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Sample records for 17d yf vaccines

  1. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  2. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Maria R.; Larsen, Mads A. B.; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested. PMID:26886513

  3. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested. PMID:26886513

  4. The yellow fever 17D virus as a platform for new live attenuated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Sequeira, Patrícia C; Galler, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The live-attenuated yellow fever 17D virus is one of the most outstanding human vaccines ever developed. It induces efficacious immune responses at a low production cost with a well-established manufacture process. These advantages make the YF17D virus attractive as a vector for the development of new vaccines. At the beginning of vector development studies, YF17D was genetically manipulated to express other flavivirus prM and E proteins, components of the viral envelope. While these 17D recombinants are based on the substitution of equivalent YF17D genes, other antigens from unrelated pathogens have also been successfully expressed and delivered by recombinant YF17D viruses employing alternative strategies for genetic manipulation of the YF17D genome. Herein, we discuss these strategies in terms of possibilities of single epitope or larger sequence expression and the main properties of these replication-competent viral platforms.

  5. [Construction of recombinant yellow fever virus 17D containing 2A fragment as a vaccine vector].

    PubMed

    Xiaowu, Pang; Fu, Wen-Chuan; Guo, Yin-Han; Zhang, Li-Shu; Xie, Tian-Pei; Xinbin, Gu

    2006-05-01

    The Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine, an attenuated yellow fever 17D (YF-17D) live vaccine, is one of the most effective and safest vaccines in the world and is regarded as one of the best candidates for viral expression vector. We here first reported in China the construction and characterization of the recombinant expression vector of yellow fever 17D which contained the proteinase 2A fragment of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Three cDNA fragments representing the full-length YF-17D genome, named 5'-end cDNA (A), 3'-end cDNA (B) and middle cDNA (C), were obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), together with the introduction of SP6 enhancer, necessary restriction sites and overlaps for homologous recombination in yeast. Fragment A and B were then introduced into pRS424 in turn by DNA recombination, followed by transfection of fragment C and the recombinant pRS424 containing A and B (pRS-A-B) into yeast. A recombinant vector containing full length cDNA of YF-17D (pRS-YF) was obtained by screening on medium lack of tryptophan and uracil. A recombinant YF-17D expression vector containing FMDV-2A gene fragment (pRS-YF-2A1) was then constructed by methods of DNA recombination and homologous recombination in yeast described above. In vitro transcription of the recombinant vector pRS-YF-2A1 was then carried out and introduced into BHK-21 cells by electroporation. Results of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and titer determination showed a stable infectious recombinant virus was gotten, whose features such as growth curve were similar to those of the parental YF-17D. The results suggest that the recombinant vector pRS-YF-2A1, by introduction of heterogenous genes via 2A region, is potential to be an effective live vaccine expression vector.

  6. 17DD and 17D-213/77 Yellow Fever Substrains Trigger a Balanced Cytokine Profile in Primary Vaccinated Children

    PubMed Central

    Luiza-Silva, Maria; Batista, Maurício Azevedo; Martins, Marina Angela; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; de Lourdes de Sousa Maia, Maria; Farias, Roberto Henrique Guedes; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Galler, Ricardo; Homma, Akira; Ribeiro, José Geraldo Leite; Lemos, Jandira Aparecida Campos; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Caldas, Iramaya Rodrigues; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the cytokine-mediated immune response in children submitted to primary vaccination with the YF-17D-213/77 or YF-17DD yellow fever (YF) substrains. Methods A non-probabilistic sample of eighty healthy primary vaccinated (PV) children was selected on the basis of their previously known humoral immune response to the YF vaccines. The selected children were categorized according to their YF-neutralizing antibody titers (PRNT) and referred to as seroconverters (PV-PRNT+) or nonseroconverters (PV-PRNT−). Following revaccination with the YF-17DD, the PV-PRNT− children (YF-17D-213/77 and YF-17DD groups) seroconverted and were referred as RV-PRNT+. The cytokine-mediated immune response was investigated after short-term in vitro cultures of whole blood samples. The results are expressed as frequency of high cytokine producers, taking the global median of the cytokine index (YF-Ag/control) as the cut-off. Results The YF-17D-213/77 and the YF-17DD substrains triggered a balanced overall inflammatory/regulatory cytokine pattern in PV-PRNT+, with a slight predominance of IL-12 in YF-17DD vaccinees and a modest prevalence of IL-10 in YF-17D-213/77. Prominent frequency of neutrophil-derived TNF-α and neutrophils and monocyte-producing IL-12 were the major features of PV-PRNT+ in the YF-17DD, whereas relevant inflammatory response, mediated by IL-12+CD8+ T cells, was the hallmark of the YF-17D-213/77 vaccinees. Both substrains were able to elicit particular but relevant inflammatory events, regardless of the anti-YF PRNT antibody levels. PV-PRNT− children belonging to the YF-17DD arm presented gaps in the inflammatory cytokine signature, especially in terms of the innate immunity, whereas in the YF-17D-213/77 arm the most relevant gap was the deficiency of IL-12-producing CD8+T cells. Revaccination with YF-17DD prompted a balanced cytokine profile in YF-17DD nonresponders and a robust inflammatory profile in YF-17D-213/77 nonresponders

  7. Suspected YF-AND after yellow fever vaccination in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Huhtamo, Eili; Kivioja, Reetta; Domingo, Cristina; Vene, Sirkka; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Niedrig, Matthias; Tienari, Pentti J; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine is considered safe but vaccine-associated complications have also been encountered. We report neurological symptoms after YF-vaccination in a previously healthy Finnish male. Other concomitant infections or causes for the symptoms could not be identified.

  8. [Serologic survey for yellow fever and other arboviruses among inhabitants of Rio Branco, Brazil, before and three months after receiving the yellow fever 17D vaccine].

    PubMed

    Tavares-Neto, José; Freitas-Carvalho, Juliano; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Rocha, Grace; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiro; Damasceno, Edilândio; Darub, Recleides; Viana, Sebastião; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2004-01-01

    During a yellow fever vaccination campaign among residents of Rio Branco (Acre State), the frequency of HI antibodies to the most prevalent arboviruses in the Amazon region and to yellow fever virus was determined before and three months after immunization with YF 17D vaccine. From 390 inhabitants included in the first phase of serologic survey (August 1999), only 190 provided a second serum sample, after the use of 17D vaccine (January 2000). Among first phase samples, the frequency of HI antibodies was: 17D (27.2%); Ilheus (5.9%); Mayaro (5.4%); Caraparu (4.9%); Dengue-2 (4.1%); Oropouche (2.3%); and Dengue-1 (0.3%). In the second study phase, the serologic conversion to YF reached 89.7% among previously negative persons. Serologic conversions were also observed to Ilheus (6.2%); Dengue-3 (3.2%); Mayaro (1.1%); and Oropouche (1.1%) viruses. In conclusion, considering the high YF antibody rate after vaccination, the risk of urban yellow fever seems insignificant, although the lower prevalence of HI antibodies to dengue viruses, is of concern and inhabitants are under high risk of dengue outbreaks, especially to DEN-3 recently introduced in Brazil, as was observed in 2000 and 2001 with DEN-1 and DEN-2.

  9. The yellow fever 17D vaccine virus as a vector for the expression of foreign proteins: development of new live flavivirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, M C; Caufour, P S; Freire, M S; Galler, R

    2000-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of about 70 mostly arthropod-borne viruses many of which are major public health problems with members being present in most continents. Among the most important are yellow fever (YF), dengue with its four serotypes and Japanese encephalitis virus. A live attenuated virus is used as a cost effective, safe and efficacious vaccine against YF but no other live flavivirus vaccines have been licensed. The rise of recombinant DNA technology and its application to study flavivirus genome structure and expression has opened new possibilities for flavivirus vaccine development. One new approach is the use of cDNAs encopassing the whole viral genome to generate infectious RNA after in vitro transcription. This methodology allows the genetic mapping of specific viral functions and the design of viral mutants with considerable potential as new live attenuated viruses. The use of infectious cDNA as a carrier for heterologous antigens is gaining importance as chimeric viruses are shown to be viable, immunogenic and less virulent as compared to the parental viruses. The use of DNA to overcome mutation rates intrinsic of RNA virus populations in conjunction with vaccine production in cell culture should improve the reliability and lower the cost for production of live attenuated vaccines. The YF virus despite a long period ignored by researchers probably due to the effectiveness of the vaccine has made a come back, both in nature as human populations grow and reach endemic areas as well as in the laboratory being a suitable model to understand the biology of flaviviruses in general and providing new alternatives for vaccine development through the use of the 17D vaccine strain.

  10. Lack of Interference by Zoster Vaccine With the Immune Response to Yellow Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Stier, David M.; Weber, Ingrid B.; Staples, J. Erin

    2015-01-01

    Concerns exist about the serologic response to yellow fever (YF) vaccine when given within 28 days of another live virus vaccine. We report the case of a healthy adult who received 17D YF vaccine 21 days following administration of another live viral vaccine, and developed a protective level of immunity against YF virus. PMID:22414038

  11. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were tittered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose. PMID:26517656

  12. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were titered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose.

