple common human disorders

    PubMed Central

    Glinskii, Anna B; Ma, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Grant, Denise; Lim, Chang-Uk; Guest, Ian; Sell, Stewart; Buttyan, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic relevance of intergenic disease-associated genetic loci (IDAGL) containing highly statistically significant disease-linked SNPs remains unknown. Here, we present experimental and clinical evidence supporting the importantance of the role of IDAGL in human diseases. A targeted RT-PCR screen coupled with sequencing of purified PCR products detects widespread transcription at multiple IDAGL and identifies 96 small noncoding trans-regulatory RNAs of ∼100–300 nt in length containing SNPs (snpRNAs) associated with 21 common disorders. Multiple independent lines of experimental evidence support functionality of snpRNAs by documenting their cell type-specific expression and evolutionary conservation of sequences, genomic coordinates and biological effects. Chromatin state signatures, expression profiling experiments and luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that many IDAGL are Polycomb-regulated long-range enhancers. Expression of snpRNAs in human and mouse cells markedly affects cellular behavior and induces allele-specific clinically relevant phenotypic changes: NLRP1-locus snpRNAs rs2670660 exert regulatory effects on monocyte/macrophage transdifferentiation, induce prostate cancer (PC) susceptibility snpRNAs and transform low-malignancy hormone-dependent human PC cells into highly malignant androgen-independent PC. Q-PCR analysis and luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that snpRNA sequences represent allele-specific “decoy” targets of microRNAs that function as SNP allele-specific modifiers of microRNA expression and activity. We demonstrate that trans-acting RNA molecules facilitating resistance to androgen depletion (RAD) in vitro and castration-resistant phenotype (CRP) in vivo of PC contain intergenic 8q24-locus SNP variants (rs1447295; rs16901979; rs6983267) that were recently linked with increased risk of PC. Q-PCR analysis of clinical samples reveals markedly increased and highly concordant (r = 0.896; p < 0.0001) snpRNA expression

  15. Crystallization of engineered Thermus flavus 5S rRNA under earth and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, S; Perbandt, M; Lippmann, C; Moore, K; DeLucas, L J; Betzel, C; Erdmann, V A

    2000-04-01

    Thermus flavus 5S rRNA with a molecular weight of about 40 kDa was modified at the 5' and 3' ends. Crystals were obtained under earth and microgravity conditions. The best crystals were obtained during NASA space mission STS 94. For the first time, it was possible to collect a complete data set from 5S rRNA crystals to 7.8 A resolution and to assign the space group as R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.3, c = 387.6 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees.

  16. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  17. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  18. The High Degree of Sequence Plasticity of the Arenavirus Noncoding Intergenic Region (IGR) Enables the Use of a Nonviral Universal Synthetic IGR To Attenuate Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Cubitt, Beatrice; Sullivan, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFAs) pose important public health problems in regions where they are endemic. Concerns about human-pathogenic arenaviruses are exacerbated because of the lack of FDA-licensed arenavirus vaccines and because current antiarenaviral therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. We have recently shown that the noncoding intergenic region (IGR) present in each arenavirus genome segment, the S and L segments (S-IGR and L-IGR, respectively), plays important roles in the control of virus protein expression and that this knowledge could be harnessed for the development of live-attenuated vaccine strains to combat HFAs. In this study, we further investigated the sequence plasticity of the arenavirus IGR. We demonstrate that recombinants of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMVs), whose S-IGRs were replaced by the S-IGR of Lassa virus (LASV) or an entirely nonviral S-IGR-like sequence (Ssyn), are viable, indicating that the function of S-IGR tolerates a high degree of sequence plasticity. In addition, rLCMVs whose L-IGRs were replaced by Ssyn or S-IGRs of the very distantly related reptarenavirus Golden Gate virus (GGV) were viable and severely attenuated in vivo but able to elicit protective immunity against a lethal challenge with wild-type LCMV. Our findings indicate that replacement of L-IGR by a nonviral Ssyn could serve as a universal molecular determinant of arenavirus attenuation. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFAs) cause high rates of morbidity and mortality and pose important public health problems in regions where they are endemic. Implementation of live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) will represent a major step to combat HFAs. Here we document that the arenavirus noncoding intergenic region (IGR) has a high degree of plasticity compatible with virus viability. This observation led us to generate recombinant LCMVs containing nonviral synthetic

  19. Population Structure of the Lyme Borreliosis Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the Western Black-Legged Tick (Ixodes pacificus) in Northern California ▿

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Yvette A.; Travinsky, Bridgit; Schotthoefer, Anna; Fedorova, Natalia; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Eisen, Lars; Barbour, Alan G.; Lane, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Factors potentially contributing to the lower incidence of Lyme borreliosis (LB) in the far-western than in the northeastern United States include tick host-seeking behavior resulting in fewer human tick encounters, lower densities of Borrelia burgdorferi-infected vector ticks in peridomestic environments, and genetic variation among B. burgdorferi spirochetes to which humans are exposed. We determined the population structure of B. burgdorferi in over 200 infected nymphs of the primary bridging vector to humans, Ixodes pacificus, collected in Mendocino County, CA. This was accomplished by sequence typing the spirochete lipoprotein ospC and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (IGS). Thirteen ospC alleles belonging to 12 genotypes were found in California, and the two most abundant, ospC genotypes H3 and E3, have not been detected in ticks in the Northeast. The most prevalent ospC and IGS biallelic profile in the population, found in about 22% of ticks, was a new B. burgdorferi strain defined by ospC genotype H3. Eight of the most common ospC genotypes in the northeastern United States, including genotypes I and K that are associated with disseminated human infections, were absent in Mendocino County nymphs. ospC H3 was associated with hardwood-dominated habitats where western gray squirrels, the reservoir host, are commonly infected with LB spirochetes. The differences in B. burgdorferi population structure in California ticks compared to the Northeast emphasize the need for a greater understanding of the genetic diversity of spirochetes infecting California LB patients. PMID:19783741

  20. Description and prevalence of Mycoplasma ciconiae sp. nov. isolated from white stork nestlings (Ciconia ciconia).

    PubMed

    Möller Palau-Ribes, Franca; Enderlein, Dirk; Hagen, Nils; Herbst, Werner; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Lierz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The mycoplasma strain ST 57T was isolated from the trachea of a clinically healthy, free-ranging white stork nestling in Nielitz, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. Strain ST 57T grew in fried-egg-shaped colonies on mycoplasma (SP4) agar plates and was dependent on sterol for growth. The organism fermented glucose and did not hydrolyse arginine or urea. The optimal growth temperature was 37 °C, with a temperature range from 23 to 44 °C. Strain ST 57Tcould not be identified as a representative of any of the currently described mycoplasma species by alignment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence or 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer region, or by immunobinding assays. Thus, this organism appears to be a representative of a novel species, for which the name Mycoplasma ciconiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST 57T (=ATCC BAA-2401T=DSM 25251T). Four further strains of this species are included in this description (ST 24=DSM 29908, ST 56 Clone 1=DSM 29054, ST 99=DSM 29909, ST 102=DSM 29010). The prevalence of this mycoplasma species in clinically healthy, white stork nestlings in northern Germany was determined. Our species-specific PCR detected 57.8 % (48/83) of the samples positive for M. ciconiae sp. nov. As this species appears to be widespread in the healthy free-ranging white stork population, we conclude that this species is either apathogenic or an opportunistic pathogen in white storks.

  1. Distinguishing bacterial pathogens of potato using a genome-wide microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Aittamaa, M; Somervuo, P; Pirhonen, M; Mattinen, L; Nissinen, R; Auvinen, P; Valkonen, J P T

    2008-09-01

    A set of 9676 probes was designed for the most harmful bacterial pathogens of potato and tested in a microarray format. Gene-specific probes could be designed for all genes of Pectobacterium atrosepticum, c. 50% of the genes of Streptomyces scabies and c. 30% of the genes of Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus utilizing the whole-genome sequence information available. For Streptomyces turgidiscabies, 226 probes were designed according to the sequences of a pathogenicity island containing important virulence genes. In addition, probes were designed for the virulence-associated nip (necrosis-inducing protein) genes of P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya dadantii and for the intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences of the 16S-23S rRNA gene region. Ralstonia solanacearum was not included in the study, because it is a quarantine organism and is not presently found in Finland, but a few probes were also designed for this species. The probes contained on average 40 target-specific nucleotides and were synthesized on the array in situ, organized as eight sub-arrays with an identical set of probes which could be used for hybridization with different samples. All bacteria were readily distinguished using a single channel system for signal detection. Nearly all of the c. 1000 probes designed for C. michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus, c. 50% and 40% of the c. 4000 probes designed for the genes of S. scabies and P. atrosepticum, respectively, and over 100 probes for S. turgidiscabies showed significant signals only with the respective species. P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya strains were all detected with 110 common probes. By contrast, the strains of these species were found to differ in their signal profiles. Probes targeting the IGS region and nip genes could be used to place strains of Dickeya to two groups, which correlated with differences in virulence. Taken together, the approach of using a custom-designed, genome-wide microarray provided a robust means

  2. Diversity and biogeography of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of Glycine max grown in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin Qin; Wang, En Tao; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Zhang, Yan Ming; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Feng; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-05-01

    A total of 215 rhizobial strains were isolated and analyzed with 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S intergenic spacer, housekeeping genes atpD, recA, and glnII, and symbiotic genes nifH and nodC to understand the genetic diversity of soybean rhizobia in Hebei province, China. All the strains except one were symbiotic bacteria classified into nine genospecies in the genera of Bradyrhizobium and Sinorhizobium. Surveys on the distribution of these rhizobia in different regions showed that Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii strains were found only in neutral to slightly alkaline soils whereas Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense-related strains and strains of five Sinorhizobium genospecies were found in alkaline-saline soils. Correspondence and canonical correspondence analyses on the relationship of rhizobial distribution and their soil characteristics reveal that high soil pH, electrical conductivity, and potassium content favor distribution of the B. yuanmingense and the five Sinorhizobium species but inhibit B. japonicum and B. elkanii. High contents of available phosphorus and organic matters benefit Sinorhizobium fredii and B. liaoningense-related strains and inhibit the others groups mentioned above. The symbiotic gene (nifH and nodC) lineages among B. elkanii, B. japonicum, B. yuanmingense, and Sinorhizobium spp. were observed in the strains, signifying that vertical gene transfer was the main mechanism to maintain these genes in the soybean rhizobia. However, lateral transfer of symbiotic genes commonly in Sinorhizobium spp. and rarely in Bradyrhizobium spp. was also detected. These results showed the genetic diversity, the biogeography, and the soil determinant factors of soybean rhizobia in Hebei province of China.

  3. Analysis of genomic diversity among photosynthetic stem-nodulating rhizobial strains from northeast Argentina.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, Marcela S; Kerber, Norma L; Pucheu, Norma L; Perticari, Alejandro; García, Augusto F

    2002-10-01

    The genomic diversity among photosynthetic rhizobia from northeast Argentina was assessed. Forty six isolates obtained from naturally occurring stem and root nodules of Aeschynomene rudis plants were analyzed by three molecular typing methods with different levels of taxonomic resolution: repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprinting with BOX and REP primers, amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer-restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS-RFLP) analysis. The in vivo absorption spectra of membranes of strains were similar in the near infrared region with peaks at 870 and 800 nm revealing the presence of light harvesting complex I, bacteriochlorophyll-binding polypeptides (LHI-Bchl complex). After extraction with acetone-methanol the spectra differed in the visible part displaying peaks belonging to canthaxanthin or spirilloxanthin as the main carotenoid complement. The genotypic characterization by rep-PCR revealed a high level of genomic diversity among the isolates and almost all the photosynthetic ones have identical ARDRA patterns and fell into one cluster different from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii. In the combined analysis of ARDRA and rep-PCR fingerprints, 7 clusters were found including most of the isolates. Five of those contained only photosynthetic isolates; all canthaxanthin-containing strains grouped in one cluster, most of the other photosynthetic isolates were grouped in a second large cluster, while the remaining three clusters contained a few strains. The other two clusters comprising reference strains of B. japonicum and B. elkanii, respectively. The IGS-RFLP analysis produced similar clustering for almost all the strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of one representative isolate was determined and the DNA sequence analysis confirmed the position of photosynthetic rhizobia in a distinct phylogenetic group within the Bradyrhizobium rDNA cluster.

  4. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  5. Strategy for identification of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains closely related to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Raddadi, Noura; Merabishvili, Maya; Cherif, Ameur; Carmagnola, Lorenzo; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Chanishvili, Nina; Visca, Paolo; Sharp, Richard; Borin, Sara

    2006-02-01

    Bacillus cereus strains that are genetically closely related to B. anthracis can display anthrax-like virulence traits (A. R. Hoffmaster et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:8449-8454, 2004). Hence, approaches that rapidly identify these "near neighbors" are of great interest for the study of B. anthracis virulence mechanisms, as well as to prevent the use of such strains for B. anthracis-based bioweapon development. Here, a strategy is proposed for the identification of near neighbors of B. anthracis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) containing tRNA genes, characteristic of B. anthracis. By using restriction site insertion-PCR (RSI-PCR) the presence of two SNP typical of B. anthracis was screened in 126 B. cereus group strains of different origin. Two B. cereus strains and one B. thuringiensis strain showed RSI-PCR profiles identical to that of B. anthracis. The sequencing of the entire ITS containing tRNA genes revealed two of the strains to be identical to B. anthracis. The strict relationship with B. anthracis was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of four other independent loci: cerA, plcR, AC-390, and SG-749. The relationship to B. anthracis of the three strains described by MLST was comparable and even higher to that of four B. cereus strains associated with periodontitis in humans and previously reported as the closest known strains to B. anthracis. SNP in ITS containing tRNA genes combined with RSI-PCR provide a very efficient tool for the identification of strains closely related to B. anthracis.

  6. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    PubMed Central

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  7. Mycoplasma corogypsi associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, A. J.; Ley, D. H.; Scott, D. E.; Buckanoff, H. D.; Degernes, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi. PMID:22903399

  8. Survey of Bartonella spp. in U.S. bed bugs detects Burkholderia multivorans but not Bartonella.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Virna L; Maggi, Ricardo G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Kim, Jung; Vargo, Edward L; Schal, Coby

    2013-01-01

    Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) have resurged in the United States and globally. Bed bugs are hematophagous ectoparasites of humans and other animals, including domestic pets, chickens, and bats, and their blood feeding habits contribute to their potential as disease vectors. Several species of Bartonella are re-emergent bacterial pathogens that also affect humans, domestic pets, bats and a number of other wildlife species. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the U.S., and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgences of these medically important pathogens and their potential vector might be linked, by screening for Bartonella spp. in bed bugs collected from geographic areas where these pathogens are prevalent and from bed bugs that have been in culture in the laboratory for several years. We screened a total of 331 bed bugs: 316 bed bugs from 36 unique collections in 29 geographic locations in 13 states, 10 bed bugs from two colonies maintained in the laboratory for 3 yr, and 5 bed bugs from a colony that has been in culture since before the recent resurgence of bed bugs. Bartonella spp. DNA was screened using a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region. Bartonella DNA was not amplified from any bed bug, but five bed bugs from four different apartments of an elderly housing building in North Carolina contained DNA sequences that corresponded to Burkholderia multivorans, an important pathogen in nosocomial infections that was not previously linked to an arthropod vector.

  9. The development and application of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum sequence database.

    PubMed

    Armour, Natalie K; Laibinis, Victoria A; Collett, Stephen R; Ferguson-Noel, Naola

    2013-01-01

    Molecular analysis was conducted on 36 Mycoplasma gallisepticum DNA extracts from tracheal swab samples of commercial poultry in seven South African provinces between 2009 and 2012. Twelve unique M. gallisepticum genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (IGSR), M. gallisepticum cytadhesin 2 (mgc2), MGA_0319 and gapA genetic regions. The DNA sequences of these genotypes were distinct from those of M. gallisepticum isolates in a database composed of sequences from other countries, vaccine and reference strains. The most prevalent genotype (SA-WT#7) was detected in samples from commercial broilers, broiler breeders and layers in five provinces. South African M. gallisepticum sequences were more similar to those of the live vaccines commercially available in South Africa, but were distinct from that of F strain vaccine, which is not registered for use in South Africa. The IGSR, mgc2 or MGA_0319 sequences of three South African genotypes were identical to those of the ts-11 vaccine strain, necessitating a combination of mgc2 and IGSR targeted sequencing to differentiate South African wild-type genotypes from ts-11 vaccine. To identify and differentiate all 12 wild-types, mgc2, IGSR and MGA_0319 sequencing was required. Sequencing of gapA was least effective at strain differentiation. This research serves as a model for the development of an M. gallisepticum sequence database, and illustrates its application to characterize M. gallisepticum genotypes, select diagnostic tests and better understand the epidemiology of M. gallisepticum.

  10. Systemic Disease in Vaal Rhebok (Pelea capreolus) Caused by Mycoplasmas in the Mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Melissa M.; Stalis, Ilse H.; Clippinger, Tracy L.; Busch, Martin; Nordhausen, Robert; Maalouf, Gabriel; Schrenzel, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    In the winter of 2002, an outbreak of mycoplasma infection in Vaal rhebok (Pelea capreolus) originating from South Africa occurred 15 weeks after their arrival in San Diego, Calif. Three rhebok developed inappetence, weight loss, lethargy, signs related to pulmonary or arthral dysfunction, and sepsis. All three rhebok died or were euthanized. Primary postmortem findings were erosive tracheitis, pleuropneumonia, regional cellulitis, and necrotizing lymphadenitis. Mycoplasmas were detected in numerous tissues by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and PCR. The three deceased rhebok were coinfected with ovine herpesvirus-2, and two animals additionally had a novel gammaherpesvirus. However, no lesions indicative of herpesvirus were seen microscopically in any animal. The rheboks' mycoplasmas were characterized at the level of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region, and the fructose biphosphate aldolase gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was carried out to address the possibility of infection with multiple strains. Two of the deceased rhebok were infected with a single strain of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum, and the third animal had a single, unique strain most closely related to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large-colony. A PCR survey of DNA samples from 46 other ruminant species demonstrated the presence of several species of mycoplasmas in the mycoides cluster, including a strain of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum identical to that found in two of the rhebok. These findings demonstrate the pervasiveness of mycoplasmas in the mycoides cluster in small ruminants and the potential for interspecies transmission and disease when different animal taxa come in contact. PMID:15750104

  11. The Streptomyces glaucescens TcmR protein represses transcription of the divergently oriented tcmR and tcmA genes by binding to an intergenic operator region.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoile, P G; Hutchinson, C R

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary evidence has been presented by Guilfoile and Hutchinson (J. Bacteriol. 174:3651-3658, 1992) suggesting that the Streptomyces glaucescens TcmR protein is a transcriptional repressor. Here, we extend that work by showing that transcription of the S. glaucescens tcmA gene is inducible by tetracenomycin C and that inactivation of the tcmR gene results in constitutive transcription of the tcmA gene. Gel retardation studies show that the TcmR protein binds to the tcmA-tcmR intergenic region in vitro and that this binding is inhibited by tetracenomycin C. Footprinting experiments demonstrate that the TcmR protein binds to an operator region that encompasses both the tcmA and the tcmR promoters. This genetic and biochemical evidence strongly supports the model of the TcmR protein acting as a repressor in inhibiting transcription of both the tcmA and the tcmR genes, in much the same way that TetR from Tn10 inhibits transcription of tetA and tetR. Images PMID:1592820

  12. PCR-based analysis of the intergenic spacers of the Nor loci on the A genomes of Triticum diploids and polyploids.

    PubMed

    Sallares, R; Brown, T A

    1999-02-01

    We present DNA sequence data showing population variation in the intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of the ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) on the A genomes of 27 diploid and polyploid wheats. PCRs (polymerase chain reactions) specific for the A(m) genome gave products with five populations of Triticum monococcum but did not give products with AABB or AABBDD wheats. PCRs specific to the A(u) genome of T. urartu gave products with all the AABB and AABBDD polyploids that were tested, but not with T. monococcum. AAGG tetraploids gave products only with the A(u)-specific primers, but the AAAAGG hexaploid T. zhukovskyi gave products with both the A(u) and A(m) primers. Phylogenetic analysis showed a substantial degree of IGS divergence for both the A(m) and A(u) genomes in diploids and polyploids compared with other genomes of Triticum and Aegilops. The rate of evolution of the IGS is much greater than previously reported for the internal transcribed region of the rDNAs but the view that the IGS only gives random noise is rejected, the IGS sequences presented here reflecting the general evolutionary trends affecting the wheat genome as a whole.

  13. Geographical clustering of Trypanosoma cruzi I groups from Colombia revealed by low-stringency single specific primer-PCR of the intergenic regions of spliced-leader genes.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; Arboleda-Sánchez, Sair; Rodríguez, Ingrid Bibiana; Cura, Carolina; Salazar, Alexander; Del Mazo, Jesús; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    A low-stringency single-primer polymerase chain reaction (LSSP-PCR) typing procedure targeted to the intergenic regions of spliced-leader genes (SL) was designed to profile Trypanosoma cruzi I stocks from endemic regions of Colombia. Comparison between SL-LSSP-PCR profiles of parasite DNA from vector faeces and cultures isolated from those faeces showed more conservative signatures than profiles using LSSP-PCR targeted to the minicircle variable regions (kDNA). This was also observed by analysing 15 parasite clones from one stock as well as serial samples of a same stock after in vitro culturing or inoculation into mice. Thus, SL-LSSP-PCR appears more appropriate than kDNA-LSSP-PCR for reliable typing of major T. cruzi I groups from in vitro cultured stocks and triatomine faeces. SL-LSSP-PCR grouped 46 of 47 T. cruzi I Colombian stocks according to their geographical procedences in four clusters: Cluster Cas from Casanare Department, Cluster Mg from Northern Magdalena department, Cluster Mom from Momposina Depression in Southern Magdalena and finally Cluster NW from northwestern Colombia, including Sucre, Chocó, Córdoba and Antioquia departments. Sequence analysis identified punctual mutations among amplicons from each cluster. Within Cluster Mg, sequence polymorphism allowed association with different sylvatic vector species. Novel SL sequences and LSSP-PCR profiles are reported from T. cruzi I infecting Eratyrus cuspidatus, Panstrongylus geniculatus and Rhodnius pallescens vectors.

  14. Accurate and sensitive real-time PCR assays using intergenic spacer 1 region to differentiate Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato and Cryptococcus neoformans sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eliandro Reis; Azevedo, Caroline Souza; Panagio, Luciano Aparecido; Pelisson, Marsileni; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Venancio, Emerson José; Barros, Tânia Fraga; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two accurate and sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to differentiate pathogenic Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato (s.l.) and C. neoformans sensu lato (s.l.) targeting the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region from rDNA locus were developed. Specific primers were designed based on their IGS1 sequence analyses and the optimal real-time PCR assays showed that the dissociation curves generated two different melting peaks, at 82.8 and 84.2ºC for C. gattii s.l. and C. neoformans s.l., respectively. No amplifications were observed in the negative template control. The minimum limit of detection of both primers was 100 plasmid copies per reaction, and they were highly specific when tested with a range of fungal DNAs. Overall, the results showed that the designed primers completely differentiated C. gattii s.l. and C. neoformans s.l. from clinical and environmental sources with great accuracy when compared to phenotypic identification, with no cross-reactivity to other fungal DNA.

  15. Horizontal alignment of 5′ -> 3′ intergene distance segment tropy with respect to the gene as the conserved basis for DNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To study the conserved basis for gene expression in comparative cell types at opposite ends of the cell pressuromodulation spectrum, the lymphatic endothelial cell and the blood microvascular capillary endothelial cell. Methods: The mechanism for gene expression is studied in terms of the 5′ -> 3′ direction paired point tropy quotients (prpTQs) and the final 5′ -> 3′ direction episodic sub-episode block sums split-integrated weighted average-averaged gene overexpression tropy quotient (esebssiwaagoTQ). Results: The final 5′ -> 3′ esebssiwaagoTQ classifies an lymphatic endothelial cell overexpressed gene as a supra-pressuromodulated gene (esebssiwaagoTQ ≥ 0.25 < 0.75) every time and classifies a blood microvascular capillary endothelial cell overexpressed gene every time as an infra-pressuromodulated gene (esebssiwaagoTQ < 0.25) (100% sensitivity; 100% specificity). Conclusion: Horizontal alignment of 5′ -> 3′ intergene distance segment tropy wrt the gene is the basis for DNA transcription in the pressuromodulated state. PMID:28344824

  16. Expression of long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and effect on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) and the clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate the effect on cell growth. HOTAIR expressions in 50 surgically resected samples (including tumor and paracancerous tissues) collected from OSCC patients treated in our hospital from January 2009 to December 2010 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and the relationship with clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis was analyzed. The effect of small interfering RNA treatment on cell growth (Tca8113, UM-1, and CAL-27 cells) was evaluated by MTT assay, and those on apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry. HOTAIR was positively expressed in 45 samples (90 %). The expression level in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in paracancerous tissues (t = 5.459, P < 0.01). Relative expression level of HOTAIR was correlated with tumor size and clinical stage (P < 0.05). More HOTAIR was expressed in OSCC cell lines than in normal oral epithelial cells. Interfering with HOTAIR expression in Tca8113 cells significantly decelerated cell growth, arrested cell cycle, and promoted apoptosis (P < 0.01). HOTAIR was highly expressed in OSCC tissues and facilitated the growth of OSCC cells, thus probably being an eligible molecular marker for OSCC diagnosis and prognosis determination.

  17. Genome wide discovery of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) and their expression in insecticide resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Etebari, Kayvan; Furlong, Michael J; Asgari, Sassan

    2015-09-28

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in genomic imprinting, cancer, differentiation and regulation of gene expression. Here, we identified 3844 long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNA) in Plutella xylostella, which is a notorious pest of cruciferous plants that has developed field resistance to all classes of insecticides, including Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) endotoxins. Further, we found that some of those lincRNAs may potentially serve as precursors for the production of small ncRNAs. We found 280 and 350 lincRNAs that are differentially expressed in Chlorpyrifos and Fipronil resistant larvae. A survey on P. xylostella midgut transcriptome data from Bt-resistant populations revealed 59 altered lincRNA in two resistant strains compared with the susceptible population. We validated the transcript levels of a number of putative lincRNAs in deltamethrin-resistant larvae that were exposed to deltamethrin, which indicated that this group of lincRNAs might be involved in the response to xenobiotics in this insect. To functionally characterize DBM lincRNAs, gene ontology (GO) enrichment of their associated protein-coding genes was extracted and showed over representation of protein, DNA and RNA binding GO terms. The data presented here will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lincRNAs in insecticide resistance or the response to xenobiotics of eukaryotic cells.

  18. Dynamic changes in the distribution of a satellite homologous to intergenic 26-18S rDNA spacer in the evolution of Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K Y; Skalicka, K; Koukalova, B; Volkov, R A; Matyasek, R; Hemleben, V; Leitch, A R; Kovarik, A

    2004-01-01

    An approximately 135-bp sequence called the A1/A2 repeat was isolated from the transcribed region of the 26-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot analysis revealed its occurrence as an independent satellite (termed an A1/A2 satellite) outside of rDNA loci in species of Nicotiana section Tomentosae. The chromosomal location, patterns of genomic dispersion, and copy numbers of its tandemly arranged units varied between the species. In more distantly related Nicotiana species the A1/A2 repeats were found only at the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR). There was a trend toward the elimination of the A1/A2 satellite in N. tabacum (tobacco), an allotetraploid with parents closely related to the diploids N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. This process may have already commenced in an S(3) generation of synthetic tobacco. Cytosine residues in the IGS were significantly hypomethylated compared with the A1/A2 satellite. There was no clear separation between the IGS and satellite fractions in sequence analysis of individual clones and we found no evidence for CG suppression. Taken together the data indicate a dynamic nature of the A1/A2 repeats in Nicotiana genomes, with evidence for recurrent integration, copy number expansions, and contractions. PMID:15126410

  19. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic noncoding RNAs and their potential association with larval development in the Pacific oyster

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Zhao, Xuelin; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) may play diverse roles in many cellular processes. However, little is known about lincRNAs in marine invertebrates. Here, we presented the first identification and characterization of lincRNAs in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas). We developed a pipeline and identified 11,668 lincRNAs in C. gigas based on RNA-Seq resources available. These lincRNAs exhibited many common characteristics with vertebrate lincRNAs: relatively short length, low exon numbers, low expression, and low sequence conservation. 1,175 lincRNAs were expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with 35.2% preferentially expressed in male gonad. 776 lincRNAs were specifically expressed in juvenile during different developmental stages. In addition, 47 lincRNAs were found to be potentially related to oyster settlement and metamorphosis. Such diverse temporal and spatial patterns of expression suggest that these lincRNAs might function in cell differentiation during early development, as well as sex differentiation and reproduction. Based on a co-expression network analysis, five lincRNAs were detected that have an expression correlation with key hub genes in four modules significantly correlated with larval development. Our study provides the first large-scale identification of lincRNAs in molluscs and offers new insights into potential functions of lincRNAs in marine invertebrates. PMID:26861843

  20. The intergenic region of the maize defensin-like protein genes Def1 and Def2 functions as an embryo-specific asymmetric bidirectional promoter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Wenzhu; Li, Ye; Li, Suzhen; Zhou, Xiaojin; Zhao, Qianqian; Fan, Yunliu; Lin, Min; Chen, Rumei