  13. A Single 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination Provides Lifelong Immunity; Characterization of Yellow-Fever-Specific Neutralizing Antibody and T-Cell Responses after Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; de Visser, Adriëtte W.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Visser, Leo G.; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Bree, Godelieve J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prompted by recent amendments of Yellow Fever (YF) vaccination guidelines from boost to single vaccination strategy and the paucity of clinical data to support this adjustment, we used the profile of the YF-specific CD8+ T-cell subset profiles after primary vaccination and neutralizing antibodies as a proxy for potentially longer lasting immunity. Methods and Findings PBMCs and serum were collected in six individuals on days 0, 3, 5, 12, 28 and 180, and in 99 individuals >10 years after YF-vaccination. Phenotypic characteristics of YF- tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were determined using class I tetramers. Antibody responses were measured using a standardized plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Also, characteristics of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were compared between individuals who had received a primary- and a booster vaccination. YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were detectable on day 12 (median tetramer+ cells as percentage of CD8+ T-cells 0.2%, range 0.07–3.1%). On day 180, these cells were still present (median 0.06%, range 0.02–0.78%). The phenotype of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells shifted from acute phase effector cells on day 12, to late differentiated or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA-/+CD27-) on day 28. Two subsets of YF-tetramer positive T-cells (CD45RA+CD27- and CD45RA+CD27+) persisted until day 180. Within all phenotypic subsets, the T-bet: Eomes ratio tended to be high on day 28 after vaccination and shifted towards predominant Eomes expression on day 180 (median 6.0 (day 28) vs. 2.2 (day 180) p = 0.0625), suggestive of imprinting compatible with long-lived memory properties. YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were detectable up to 18 years post vaccination, YF-specific antibodies were detectable up to 40 years after single vaccination. Booster vaccination did not increase titers of YF-specific antibodies (mean 12.5 vs. 13.1, p = 0.583), nor induce frequencies or alter phenotypes of YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells. Conclusion The

  14. Booster dose after 10 years is recommended following 17DD-YF primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Antonelli, Lis R; Fonseca, Cristina T; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Villela-Rezende, Gabriela; Santos, Raiany A; Batista, Maurício A; Campos, Fernanda M; Pacheco-Porto, Luiza; Melo Júnior, Otoni A; Hossell, Débora M S H; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Costa-Silva, Matheus F; de Oliveira, Jaquelline G; Farias, Roberto H; Noronha, Tatiana G; Lemos, Jandira A; von Doellinger, Vanessa dos R; Simões, Marisol; de Souza, Mirian M; Malaquias, Luiz C; Persi, Harold R; Pereira, Jorge M; Martins, José A; Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Vinhas, Aline de A; Alves, Tatiane R; Maia, Maria de L; Freire, Marcos da S; Martins, Reinaldo de M; Homma, Akira; Romano, Alessandro P M; Domingues, Carla M; Tauil, Pedro L; Vasconcelos, Pedro F; Rios, Maria; Caldas, Iramaya R; Camacho, Luiz A; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2016-01-01

    A single vaccination of Yellow Fever vaccines is believed to confer life-long protection. In this study, results of vaccinees who received a single dose of 17DD-YF immunization followed over 10 y challenge this premise. YF-neutralizing antibodies, subsets of memory T and B cells as well as cytokine-producing lymphocytes were evaluated in groups of adults before (NVday0) and after (PVday30-45, PVyear1-4, PVyear5-9, PVyear10-11, PVyear12-13) 17DD-YF primary vaccination. YF-neutralizing antibodies decrease significantly from PVyear1-4 to PVyear12-13 as compared to PVday30-45, and the seropositivity rates (PRNT≥2.9Log10mIU/mL) become critical (lower than 90%) beyond PVyear5-9. YF-specific memory phenotypes (effector T-cells and classical B-cells) significantly increase at PVday30-45 as compared to naïve baseline. Moreover, these phenotypes tend to decrease at PVyear10-11 as compared to PVday30-45. Decreasing levels of TNF-α(+) and IFN-γ(+) produced by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells along with increasing levels of IL-10(+)CD4(+)T-cells were characteristic of anti-YF response over time. Systems biology profiling represented by hierarchic networks revealed that while the naïve baseline is characterized by independent micro-nets, primary vaccinees displayed an imbricate network with essential role of central and effector CD8(+) memory T-cell responses. Any putative limitations of this cross-sectional study will certainly be answered by the ongoing longitudinal population-based investigation. Overall, our data support the current Brazilian national immunization policy guidelines that recommend one booster dose 10 y after primary 17DD-YF vaccination. PMID:26360663

  15. Booster dose after 10 years is recommended following 17DD-YF primary vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Antonelli, Lis R; Fonseca, Cristina T; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Villela-Rezende, Gabriela; Santos, Raiany A; Batista, Maurício A; Campos, Fernanda M; Pacheco-Porto, Luiza; Melo Júnior, Otoni A; Hossell, Débora MSH; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Costa-Silva, Matheus F; de Oliveira, Jaquelline G; Farias, Roberto H; Noronha, Tatiana G; Lemos, Jandira A; von Doellinger, Vanessa dos R; Simões, Marisol; de Souza, Mirian M; Malaquias, Luiz C; Persi, Harold R; Pereira, Jorge M; Martins, José A; Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Vinhas, Aline de A; Alves, Tatiane R; Maia, Maria de L; Freire, Marcos da S; Martins, Reinaldo de M; Homma, Akira; Romano, Alessandro PM; Domingues, Carla M; Tauil, Pedro L; Vasconcelos, Pedro F; Rios, Maria; Caldas, Iramaya R; Camacho, Luiz A; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2016-01-01

    A single vaccination of Yellow Fever vaccines is believed to confer life-long protection. In this study, results of vaccinees who received a single dose of 17DD-YF immunization followed over 10 y challenge this premise. YF-neutralizing antibodies, subsets of memory T and B cells as well as cytokine-producing lymphocytes were evaluated in groups of adults before (NVday0) and after (PVday30-45, PVyear1-4, PVyear5-9, PVyear10-11, PVyear12-13) 17DD-YF primary vaccination. YF-neutralizing antibodies decrease significantly from PVyear1-4 to PVyear12-13 as compared to PVday30-45, and the seropositivity rates (PRNT≥2.9Log10mIU/mL) become critical (lower than 90%) beyond PVyear5-9. YF-specific memory phenotypes (effector T-cells and classical B-cells) significantly increase at PVday30-45 as compared to naïve baseline. Moreover, these phenotypes tend to decrease at PVyear10-11 as compared to PVday30-45. Decreasing levels of TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+ produced by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells along with increasing levels of IL-10+CD4+T-cells were characteristic of anti-YF response over time. Systems biology profiling represented by hierarchic networks revealed that while the naïve baseline is characterized by independent micro-nets, primary vaccinees displayed an imbricate network with essential role of central and effector CD8+ memory T-cell responses. Any putative limitations of this cross-sectional study will certainly be answered by the ongoing longitudinal population-based investigation. Overall, our data support the current Brazilian national immunization policy guidelines that recommend one booster dose 10 y after primary 17DD-YF vaccination. PMID:26360663

  16. Immunogenicity of seven new recombinant yellow fever viruses 17D expressing fragments of SIVmac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif in Indian rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mauricio A; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Rudersdorf, Richard A; Piaskowski, Shari M; Rakasz, Eva G; Weisgrau, Kim L; Furlott, Jessica R; Eernisse, Christopher M; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G; Hidalgo, Bertha; Friedrich, Thomas C; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Parks, Christopher L; Wilson, Nancy A; Allison, David B; Galler, Ricardo; Watkins, David I

    2013-01-01

    An effective vaccine remains the best solution to stop the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cellular immune responses have been repeatedly associated with control of viral replication and thus may be an important element of the immune response that must be evoked by an efficacious vaccine. Recombinant viral vectors can induce potent T-cell responses. Although several viral vectors have been developed to deliver HIV genes, only a few have been advanced for clinical trials. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine virus 17D (YF17D) has many properties that make it an attractive vector for AIDS vaccine regimens. YF17D is well tolerated in humans and vaccination induces robust T-cell responses that persist for years. Additionally, methods to manipulate the YF17D genome have been established, enabling the generation of recombinant (r)YF17D vectors carrying genes from unrelated pathogens. Here, we report the generation of seven new rYF17D viruses expressing fragments of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif. Studies in Indian rhesus macaques demonstrated that these live-attenuated vectors replicated in vivo, but only elicited low levels of SIV-specific cellular responses. Boosting with recombinant Adenovirus type-5 (rAd5) vectors resulted in robust expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, particularly those targeting Vif. Priming with rYF17D also increased the frequency of CD4(+) cellular responses in rYF17D/rAd5-immunized macaques compared to animals that received rAd5 only. The effect of the rYF17D prime on the breadth of SIV-specific T-cell responses was limited and we also found evidence that some rYF17D vectors were more effective than others at priming SIV-specific T-cell responses. Together, our data suggest that YF17D - a clinically relevant vaccine vector - can be used to prime AIDS virus-specific T-cell responses in heterologous prime boost regimens. However, it will be important to optimize rYF17D-based vaccine

  17. Antibody response to 17D yellow fever vaccine in Ghanaian infants.

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Kwasi, M.; Dunyo, S. K.; Koram, K. A.; Afari, E. A.; Odoom, J. K.; Nkrumah, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the seroresponses to yellow fever vaccination at 6 and 9 months of age; assess any possible adverse effects of immunization with the 17D yellow fever vaccine in infants, particularly at 6 months of age. METHODS: Four hundred and twenty infants who had completed BCG, OPV and DPT immunizations were randomized to receive yellow fever immunization at either 6 or 9 months. A single dose of 0.5 ml of the reconstituted vaccine was administered to each infant by subcutaneous injection. To determine the yellow fever antibody levels of the infants, each donated 1 ml whole blood prior to immunization and 3 months post-immunization. Each serum sample was titred on Vero cells against the vaccine virus. FINDINGS: The most common adverse reactions reported were fever, cough, diarrhoea and mild reactions at the inoculation site. The incidences of adverse reactions were not statistically different in both groups. None of the pre-immunization sera in both age groups had detectable yellow fever antibodies. Infants immunized at 6 months recorded seroconversion of 98.6% and those immunized at 9 months recorded 98% seroconversion. The GMT of their antibodies were 158.5 and 129.8, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that seroresponses to yellow fever immunization at 6 and 9 months as determined by seroconversion and GMTs of antibodies are similar. The findings of good seroresponses at 6 months without significant adverse effects would suggest that the 17D yellow fever vaccine could be recommended for use in children at 6 months in outbreak situations or in high risk endemic areas. PMID:11731813