    2016-01-01

    Bidirectional promoters are identified in diverse organisms with widely varied genome sizes, including bacteria, yeast, mammals, and plants. However, little research has been done on any individual endogenous bidirectional promoter from plants. Here, we describe a promoter positioned in the intergenic region of two defensin-like protein genes, Def1 and Def2 in maize (Zea mays). We examined the expression profiles of Def1 and Def2 in 14 maize tissues by qRT-PCR, and the results showed that this gene pair was expressed abundantly and specifically in seeds. When fused to either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter genes, P ZmBD1, P ZmDef1, and P ZmDef2 were active and reproduced the expression patterns of both Def1 and Def2 genes in transformed immature maize embryos, as well as in developing seeds of transgenic maize. Comparative analysis revealed that PZmBD1 shared most of the expression characteristics of the two polar promoters, but displayed more stringent embryo specificity, delayed expression initiation, and asymmetric promoter activity. Moreover, a truncated promoter study revealed that the core promoters only exhibit basic bidirectional activity, while interacting with necessary cis-elements, which leads to polarity and different strengths. The sophisticated interaction or counteraction between the core promoter and cis-elements may potentially regulate bidirectional promoters. PMID:27279278

  1. Long intergenic non-coding RNA APOC1P1-3 inhibits apoptosis by decreasing α-tubulin acetylation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liao, X-H; Wang, J-G; Li, L-Y; Zhou, D-M; Ren, K-H; Jin, Y-T; Lv, L; Yu, J-G; Yang, J-Y; Lu, Q; Zou, Q; Yu, J; Liu, X-P; Zhou, P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) act as important regulatory factors in tumor progression. However, their roles in breast cancer remain largely unknown. In present studies, we identified aberrantly expressed long intergenic non-coding RNA APOC1P1-3 (lincRNA-APOC1P1-3) in breast cancer by microarray, verified it by quantitative real-time PCR, and assessed methylation status in the promoter region by pyrosequencing. We also investigated the biological functions with plasmid transfection and siRNA silencing experiments, and further explored their mechanisms by RNA pull-down and RNA immunoprecipitation to identify binding proteins. We found that 224 lncRNAs were upregulated in breast cancer, whereas 324 were downregulated. The lincRNA-APOC1P1-3 was overexpressed in breast cancer, which was related to tumor size and hypomethylation in its promoter region. We also found that APOC1P1-3 could directly bind to tubulin to decrease α-tubulin acetylation, to inactivate caspase-3, and to inhibit apoptosis. This study demonstrates that overexpression of APOC1P1-3 can inhibit breast cancer apoptosis. PMID:27228351

  2. The Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure (InterGEN) Study: Design and Methods for Complex DNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Wright, Michelle L; Crusto, Cindy A; Sun, Yan V

    2016-10-01

    The Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure (InterGEN) study aims to delineate the independent and interaction effects of genomic (genetic and epigenetic) and psychological-environmental (maternally perceived racial discrimination, mental health, and parenting behavior) factors on blood pressure (BP) among African American mother-child dyads over time. The purpose of this article is to describe the two-step genetic and epigenetic approach that will be executed to explore Gene × Environment interactions on BP using a longitudinal cohort design. Procedure for the single collection of DNA at Time 1 includes the use of the Oragene 500-format saliva sample collection tube, which provides enough DNA for both the Illumina Multi-Ethnic Genotyping and 850K EPIC methylation analyses. BP readings, height, weight, percentage of body fat, and percentage of body water will be measured on all participants every 6 months for 2 years for a total of 4 time points. Genomic data analyses to be completed include multivariate modeling, assessment of population admixture and structure, and extended analyses including Bonferroni correction, false discovery rate methods, Monte Carlo approach, EIGENSTRAT methods, and so on, to determine relationships among both main and interaction effects of genetic, epigenetic, and psychological environmental factors on BP.

  3. TALEN-mediated single-base-pair editing identification of an intergenic mutation upstream of BUB1B as causative of PCS (MVA) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Kanai, Akinori; Hosoba, Kosuke; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kudo, Yoshiki; Asami, Keiko; Ogawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Akihiro; Kajii, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Matsuura, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-prone syndrome of premature chromatid separation with mosaic variegated aneuploidy [PCS (MVA) syndrome] is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by constitutional aneuploidy and a high risk of childhood cancer. We previously reported monoallelic mutations in the BUB1B gene (encoding BUBR1) in seven Japanese families with the syndrome. No second mutation was found in the opposite allele of any of the families studied, although a conserved BUB1B haplotype and a decreased transcript were identified. To clarify the molecular pathology of the second allele, we extended our mutational search to a candidate region surrounding BUB1B. A unique single nucleotide substitution, G > A at ss802470619, was identified in an intergenic region 44 kb upstream of a BUB1B transcription start site, which cosegregated with the disorder. To examine whether this is the causal mutation, we designed a transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated two-step single-base pair editing strategy and biallelically introduced this substitution into cultured human cells. The cell clones showed reduced BUB1B transcripts, increased PCS frequency, and MVA, which are the hallmarks of the syndrome. We also encountered a case of a Japanese infant with PCS (MVA) syndrome carrying a homozygous single nucleotide substitution at ss802470619. These results suggested that the nucleotide substitution identified was the causal mutation of PCS (MVA) syndrome. PMID:24344301

  4. Long intergenic non-coding RNA 00152 promotes renal cell carcinoma progression by epigenetically suppressing P16 and negatively regulates miR-205

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Jianzhen; Bai, Hongzhong; Dang, Yi; Lv, Pei; Wu, Shucai

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the tumorigenesis and development of several human cancers. Long intergenic non-coding RNA 152 (LINC00152) is significantly up-regulated in some solid tumors. However, the role of LINC00152 in the pathogenesis and development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains largely unclear. In the study, we showed that LINC00152 expression was up-regulated in RCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and revealed that LINC00152 expression was positively correlated with lymph node metastasis, higher TNM stage, and poor over survival (OS) time in RCC patients. Furthermore, knockdown of LINC00152 inhibited RCC cell proliferation and S phase cell proportion in vitro. Mechanistically, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) verified that LINC00152 bound to Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), LSD1 and histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and epigenetically suppressing P16 expression. In addition, LINC00152 expression was negatively correlated with miR-205 in RCC and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-205 was a target of LINC00152. These findings suggested that LINC00152 may contribute to RCC progression by epigenetically repressing P16 expression and interacted with miR-205. Thus, LINC00152 acted as a novel prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target for RCC. PMID:28337379

  5. Phylogenetic relationships within Chamaecrista sect. Xerocalyx (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae) inferred from the cpDNA trnE-trnT intergenic spacer and nrDNA ITS sequences

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Davi Coe; Lima, João Paulo Matos Santos; Fernandes, Afrânio Gomes; Nunes, Edson Paula; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Chamaecrista belongs to subtribe Cassiinae (Caesalpinioideae), and it comprises over 330 species, divided into six sections. The section Xerocalyx has been subjected to a profound taxonomic shuffling over the years. Therefore, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis using a cpDNA trnE-trnT intergenic spacer and nrDNA ITS/5.8S sequences from Cassiinae taxa, in an attempt to elucidate the relationships within this section from Chamaecrista. The tree topology was congruent between the two data sets studied in which the monophyly of the genus Chamaecrista was strongly supported. Our analyses reinforce that new sectional boundaries must be defined in the Chamaecrista genus, especially the inclusion of sections Caliciopsis and Xerocalyx in sect. Chamaecrista, considered here paraphyletic. The section Xerocalyx was strongly supported as monophyletic; however, the current data did not show C. ramosa (microphyllous) and C. desvauxii (macrophyllous) and their respective varieties in distinct clades, suggesting that speciation events are still ongoing in these specimens. PMID:21734825

  6. Restoration of Dlk1 and Rtl1 is necessary but insufficient to rescue lethality in intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Ryota; Kono, Tomohiro

    2010-08-20

    In the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted domain, an intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) regulates the parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes. The maternally inherited deletion of IG-DMR (IG-DMR((-/+))) results in perinatal lethality because of the overexpression of paternally expressed genes and repression of maternally expressed noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including Gtl2. To better understand the possible contribution of paternally expressed genes to the lethality, we attempted to rescue the lethality of IG-DMR((-/+)) mutants by restoring the paternally expressed genes. Because the paternally inherited Gtl2 deletion (Gtl2((+/-))) induced a decrease in the expression of paternally expressed genes, we crossed female IG-DMR heterozygous mice and male Gtl2 heterozygous mutant mice. The resultant IG-DMR((-/+))/Gtl2((+/-)) double mutant mice had normal expression levels of paternally expressed genes, and none of them showed perinatal lethality; however, most mice showed postnatal lethality with decreased expression of the maternally expressed ncRNAs. Thus, we inferred that paternally expressed genes are necessary for perinatal survivability and that maternally expressed ncRNAs are involved in postnatal lethality.

  7. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  8. Exceptionally high and diverse mutation rates in insects small rRNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y X; Krupp, G; Gross, J H

    1985-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from the posterior silk gland of the silk worm Philosamia cynthia ricini has been determined. The comparison with other insect 5S rRNAs revealed an exceptionally conserved secondary structure, in spite of an extremely high mutation rate: Thirteen nucleotides are different in Philosamia and Drosophila 5S rRNA, but all substitutions are either compensatory or occur in loops or introduce G:U base pairs. The rates of base substitution per site per year of several insect species (diptera and lepidoptera) 5S and 5.8S rRNAs are compared with those occurring in vertebrate rRNAs. In the latter cases the rates are remarkably constant, whereas their value is not only about twofold higher in insect rRNAs, but is found to be extremely large in the 5S rRNA of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic conclusions derived from small rRNA sequence comparisons are only of limited value.

  9. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  10. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  11. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  12. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  13. Methyltransferase Erm(37) slips on rRNA to confer atypical resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Jakobsen, Lene; Buriánková, Karolina; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2005-11-25

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex possess a resistance determinant, erm(37) (also termed ermMT), which is a truncated homologue of the erm genes found in a diverse range of drug-producing and pathogenic bacteria. All erm genes examined thus far encode N(6)-monomethyltransferases or N(6),N(6)-dimethyltransferases that show absolute specificity for nucleotide A2058 in 23 S rRNA. Monomethylation at A2058 confers resistance to a subset of the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) group of antibiotics and no resistance to the latest macrolide derivatives, the ketolides. Dimethylation at A2058 confers high resistance to all MLS(B) and ketolide drugs. The erm(37) phenotype fits into neither category. We show here by tandem mass spectrometry that Erm(37) initially adds a single methyl group to its primary target at A2058 but then proceeds to attach additional methyl groups to the neighboring nucleotides A2057 and A2059. Other methyltransferases, Erm(E) and Erm(O), maintain their specificity for A2058 on mycobacterial rRNA. Erm(E) and Erm(O) have a full-length C-terminal domain, which appears to be important for stabilizing the methyltransferases at their rRNA target, and this domain is truncated in Erm(37). The lax interaction of the M. tuberculosis Erm(37) with its rRNA produces a unique methylation pattern and confers resistance to the ketolide telithromycin.

  14. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  15. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  16. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  17. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2–2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2–2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2–2, atg9–4, atg5–1, rns2–2 atg9–4, and rns2–2 atg5–1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2–2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2–2 atg5–1 double mutant but not by an rns2–2 atg9–4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole. PMID:26735434

  18. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2-2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2-2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2-2, atg9-4, atg5-1, rns2-2 atg9-4, and rns2-2 atg5-1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2-2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2-2 atg5-1 double mutant but not by an rns2-2 atg9-4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole.

  19. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  20. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-24

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested.

  1. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested. PMID:28117413

  2. Development of a cultivation-independent approach for the study of genetic diversity of Sinorhizobium meliloti populations.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Darine; Pini, Francesco; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele G; Aouani, Mohammed E; Mengoni, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    The development of a species-specific marker for the analysis of the genetic polymorphism of the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti directly from environmental DNA is reported. The marker is based on terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) methodology targeting specifically the 16S-23S Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer of S. meliloti. Species-specificity and polymorphism of the marker were tested on DNA extracted from soil samples and from a collection of 130 S. meliloti bacterial isolates. These primers and the T-RFLP approach proved useful for the detection and analysis of polymorphism of S. meliloti populations.

  3. Fleas and Flea-Associated Bartonella Species in Dogs and Cats from Peru.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M F; Billeter, S A; Osikowicz, L; Luna-Caipo, D V; Cáceres, A G; Kosoy, M

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated 238 fleas collected from cats and dogs in three regions of Peru (Ancash, Cajamarca, and Lima) for the presence of Bartonella DNA. Bartonella spp. were detected by amplification of the citrate synthase gene (16.4%) and the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (20.6%). Bartonella rochalimae was the most common species detected followed by Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae. Our results demonstrate that dogs and cats in Peru are infested with fleas harboring zoonotic Bartonella spp. and these infected fleas could pose a disease risk for humans.

  4. Phylogenetic Sequence Variations in Bacterial rRNA Affect Species-Specific Susceptibility to Drugs Targeting Protein Synthesis▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Akshay, Subramanian; Bertea, Mihai; Hobbie, Sven N.; Oettinghaus, Björn; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Böttger, Erik C.; Akbergenov, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting the bacterial ribosome typically bind to highly conserved rRNA regions with only minor phylogenetic sequence variations. It is unclear whether these sequence variations affect antibiotic susceptibility or resistance development. To address this question, we have investigated the drug binding pockets of aminoglycosides and macrolides/ketolides. The binding site of aminoglycosides is located within helix 44 of the 16S rRNA (A site); macrolides/ketolides bind to domain V of the 23S rRNA (peptidyltransferase center). We have used mutagenesis of rRNA sequences in Mycobacterium smegmatis ribosomes to reconstruct the different bacterial drug binding sites and to study the effects of rRNA sequence variations on drug activity. Our results provide a rationale for differences in species-specific drug susceptibility patterns and species-specific resistance phenotypes associated with mutational alterations in the drug binding pocket. PMID:21730122

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographical regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced-leader genes.

    PubMed

    Cura, Carolina I; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M; Tomasini, Nicolás; da Silva, Alexandre; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba, Cesar A Cuba; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2010-12-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harbouring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia+Tc Id, Tc Ia+Tc Ie and Tc Id+Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time.

  6. H3K27me3 forms BLOCs over silent genes and intergenic regions and specifies a histone banding pattern on a mouse autosomal chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Pauler, Florian M.; Sloane, Mathew A.; Huang, Ru; Regha, Kakkad; Koerner, Martha V.; Tamir, Ido; Sommer, Andreas; Aszodi, Andras; Jenuwein, Thomas; Barlow, Denise P.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, genome-wide chromatin maps and immunofluorescence studies show that broad domains of repressive histone modifications are present on pericentromeric and telomeric repeats and on the inactive X chromosome. However, only a few autosomal loci such as silent Hox gene clusters have been shown to lie in broad domains of repressive histone modifications. Here we present a ChIP-chip analysis of the repressive H3K27me3 histone modification along chr 17 in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells using an algorithm named broad local enrichments (BLOCs), which allows the identification of broad regions of histone modifications. Our results, confirmed by BLOC analysis of a whole genome ChIP-seq data set, show that the majority of H3K27me3 modifications form BLOCs rather than focal peaks. H3K27me3 BLOCs modify silent genes of all types, plus flanking intergenic regions and their distribution indicates a negative correlation between H3K27me3 and transcription. However, we also found that some nontranscribed gene-poor regions lack H3K27me3. We therefore performed a low-resolution analysis of whole mouse chr 17, which revealed that H3K27me3 is enriched in mega-base-pair-sized domains that are also enriched for genes, short interspersed elements (SINEs) and active histone modifications. These genic H3K27me3 domains alternate with similar-sized gene-poor domains. These are deficient in active histone modifications, as well as H3K27me3, but are enriched for long interspersed elements (LINEs) and long-terminal repeat (LTR) transposons and H3K9me3 and H4K20me3. Thus, an autosome can be seen to contain alternating chromatin bands that predominantly separate genes from one retrotransposon class, which could offer unique domains for the specific regulation of genes or the silencing of autonomous retrotransposons. PMID:19047520

  7. Existence of HbF Enhancer Haplotypes at HBS1L-MYB Intergenic Region in Transfusion-Dependent Saudi β-Thalassemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Cyrus, Cyril; Vatte, Chittibabu; Borgio, J Francis; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah; Chathoth, Shahanas; Nasserullah, Zaki A; Jarrash, Sana Al; Sulaiman, Ahmed; Qutub, Hatem; Alsaleem, Hassan; Alzahrani, Alhusain J; Steinberg, Martin H; Ali, Amein K Al

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives. β-Thalassemia and sickle cell disease are genetic disorders characterized by reduced and abnormal β-globin chain production, respectively. The elevation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate the severity of these disorders. In sickle cell disease patients, the HbF level elevation is associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs), BCL11A, HBG2 promoter, and HBS1L-MYB intergenic region. This study elucidates the existence of the variants in these three QTLs to determine their association with HbF levels of transfusion-dependent Saudi β-thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods. A total of 174 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients and 164 healthy controls from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were genotyped for fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the three QTL regions using TaqMan assay on real-time PCR. Results. Genotype analysis revealed that six alleles of HBS1L-MYB QTL (rs9376090C p = 0.0009, rs9399137C p = 0.008, rs4895441G p = 0.004, rs9389269C p = 0.008, rs9402686A p = 0.008, and rs9494142C p = 0.002) were predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotypes of HBS1L-MYB (GCCGCAC p = 0.022) and HBG2 (GTT p = 0.009) were also predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. Furthermore, the HBS1L-MYB region also exhibited association with the high HbF cohort. Conclusion. The stimulation of HbF gene expression may provide alternative therapies for the amelioration of the disease severity of β-thalassemia.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographic regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced leader genes✯

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Carolina I.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M.; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V.; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M.; Tomasini, Nicolás; Silva, Alex Da; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J.; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harboring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia + Tc Id, Tc Ia + Tc Ie and Tc Id + Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. PMID:20670628

  9. Population genetic structure and phylogeographical pattern of a relict tree fern, Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae), inferred from cpDNA atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Guopei; Gu, Hongya

    2004-11-01

    Sequences of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers of individuals of a tree fern species, Alsophila spinulosa, collected from ten relict populations distributed in the Hainan and Guangdong provinces, and the Guangxi Zhuang region in southern China, were determined. Sequence length varied from 724 bp to 731 bp, showing length polymorphism, and base composition was with high A+T content between 63.17% and 63.95%. Sequences were neutral in terms of evolution (Tajima's criterion D=-1.01899, P>0.10 and Fu and Li's test D*=-1.39008, P>0.10; F*=-1.49775, P>0.10). A total of 19 haplotypes were identified based on nucleotide variation. High levels of haplotype diversity (h=0.744) and nucleotide diversity (Dij=0.01130) were detected in A. spinulosa, probably associated with its long evolutionary history, which has allowed the accumulation of genetic variation within lineages. Both the minimum spanning network and neighbor-joining trees generated for haplotypes demonstrated that current populations of A. spinulosa existing in Hainan, Guangdong, and Guangxi were subdivided into two geographical groups. An analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variation (93.49%, P<0.001) was partitioned among regions. Wright's isolation by distance model was not supported across extant populations. Reduced gene flow by the Qiongzhou Strait and inbreeding may result in the geographical subdivision between the Hainan and Guangdong + Guangxi populations (FST=0.95, Nm=0.03). Within each region, the star-like pattern of phylogeography of haplotypes implied a population expansion process during evolutionary history. Gene genealogies together with coalescent theory provided significant information for uncovering phylogeography of A. spinulosa.

  10. Sequence analysis of two alleles reveals that intra-and intergenic recombination played a role in the evolution of the radish fertility restorer (Rfo)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Land plant genomes contain multiple members of a eukaryote-specific gene family encoding proteins with pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motifs. Some PPR proteins were shown to participate in post-transcriptional events involved in organellar gene expression, and this type of function is now thought to be their main biological role. Among PPR genes, restorers of fertility (Rf) of cytoplasmic male sterility systems constitute a peculiar subgroup that is thought to evolve in response to the presence of mitochondrial sterility-inducing genes. Rf genes encoding PPR proteins are associated with very close relatives on complex loci. Results We sequenced a non-restoring allele (L7rfo) of the Rfo radish locus whose restoring allele (D81Rfo) was previously described, and compared the two alleles and their PPR genes. We identified a ca 13 kb long fragment, likely originating from another part of the radish genome, inserted into the L7rfo sequence. The L7rfo allele carries two genes (PPR-1 and PPR-2) closely related to the three previously described PPR genes of the restorer D81Rfo allele (PPR-A, PPR-B, and PPR-C). Our results indicate that alleles of the Rfo locus have experienced complex evolutionary events, including recombination and insertion of extra-locus sequences, since they diverged. Our analyses strongly suggest that present coding sequences of Rfo PPR genes result from intragenic recombination. We found that the 10 C-terminal PPR repeats in Rfo PPR gene encoded proteins result from the tandem duplication of a 5 PPR repeat block. Conclusions The Rfo locus appears to experience more complex evolution than its flanking sequences. The Rfo locus and PPR genes therein are likely to evolve as a result of intergenic and intragenic recombination. It is therefore not possible to determine which genes on the two alleles are direct orthologs. Our observations recall some previously reported data on pathogen resistance complex loci. PMID:20178653

  11. CHIR99021 promotes self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells by modulation of protein-encoding gene and long intergenic non-coding RNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yongyan; Ai, Zhiying; Yao, Kezhen; Cao, Lixia; Du, Juan; Shi, Xiaoyan; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2013-10-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely in vitro and differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. These unique properties make them exceptionally valuable for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, the practical application of ESCs is limited because it is difficult to derive and culture ESCs. It has been demonstrated that CHIR99021 (CHIR) promotes self-renewal and enhances the derivation efficiency of mouse (m)ESCs. However, the downstream targets of CHIR are not fully understood. In this study, we identified CHIR-regulated genes in mESCs using microarray analysis. Our microarray data demonstrated that CHIR not only influenced the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by stabilizing β-catenin, but also modulated several other pluripotency-related signaling pathways such as TGF-β, Notch and MAPK signaling pathways. More detailed analysis demonstrated that CHIR inhibited Nodal signaling, while activating bone morphogenetic protein signaling in mESCs. In addition, we found that pluripotency-maintaining transcription factors were up-regulated by CHIR, while several developmental-related genes were down-regulated. Furthermore, we found that CHIR altered the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with microarray data, suggesting that CHIR alters the expression pattern of protein-encoding genes (especially transcription factors), epigenetic regulatory genes and non-coding RNAs to establish a relatively stable pluripotency-maintaining network. - Highlights: • Combined use of CHIR with LIF promotes self-renewal of J1 mESCs. • CHIR-regulated genes are involved in multiple pathways. • CHIR inhibits Nodal signaling and promotes Bmp4 expression to activate BMP signaling. • Expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and lincRNAs is altered by CHIR.

  12. BAC-End Microsatellites from Intra and Inter-Genic Regions of the Common Bean Genome and Their Correlation with Cytogenetic Features

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew Wohlgemuth; Córdoba, Juana Marcela; Muñóz, Claritza; Yuyó, Deissy K.

    2014-01-01

    Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES) from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). These so called “singleton” BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally) and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed. PMID:25254501

  13. Utility of indels for species-level identification of a biologically complex plant group: a study with intergenic spacer in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Mahadani, Pradosh; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The Consortium of Barcode of Life plant working group proposed to use the defined portion of plastid genes rbcL and matK either singly or in combination as the standard DNA barcode for plants. But DNA barcode based identification of biologically complex plant groups are always a challenging task due to the occurrence of natural hybridization. Here, we examined the use of indels polymorphism in trnH-psbA and trnL-trnF sequences for rapid species identification of citrus. DNA from young leaves of selected citrus species were isolated and matK gene (~800 bp) and trnH-psbA spacer (~450 bp) of Chloroplast DNA was amplified for species level identification. The sequences within the group taxa of Citrus were aligned using the ClustalX program. With few obvious misalignments were corrected manually using the similarity criterion. We identified a 54 bp inverted repeat or palindrome sequence (27-80 regions) and 6 multi residues indel coding regions. Large inverted repeats in cpDNA provided authentication at the higher taxonomic levels. These diagnostics indel marker from trnH-psbA were successful in identifying different species (5 out of 7) within the studied Citrus except Citrus limon and Citrus medica. These two closely related species are distinguished through the 6 bp deletion in trnL-trnF. This study demonstrated that the indel polymorphism based approach easily characterizes the Citrus species and the same may be applied in other complex groups. Likewise other indels occurring intergenic spacer of chloroplast regions may be tested for rapid identification of other secondary citrus species.

  14. Existence of HbF Enhancer Haplotypes at HBS1L-MYB Intergenic Region in Transfusion-Dependent Saudi β-Thalassemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Borgio, J. Francis; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah; Nasserullah, Zaki A.; Jarrash, Sana Al; Sulaiman, Ahmed; Qutub, Hatem; Alsaleem, Hassan; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.; Steinberg, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives. β-Thalassemia and sickle cell disease are genetic disorders characterized by reduced and abnormal β-globin chain production, respectively. The elevation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate the severity of these disorders. In sickle cell disease patients, the HbF level elevation is associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs), BCL11A, HBG2 promoter, and HBS1L-MYB intergenic region. This study elucidates the existence of the variants in these three QTLs to determine their association with HbF levels of transfusion-dependent Saudi β-thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods. A total of 174 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients and 164 healthy controls from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were genotyped for fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the three QTL regions using TaqMan assay on real-time PCR. Results. Genotype analysis revealed that six alleles of HBS1L-MYB QTL (rs9376090C p = 0.0009, rs9399137C p = 0.008, rs4895441G p = 0.004, rs9389269C p = 0.008, rs9402686A p = 0.008, and rs9494142C p = 0.002) were predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotypes of HBS1L-MYB (GCCGCAC p = 0.022) and HBG2 (GTT p = 0.009) were also predominantly associated with β-thalassemia. Furthermore, the HBS1L-MYB region also exhibited association with the high HbF cohort. Conclusion. The stimulation of HbF gene expression may provide alternative therapies for the amelioration of the disease severity of β-thalassemia. PMID:28280727

  15. Comparison of soil fungal community structure in different peanut rotation sequences using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis in relation to aflatoxin-producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Sudini, H; Arias, C R; Liles, M R; Bowen, K L; Huettel, R N

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on determining soil fungal community structure in different peanut-cropping sequences by using a high-resolution DNA fingerprinting technique: ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). This study was initiated to determine fungal community profiles in four peanut-cropping sequences (continuous peanut, 4 years of continuous bahiagrass followed by peanut, peanut-corn-cotton, and peanut-cotton rotations), with a special focus to evaluate whether the profiles under investigation may have also indicated microbial differences that could affect Aspergillus flavus populations. Results indicated 75% similarities among fungal communities from the same cropping sequences as well as with similar times of sampling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of A. flavus directly from these soils was carried out using A. flavus-specific primers (FLA1 and FLA2) and also through quantitative estimation on A. flavus and A. parasiticus agar medium. Population levels of A. flavus in soil samples ranged from zero to 1.2 × 10(3) CFU g(-1) of soil (based on culturable methods); however, the fungus was not detected with A. flavus-specific primers. The minimum threshold limit at which these aflatoxin-producing fungi could be detected from the total soil genomic DNA was determined through artificial inoculation of samples with 10-fold increases in concentrations. The results indicated that a minimum population density of 2.6 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) of soil is required for PCR detection in our conditions. These results are useful in further determining the relative population levels of these fungi in peanut soils with other soil fungi. This is a new approach to understanding soil fungal communities and how they might change over time and under different rotation systems.

  16. COII/tRNA[sup Lys] intergenic 9-bp deletion and other mtDNA markers clearly reveal that the Tharus (Southern Nepal) have oriental affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Passarino, G.; Semino, O.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A.S.; Modiano, G. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors searched for the East Asian mtDNA 9-bp deletion in the intergenic COII/tRNA[sup Lys] region in a sample of 107 Tharus (50 from central Terai and 57 from eastern Terai), a population whose anthropological origin has yet to be completely clarified. The deletion, detected by electrophoresis of the PCR-amplified nt 7392-8628 mtDNA fragment after digestion with HaeIII, was found in about 8% of both Tharu groups but was found in none of the 76 Hindus who were examined as a non-Oriental neighboring control population. A complete triplication of the 9-bp unit, the second case so far reported, was also observed in one eastern Tharu. All the mtDNAs with the deletion, and that with the triplication, were further characterized (by PCR amplification of the relevant mTDNA fragments and their digestion with the appropriate enzymes) to locate them in the Ballinger et al. phylogeny of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes. The deletion was found to be associated with four different haplotypes, two of which are reported for the first time. One of the deletions and especially the triplication could be best explained by the assumption of novel length-change events. Ballinger's classification of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes is mainly based on the phenotypes for the DdeI site at nt 10394 and the AluI site at nt 10397. Analysis of the entire Tharu sample revealed that more than 70% of the Tharus have both sites, the association of which has been suggested as an ancient East Asian peculiarity. These results conclusively indicate that the Tharus have a predominantly maternal Oriental ancestry. Moreover, they show at least one and perhaps two further distinct length mutations, and this suggests that the examined region is a hot spot of rearrangements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Characterization of a Streptococcus mutans intergenic region containing a small toxic peptide and its cis-encoded antisense small RNA antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Stephanie; Lévesque, Céline M

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules consist of a pair of genes that encode two components: a protein toxin and an antitoxin, which may be in the form of either a labile protein or an antisense small RNA. Here we describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first functional chromosomal type I TA system in streptococci. Our model organism is the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results showed that the genome of S. mutans UA159 reference strain harbors a previously unannotated Fst-like toxin (Fst-Sm) and its cis-encoded small RNA antitoxin (srSm) converging towards the end of the toxin gene in IGR176, a small intergenic region of 318 nt. Fst-Sm is a small hydrophobic peptide of 32 amino acid residues with homology to the Fst toxin family. Transcripts of ∼200 nt and ∼70 nt specific to fst-Sm mRNA and srSm RNA, respectively, were detected by Northern blot analysis throughout S. mutans growth. The toxin mRNA was considerably more stable than its cognate antitoxin. The half-life of srSm RNA was determined to be ∼30 min, while fst-Sm mRNA had a half-life of ∼90 min. Both fst-Sm and srSm RNAs were transcribed across direct tandem repeats providing a region of complementarity for inhibition of toxin translation. Overproduction of Fst-Sm had a toxic effect on E. coli and S. mutans cells which can be neutralized by coexpression of srSm RNA. Deletion of fst-Sm/srSm locus or overexpression of Fst-Sm/srSm had no effect on S. mutans cell growth in liquid medium and no differences in the total biofilm biomass were noted. In contrast, mild-overproduction of Fst-Sm/srSm type I TA system decreases the levels of persister cells tolerant to bacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitors.