  18. Protection against 17D yellow fever encephalitis in mice by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies to the nonstructural glycoprotein gp48 and by active immunization with gp48.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, J J; Brandriss, M W; Walsh, E E

    1985-10-01

    The protective capacity of antiviral antibodies has generally been considered to depend on their interactions with structural components of the virion. Here we report protection against lethal 17D yellow fever virus (YF) encephalitis of mice by passive administration of nonneutralizing monoclonal antibodies to a 17D YF-specified nonstructural glycoprotein, gp48, and by active immunization with purified gp48. Among five anti-gp48 monoclonal antibodies tested, two with high titer complement-fixing (CF) activity were protective, whereas three antibodies with little or no CF activity were not. The ability of antibodies to protect correlated with their ability to promote complement-mediated cytolysis (CMC) of 51Cr-labeled 17D YF-infected mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro 2a) cells. Purified gp48, prepared from lysates of 17D YF-infected Vero cells by immunoaffinity chromatography, was shown to bear both YF type-specific and flavivirus group-reactive determinants in a solid phase radioimmunoassay. Immunization of mice with purified gp48 resulted in solid protection in the absence of detectable anti-virion antibody, measured by neutralization and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. The results are consistent with plasma membrane expression of gp48 and susceptibility of 17D YF-infected neural cells to CMC, a possible mechanism of host defense in 17D YF encephalitis. Protection provided by immunization with gp48, which bears a group-reactive determinant and is highly conserved among flaviviruses, may have implications in regard to flavivirus vaccine design.

  19. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. PMID:25516543

  20. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines.

  1. Lethal 17D yellow fever encephalitis in mice. I. Passive protection by monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins of 17D yellow fever and dengue 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Brandriss, M W; Schlesinger, J J; Walsh, E E; Briselli, M

    1986-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins (E) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus (17D YF) and to dengue 2 virus were examined for their ability to confer passive protection against lethal 17D YF encephalitis in mice. All 13 IgG anti-17D YF antibodies, regardless of neutralizing capacity, conferred solid protection when given in a relatively high dose prior to intracerebral inoculation of virus. Three antibodies with high in vitro neutralizing titres were all protective at a low dose as were several non-neutralizing antibodies. One flavivirus group-reactive antibody to dengue 2 virus conferred similar protection at low dose. Protection was also observed when antibodies were given several days after virus inoculation when peak infectious virus titres and histopathological evidence of infection were present in brains. The ability of a non-neutralizing antibody to protect could not be attributed to complement-dependent lysis of virus-infected cells and did not correlate with avidity or with proximity of its binding site to a critical neutralizing epitope of the E protein. Some antibodies, characterized as non-neutralizing by plaque reduction assay on Vero cells, inhibited the growth of virus in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, suggesting one possible mechanism of protection. These results may be relevant to the design of prospective flavivirus vaccines and support the possibility of conferring broadened protection among flaviviruses by stimulating the antibody response to appropriate epitopes of the E protein.

  2. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L. K. Metthew; Klimstra, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  3. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  4. A case suspected for yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Eva M; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Richter, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed. Since 2001, 56 cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. Here, we report a new case suspected for YEL-AVD in the Netherlands. Further research is needed to determine the true incidence of YEL-AVD and to clarify host and vaccine-associated factors in the pathogenesis of YEL-AVD. Because of the potential adverse events, healthcare providers should carefully consider vaccination only in people who are truly at risk for YF infection, especially in primary vaccine recipients.

  5. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  6. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. PMID:27126613

  7. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone.

  8. Limited replication of yellow fever 17DD and 17D-Dengue recombinant viruses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Gisela F; Marchevsky, Renato S; Fillipis, Ana M B de; Nogueira, Rita M R; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Acero, Pedro C; Caride, Elena; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    For the development of safe live attenuated flavivirus vaccines one of the main properties to be established is viral replication. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and virus titration by plaque assay to determine the replication of yellow fever 17DD virus (YFV 17DD) and recombinant yellow fever 17D viruses expressing envelope proteins of dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 (17D-DENV-2 and 17D-DENV-4). Serum samples from rhesus monkeys inoculated with YFV 17DD and 17D-DENV chimeras by intracerebral or subcutaneous route were used to determine and compare the viremia induced by these viruses. Viral load quantification in samples from monkeys inoculated by either route with YFV 17DD virus suggested a restricted capability of the virus to replicate reaching not more than 2.0 log10 PFU mL(-1) or 3.29 log10 copies mL(-1). Recombinant 17D-dengue viruses were shown by plaquing and real-time PCR to be as attenuated as YF 17DD virus with the highest mean peak titer of 1.97 log10 PFU mL(-1) or 3.53 log10 copies mL(-1). These data serve as a comparative basis for the characterization of other 17D-based live attenuated candidate vaccines against other diseases.

  9. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos.

    PubMed

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C E P; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  10. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  11. Advances and controversies in yellow fever vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Emile F. F.; Visser, Leonardus G.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since its development in 1937, the live-attenuated 17D yellow fever (YF) vaccine has been one of the most effective vaccines available to man. In this review we highlight the major steps in the development of 17D YF vaccine. We discuss the use of neutralizing antibodies as a surrogate marker for protection, and explore the strengths and weaknesses of the current plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), a technique developed in the 1960s that continues to be superior to every modern test in both sensitivity and specificity. The neutralizing antibodies demonstrated by the PRNT can be detected for several decades after vaccination, possibly even for the remainder of the recipient’s natural life. We review the available evidence on the duration of protection after primary vaccination, a topic that has been the subject of controversy over the last few months. For persons who are immunocompromised due to disease, medication or advancing age, the duration of protection may be shorter: they should always have their vaccine response checked by PRNT. Due to the higher risk of severe adverse events after vaccination with 17D YF in this group, the development of a new, inactivated vaccine will have substantial benefits in this population. PMID:24757521

  12. Immunogenicity of Yellow Fever Vaccine Coadministered With MenAfriVac in Healthy Infants in Ghana and Mali

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Panchali; Meier, Christian; Laraway, Hewad; Tang, Yuxiao; Hodgson, Abraham; Sow, Samba O.; Enwere, Godwin C.; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Niedrig, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background. Yellow fever (YF) is still a major public health problem in endemic regions of Africa and South America. In Africa, one of the main control strategies is routine vaccination within the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). A new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) is about to be introduced in the EPI of countries in the African meningitis belt, and this study reports on the immunogenicity of the YF-17D vaccines in infants when administered concomitantly with measles vaccine and PsA-TT. Methods. Two clinical studies were conducted in Ghana and in Mali among infants who received PsA-TT concomitantly with measles and YF vaccines at 9 months of age. YF neutralizing antibody titers were measured using a microneutralization assay. Results. In both studies, the PsA-TT did not adversely affect the immune response to the concomitantly administered YF vaccine at the age of 9 months. The magnitude of the immune response was different between the 2 studies, with higher seroconversion and seroprotection rates found in Mali vs Ghana. Conclusions. Immunogenicity to YF vaccine is unaffected when coadministered with PsA-TT at 9 months of age. Further studies are warranted to better understand the determinants of the immune response to YF vaccine in infancy. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT-004); PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT-007). PMID:26553692

  13. Evaluation of chimeric yellow fever 17D/dengue viral replication in ticks.

    PubMed

    Kazimírová, Mária; Mantel, Nathalie; Raynaud, Sandrine; Slovák, Mirko; Ustaniková, Katarína; Lang, Jean; Guy, Bruno; Barban, Veronique; Labuda, Milan

    2012-11-01

    Chimeric yellow fever 17D/DENV-1-4 viruses (CYD-1-4) have been developed as a tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate which is currently being evaluated in efficacy trials in Asia and America. While YF 17D and DENV are mosquito-borne flaviviruses, it has been shown that CYD-1-4 do not replicate after oral infection in mosquitoes and are not transmitted to new hosts. To further document the risk of environmental dissemination of these viruses, we evaluated the replication of CYD-1-4 in ticks, the vector of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), another member of the flavivirus family. Females of two hard tick species, Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, were inoculated intracoelomically with CYD-1-4 viruses and parent viruses (DENV-1-4 and YF 17D). Virus persistence and replication was assessed 2, 16, and 44 days post-inoculation by plaque titration and qRT-PCR. CYD-1-4 viruses were detected in I. ricinus ticks at early time points post-inoculation, but with infectious titers at least 100-fold lower than those observed in TBEV-infected ticks. Unlike TBEV, complete viral clearance occurred by day 44 in most ticks except for CYD-2, which had a tendency to decline. In addition, while about 70% of TBEV-infected I. ricinus nymphs acquired infection by co-feeding with infected tick females on non-viremic hosts, no co-feeding transmission of CYD-2 virus was detected. Based on these results, we conclude that the risk of dissemination of the candidate vaccine viruses by tick bite is highly unlikely.

  14. Construction, Safety, and Immunogenicity in Nonhuman Primates of a Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Guirakhoo, F.; Arroyo, J.; Pugachev, K. V.; Miller, C.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Weltzin, R.; Georgakopoulos, K.; Catalan, J.; Ocran, S.; Soike, K.; Ratterree, M.; Monath, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported construction of a chimeric yellow fever-dengue type 2 virus (YF/DEN2) and determined its safety and protective efficacy in rhesus monkeys (F. Guirakhoo et al., J. Virol. 74:5477–5485, 2000). In this paper, we describe construction of three additional YF/DEN chimeras using premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of wild-type (WT) clinical isolates: DEN1 (strain PUO359, isolated in 1980 in Thailand), DEN3 (strain PaH881/88, isolated in 1988 in Thailand), and DEN4 (strain 1228, isolated in 1978 in Indonesia). These chimeric viruses (YF/DEN1, YF/DEN3, and YF/DEN4) replicated to ∼7.5 log10 PFU/ml in Vero cells, were not neurovirulent in 3- to 4-week-old ICR mice inoculated by the intracerebral route, and were immunogenic in monkeys. All rhesus monkeys inoculated subcutaneously with one dose of these chimeric viruses (as monovalent or tetravalent formulation) developed viremia with magnitudes similar to that of the YF 17D vaccine strain (YF-VAX) but significantly lower than those of their parent WT viruses. Eight of nine monkeys inoculated with monovalent YF/DEN1 -3, or -4 vaccine and six of six monkeys inoculated with tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine seroconverted after a single dose. When monkeys were boosted with a tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 dose 6 months later, four of nine monkeys in the monovalent YF/DEN groups developed low levels of viremia, whereas no viremia was detected in any animals previously inoculated with either YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or WT DEN virus. An anamnestic response was observed in all monkeys after the second dose. No statistically significant difference in levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed between YF virus-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or between tetravalent YF/DEN1-4-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the YF-VAX. However, preimmune monkeys developed either no detectable viremia or a level of viremia lower than that in nonimmune controls. This is the first

  15. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF.

  16. Vaccine Platforms to Control Arenaviral Hemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Ricardo; Bredenbeek, Peter; Jiang, Xiaohong; Tretyakova, Irina; Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-20

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne emerging human pathogens. Diseases caused by these viruses, e.g., Lassa fever (LF) in West Africa and South American hemorrhagic fevers (HFs), are serious public health problems in endemic areas. We have employed replication-competent and replication-deficient strategies to design vaccine candidates potentially targeting different groups "at risk". Our leader LF vaccine candidate, the live reassortant vaccine ML29, is safe and efficacious in all tested animal models including non-human primates. In this study we showed that treatment of fatally infected animals with ML29 two days after Lassa virus (LASV) challenge protected 80% of the treated animals. In endemic areas, where most of the target population is poor and many live far from health care facilities, a single-dose vaccination with ML29 would be ideal solution. Once there is an outbreak, a fast-acting vaccine or post-exposure prophylaxis would be best. The 2(nd) vaccine technology is based on Yellow Fever (YF) 17D vaccine. We designed YF17D-based recombinant viruses expressing LASV glycoproteins (GP) and showed protective efficacy of these recombinants. In the current study we developed a novel technology to clone LASV nucleocapsid within YF17D C gene. Low immunogenicity and stability of foreign inserts must be addressed to design successful LASV/YFV bivalent vaccines to control LF and YF in overlapping endemic areas of West Africa. The 3(rd) platform is based on the new generation of alphavirus replicon virus-like-particle vectors (VLPV). Using this technology we designed VLPV expressing LASV GP with enhanced immunogenicity and bivalent VLPV expressing cross-reactive GP of Junin virus (JUNV) and Machupo virus (MACV), causative agents of Argentinian and Bolivian HF, respectively. A prime-boost regimen required for VLPV immunization might be practical for medical providers, military, lab personnel, and visitors in endemic areas.

  17. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  18. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  19. Live Virus Vaccines Based on a Yellow Fever Vaccine Backbone: Standardized Template with Key Considerations for a Risk/Benefit Assessment*

    PubMed Central

    Monath, Thomas P.; Seligman, Stephen J.; Robertson, James S.; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B.; Condit, Richard C.; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called “chimeric virus vaccines”). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were replaced by the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  20. Genome-wide RNA profiling of long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by Yellow Fever vaccination in humans.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-09-01

    The live-attenuated Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine YF-17D induces a broad and polyfunctional CD8 T cell response in humans. Recently, we identified a population of stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by YF-17D that persists at stable frequency for at least 25 years after vaccination. The YF-17D is thus a model system of human CD8 T cell biology that furthermore allows to track and study long-lasting and antigen-specific human memory CD8 T cells. Here, we describe in detail the sample characteristics and preparation of a microarray dataset acquired for genome-wide gene expression profiling of long-lasting YF-specific stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells, compared to the reference CD8 T cell differentiation subsets from total CD8 T cells. We also describe the quality controls, annotations and exploratory analyses of the dataset. The microarray data is available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository with accession number GSE65804. PMID:26484272

  1. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  2. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  3. Yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events following extensive immunization in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Biscayart, Cristián; Carrega, María Eugenia Pérez; Sagradini, Sandra; Gentile, Angela; Stecher, Daniel; Orduna, Tomás; Bentancourt, Silvia; Jiménez, Salvador García; Flynn, Luis Pedro; Arce, Gabriel Pirán; Uboldi, María Andrea; Bugna, Laura; Morales, María Alejandra; Digilio, Clara; Fabbri, Cintia; Enría, Delia; Diosque, Máximo; Vizzotti, Carla

    2014-03-01

    As a consequence of YF outbreaks that hit Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay in 2008-2009, a significant demand for YF vaccination was subsequently observed in Argentina, a country where the usual vaccine recommendations are restricted to provinces that border Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The goal of this paper is to describe the adverse events following immunization (AEFI) against YF in Argentina during the outbreak in the northeastern province of Misiones, which occurred from January 2008 to January 2009. During this time, a total of nine cases were reported, almost two million doses of vaccine were administered, and a total of 165 AEFI were reported from different provinces. Case study analyses were performed using two AEFI classifications. Forty-nine events were classified as related to the YF vaccine (24 serious and 1 fatal case), and 12 events were classified as inconclusive. As the use of the YF 17D vaccine can be a challenge to health systems of countries with different endemicity patterns, a careful clinical and epidemiological evaluation should be performed before its prescription to minimize serious adverse events. PMID:24456625

  4. The Safety of Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D or 17DD in Children, Pregnant Women, HIV+ Individuals, and Older Persons: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger E.; Lorenzetti, Diane L.; Spragins, Wendy; Jackson, Dave; Williamson, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting immunity. Rare serious adverse events after vaccination include neurologic or viscerotropic syndromes or anaphylaxis. We conducted a systematic review of adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination in vulnerable populations. Nine electronic bibliographic databases and reference lists of included articles were searched. Electronic databases identified 2,415 abstracts for review, and 32 abstracts were included in this review. We identified nine studies of adverse events in infants and children, eight studies of adverse events in pregnant women, nine studies of adverse events in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, five studies of adverse events in persons 60 years and older, and one study of adverse events in individuals taking immunosuppressive medications. Two case studies of maternal–neonate transmission resulted in serious adverse events, and the five passive surveillance databases identified very small numbers of cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease, yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic disease, and anaphylaxis in persons ≥ 60 years. No other serious adverse events were identified in the other studies of vulnerable groups. PMID:22302874

  5. Chimeric flaviviruses: novel vaccines against dengue fever, tick-borne encephalitis, and Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Juh; Monath, Thomas P

    2003-01-01

    Many arthropod-borne flaviviruses are important human pathogens responsible for diverse illnesses, including YF, JE, TBE, and dengue. Live, attenuated vaccines have afforded the most effective and economical means of prevention and control, as illustrated by YF 17D and JE SA14-14-2 vaccines. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology have made it possible to explore a novel approach for developing live attenuated flavivirus vaccines against other flaviviruses. Full-length cDNA clones allow construction of infectious virus bearing attenuating mutations or deletions incorporated in the viral genome. It is also possible to create chimeric flaviviruses in which the structural protein genes for the target antigens of a flavivirus are replaced by the corresponding genes of another flavivirus. By combining these molecular techniques, the DNA sequences of DEN4 strain 814669, DEN2 PDK-53 candidate vaccine and YF 17D vaccine have been used as the genetic backbone to construct chimeric flaviviruses with the required attenuation phenotype and expression of the target antigens. Encouraging results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown that several chimeric flavivirus vaccines have the safety profile and satisfactory immunogenicity and protective efficacy to warrant further evaluation in humans. The chimeric flavivirus strategy has led to the rapid development of novel live-attenuated vaccines against dengue, TBE, JE, and West Nile viruses. PMID:14714441

  6. Clinical and Immunological Insights on Severe, Adverse Neurotropic and Viscerotropic Disease following 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Luiza; Espírito-Santo, Luçandra Ramos; Martins, Marina Angela; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Caminha, Ricardo Carvalho; de Andrade Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Galler, Ricardo; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Marcovistz, Rugimar; Homma, Akira; Teuwen, Dirk E.; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccines (17D-204 and 17DD) are well tolerated and cause very low rates of severe adverse events (YEL-SAE), such as serious allergic reactions, neurotropic adverse diseases (YEL-AND), and viscerotropic diseases (YEL-AVD). Viral and host factors have been postulated to explain the basis of YEL-SAE. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of YEL-SAE remain unknown. The present report provides a detailed immunological analysis of a 23-year-old female patient. The patient developed a suspected case of severe YEL-AVD with encephalitis, as well as with pancreatitis and myositis, following receipt of a 17D-204 YF vaccination. The patient exhibited a decreased level of expression of Fc-γR in monocytes (CD16, CD32, and CD64), along with increased levels of NK T cells (an increased CD3+ CD16+/− CD56+/−/CD3+ ratio), activated T cells (CD4+ and CD8+ cells), and B lymphocytes. Enhanced levels of plasmatic cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) as well as an exacerbated ex vivo intracytoplasmic cytokine pattern, mainly observed within NK cells (gamma interferon positive [IFN-γ+], tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+], and IL-4 positive [IL-4+]), CD8+ T cells (IL-4+ and IL-5+), and B lymphocytes (TNF-α+, IL-4+, and IL-10+). The analysis of CD4+ T cells revealed a complex profile that consisted of an increased frequency of IL-12+ and IFN-γ+ cells and a decreased percentage of TNF-α+, IL-4+, and IL-5+ cells. Depressed cytokine synthesis was observed in monocytes (TNF-α+) following the provision of antigenic stimuli in vitro. These results support the hypothesis that a strong adaptive response and abnormalities in the innate immune system may be involved in the establishment of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD. PMID:19906894