  18. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  19. Phylogeny of Metschnikowia species estimated from partial rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N; Kurtzman, C P

    1993-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of species assigned to the genus Metschnikowia were estimated from the extents of divergence among partial sequences of rRNA. The data suggest that the aquatic species (Metschnikowia australis, Metschnikowia bicuspidata, Metschnikowia krissii, and Metschnikowia zobellii) and the terrestrial species (Metschnikowia hawaiiensis, Metschnikowia lunata, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Metschnikowia reukaufii) form two groups within the genus. M. lunata and M. hawaiiensis are well separated from other members of the genus, and M. hawaiiensis may be sufficiently divergent that it could be placed in a new genus. Species of the genus Metschnikowia are unique compared with other ascomycetous yeasts because they have a deletion in the large-subunit rRNA sequence that includes nucleotides 434 to 483.

  20. Improving oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes by implementation of polony microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Bent, Elizabeth; Li, Wei; Jeske, Daniel R.; Cui, Xinping; Braun, Jonathan; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) were obtained by implementing polony microarray technology. OFRG is an array-based method for analyzing microbial community composition. Polonies are discrete clusters of DNA, produced by solid-phase PCR in hydrogels, and derived from individual, spatially isolated DNA molecules. The advantages of a polony-based OFRG method include higher throughput and reductions in the PCR-induced errors and compositional skew inherent in all other PCR-based community composition methods, including high throughput sequencing of rRNA genes. Given the similarities between polony microarrays and certain aspects of sequencing methods such as the Illumina platform, we suggest that if concepts presented in this study were implemented in high throughput sequencing protocols, a reduction of PCR-induced errors and compositional skew may be realized. PMID:22640891

  1. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  2. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  3. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  4. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  5. DNA sequencing analysis of ITS and 28S rRNA of Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Mikage, Masayuki

    2007-08-01

    We determined the DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS 1 and 2), the 5.8S rRNA gene and most of the 28S rRNA gene of Poria cocos for the first time, and conducted analysis of 20 samples including cultured mycelias and crude drug materials obtained from various localities and markets. Direct sequencing of the ITS 1 and 2 regions of the samples, except for four wild samples, showed that they had identical DNA sequences for ITS 1 and 2 with nucleotide lengths of 997 bps and 460 bps, respectively. By cloning, the four wild samples were found to have combined sequences of common ITS sequences with 1 or 2-base-pair insertions. Altogether both ITS 1 and 2 sequences were substantially longer than those of other fungal crude drugs such as Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus. Thus, Poria cocos could be distinguished from these crude drugs and fakes by comparing the nucleotide length of PCR products of ITS 1 and 2. Contrary to the basic homogeneity in ITS 1 and 2, three types (Group 1, 2, 3) of the 28S rRNA gene with distinctive differences in length and sequence were found. Furthermore, Group 1 could be divided into three subgroups depending on differences at nucleotide position 690. Products with different types of 28S rRNA gene were found in crude drugs from Yunnan and Anhui Provinces as well as the Korean Peninsula, suggesting that the locality of the crude drugs does not guarantee genetic uniformity. The result of DNA typing of Poria cocos may help discrimination of the quality of the crude drug by genotype.

  6. Application of 12S rRNA gene for the identification of animal-derived drugs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Da; Han, Yumei; Dong, Xiaoping; Yang, Yong; Deng, Kejun; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. Animal-derived drugs are the major source of biological products and traditional medicine, but they are often difficult to identify, causing confusion in the clinical application. Among these medicinal animals, a number of animal species are endangered, leading to the destruction of biodiversity. The identification of animal-derived drugs and their alternatives would be a first step toward biodiversity conservation and safe medication. Until now, no effective method for identifying animal-derived drugs has been demonstrated; DNA-based species identification presents a brand-new technique. METHODS. We designed primers to amplify a 523-bp fragment of 12S rRNA and generated sequences for 13 individuals within six medicinal animal species. We examined the efficiency of species recognition based on this sequence, and we also tested the taxonomic affiliations against the GenBank database. RESULTS. All the tested drugs were identified successfully, and a visible gap was found between the inter-specific and intra-specific variation. We further demonstrated the importance of data exploration in DNA-based species identification practice by examining the sequence characteristics of relative genera in GenBank. This region of the 12S rRNA gene had a 100% success rate of species recognition within the six medicinal animal species. CONCLUSIONS. We propose that the 12S rRNA locus might be universal for identifying animal-derived drugs and their adulterants. The development of 12S rRNA for indentifying animal-derived drugs that share a common gene target would contribute significantly to the clinical application of animal-derived drugs and the conservation of medicinal animal species. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  7. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  8. GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Sun, Liang; Zong, Ling; Wu, Xuan; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Chang; Cao, Hui; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sudden deafness. However, the specific genes involved are largely unknown. We sought to explore the frequency of GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in patients with sudden deafness. Between September 2011 and May 2012, 62 consecutive patients with sudden deafness were seen. In 50 of these, no etiological factors for sudden deafness were found. We detected GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants by direct sequencing in these 50 patients and in 53-aged matched controls with normal hearing. In addition, we undertook functional analyses of the mitochondrial mutations which we detected, applying structural and phylogenetic analysis. GJB2 sequencing identified six mutations, including three pathogenic mutations (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, c.109G>A) and three polymorphisms, in the study participants, giving an allele frequency of 15.0 %. A homozygous c.109G>A mutation was detected in two participants. A total of 16 variants in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene were identified in the participants. No significant differences were found in GJB2 heterozygosity or in mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants between patients with sudden deafness and in controls. Our results suggest that the homozygous GJB2 c.109G>A mutation may be a cause of sudden deafness involving both ears. This finding should increase awareness of the likely role of genetic factors in the etiology of sudden deafness in general.

  9. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  10. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  11. Molecular systematics of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) based on exhaustive 18S rRNA phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Misawa, Kazuharu; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomy of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) was traditionally based solely on morphological characteristics. However, because recent molecular phylogeny largely contradicts the traditional subordinal and familial classifications, no classification system has yet been established that describes the subdivision of Volvocales in a manner consistent with the phylogenetic relationships. Towards development of a natural classification system at and above the generic level, identification and sorting of hundreds of sequences based on subjective phylogenetic definitions is a significant step. We constructed an 18S rRNA gene phylogeny based on 449 volvocalean sequences collected using exhaustive BLAST searches of the GenBank database. Many chimeric sequences, which can cause fallacious phylogenetic trees, were detected and excluded during data collection. The results revealed 21 strongly supported primary clades within phylogenetically redefined Volvocales. Phylogenetic classification following PhyloCode was proposed based on the presented 18S rRNA gene phylogeny along with the results of previous combined 18S and 26S rRNA and chloroplast multigene analyses.

  12. rRNA Binding Sites and the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Tetracyclines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics are known to be effective in the treatment of both infectious and noninfectious disease conditions. The 16S rRNA binding mechanism currently held for the antibacterial action of the tetracyclines does not explain their activity against viruses, protozoa that lack mitochondria, and noninfectious conditions. Also, the mechanism by which the tetracyclines selectively inhibit microbial protein synthesis against host eukaryotic protein synthesis despite conservation of ribosome structure and functions is still questionable. Many studies have investigated the binding of the tetracyclines to the 16S rRNA using the small ribosomal subunit of different bacterial species, but there seems to be no agreement between various reports on the exact binding site on the 16S rRNA. The wide range of activity of the tetracyclines against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens, viruses, protozoa, and helminths, as well as noninfectious conditions, indicates a more generalized effect on RNA. In the light of recent evidence that the tetracyclines bind to various synthetic double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) of random base sequences, suggesting that the double-stranded structures may play a more important role in the binding of the tetracyclines to RNA than the specific base pairs, as earlier speculated, it is imperative to consider possible alternative binding modes or sites that could help explain the mechanisms of action of the tetracyclines against various pathogens and disease conditions. PMID:27246781

  13. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  14. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  15. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  16. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  17. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  18. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  20. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  1. Minor contribution of mutations at iniA codon 501 and embC-embA intergenic region in ethambutol-resistant clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Al-Anoud; Ahmad, Suhail; Mokaddas, Eiman

    2009-01-01

    Background Ethambutol (EMB) is a first-line drug for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). Resistance to EMB in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is mediated by mutations in several genes involved in arabinan synthesis notably three emb (arabinosyl transferase) and iniA (isoniazid-inducible) genes. Most epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains contain mutations at embB codons 306, 406 and 497, embC-embA intergenic region (IGR) and iniA codon 501 (iniA501). Objective To develop a more comprehensive molecular screen for EMB-resistance detectioamong epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains previously analyzed for embB codon 306, 406 and 497 mutations by including analysis of mutations at iniA501 and in embC-embA IGR. Methods Fifty consecutive and phenotypically documented EMB-resistant and 25 pansusceptible M. tuberculosis strains isolated from 75 different TB patients over a four-year period in Kuwait were analyzed. Mutations at iniA501 were detected by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns generated with Hpy 99 I. Direct DNA sequencing was used to confirm RFLP results and for detecting mutations in embC-embA IGR. Results Nearly same number of EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis strains were resistant to EMB alone and EMB together with additional resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid (9 of 50, 18% and 11 of 50, 22%, respectively). All the 25 pansusceptible strains contained wild-type sequences at iniA501 and in embC-embA IGR. The analysis of 50 EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates showed that only one strain contained a mutated iniA501 while no mutation was detected in embC-embA IGR in any of the isolate. Conclusion Analysis of iniA501 and embC-embA IGR in epidemiologically unrelated EMB-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in Kuwait indicate that mutations at these locations occur very infrequently and their inclusion for the development of a comprehensive molecular screen

  2. Inactivation of Intergenic Enhancers by EBNA3A Initiates and Maintains Polycomb Signatures across a Chromatin Domain Encoding CXCL10 and CXCL9

    PubMed Central

    Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Scholz, Barbara A.; Erhard, Florian; Glaser, Laura V.; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf; Kempkes, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes a persistent infection in human B cells by establishing specific transcription programs to control B cell activation and differentiation. Transcriptional reprogramming of EBV infected B cells is predominantly driven by the action of EBV nuclear antigens, among them the transcriptional repressor EBNA3A. By comparing gene expression profiles of wt and EBNA3A negative EBV infected B cells, we have previously identified a broad array of cellular genes controlled by EBNA3A. We now find that genes repressed by EBNA3A in these cells are significantly enriched for the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, which is installed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. This PcG-controlled subset of genes also carries H3K27me3 marks in a variety of other tissues, suggesting that the commitment to PcG silencing is an intrinsic feature of these gene loci that can be used by EBNA3A. In addition, EBNA3A targets frequently reside in co-regulated gene clusters. To study the mechanism of gene repression by EBNA3A and to evaluate the relative contribution of PcG proteins during this process, we have selected the genomic neighbors CXCL10 and CXCL9 as a model for co-repressed and PcG-controlled genes. We show that EBNA3A binds to CBF1 occupied intergenic enhancers located between CXCL10 and CXCL9 and displaces the transactivator EBNA2. This impairs enhancer activity, resulting in a rapid transcriptional shut-down of both genes in a CBF1-dependent manner and initiation of a delayed gain of H3K27me3 marks covering an extended chromatin domain. H3K27me3 marks increase gradually and are maintained by EBNA3A. Our study provides direct evidence that repression by EBNA3A requires CBF1 and that EBNA3A and EBNA2 compete for access to CBF1 at identical genomic sites. Most importantly, our results demonstrate that transcriptional silencing by EBNA3A precedes the appearance of repressive PcG marks and indicate that both events are triggered by loss of enhancer activity. PMID

  3. Comparative Bioinformatics and Experimental Analysis of the Intergenic Regulatory Regions of Bacillus cereus hbl and nhe Enterotoxin Operons and the Impact of CodY on Virulence Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Maria-Elisabeth; Krey, Viktoria M.; Jeßberger, Nadja; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant with greatly varying enteropathogenic potential. Almost all known strains harbor the genes for at least one of the three enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and CytK. While some strains show no cytotoxicity, others have caused outbreaks, in rare cases even with lethal outcome. The reason for these differences in cytotoxicity is unknown. To gain insight into the origin of enterotoxin expression heterogeneity in different strains, the architecture and role of 5′ intergenic regions (5′ IGRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl operons was investigated. In silico comparison of 142 strains of all seven phylogenetic groups of B. cereus sensu lato proved the presence of long 5′ IGRs upstream of the nheABC and hblCDAB operons, which harbor recognition sites for several transcriptional regulators, including the virulence regulator PlcR, redox regulators ResD and Fnr, the nutrient-sensitive regulator CodY as well as the master regulator for biofilm formation SinR. By determining transcription start sites, unusually long 5′ untranslated regions (5′ UTRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl start codons were identified, which are not present upstream of cytK-1 and cytK-2. Promoter fusions lacking various parts of the nhe and hbl 5′ UTR in B. cereus INRA C3 showed that the entire 331 bp 5′ UTR of nhe is necessary for full promoter activity, while the presence of the complete 606 bp hbl 5′ UTR lowers promoter activity. Repression was caused by a 268 bp sequence directly upstream of the hbl transcription start. Luciferase activity of reporter strains containing nhe and hbl 5′ IGR lux fusions provided evidence that toxin gene transcription is upregulated by the depletion of free amino acids. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the branched-chain amino acid sensing regulator CodY binds to both nhe and hbl 5′ UTR downstream of the promoter, potentially acting as a nutrient-responsive roadblock repressor of toxin gene transcription. Plc

  4. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  5. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  6. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  7. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  8. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  9. Molecular typing of isolates of the fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2007-04-01

    Flavobacterium columnare intraspecies diversity was revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal spacer region (ISR). Standard restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of these sequences was compared with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Diversity indexes showed that both 16S-SSCP and ISR-SSCP improved resolution (D>or=0.9) when compared with standard RFLP. ISR-SSCP offered a simpler banding pattern than 16S-SSCP while providing high discrimination between isolates. SSCP analysis of rRNA genes proved to be a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for routine fingerprinting of F. columnare.