  7. Yellow fever vaccine: an effective vaccine for travelers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral communicable disease transmitted by an arbovirus of the Flavivirus genus. It is primarily a zoonotic disease, especially the monkeys. Worldwide, an estimated 200,000 cases of yellow fever occurred each year, and the case-fatality rate is ~15%. Forty-five endemic countries in Africa and Latin America, with a population of close to 1 billion, are at risk. Up to 50% of severely affected persons from YF die without treatment. During 2009, 55 cases and 18 deaths were reported from Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. Brazil reported the maximum number of cases and death, i.e., 42 cases with 11 deaths. From January 2010 to March 2011, outbreaks of YF were reported to the WHO by Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Senegal, and Uganda. Cases were also reported in three northern districts of Abim, Agago, and Kitugun near the border with South Sudan. YF usually causes fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, shivers, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. Most patients improve, and their symptoms disappear after 3 to 4 d. Half of the patients who enter the toxic phase die within 10-14 d, while the rest recover without significant organ damage. Vaccination has been the single most important measure for preventing YF. The 17D-204 YF vaccine is a freeze-dried, live attenuated, highly effective vaccine. It is available in single-dose or multi-dose vials and should be stored at 2-8 °C. It is reconstituted with normal saline and should be used within 1 h of reconstitution. The 0.5 mL dose is delivered subcutaneously. Revaccination is recommended every 10 y for people at continued risk of exposure to yellow fever virus (YFV). This vaccine is available worldwide. Travelers, especially to Africa or Latin America from Asia, must have a certificate documenting YF vaccination, which is required by certain countries for entry under the International Health Regulations (IHR) of the WHO.

  8. Chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus as a candidate dengue vaccine: quantitation of the dengue virus-specific CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    van Der Most, R G; Murali-Krishna, K; Ahmed, R; Strauss, J H

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against DEN-2 virus challenge, indicating that protection was mediated by the DEN-2 virus prM- and E-specific immune responses. YF/DEN vaccine-primed CD8 T cells expanded and were efficiently recruited into the central nervous systems of DEN-2 virus challenged mice. At 5 days after challenge, 3 to 4% of CD8 T cells in the spleen were specific for the prM and E proteins, and 34% of CD8 T cells in the central nervous system recognized these proteins. Depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells, or both, strongly reduced the protective efficacy of the YF/DEN virus, stressing the key role of the antiviral T-cell response.

  9. YF-12 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the so-called YF-12C (SR-71A 61-7951, modified with YF-12A inlets and engines and a bogus tail number 06937). The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson. They were constructed mostly of titanium to withstand aerodynamic heating. Fueled by JP-7, the Blackbirds were capable of cruising at Mach 3.2 and attaining altitudes in excess of 80,000 feet. The first version, a CIA reconnaissance aircraft that first flew in April 1962 was called the A-12. An

  10. YF-12C on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The so-called YF-12C on the NASA Flight Research Center ramp. Following the loss of a YF-12A in a non-fatal accident in June 1971, NASA acquired the second production SR-71A (61-7951) from the Air Force. Because the SR-71 program was shrouded in the highest secrecy, the Air Force restricted NASA to using the aircraft solely for propulsion testing with YF-12A inlets and engines. It was designated the YF-12C, and given a bogus tail number (06937). The two YF-12As in the program had actual tail numbers 06935 and 06936. The first NASA flight of the YF-12C took place on 24 May 1972. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 606936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made

  11. YF-17/ADEN system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowadia, N. S.; Bard, W. D.; Wooten, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The YF-17 aircraft was evaluated as a candidate nonaxisymmetric nozzle flight demonstrator. Configuration design modifications, control system design, flight performance assessment, and program plan and cost we are summarized. Two aircraft configurations were studied. The first was modified as required to install only the augmented deflector exhaust nozzle (ADEN). The second one added a canard installation to take advantage of the full (up to 20 deg) nozzle vectoring capability. Results indicate that: (1) the program is feasible and can be accomplished at reasonable cost and low risk; (2) installation of ADEN increases the aircraft weight by 600 kg (1325 lb); (3) the control system can be modified to accomplish direct lift, pointing capability, variable static margin and deceleration modes of operation; (4) unvectored thrust-minus-drag is similar to the baseline YF-17; and (5) vectoring does not improve maneuvering performance. However, some potential benefits in direct lift, aircraft pointing, handling at low dynamic pressure and takeoff/landing ground roll are available. A 27 month program with 12 months of flight test is envisioned, with the cost estimated to be $15.9 million for the canard equipped aircraft and $13.2 million for the version without canard. The feasiblity of adding a thrust reverser to the YF-17/ADEN was investigated.

  12. YF-12C in flight at sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The so-called YF-12C in flight at sunset. The YF-12C was the second production SR-71A (61-7951), modified with YF-12A inlets and engines, and given a bogus tail number (06937). It replaced a YF-12A (60-6936) that crashed during a joint USAF-NASA research program. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the YF-12C. The YF-12C was delivered to NASA on 16 July 1971. From then until 22 December 1978, it made 90 flights. The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson. They were constructed mostly

  13. Two YF-12 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The YF-12A (60-6935) carries the 'coldwall' heat transfer pod on a pylon beneath the forward fuselage. The pod is seen with its insulating coating intact. In the foreground, the YF-12C flies photo chase. The coldwall project, supported by Langley Research Center, consisted of a stainless steel tube equipped with thermocouples and pressure-sensors. A special insulating coating covered the tube, which was chilled with liquid nitrogen. At Mach 3, the insulation could be pyrotechnically blown away from the tube, instantly exposing it to the thermal environment. The experiment caused many inflight difficulties, such as engine unstarts, but eventually researchers got a successful flight. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse

  14. YF-12A #935 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A front, overhead view of the number two YF-12A (60-6935) on the ramp at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden), Edwards, California. Notice how the chines end abruptly, just aft of the nose radome. The aircraft was originally designed as an interceptor. The large radome housed a radar for the Hughes ASG-18 missile fire control system. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the so-called YF-12C (SR-71A 61-7951, modified with YF-12A inlets and engines and a bogus tail number 06937). The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the

  15. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  16. YF-12 Experiments Symposium, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Papers presented by personnel from the Dryden Flight Research Center, the Lewis Research Center, and the Ames Research Center are presented. Topics cover propulsion system performance, inlet time varying distortion, structures, aircraft controls, propulsion controls, and aerodynamics. The reports were based on analytical studies, laboratory experiments, wind tunnel tests, and extensive flight research with two YF-12 airplanes.

  17. Vaccines and vaccination against yellow fever: WHO Position Paper, June 2013--recommendations.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the World Health Organizations (WHO) evidence and recommendations for the use of yellow fever (YF) vaccination from "Vaccines and vaccination against yellow fever: WHO Position Paper - June 2013" published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record. This position paper summarizes the WHO position on the use of YF vaccination, in particular that a single dose of YF vaccine is sufficient to confer sustained life-long protective immunity against YF disease. A booster dose is not necessary. The current document replaces the position paper on the use of yellow fever vaccines and vaccination published in 2003. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its April 2013 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html.

  18. YF-12A #936 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The arrival of YF-12A (60-6936) at the NASA Flight Research Center. This aircraft was used by the Air Force crews during the joint USAF-NASA research program. This aircraft, 936, was the third YF-12A built. The first YF-12A (60-6934) flew in August 1963. Lockheed test pilot Robert Gilliland made the first flight in 936 on 13 March 1964. It later set nine world absolute speed and altitude records on 1 May 1965. Aircraft 936 participated in AIM-47 missile firing tests at Eglin AFB, Florida in 1966. It joined the USAF-NASA F-12 Test Force in 1969, and made 62 successful flights. On 24 June 1971, it was lost in an accident during the 63rd flight. A fuel line failed, causing a fire in the right engine. As the aircraft approached Rogers Dry Lake for an emergency landing, the intensity of the fire increased. Lt. Col. Ronald 'Jack' Layton and Maj. Billy Curtis decided to eject, and the YF-12A nosed in and exploded. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included

  19. YF-12A and YF-12C in flight formation at dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The YF-12A (60-6935) carries the 'coldwall' heat transfer pod on a pylon beneath the forward fuselage. The pod is seen with its insulating coating intact. In the background, the YF-12C flies photo chase. The coldwall project, supported by Langley Research Center, consisted of a stainless steel tube equipped with thermocouples and pressure-sensors. A special insulating coating covered the tube, which was chilled with liquid nitrogen. At Mach 3, the insulation could be pyrotechnically blown away from the tube, instantly exposing it to the thermal environment. The experiment caused many inflight difficulties, such as engine unstarts, but eventually researchers got a successful flight. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse

  20. Precision controllability of the YF-17 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Mataeny, N. W.

    1980-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on the YF-17 airplane permitted assessment of its precision controllability in the transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. The precision controllability (tailchase tracking) study was conducted in constant-g and windup turn tracking maneuvers with the command augmentation system (CAS) on, automatic maneuver flaps, and the caged pipper gunsight depressed 70 mils. This study showed that the YF-17 airplane tracks essentially as well at 7 g's to 8 g's as earlier fighters did at 4 g's to 5 g's before they encountered wing rock. The pilots considered the YF-17 airplane one of the best tracking airplanes they had flown. Wing rock at the higher angles of attack degraded tracking precision, and lack of control harmony made precision controllability more difficult. The revised automatic maneuver flap schedule incorporated in the airplane at the time of the tests did not appear to be optimum. The largest tracking errors and greatest pilot workload occurred at high normal load factors at low angles of attack. The pilots reported that the high-g maneuvers caused some tunnel vision and that they found it difficult to think clearly after repeated maneuvers.

  1. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  2. [Yellow fever vaccination in non-immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Bruyand, M; Receveur, M C; Pistone, T; Verdière, C H; Thiebaut, R; Malvy, D

    2008-10-01

    Any person travelling in countries where yellow fever (YF) is endemic and without presenting contra-indication for the vaccination against YF may be vaccinated. This vaccination can very rarely induce a potentially lethal neurotropic or viscerotropic disease. In severely immunodeficient patients, the vaccination is contra-indicated because postvaccinal encephalitis may occur after the vaccination, due to vaccine strain pathogenecity. It is important to evaluate the general health status in elderly individuals before vaccinating because of the increased risk of viscerotropic disease in people of 60 years of age and over. Pregnant women should not be vaccinated, except if departure to an endemic zone is unavoidable. YF vaccinatio is contra-indicated for newborns under six months of age. Solid organ grafts, congenital immunodeficiency, leukemia, lymphoma, cancer, and immunosuppressive treatments are contra-indications for this vaccination. Nevertheless, YF immunization is possible after a bone marrow graft and a two-year period without graft-versus-host disease or immunosuppressive treatment. There is no data to support that immunization of the dono prior to the graft could confer protection against yellow fever to the recipient. Low doses, short courses of corticosteroids either as systemic treatment or intra-articular injections are not contra-indications for YF vaccination. Patients infected with HIV with stable clinical status and T CD4-cel count above 200 cells per millimetre cube may be vaccinated. Thymic diseases, including thymoma and thymectomy, are contra-indications for YF vaccination. Finally, a substantial residual level of antibodies beyond 10 years after the latest vaccination could confer protection, thus avoiding a new vaccination when it is an issue.

  3. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease.

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of a new inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in concurrent administration with a typhoid fever vaccine or a typhoid fever + yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Forrat, R; Lang, J; Farinelli, T; Loutan, L

    1997-01-01

    Two clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of concomitant administration of a new inactivated hepatitis A (HA) vaccine and either a typhoid fever (Vi) vaccine or a combination of Vi and yellow fever (YF) vaccines. In study 1, 62 healthy adults received HA+Vi into the deltoid muscle on contralateral sides. In study 2, 59 healthy adults received HA and a combined Vi/YF vaccine into the contralateral deltoid muscles. Reactogenicity was evaluated for 14 days following vaccination. Blood samples (for antibody titration) were obtained prior to vaccination on days 0 and 28 in study 1 and prior to vaccination on day 0 and on days 14 and 28 in study 2. The overall rate of local reactions was 19% at the HA injection site and 75% at the Vi injection site in study 1; the rate of systemic reactions was 41%. In study 2, local reactions occurred at 27% and 78% of the HA and Vi/YF injection sites; the rate of systemic reactions was 42%. All reactions were transient. Twenty-eight days after vaccination, the seroconversion rate was 100% for HA antibodies and 90% for the Vi vaccine in study 1. Rates of seroconversion in study 2 were 100% for the HA vaccine, 92% for the Vi vaccine, and 100% for the YF vaccine. Although this study was not comparative, both tested combinations were safe and immunogenic, and their routine use for persons at risk, such as travelers, can be recommended.

  5. Efficacy and Duration of Immunity after Yellow Fever Vaccination: Systematic Review on the Need for a Booster Every 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Yactayo, Sergio; Córdova, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Current regulations stipulate a yellow fever (YF) booster every 10 years. We conducted a systematic review of the protective efficacy and duration of immunity of YF vaccine in residents of disease-endemic areas and in travelers to assess the need for a booster in these two settings and in selected populations (human immunodeficiency virus–infected persons, infants, children, pregnant women, and severely malnourished persons). Thirty-six studies and 22 reports were included. We identified 12 studies of immunogenicity, 8 of duration of immunity, 8 of vaccine response in infants and children, 7 of human-immunodeficiency virus–infected persons, 2 of pregnant women, and 1 of severely malnourished children. Based on currently available data, a single dose of YF vaccine is highly immunogenic and confers sustained life-long protective immunity against YF. Therefore, a booster dose of YF vaccine is not needed. Special considerations for selected populations are detailed. PMID:24006295

  6. Travel characteristics and yellow fever vaccine usage among US Global TravEpiNet travelers visiting countries with risk of yellow fever virus transmission, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Jentes, Emily S; Han, Pauline; Gershman, Mark D; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Staples, J Erin; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-05-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated serious adverse events and changing YF epidemiology have challenged healthcare providers to vaccinate only travelers whose risk of YF during travel is greater than their risk of adverse events. We describe the travel characteristics and YF vaccine use among US travelers visiting Global TravEpiNet clinics from January of 2009 to March of 2011. Of 16,660 travelers, 5,588 (34%) had itineraries to areas with risk of YF virus transmission. Of those travelers visiting one country with YF risk (N = 4,517), 71% were vaccinated at the visit, and 20% were presumed to be immune from prior vaccination. However, travelers visiting friends and relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.27-5.22) or going to Nigeria (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.37-6.62) were significantly more likely to decline vaccination. To optimize YF vaccine use, clinicians should discuss an individual's risk-benefit assessment of vaccination and close knowledge gaps regarding vaccine use among at-risk populations.

  7. Travel Characteristics and Yellow Fever Vaccine Usage Among US Global TravEpiNet Travelers Visiting Countries with Risk of Yellow Fever Virus Transmission, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Jentes, Emily S.; Han, Pauline; Gershman, Mark D.; Rao, Sowmya R.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Staples, J. Erin; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated serious adverse events and changing YF epidemiology have challenged healthcare providers to vaccinate only travelers whose risk of YF during travel is greater than their risk of adverse events. We describe the travel characteristics and YF vaccine use among US travelers visiting Global TravEpiNet clinics from January of 2009 to March of 2011. Of 16,660 travelers, 5,588 (34%) had itineraries to areas with risk of YF virus transmission. Of those travelers visiting one country with YF risk (N = 4,517), 71% were vaccinated at the visit, and 20% were presumed to be immune from prior vaccination. However, travelers visiting friends and relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.27–5.22) or going to Nigeria (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.37–6.62) were significantly more likely to decline vaccination. To optimize YF vaccine use, clinicians should discuss an individual's risk–benefit assessment of vaccination and close knowledge gaps regarding vaccine use among at-risk populations. PMID:23458961

  8. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs.

  9. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. Methods All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. Results All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People’s Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Conclusion Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity. PMID:27784992

  10. SR-71A/YF-12A takeoff and flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The YF-12 'Blackbird' was an experimental fighter-interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12 aircraft. In Air Force flight tests on May 1, 1965, the YF-12 set a speed record of 2,070.101 miles per hour and an altitude record of 80,258 feet. First publicly displayed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1964, the YF-12 was never adopted by the military as an operational aircraft. It was, however, a precursor to the SR-71 Blackbird reconnaissance plane. Two YF-12 aircraft were flown in a joint Air Force-NASA research program at the NASA Flight Research Center (now the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center) between 1969 and 1979, although the second plane, piloted primarily by the Air Force, was lost to an inflight fire in 1971. The two YF-12 aircraft bore the serial numbers 60-6935 and 60-6936. This clip, which runs 36 seconds in length, begins with shots of the crew boarding and takeoff of an SR-71A (serial no. 61-7951) flown at NASA Dryden but designated as a YF-12C. The clip ends with air-to-air footage of a true YF-12A (serial no. 60-6935) identified by its distinctive radome that housed a powerful search and attack radar.

  11. Surveillance for yellow Fever virus in non-human primates in southern Brazil, 2001-2011: a tool for prioritizing human populations for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marco A B; Cardoso, Jader da C; Dos Santos, Edmilson; da Fonseca, Daltro F; Cruz, Laura L; Faraco, Fernando J C; Bercini, Marilina A; Vettorello, Kátia C; Porto, Mariana A; Mohrdieck, Renate; Ranieri, Tani M S; Schermann, Maria T; Sperb, Alethéa F; Paz, Francisco Z; Nunes, Zenaida M A; Romano, Alessandro P M; Costa, Zouraide G; Gomes, Silvana L; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-03-01

    In Brazil, epizootics among New World monkey species may indicate circulation of yellow fever (YF) virus and provide early warning of risk to humans. Between 1999 and 2001, the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul initiated surveillance for epizootics of YF in non-human primates to inform vaccination of human populations. Following a YF outbreak, we analyzed epizootic surveillance data and assessed YF vaccine coverage, timeliness of implementation of vaccination in unvaccinated human populations. From October 2008 through June 2009, circulation of YF virus was confirmed in 67 municipalities in Rio Grande do Sul State; vaccination was recommended in 23 (34%) prior to the outbreak and in 16 (24%) within two weeks of first epizootic report. In 28 (42%) municipalities, vaccination began more than two weeks after first epizootic report. Eleven (52%) of 21 laboratory-confirmed human YF cases occurred in two municipalities with delayed vaccination. By 2010, municipalities with confirmed YF epizootics reported higher vaccine coverage than other municipalities that began vaccination. In unvaccinated human populations timely response to epizootic events is critical to prevent human yellow fever cases.