  10. Phylogenetic and biogeographic implications inferred by mitochondrial intergenic region analyses and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and B. brongniartii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The entomopathogenic fungi of the genus Beauveria are cosmopolitan with a variety of different insect hosts. The two most important species, B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, have already been used as biological control agents of pests in agriculture and as models for the study of insect host - pathogen interactions. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes, due to their properties to evolve faster than the nuclear DNA, to contain introns and mobile elements and to exhibit extended polymorphisms, are ideal tools to examine genetic diversity within fungal populations and genetically identify a species or a particular isolate. Moreover, mt intergenic region can provide valuable phylogenetic information to study the biogeography of the fungus. Results The complete mt genomes of B. bassiana (32,263 bp) and B. brongniartii (33,920 bp) were fully analysed. Apart from a typical gene content and organization, the Beauveria mt genomes contained several introns and had longer intergenic regions when compared with their close relatives. The phylogenetic diversity of a population of 84 Beauveria strains -mainly B. bassiana (n = 76) - isolated from temperate, sub-tropical and tropical habitats was examined by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of two mt intergenic regions (atp6-rns and nad3-atp9) and the nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 domain. Mt sequences allowed better differentiation of strains than the ITS region. Based on mt and the concatenated dataset of all genes, the B. bassiana strains were placed into two main clades: (a) the B. bassiana s. l. and (b) the "pseudobassiana". The combination of molecular phylogeny with criteria of geographic and climatic origin showed for the first time in entomopathogenic fungi, that the B. bassiana s. l. can be subdivided into seven clusters with common climate characteristics. Conclusions This study indicates that mt genomes and in particular intergenic regions provide molecular phylogeny tools that combined with criteria of geographic and

  11. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994). PMID:7651413

  12. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-09-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994).

  13. Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov., an alkalitolerant member of Bacillus rRNA group 6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianli; Wang, Jiewei; Song, Fei; Fang, Caiyuan; Xin, Yuhua; Zhang, Yabo

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain NH3(T), was isolated from a sediment sample from the South China Sea and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 9. Strain NH3(T) had cell-wall peptidoglycan based on meso-diaminopimelic acid and MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone. The cellular fatty acid profile included significant amounts of iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(14 : 0). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain NH3(T) was 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NH3(T) was a member of rRNA group 6 of the genus Bacillus, which includes alkalitolerant, alkaliphilic and halotolerant species. The closest phylogenetic relatives were Bacillus akibai 1139(T) (96.82 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), B. pseudofirmus DSM 8715(T) (96.76 %), B. okhensis Kh10-101(T) (96.76 %) and B. alkalidiazotrophicus MS 6(T) (96.47 %). Strain NH3(T) could be distinguished from these phylogenetically close neighbours based on a number of phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic data, we conclude that strain NH3(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10116(T)  = JCM 16507(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov. is proposed.

  14. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  15. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  16. Rhizobium halophytocola sp. nov., isolated from the root of a coastal dune plant.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Fehmida; Chung, Eu Jin; Khan, Ajmal; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2012-08-01

    During a study of endophytic bacteria from coastal dune plants, a bacterial strain, designated YC6881(T), was isolated from the root of Rosa rugosa collected from the coastal dune areas of Namhae Island, Korea. The bacterium was found to be Gram-staining-negative, motile, halophilic and heterotrophic with a single polar flagellum. Strain YC6881(T) grew at temperatures of 4-37 °C (optimum, 28-32 °C), at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0-8.0), and at NaCl concentrations in the range of 0-7.5% (w/v) (optimum, 4-5% NaCl). Strain YC6881(T) was catalase- and oxidase-positive and negative for nitrate reduction. According to phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain YC6881(T) belonged to the genus Rhizobium and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.9% to Rhizobium rosettiformans, followed by Rhizobium borbori (96.3%), Rhizobium radiobacter (96.1%), Rhizobium daejeonense (95.9%), Rhizobium larrymoorei (95.6%) and Rhizobium giardinii (95.4%). Phylogenetic analysis of strain YC6881(T) by recA, atpD, glnII and 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences all confirmed the phylogenetic arrangements obtained by using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Cross-nodulation tests showed that strain YC6881(T) was a symbiotic bacterium that nodulated Vigna unguiculata and Pisum sativum. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C(18:1)ω7c (53.7%), C(19:0) cyclo ω8c (12.6%) and C(12:0) (8.1%). The DNA G+C content was 52.8 mol%. Phenotypic and physiological tests with respect to carbon source utilization, antibiotic resistance, growth conditions, phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes recA, atpD and glnII, and fatty acid composition could be used to discriminate strain YC6881(T) from other species of the genus Rhizobium in the same sublineage. Based on the results obtained in this study, strain YC6881(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium halophytocola sp. nov. is proposed. The type

  17. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  18. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  19. Campylobacter species identification based on polymorphism of DNA encoding rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, P; Derclaye, I; Gregoire, D; Janssen, M; Cornelis, G R

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA from five Campylobacter species was digested with a mixture of XhoI and BglII restriction endonucleases and analyzed by Southern hybridization by using a probe complementary to the DNA coding for the 16S rRNA. Each of the Campylobacter species, including C. jejuni, C. coli, C. laridis, C. fetus, and C. upsaliensis, displayed a characteristic pattern. Although some bands may be common to different species, the simplicity of the hybridization pattern enabled us to discriminate among the different species of Campylobacter. Images PMID:2570080

  20. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  1. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  2. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  3. Anticancer activity of CX-3543: a direct inhibitor of rRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; O'Brien, Sean; Schwaebe, Michael; Lin, Amy; Bliesath, Josh; Ho, Caroline B; Proffitt, Chris; Trent, Katy; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G

    2009-10-01

    Hallmark deregulated signaling in cancer cells drives excessive ribosome biogenesis within the nucleolus, which elicits unbridled cell growth and proliferation. The rate-limiting step of ribosome biogenesis is synthesis of rRNA (building blocks of ribosomes) by RNA Polymerase I (Pol I). Numerous kinase pathways and products of proto-oncogenes can up-regulate Pol I, whereas tumor suppressor proteins can inhibit rRNA synthesis. In tumorigenesis, activating mutations in certain cancer-associated kinases and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors lead to deregulated signaling that stimulates Pol I transcription with resultant increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Certain anticancer therapeutics, such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, reportedly exert, at least partially, their activity through disruption of ribosome biogenesis, yet many prime targets for anticancer drugs within the ribosome synthetic machinery of the nucleolus remain largely unexploited. Herein, we describe CX-3543, a small molecule nucleolus-targeting agent that selectively disrupts nucleolin/rDNA G-quadruplex complexes in the nucleolus, thereby inhibiting Pol I transcription and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. CX-3543 is the first G-quadruplex interactive agent to enter human clinical trials, and it is currently under evaluation against carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors in a phase II clinical trial.

  4. DbpA: a DEAD box protein specifically activated by 23s rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Pace, F V; Nicol, S M; Reid, A D; Lane, D P

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein DbpA is a member of the 'DEAD box' family of putative RNA-dependent ATPases and RNA helicases, so called because they share the highly conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, together with several other conserved elements. We have investigated DbpA expression under conditions where an endogenous promoter is used. In this context, translation initiation does not occur at the previously identified AUG, but at an upstream, in-frame GUG. Mutation of the GUG initiation codon to AUG virtually abolishes DbpA expression, suggesting an unusual translation initiation mechanism. Using an inducible overexpression plasmid, we have purified milligram quantities of DbpA to homogeneity and shown that the purified protein hydrolyses ATP in an RNA-dependent manner. This ATPase activity is interesting in that, unlike that of other DEAD box proteins investigated to date, it absolutely requires a specific bacterial RNA, which we have identified as 23S rRNA. This observation is particularly significant since DbpA will bind other RNAs and DNA, but will only hydrolyse ATP in the presence of 23S rRNA. Images PMID:8253085

  5. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  6. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  7. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  8. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  9. Control of rRNA Synthesis in Escherichia coli: a Systems Biology Approach†

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Patrick P.; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The first part of this review contains an overview of the various contributions and models relating to the control of rRNA synthesis reported over the last 45 years. The second part describes a systems biology approach to identify the factors and effectors that control the interactions between RNA polymerase and rRNA (rrn) promoters of Escherichia coli bacteria during exponential growth in different media. This analysis is based on measurements of absolute rrn promoter activities as transcripts per minute per promoter in bacterial strains either deficient or proficient in the synthesis of the factor Fis and/or the effector ppGpp. These absolute promoter activities are evaluated in terms of rrn promoter strength (Vmax/Km) and free RNA polymerase concentrations. Three major conclusions emerge from this evaluation. First, the rrn promoters are not saturated with RNA polymerase. As a consequence, changes in the concentration of free RNA polymerase contribute to changes in rrn promoter activities. Second, rrn P2 promoter strength is not specifically regulated during exponential growth at different rates; its activity changes only when the concentration of free RNA polymerase changes. Third, the effector ppGpp reduces the strength of the rrn P1 promoter both directly and indirectly by reducing synthesis of the stimulating factor Fis. This control of rrn P1 promoter strength forms part of a larger feedback loop that adjusts the synthesis of ribosomes to the availability of amino acids via amino acid-dependent control of ppGpp accumulation. PMID:15590778

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  11. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  12. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence.

  13. Orientation-dependent influence of an intergenic enhancer on the promoter activity of the divergently transcribed mouse Shsp/alpha B-crystallin and Mkbp/HspB2 genes.

    PubMed

    Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2002-12-20

    The mouse Shsp/alphaB-crystallin and Mkbp/HspB2 genes are closely linked and divergently transcribed. In this study, we have analyzed the contribution of the intergenic enhancer to Shsp/alphaB-crystallin and Mkbp/HspB2 promoter activity using dual-reporter vectors in transient transfection and transgenic mouse experiments. Deletion of the enhancer reduced Shsp/alphaB-crystallin promoter activity by 30- and 93-fold and Mkbp/HspB2 promoter activity by 6- and 10-fold in transiently transfected mouse lens alpha-TN4 and myoblast C2C12 cells, respectively. Surprisingly, inversion of the enhancer reduced Shsp/alphaB-crystallin promoter activity by 17-fold, but did not affect Mkbp/HspB2 promoter activity in the transfected cells. In contrast, enhancer activity was orientation-independent in combination with a heterologous promoter in transfected cells. Transgenic mouse experiments established the orientation dependence and Shsp/alphaB-crystallin promoter preference of the intergenic enhancer in its native context. The orientation dependence and preferential effect of the Shsp/alphaB-crystallin enhancer on the Shsp/alphaB-crystallin promoter provide an example of adaptive changes in gene regulation accompanying the functional diversification of duplicated genes during evolution.

  14. Detection of Vibrio splendidus and related species in Chamelea gallina sampled in the Adriatic along the Abruzzi coastline.

    PubMed

    Torresi, Marina; Acciari, Vicdalia A; Piano, Annamaria; Serratore, Patrizia; Prencipe, Vincenza; Migliorati, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio species are an important and widespread component of marine microbial communities. Some Vibrio strains are potentially pathogenic to marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The aim of this study was to identify vibrios, in particular Vibrio splendidus and related species, isolated from clams (Chamelea gallina) collected along the coasts of the Abruzzi region from May to October 2007. The isolates obtained were phenotyped and classified as belonging to the genus Vibrio. The strains underwent biochemical testing in accordance with Alsina's scheme for V. splendidus identification. Molecular analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic space region and recA gene was used to identify V. splendidus and related species. All the samples examined were found to contain halophylic Vibrio species, with V. alginolyticus, V. splendidus-related species and V. mediterranei most commonly found. A polymerase chain reaction of the 16S-23S intergenic space region and sequencing of the recA gene from isolates confirmed that phenotyping of Vibrio species is not sufficient to distinguish between different species. Differentiation of the highly related species among V. splendidus-related clusters remains an important issue. In this regard, our data suggests sequencing the recA genes was far more discriminatory than sequencing 16S rDNA for this purpose.

  15. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-01-01

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years. PMID:7937917

  16. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence.

  17. Conservation of the primary structure at the 3' end of 18S rRNA from eucaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagenbüchle, O; Santer, M; Steitz, J A; Mans, R J

    1978-03-01

    DNA sequencing methods have been used to determine a sequence of about 20 nucleotides at the 3' termini of various 18S (small ribosomal subunit) RNA molecules. Polyadenylated rRNA was first synthesized using the enzyme ATP:polynucleotidyl transferase from mainze. Then in the presence of an oligonucleotide primer uniquely complementary to the end of each adenylated rRNA, a cDNA copy was produced using AMV reverse transcriptase. In every case, the cDNA transcript was of finite size, which we ascribe to the appearance of an oligonucleotide containing m62A near the 3' end of the 18S rRNAs. Sequences at the 3' termini of 18S rRNA molecules from the four eucaryotic species examined here (mouse, silk worm, wheat embryo and slime mold) are highly conserved. They also exhibit strong homology to the 3' end of E. coli 16S rRNA. Two important differences, however, are apparent. First, the 16S sequence CCUCC, implicated in mRNA binding by E. coli ribosomes, is absent from each eucaryotic rRNA sequence. Second, a purine-rich region which exhibits extensive complementarity to the 5' noncoding regions of many eucaryotic mRNAs appears consistently.

  18. METAXA2: improved identification and taxonomic classification of small and large subunit rRNA in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Hartmann, Martin; Eriksson, Karl Martin; Pal, Chandan; Thorell, Kaisa; Larsson, Dan Göran Joakim; Nilsson, Rolf Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The ribosomal rRNA genes are widely used as genetic markers for taxonomic identification of microbes. Particularly the small subunit (SSU; 16S/18S) rRNA gene is frequently used for species- or genus-level identification, but also the large subunit (LSU; 23S/28S) rRNA gene is employed in taxonomic assignment. The METAXA software tool is a popular utility for extracting partial rRNA sequences from large sequencing data sets and assigning them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial or chloroplast origin. This study describes a comprehensive update to METAXA - METAXA2 - that extends the capabilities of the tool, introducing support for the LSU rRNA gene, a greatly improved classifier allowing classification down to genus or species level, as well as enhanced support for short-read (100 bp) and paired-end sequences, among other changes. The performance of METAXA2 was compared to other commonly used taxonomic classifiers, showing that METAXA2 often outperforms previous methods in terms of making correct predictions while maintaining a low misclassification rate. METAXA2 is freely available from http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa2/.