  12. Persistence of Th1/Tc1 responses one year after tetravalent dengue vaccination in adults and adolescents in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Anke; Begue, Sarah; Mamessier, Audrey; Gimenez-Fourage, Sophie; Ching Seah, Ching; Wei Liang, Ai; Li Ng, Jun; Yun Toh, Xue; Archuleta, Sophia; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Shek, Lynette P; Wartel-Tram, Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Lang, Jean; Crevat, Denis; Caillet, Catherine; Guy, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the cell mediated immunity (CMI) induced by the investigational CYD tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV), we developed a whole-blood, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay and a multiplex assay, each requiring 3 mL of blood. We assessed CMI before and 28 d after a first and third injection of CYD-TDV and one year after the third injection in a subset of 80 adolescents and adults enrolled in a phase II trial in Singapore (ClinicalTrial.gov NCT NCT00880893). CD4/IFNγ/TNFα responses specific to dengue NS3 were detected before vaccination. Vaccination induced YF-17D-NS3-specific CD8/IFNγ responses, without significant TNFα, and a CYD-specific Th1/Tc1 cellular response in all participants, which was characterized by predominant IFNγ secretion compared with TNFα, associated with low level IL-13 secretion in multiplex analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) supernatants after restimulation with each the CYD vaccine viruses. Responses were directed mainly against CYD-4 after the first vaccination, and were more balanced against all four serotypes after the third vaccination. The same qualitative profile was observed one year after the third vaccination, with approximately 2-fold lower NS3-specific responses, and 3-fold lower serotype-specific cellular responses. These findings confirm previous observations regarding both the nature and specificity of cellular responses induced by CYD-TDV, and for the first time demonstrate the persistence of cellular responses after one year. We also established the feasibility of analyzing CMI with small blood samples, allowing such analysis to be considered for pediatric trials.

  13. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population.

  14. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population. PMID:27571912

  15. Feasibility study of inlet shock stability system of YF-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blausey, G. C.; Coleman, D. M.; Harp, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of self actuating bleed valves as a shock stabilization system in the inlet of the YF-12 is considered for vortex valves, slide valves, and poppet valves. Analytical estimation of valve performance indicates that only the slide and poppet valves located in the inlet cowl can meet the desired steady state stabilizing flows, and of the two the poppet valve is substantially faster in response to dynamic disturbances. The poppet valve is, therefore, selected as the best shock stability system for the YF-12 inlet.

  16. Characterization of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) IL-17D: molecular cloning, functional implication and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Du, Linyong; Qin, Lei; Wang, Xinyan; Zhang, Anying; Wei, He; Zhou, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Although the roles of IL-17 family members during inflammation have been extensively studied in mammals, their knowledge in lower vertebrates is limited. In particular, the biological activities of fish IL-17 and their functional roles are largely unknown. In this study, we cloned grass carp IL-17D (gcIL-17D) and found that its putative protein possessed the conserved features of IL-17 family members. Tissue distribution analysis showed that gcIL-17D was preferentially expressed in the mucosal tissues, including skin, gill and intestine. Subsequently, the involvement of gcIL-17D in inflammatory response was demonstrated by examining the expression profiles of gcIL-17D in head kidney and head kidney leukocytes following in vivo bacterial infection and in vitro LPS treatment, respectively. Furthermore, recombinant gcIL-17D (rgcIL-17D) was prepared in grass carp kidney cells and was able to promote the gene expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and CXCL-8) in grass carp primary head kidney cells, revealing gcIL-17D can function as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, rgcIL-17D appeared to activate NF-κB signaling by modulating the phosphorylation of IκBα and up-regulated CXCL-8 mRNA expression possibly through NF-κB pathway. Our data shed new light on the functional role of teleost IL-17D in inflammatory response. PMID:24120974

  17. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Envelope Protein of Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue 1 Vaccine Virus Reduces Neurovirulence for Suckling Mice and Viremia/Viscerotropism for Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Guirakhoo, F.; Zhang, Z.; Myers, G.; Johnson, B. W.; Pugachev, K.; Nichols, R.; Brown, N.; Levenbook, I.; Draper, K.; Cyrek, S.; Lang, J.; Fournier, C.; Barrere, B.; Delagrave, S.; Monath, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric yellow fever-dengue 1 (ChimeriVax-DEN1) virus was produced by the transfection of Vero cells with chimeric in vitro RNA transcripts. The cell culture supernatant was subjected to plaque purification for the identification of a vaccine candidate without mutations. Of 10 plaque-purified clones, 1 containing no mutation (clone J) was selected for production of the vaccine virus. During subsequent cell culture passaging of this clone for vaccine production, a single amino acid substitution (K to R) occurred in the envelope (E) protein at residue 204 (E204) (F. Guirakhoo, K. Pugachev, Z. Zhang, G. Myers, I. Levenbook, K. Draper, J. Lang, S. Ocran, F. Mitchell, M. Parsons, N. Brown, S. Brandler, C. Fournier, B. Barrere, F. Rizvi, A. Travassos, R. Nichols, D. Trent, and T. Monath, J. Virol. 78:4761-4775, 2004). The same mutation was observed in another clone (clone E). This mutation attenuated the virus in 4-day-old suckling mice inoculated by the intracerebral (i.c.) route and led to reduced viremia in monkeys inoculated by the subcutaneous or i.c. route. The histopathology scores of lesions in the brain tissue of monkeys inoculated with either the E204K or E204R virus were reduced compared to those for monkeys inoculated with the reference virus, a commercial yellow fever 17D vaccine (YF-VAX). Both viruses grew to significantly lower titers than YF-VAX in HepG2, a human hepatoma cell line. After intrathoracic inoculation into mosquitoes, both viruses grew to a similar level as YF-VAX, which was significantly lower than that of their wild-type DEN1 parent virus. A comparison of the E-protein structures of nonmutant and mutant viruses suggested the appearance of new intramolecular bonds between residues 204R, 261H, and 257E in the mutant virus. These changes may be responsible for virus attenuation through a change in the pH threshold for virus envelope fusion with the host cell membrane. PMID:15331733

  18. Clustered lot quality assurance sampling: a tool to monitor immunization coverage rapidly during a national yellow fever and polio vaccination campaign in Cameroon, May 2009.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, L; Tchio, R; Dzossa, A D; Ndjomo, S; Takeu, A; Anya, B; Ticha, J; Ronveaux, O; Lewis, R F

    2012-01-01

    We used the clustered lot quality assurance sampling (clustered-LQAS) technique to identify districts with low immunization coverage and guide mop-up actions during the last 4 days of a combined oral polio vaccine (OPV) and yellow fever (YF) vaccination campaign conducted in Cameroon in May 2009. We monitored 17 pre-selected districts at risk for low coverage. We designed LQAS plans to reject districts with YF vaccination coverage <90% and with OPV coverage <95%. In each lot the sample size was 50 (five clusters of 10) with decision values of 3 for assessing OPV and 7 for YF coverage. We 'rejected' 10 districts for low YF coverage and 14 for low OPV coverage. Hence we recommended a 2-day extension of the campaign. Clustered-LQAS proved to be useful in guiding the campaign vaccination strategy before the completion of the operations.

  19. West Nile virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P; Arroyo, J; Miller, C; Guirakhoo, F

    2001-05-01

    Within the past 5 years, West Nile encephalitis has emerged as an important disease of humans and horses in Europe. In 1999, the disease appeared for the first time in the northeastern United States. West Nile virus (a mosquito-borne flavivirus) has flourished in the North American ecosystem and is expected to expand its geographic range. In this review, the rationale for a human and veterinary vaccine is presented and a novel approach for rapid development of a molecularly-defined, live, attenuated vaccine is described. The technology (ChimeriVax) is applicable to the development of vaccines against all flaviviruses, and products against Japanese encephalitis (a close relative of West Nile) and dengue are in or are nearing clinical trials, respectively. ChimeriVax vaccines utilize the safe and effective vaccine against the prototype flavivirus -yellow fever 17D- as a live vector. Infectious clone technology is used to replace the genes encoding the pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of yellow fever 17D vaccine with the corresponding genes of the target virus (e.g., West Nile). The resulting chimeric virus contains the antigens responsible for protection against West Nile but retains the replication efficiency of yellow fever 17D. The ChimeriVax technology is well-suited to the rapid development of a West Nile vaccine, and clinical trials could begin as early as mid-2002. Other approaches to vaccine development are briefly reviewed. The aim of this brief review is to describe the features of West Nile encephalitis, a newly introduced infectious disease affecting humans, horses and wildlife in the United States; the rationale for rapid development of vaccines; and approaches to the development of vaccines against the disease.

  20. A public health risk assessment for yellow fever vaccination: a model exemplified by an outbreak in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Tengan, Ciléa; Sato, Helena Keico; Spinola, Roberta; Mascheretti, Melissa; França, Ana Cecilia Costa; Port-Carvalho, Marcio; Pereira, Mariza; Souza, Renato Pereira de; Amaku, Marcos; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Coutinho, Francisco Antonio Bezerra; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    We propose a method to analyse the 2009 outbreak in the region of Botucatu in the state of São Paulo (SP), Brazil, when 28 yellow fever (YF) cases were confirmed, including 11 deaths. At the time of the outbreak, the Secretary of Health of the State of São Paulo vaccinated one million people, causing the death of five individuals, an unprecedented number of YF vaccine-induced fatalities. We apply a mathematical model described previously to optimise the proportion of people who should be vaccinated to minimise the total number of deaths. The model was used to calculate the optimum proportion that should be vaccinated in the remaining, vaccine-free regions of SP, considering the risk of vaccine-induced fatalities and the risk of YF outbreaks in these regions.