  19. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  20. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  1. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-10-11

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  3. 18S rRNA suggests that Entoprocta are protostomes, unrelated to Ectoprocta.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L Y; Winnepenninckx, B; De Wachter, R; Backeljau, T; Emschermann, P; Garey, J R

    1996-05-01

    The Ento- and Ectoprocta are sometimes placed together in the Bryozoa, which have variously been regarded as proto- or deuterostomes. However, Entoprocta have also been allied to the pseudocoelomates, while Ectoprocta are often united with the Brachiopoda and Phoronida in the (super)phylum Lophophorata. Hence, the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa are still much debated. We determined complete 18S rRNA sequences of two entoprocts, an ectoproct, an inarticulate brachiopod, a phoronid, two annelids, and a platyhelminth. Phylogenetic analyses of these data show that (1) entoprocts and lophophorates have spiralian, protostomous affinities, (2) Ento- and Ectoprocta are not sister taxa, (3) phoronids and brachiopods form a monophyletic clade, and (4) neither Ectoprocta or Annelida appear to be monophyletic. Both deuterostomous and pseudocoelomate features may have arisen at least two times in evolutionary history. These results advocate a Spiralia-Radialia-based classification rather than one based on the Protostomia-Deuterostomia concept.

  4. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded.

  5. Identification of Scopulariopsis species by partial 28S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Kosim, Kinga; Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna Barbara; Bielecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis contains over 30 species of mitosporic moulds, which although usually saprophytic may also act as opportunistic pathogens in humans. They have mainly been associated with onychomycosis, and only sporadically reported as a cause of deep tissue infections or systemic disease. Identification of Scopulariopsis species still largely relies on phenotype-based methods. There is a need for a molecular diagnostic approach, that would allow to reliably discriminate between different Scopulariopsis species. The aim of this study was to apply sequence analysis of partial 28S rRNA gene for species identification of Scopulariopsis clinical isolates. Although the method employed did reveal some genetic polymorphism among Scopulariopsis isolates tested, it was not enough for species delineation. For this to be achieved, other genetic loci, within and beyond the rDNA operon, need to be investigated.

  6. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  7. The phylogenetic status of arthropods, as inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Pfeifer, D M; Field, K G; Raff, R A

    1991-09-01

    Partial 18S rRNA sequences of five chelicerate arthropods plus a crustacean, myriapod, insect, chordate, echinoderm, annelid, and platyhelminth were compared. The sequence data were used to infer phylogeny by using a maximum-parsimony method, an evolutionary-distance method, and the evolutionary-parsimony method. The phylogenetic inferences generated by maximum-parsimony and distance methods support both monophyly of the Arthropoda and monophyly of the Chelicerata within the Arthropoda. These results are congruent with phylogenies based on rigorous cladistic analyses of morphological characters. Results support the inclusion of the Arthropoda within a spiralian or protostome coelomate clade that is the sister group of a deuterostome clade, refuting the hypothesis that the arthropods represent the "primitive" sister group of a protostome coelomate clade. Bootstrap analyses and consideration of all trees within 1% of the length of the most parsimonious tree suggest that relationships between the nonchelicerate arthropods and relationships within the chelicerate clade cannot be reliably inferred with the partial 18S rRNA sequence data. With the evolutionary-parsimony method, support for monophyly of the Arthropoda is found in the majority of the combinations analyzed if the coelomates are used as "outgroups." Monophyly of the Chelicerata is supported in most combinations assessed. Our analyses also indicate that the evolutionary-parsimony method, like distance and parsimony, may be biased by taxa with long branches. We suggest that a previous study's inference of the Arthropoda as paraphyletic may be the result of (a) having two few arthropod taxa available for analysis and (b) including long-branched taxa.

  8. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  9. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  10. Measurement of rRNA Variations in Natural Communities of Microorganisms on the Southeastern U.S. Continental Shelf †

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jonathan G.; Singleton, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a clear understanding of the physiology of marine prokaryotes is complicated by the difficulties inherent in resolving the activity of various components of natural microbial communities. Application of appropriate molecular biological techniques offers a means of overcoming some of these problems. In this regard, we have used direct probing of bulk RNA purified from selective size fractions to examine variations in the rRNA content of heterotrophic communities and Synechococcus populations on the southeastern U.S. continental shelf. Heterotrophic communities in natural seawater cultures amended with selected substrates were examined. Synechococcus populations were isolated from the water column by differential filtration. The total cellular rRNA content of the target populations was assayed by probing RNA purified from these samples with an oligonucleotide complementing a universally conserved region in the eubacterial 16S rRNA (heterotrophs) or with a 1.5-kbp fragment encoding the Synechococcus sp. strain WH 7803 16S rRNA (cyanobacteria). The analyses revealed that heterotrophic bacteria responded to the addition of glucose and trace nutrients after a 6-h lag period. However, no response was detected after amino acids were added. The cellular rRNA content increased 48-fold before dropping to a value 20 times that detected before nutrients were added. Variations in the rRNA content from Synechococcus spp. followed a distinct diel pattern imposed by the phasing of cell division within the irradiance cycle. The results indicate that careful application of these appropriate molecular biological techniques can be of great use in discerning basic physiological characteristics of selected natural populations and the mechanisms which regulate growth at the subcellular level. Images PMID:16349009

  11. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  12. The identification of rRNA maturation sites in the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi argues against the full excision of presumed ITS1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Peyretaillade, E; Peyret, P; Metenier, G; Vivares, C P; Prensier, G

    2001-01-01

    In Encephalitozoon cuniculi like in other microsporidia, the primary transcript for SSU and LSU rRNAs includes only one internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) which separates SSU rRNA from the 5.8S region associated with LSU rRNA. The extraction of total RNA from E. cuniculi-infected MRC5 cells using a hot phenol/chloroform procedure enabled us to perform primer extension and S1 nuclease protection experiments in the aim of identifying rRNA maturation sites. Our data support a simple processing (four cleavage sites) with elimination of only nine nucleotides between SSU and LSU rRNA regions. Most of the presumed ITS1 sequence characterized by strain-dependent polymorphism therefore remains linked to SSU rRNA 3' end. A new secondary structure for the sixth domain of E. cuniculi LSU rRNA is proposed following the identification of its 3' terminus.

  13. Intergenic Sequence between Arabidopsis Caseinolytic Protease B-Cytoplasmic/Heat Shock Protein100 and Choline Kinase Genes Functions as a Heat-Inducible Bidirectional Promoter1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position −517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling. PMID:25281707

  14. rRNA (rrn) Operon-Engineered Bacillus subtilis as a Feasible Test Organism for Antibiotic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Yano, Koichi; Kakugawa, Koji; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains 10 rRNA (rrn) operons. We found that rRNA operon-engineered B. subtilis strain RIK543, with only the rrnO operon, is specifically hypersensitive to RNA polymerase inhibitors such as rifamycin SV and rifampin (80-fold and 20-fold, respectively). In pilot screening experiments, we found actinomycete isolates successfully at an incidence of 1.9% (18/945) that produced antibacterials that were detectable only with RIK543 as the test organism. Strain RIK543 may be a feasible test organism for the discovery of novel RNA polymerase inhibitors. PMID:23335737

  15. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution.

  16. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  17. Coyotes (Canis latrans) as the reservoir for a human pathogenic Bartonella sp.: molecular epidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii infection in coyotes from central coastal California.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Kasten, R W; Chomel, B B; Simpson, D C; Hew, C M; Kordick, D L; Heller, R; Piemont, Y; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2000-11-01

    Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was originally isolated from a dog suffering infectious endocarditis and was recently identified as a zoonotic agent causing human endocarditis. Following the coyote bite of a child who developed clinical signs compatible with Bartonella infection in Santa Clara County, Calif., this epidemiological study was conducted. Among 109 coyotes (Canis latrans) from central coastal California, 31 animals (28%) were found to be bacteremic with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and 83 animals (76%) had B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii antibodies. These findings suggest these animals could be the wildlife reservoir of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the gltA and 16S rRNA genes for these 31 isolates yielded similar profiles that were identical to those of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Partial sequencing of the gltA and 16S rRNA genes, respectively, indicated 99.5 and 100% homology between the coyote isolate and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (ATCC 51672). PCR-RFLP analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region showed the existence of two different strain profiles, as has been reported in dogs. Six (19%) of 31 Bartonella bacteremic coyotes exhibited the strain profile that was identified in the type strain of a canine endocarditis case (B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii ATCC 51672). The other 25 bacteremic coyotes were infected with a strain that was similar to the strains isolated from healthy dogs. Based on whole bacterial genome analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI restriction endonuclease, there was more diversity in fingerprints for the coyote isolates, which had at least 10 major variants compared to the two variants described for domestic dog isolates from the eastern United States. By PFGE analysis, three Bartonella bacteremic coyotes were infected by a strain identical to the one isolated from three healthy dog carriers. Further studies are necessary

  18. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  19. Replication of the rRNA and legumin genes in synchronized root cells of pea (Pisum sativum): evidence for transient EcoR I sites in replicating rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hof, J V; Hernandez, P; Bjerknes, C A; Kraszewska, E K; Lamm, S S

    1987-03-01

    The temporal pattern of replication of the rRNA and legumin genes differs in synchronized pea root cells. The relative number of rRNA genes replicated hourly during the first five hours of S phase ranges between 5 and 10 percent. In late S phase, during hours six through nine, the number of rRNA genes replicated increases reaching a maximum of about 25 percent at the ninth hour. Unlike the rRNA genes, the legumin genes have a wave-like pattern of replication peaking in early S phase at the third hour and again in late S phase at the eighth hour.Replicating rDNA, isolated by benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-column chromatography, has EcoR I restriction sites that are absent in non-replicating rDNA sequences. The cleavage of these sites is independent of the time of rDNA replication. The transient nature of the EcoR I sites suggests that they exist in a hemimethylated state in parental DNA.The two Hind III repeat-size classes of rDNA of var. Alaska peas are replicated simultaneously as cells progress through S phase. Thus, even if the 9.0 kb and 8.6 kb repeat classes are located on different chromosomes, their temporal order of replication is the same.

  20. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  1. Long intergenic non-protein coding RNA 00858 functions as a competing endogenous RNA for miR-422a to facilitate the cell growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-Guo; Zhao, Jin-Ping

    2017-01-01

    The expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is dysregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the functions and contributions of lncRNAs remain largely unknown. Here, we identified a critical role of long intergenic non-protein coding RNA 00858 (LINC00858) in NSCLC. Ectopic expression of LINC00858 in NSCLC cells promoted cell proliferation and induced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, LINC00858 functioned as a competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA), effectively becoming sponge for miR-422a and thereby modulating the expression of kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4). In NSCLC patients, high expression of LINC00858 closely correlated with tumor progression. Thus, targeting the ceRNA network involving LINC00858 may be used as a treatment strategy against NSCLC. PMID:28177876

  2. Sulfur-Responsive Elements in the 3′-Nontranscribed Intergenic Region Are Essential for the Induction of SULFATE TRANSPORTER 2;1 Gene Expression in Arabidopsis Roots under Sulfur Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Inoue, Eri; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Under sulfur deficiency (−S), plants induce expression of the sulfate transport systems in roots to increase uptake and root-to-shoot transport of sulfate. The low-affinity sulfate transporter SULTR2;1 is predominantly expressed in xylem parenchyma and pericycle cells in Arabidopsis thaliana roots under –S. The mechanisms underlying –S-inducible expression of SULTR2;1 in roots have remained unclear, despite the possible significance of SULTR2;1 for acclimation to low-sulfur conditions. In this investigation, examination of deletions and base substitutions in the 3′-intergenic region of SULTR2;1 revealed novel sulfur-responsive elements, SURE21A (5′-CAATGTATC-3′) and SURE21B (5′-CTAGTAC-3′), located downstream of the SULTR2;1 3′-untranslated region. SURE21A and SULTR21B effectively induced reporter gene expression from fusion constructs under –S in combination with minimal promoters or promoters not inducible by –S, suggesting their versatility in controlling transcription. T-DNA insertions near SURE21A and SULTR21B abolished −S-inducible expression of SULTR2;1 in roots and reduced the uptake and root-to-shoot transport of sulfate. In addition, these mutations partially suppressed SULTR2;1 expression in shoots, without changing its –S-responsive expression. These findings indicate that SULTR2;1 contributes to the increase in uptake and internal translocation of sulfate driven by gene expression induced under the control of sulfur-responsive elements in the 3′-nontranscribed intergenic region of SULTR2;1. PMID:25855406

  3. An Intergenic Region Shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Tissue Specific and Stress Inducible Bidirectional Promoter Analyzed in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Houtz, Robert L.; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985) are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS) in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85) showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold) compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87). The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold) under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications. PMID:24260266

  4. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M C; Nielsen, A K; Molin, S; Hammer, K; Kilstrup, M

    2001-08-01

    Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting experiments, in which mRNA levels routinely are normalized to a fixed amount of extracted total RNA. The cellular levels of specific mRNA species were estimated using a renormalization with the total RNA content per cell. By a combination of fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization, which estimates the relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell decreased to 30% in the course of the heat shock. This lowered ribosome level led to a decrease in the total RNA content, resulting in a gradually increasing overestimation of the mRNA levels throughout the experiment. Using renormalized cellular mRNA levels, the HrcA-mediated regulation of the genes in the hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon was analyzed. The hybridization data suggested a complex heat shock regulation indicating that the mRNA levels continued to rise after 30 min, but after renormalization the calculated average cellular levels exhibited a much simpler induction pattern, eventually attaining a moderately increased value.

  5. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing for Epidemiological Surveys of Bacteria in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Bard, Emilie; Bernard, Maria; Brouat, Carine; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Dehne-Garcia, Alexandre; Loiseau, Anne; Tatard, Caroline; Tamisier, Lucie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vignes, Helene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission posed by urban rodents in West Africa. In addition to listing pathogenic bacteria in wild populations, as in other high-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies, our approach can estimate essential parameters for studies of zoonotic risk, such as prevalence and patterns of coinfection within individual hosts. However, the estimation of these parameters requires cleaning of the raw data to mitigate the biases generated by HTS methods. We present here an extensive review of these biases and of their consequences, and we propose a comprehensive trimming strategy for managing these biases. We demonstrated the application of this strategy using 711 commensal rodents, including 208 Mus musculus domesticus, 189 Rattus rattus, 93 Mastomys natalensis, and 221 Mastomys erythroleucus, collected from 24 villages in Senegal. Seven major genera of pathogenic bacteria were detected in their spleens: Borrelia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia. Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia have never before been detected in West African rodents. Bacterial prevalence ranged from 0% to 90% of individuals per site, depending on the bacterial taxon, rodent species, and site considered, and 26% of rodents displayed coinfection. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing strategy presented here has the advantage over other molecular surveillance tools of dealing with a large spectrum of bacterial

  6. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Robison-Cox, J F; Bateson, M M; Ward, D M

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed. PMID:7538272

  7. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  8. Molecular Diagnosis of Kingella kingae Pericarditis by Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. PMID:17634294

  9. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  10. Pathway of ATP utilization and duplex rRNA unwinding by the DEAD-box helicase, DbpA.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Cao, Wenxiang; Licciardello, Nicholas; Heitkamp, Sara E; Hackney, David D; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2010-03-02

    DEAD-box RNA helicase proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive the unwinding of duplex RNA. However, the mechanism that couples ATP utilization to duplex RNA unwinding is unknown. We measured ATP utilization and duplex RNA unwinding by DbpA, a non-processive bacterial DEAD-box RNA helicase specifically activated by the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of 23S rRNA. Consumption of a single ATP molecule is sufficient to unwind and displace an 8 base pair rRNA strand annealed to a 32 base pair PTC-RNA "mother strand" fragment. Strand displacement occurs after ATP binding and hydrolysis but before P(i) product release. P(i) release weakens binding to rRNA, thereby facilitating the release of the unwound rRNA mother strand and the recycling of DbpA for additional rounds of unwinding. This work explains how ATPase activity of DEAD-box helicases is linked to RNA unwinding.

  11. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  13. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    PubMed

    Ong, Swee Hoe; Kukkillaya, Vinutha Uppoor; Wilm, Andreas; Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  14. Sequencing and characterization of full-length sequence of 18S rRNA gene from the reniform nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Variation within this gene is rare but it has been observed in few metazoan species. For the first time, we h...

  15. Dynamics and persistence of Dead Sea microbial populations as shown by high-throughput sequencing of rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2012-04-01

    16S rRNA amplicon libraries from a haloarchaeal bloom in the hypersaline Dead Sea in 1992 were analyzed together with the 2007 residual population and simulated blooms in experimental mesocosms. Significant population shifts were observed during the bloom, and surprisingly a signature from the bloom was retained 15 years later.

  16. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  17. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  18. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes in Mixed Microbial Populations via 5′-Nuclease Assays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Taylor, Lance T.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2000-01-01

    Few techniques are currently available for quantifying specific prokaryotic taxa in environmental samples. Quantification of specific genotypes has relied mainly on oligonucleotide hybridization to extracted rRNA or intact rRNA in whole cells. However, low abundance and cellular rRNA content limit the application of these techniques in aquatic environments. In this study, we applied a newly developed quantitative PCR assay (5′-nuclease assay, also known as TaqMan) to quantify specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNAs) from uncultivated planktonic prokaryotes in Monterey Bay. Primer and probe combinations for quantification of SSU rDNAs at the domain and group levels were developed and tested for specificity and quantitative reliability. We examined the spatial and temporal variations of SSU rDNAs from Synechococcus plus Prochlorococcus and marine Archaea and compared the results of the quantitative PCR assays to those obtained by alternative methods. The 5′-nuclease assays reliably quantified rDNAs over at least 4 orders of magnitude and accurately measured the proportions of genes in artificial mixtures. The spatial and temporal distributions of planktonic microbial groups measured by the 5′-nuclease assays were similar to the distributions estimated by quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridization, whole-cell hybridization assays, and flow cytometry. PMID:11055900

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  1. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  2. The Final Step in 5.8S rRNA Processing Is Cytoplasmic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Emma; Tollervey, David

    2010-01-01

    The 18S rRNA component of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) 40S ribosomes undergoes cytoplasmic 3′ cleavage following nuclear export, whereas exported pre-60S subunits were believed to contain only mature 5.8S and 25S rRNAs. However, in situ hybridization detected 3′-extended forms of 5.8S rRNA in the cytoplasm, which were lost when Crm1-dependent preribosome export was blocked by treatment with leptomycin B (LMB). LMB treatment rapidly blocked processing of 6S pre-rRNA to 5.8S rRNA, leading to TRAMP-dependent pre-rRNA degradation. The 6S pre-rRNA was coprecipitated with the 60S export adapter Nmd3 and cytoplasmic 60S synthesis factor Lsg1. The longer 5.8S+30 pre-rRNA (a form of 5.8S rRNA 3′ extended by ∼30 nucleotides) is processed to 6S by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6, and nuclear pre-rRNA accumulated in the absence of Rrp6. In contrast, 6S to 5.8S processing requires the cytoplasmic exonuclease Ngl2, and cytoplasmic pre-rRNA accumulated in strains lacking Ngl2. We conclude that nuclear pre-60S particles containing the 6S pre-rRNA bind Nmd3 and Crm1 and are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final maturation by Ngl2. PMID:20008552

  3. R4, a non-LTR retrotransposon specific to the large subunit rRNA genes of nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, W D; Müller, F; Eickbush, T H

    1995-01-01

    A 4.7 kb sequence-specific insertion in the 26S ribosomal RNA gene of Ascaris lumbricoides, named R4, is shown to be a non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposable element. The R4 element inserts at a site in the large subunit rRNA gene which is midway between two other sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposable elements, R1 and R2, found in most insect species. Based on the structure of its open reading frame and the sequence of its reverse transcriptase domain, R4 elements do not appear to be a family of R1 or R2 elements that have changed their insertion site. R4 is most similar in structure and in sequence to the element Dong, which is not specialized for insertion into rRNA units. Thus R4 represents a separate non-LTR retrotransposable element that has become specialized for insertion in the rRNA genes of its host. Using oligonucleotide primers directed to a conserved region of the reverse transcriptase encoding domain, insertions in the R4 site were also amplified from Parascaris equorum and Haemonchus contortus. Why several non-LTR retrotransposable elements have become specialized for insertion into a short (87 bp) region of the large subunit rRNA gene is discussed. PMID:8524653

  4. rRNA operons and genome size of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', a bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Wulff, N A; Eveillard, S; Foissac, X; Ayres, A J; Bové, J-M

    2009-08-01

    Huanglongbing is one of the most severe diseases of citrus worldwide and is associated with 'Candidatus (Ca.) Liberibacter africanus' in Africa, 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' in Asia and the Americas (Brazil, USA and Cuba) and 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus' (Lam) in Brazil. In the absence of axenic cultures, genetic information on liberibacters is scarce. The sequences of the entire 23S rRNA and 5S rRNA genes from Lam have now been obtained, using a consensus primer designed on known tRNAMet sequences of rhizobia. The size of the Lam genome was determined by PFGE, using Lam-infected periwinkle plants for bacterial enrichment, and was found to be close to 1.31 Mbp. In order to determine the number of ribosomal operons on the Lam genome, probes designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene and the 3' end of the 23S rRNA gene were developed and used for Southern hybridization with I-CeuI-treated genomic DNA. Our results suggest that there are three ribosomal operons in a circular genome. Lam is the first liberibacter species for which such data are available.

  5. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robison-Cox, J. F.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed.

  6. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) variety discrimination and hybridization analysis based on the 5S rRNA region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Kang, Ho-Min; Kim, Young-Sik; Baek, Jun-Pill; Zheng, Shi-Lin; Xiang, Jin-Jun; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2014-05-04

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major vegetable crop worldwide. To satisfy popular demand, more than 500 tomato varieties have been bred. However, a clear variety identification has not been found. Thorough understanding of the phylogenetic relationship and hybridization information of tomato varieties is very important for further variety breeding. Thus, in this study, we collected 26 tomato varieties and attempted to distinguish them based on the 5S rRNA region, which is widely used in the determination of phylogenetic relations. Sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA region suggested that a large number of nucleotide variations exist among tomato varieties. These variable nucleotide sites were also informative regarding hybridization. Chromas sequencing of Yellow Mountain View and Seuwiteuking varieties indicated three and one variable nucleotide sites in the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rRNA region showing hybridization, respectively. Based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the 5S rRNA sequences, we observed that 16 tomato varieties were divided into three groups at 95% similarity. Rubiking and Sseommeoking, Lang Selection Procedure and Seuwiteuking, and Acorn Gold and Yellow Mountain View exhibited very high identity with their partners. This work will aid variety authentication and provides a basis for further tomato variety breeding.

  7. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  8. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  9. Ribosomal protein L3 bound to 23S precursor rRNA stimulates its maturation by Mini-III ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Redko, Yulia; Condon, Ciarán

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are processed from larger primary transcripts in every living system known. The maturation of 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis is catalysed by Mini-III, a member of the RNase III family of enzymes that lacks the characteristic double-stranded RNA binding domain of its relatives. We have previously shown that Mini-III processing of 23S precursor rRNA in assembled 50S ribosomal subunits is much more efficient than a substrate with no ribosomal proteins bound, suggesting that one or more large subunit proteins act as a cofactor for Mini-III cleavage. Here we show that this cofactor is ribosomal protein L3. Stimulation of the Mini-III cleavage reaction is through L3 binding to its normal site at the 3' end of 23S rRNA. We present indirect evidence that suggests that L3 acts at the level of substrate, rather than enzyme conformation. We also discuss the potential implication of using ribosomal protein cofactors in rRNA processing for ribosome quality control.

  10. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  11. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  12. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  13. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-mediated Repression of the Xenopus Oocyte 5 S rRNA Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mariam Q.; Bertke, Michelle M.; Huber, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    The 5 S rRNA gene-specific transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) interacts with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase PIAS2b and with one of its targets, the transcriptional corepressor, XCtBP. PIAS2b is restricted to the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes but relocates to the nucleus immediately after fertilization. Following the midblastula transition, PIAS2b and XCtBP are present on oocyte-type, but not somatic-type, 5 S rRNA genes up through the neurula stage, as is a limiting amount of TFIIIA. Histone H3 methylation, coincident with the binding of XCtBP, also occurs exclusively on the oocyte-type genes. Immunohistochemical staining of embryos confirms the occupancy of a subset of the oocyte-type genes by TFIIIA that become positioned at the nuclear periphery shortly after the midblastula transition. Inhibition of SUMOylation activity relieves repression of oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes and is correlated with a decrease in methylation of H3K9 and H3K27 and disruption of subnuclear localization. These results reveal a novel function for TFIIIA as a negative regulator that recruits histone modification activity through the CtBP repressor complex exclusively to the oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes, leading to their terminal repression. PMID:25368327

  14. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  15. High or low correlation between co-occuring gene clusters and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Sekelja, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are universal for all living organisms. Yet, the correspondence between genome composition and rRNA phylogeny remains poorly known. The aim of this study was to use the information from genome sequence databases to address the correlation between rRNA gene phylogeny and total gene composition in bacteria. This was done by analysing 327 genomes with TIGRFAM functional gene annotations. Our approach consisted of two steps. First, we searched for discriminatory clusters of co-occurring genes. Using a multivariate statistical approach, we identified 11 such clusters which contain genes that were co-occurring only in a subset of genomes and contributed to explain the gene content differences between genome subsets. Second, we mapped the discovered clusters to 16S rRNA-based phylogeny and calculated the correlation between co-occuring genes and phylogeny. Six of the 11 clusters exhibited significant correlation with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The most distinct phylogenetic finding was a high correlation between iron-sulfur oxidoreductases in combination with carbon nitrogen ligases and Chlorobium. The other correlations identified covered relatively large phylogroups: Actinobacteria were positively associated with kinases, while Gammaproteobacteria were positively associated with methylases and acyltransferases. The suggested functional differences between higher phylogroups, however, need experimental verification.

  16. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  17. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K. Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  18. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  19. Differential rRNA genes expression in bread wheat and its inheritance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Polanco, Carlos; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-09-01

    The expression of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from rye, located within the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), is repressed by cytosine methylation in wheat x rye hybrids and in triticale, as consequence of nucleolar dominance. Our previous study revealed that bread wheat cultivars with a maximum number of four Ag-NORs presented high level of rDNA cytosine methylation when compared to others with a maximum of six Ag-NORs. In order to evaluate the inheritance of the Ag-NORs number and NOR methylation patterns, we produced F1 hybrids between bread wheat cultivars with four Ag-NORs and bread wheat cultivars with six Ag-NORs (in the direct and reciprocal senses). The F2 progenies of these F1 hybrids were also evaluated for the NOR number and methylation patterns. Parent bread wheat cultivars with a maximum of four Ag-NORs after treated with 5-azacytidine evidenced a maximum of six Ag-NORs per metaphase cell and a maximum of six nucleoli per interphase nucleus, confirming that the expression of the rRNA genes in bread wheat is related to cytosine methylation. Most of the F1 hybrids showed a maximum number of four or six Ag-NORs, similarly to that of the female parent suggesting a non-mendelian inheritance, while other hybrids presented four or six Ag-NORs in both senses of the cross. The F1 NOR methylation patterns showed some fragments common to their parents but also novel fragments suggesting genomic and/or chromosome rearrangements after hybridization. Despite the different NOR patterns among the parents, an invariable NOR pattern was found among the F1 plants suggesting a tendency to stability, which was also transmitted to the F2. The F2 progenies showed plants with a maximum of four, five and/or six Ag-NORs. The ratio of plants with four, five and/or six Ag-NORs per F2 progeny was variable and did not follow any specific mendelian proportion. These results allowed us to suggest that the inheritance of the number of Ag-NORs by the F1 and F2 plants did not

  20. Mutational Evidence for a Functional Connection between Two Domains of 23S rRNA in Translation Termination

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, Alexey L.; Hedenstierna, Klas O. F.; Murgola, Emanuel J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide 1093 in domain II of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA is part of a highly conserved structure historically referred to as the GTPase center. The mutation G1093A was previously shown to cause readthrough of nonsense codons and high temperature-conditional lethality. Defects in translation termination caused by this mutation have also been demonstrated in vitro. To identify sites in 23S rRNA that may be functionally associated with the G1093 region during termination, we selected for secondary mutations in 23S rRNA that would compensate for the temperature-conditional lethality caused by G1093A. Here we report the isolation and characterization of such a secondary mutation. The mutation is a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides from helix 73 in domain V, close to the peptidyltransferase center. The deletion results in a shortening of the CGCG sequence between positions 2045 and 2048 by two nucleotides to CG. In addition to restoring viability in the presence of G1093A, this deletion dramatically decreased readthrough of UGA nonsense mutations caused by G1093A. An analysis of the amount of mutant rRNA in polysomes revealed that this decrease cannot be explained by an inability of G1093A-containing rRNA to be incorporated into polysomes. Furthermore, the deletion was found to cause UGA readthrough on its own, thereby implicating helix 73 in termination for the first time. These results also indicate the existence of a functional connection between the G1093 region and helix 73 during translation termination. PMID:12193621

  1. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  2. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. S