  1. A public health risk assessment for yellow fever vaccination: a model exemplified by an outbreak in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Tengan, Ciléa; Sato, Helena Keico; Spinola, Roberta; Mascheretti, Melissa; França, Ana Cecilia Costa; Port-Carvalho, Marcio; Pereira, Mariza; Souza, Renato Pereira de; Amaku, Marcos; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Coutinho, Francisco Antonio Bezerra; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    We propose a method to analyse the 2009 outbreak in the region of Botucatu in the state of São Paulo (SP), Brazil, when 28 yellow fever (YF) cases were confirmed, including 11 deaths. At the time of the outbreak, the Secretary of Health of the State of São Paulo vaccinated one million people, causing the death of five individuals, an unprecedented number of YF vaccine-induced fatalities. We apply a mathematical model described previously to optimise the proportion of people who should be vaccinated to minimise the total number of deaths. The model was used to calculate the optimum proportion that should be vaccinated in the remaining, vaccine-free regions of SP, considering the risk of vaccine-induced fatalities and the risk of YF outbreaks in these regions. PMID:25946247

  2. A public health risk assessment for yellow fever vaccination: a model exemplified by an outbreak in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Tengan, Ciléa; Sato, Helena Keico; Spinola, Roberta; Mascheretti, Melissa; França, Ana Cecilia Costa; Port-Carvalho, Marcio; Pereira, Mariza; de Souza, Renato Pereira; Amaku, Marcos; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Coutinho, Francisco Antonio Bezerra; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to analyse the 2009 outbreak in the region of Botucatu in the state of São Paulo (SP), Brazil, when 28 yellow fever (YF) cases were confirmed, including 11 deaths. At the time of the outbreak, the Secretary of Health of the State of São Paulo vaccinated one million people, causing the death of five individuals, an unprecedented number of YF vaccine-induced fatalities. We apply a mathematical model described previously to optimise the proportion of people who should be vaccinated to minimise the total number of deaths. The model was used to calculate the optimum proportion that should be vaccinated in the remaining, vaccine-free regions of SP, considering the risk of vaccine-induced fatalities and the risk of YF outbreaks in these regions. PMID:25946247

  3. Yellow Fever Vaccination of a Primary Vaccinee During Adalimumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nash, Esther R; Brand, Myron; Chalkias, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a 63-year-old female with Crohn's disease since age 16 years, and on adalimumab therapy, who inadvertently received a yellow fever vaccine (YFV) 4 days before her next dose of adalimumab. She had never received YFV. Her next dose of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist was held. She did not report any adverse effects referable to the vaccine. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for yellow fever (YF) viral RNA on days 12 and 18 postvaccination was negative. Neutralizing antibody to YF virus vaccine was immunoprotective on day 18 following vaccination, which further increased by day 26. A neutralizing antibody obtained 2 years following vaccination also remained immunoprotective.

  4. Development and validation of an ELISA kit (YF MAC-HD) to detect IgM to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Basile, Alison Jane; Goodman, Christin; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Laven, Janeen; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W

    2015-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, with around 180,000 human infections a year occurring in Africa. Serologic testing is the chief laboratory diagnostic means of identifying an outbreak and to inform the decision to commence a vaccination campaign. The World Health Organization disseminates the reagents for YFV testing to African reference laboratories, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is charged with producing and providing these reagents. The CDC M-antibody capture ELISA is a 2-day test, requiring titration of reagents when new lots are received, which leads to inconsistency in testing and wastage of material. Here we describe the development of a kit-based assay (YF MAC-HD) based upon the CDC method, that is completed in approximately 3.5h, with equivocal samples being reflexed to an overnight protocol. The kit exhibits >90% accuracy when compared to the 2-day test. The kits were designed for use with a minimum of equipment and are stored at 4°C, removing the need for freezing capacity. This kit is capable of tolerating temporary sub-optimal storage conditions which will ease shipping or power outage concerns, and a shelf life of >6 months was demonstrated with no deterioration in accuracy. All reagents necessary to run the YF MAC-HD are included in the kit and are single-use, with 8 or 24 sample options per kit. Field trials are envisioned for the near future, which will enable refinement of the method. The use of the YF MAC-HD is anticipated to reduce materials wastage, and improve the quality and consistency of YFV serologic testing in endemic areas.

  5. Development and validation of an ELISA kit (YF MAC-HD) to detect IgM to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Basile, Alison Jane; Goodman, Christin; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Laven, Janeen; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W

    2015-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, with around 180,000 human infections a year occurring in Africa. Serologic testing is the chief laboratory diagnostic means of identifying an outbreak and to inform the decision to commence a vaccination campaign. The World Health Organization disseminates the reagents for YFV testing to African reference laboratories, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is charged with producing and providing these reagents. The CDC M-antibody capture ELISA is a 2-day test, requiring titration of reagents when new lots are received, which leads to inconsistency in testing and wastage of material. Here we describe the development of a kit-based assay (YF MAC-HD) based upon the CDC method, that is completed in approximately 3.5h, with equivocal samples being reflexed to an overnight protocol. The kit exhibits >90% accuracy when compared to the 2-day test. The kits were designed for use with a minimum of equipment and are stored at 4°C, removing the need for freezing capacity. This kit is capable of tolerating temporary sub-optimal storage conditions which will ease shipping or power outage concerns, and a shelf life of >6 months was demonstrated with no deterioration in accuracy. All reagents necessary to run the YF MAC-HD are included in the kit and are single-use, with 8 or 24 sample options per kit. Field trials are envisioned for the near future, which will enable refinement of the method. The use of the YF MAC-HD is anticipated to reduce materials wastage, and improve the quality and consistency of YFV serologic testing in endemic areas. PMID:26342907

  6. Flight test of the YF-23A Advanced Tactical Fighter

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, P. )

    1992-02-01

    The paper describes the approach used in flight tests of the YF-23A Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF), the fighter which was conceived as a replacement for the F-1 Eagle and which combines stealth techologies with a supercruise capability while retaining the agility necessary in an air superiority fighter. Special attention is given to the flight test concept, flight test preparations, and test objectives. The test methods, the problems encountered, and the test results are described.

  7. Nrf2 Induces IL-17D to Mediate Tumor and Virus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Saddawi-Konefka, Robert; Seelige, Ruth; Gross, Emilie T E; Levy, Eric; Searles, Stephen C; Washington, Allen; Santosa, Endi K; Liu, Beichen; O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Harismendy, Olivier; Bui, Jack D

    2016-08-30

    Cells undergoing xenobiotic or oxidative stress activate the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2), which initiates an intrinsic "stress surveillance" pathway. We recently found that the cytokine IL-17D effects a form of extrinsic stress surveillance by inducing antitumor immunity, but how IL-17D is regulated remains unknown. Here, we show that Nrf2 induced IL-17D in cancer cell lines. Moreover, both Nrf2 and IL-17D were induced in primary tumors as well as during viral infection in vivo. Expression of IL-17D in tumors and virally infected cells is essential for optimal protection of the host as il17d(-/-) mice experienced a higher incidence of tumors and exacerbated viral infections compared to wild-type (WT) animals. Moreover, activating Nrf2 to induce IL-17D in established tumors led to natural killer cell-dependent tumor regression. These data demonstrate that Nrf2 can initiate both intrinsic and extrinsic stress surveillance pathways and highlight the use of Nrf2 agonists as immune therapies for cancer and infection. PMID:27545889

  8. Environmental fate of the next generation refrigerant 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf).

    PubMed

    Im, Jeongdae; Walshe-Langford, Gillian E; Moon, Ji-Won; Löffler, Frank E

    2014-11-18

    The hydrofluoroolefin 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) has been introduced to replace 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) as refrigerant in mobile, including vehicle, air conditioning systems because of its lower global warming potential. HFO-1234yf is volatile at ambient temperatures; however, high production volumes and widespread handling are expected to release this fluorocarbon into terrestrial and aquatic environments, including groundwater. Laboratory experiments explored HFO-1234yf degradation by (i) microbial processes under oxic and anoxic conditions, (ii) abiotic processes mediated by reactive mineral phases and zerovalent iron (Fe(0), ZVI), and (iii) cobalamin-catalyzed biomimetic transformation. These investigations demonstrated that HFO-1234yf was recalcitrant to microbial (co)metabolism and no transformation was observed in incubations with ZVI, makinawite (FeS), sulfate green rust (GR(SO4)), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), and manganese oxide (MnO2). Sequential reductive defluorination of HFO-1234yf to 3,3,3-trifluoropropene and 3,3-dichloropropene with concomitant stoichiometric release of fluoride occurred in incubations with reduced cobalamins (e.g., vitamin B12) indicating that biomolecules can transform HFO-1234yf at circumneutral pH and at ambient temperature. Taken together, these findings suggest that HFO-1234yf recalcitrance in aquifers should be expected; however, HFO-1234yf is not inert and a biomolecule may mediate reductive transformation in low redox environments, albeit at low rates. PMID:25329364

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  10. Environmental fate of the next generation refrigerant 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf).

    PubMed

    Im, Jeongdae; Walshe-Langford, Gillian E; Moon, Ji-Won; Löffler, Frank E

    2014-11-18

    The hydrofluoroolefin 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) has been introduced to replace 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) as refrigerant in mobile, including vehicle, air conditioning systems because of its lower global warming potential. HFO-1234yf is volatile at ambient temperatures; however, high production volumes and widespread handling are expected to release this fluorocarbon into terrestrial and aquatic environments, including groundwater. Laboratory experiments explored HFO-1234yf degradation by (i) microbial processes under oxic and anoxic conditions, (ii) abiotic processes mediated by reactive mineral phases and zerovalent iron (Fe(0), ZVI), and (iii) cobalamin-catalyzed biomimetic transformation. These investigations demonstrated that HFO-1234yf was recalcitrant to microbial (co)metabolism and no transformation was observed in incubations with ZVI, makinawite (FeS), sulfate green rust (GR(SO4)), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), and manganese oxide (MnO2). Sequential reductive defluorination of HFO-1234yf to 3,3,3-trifluoropropene and 3,3-dichloropropene with concomitant stoichiometric release of fluoride occurred in incubations with reduced cobalamins (e.g., vitamin B12) indicating that biomolecules can transform HFO-1234yf at circumneutral pH and at ambient temperature. Taken together, these findings suggest that HFO-1234yf recalcitrance in aquifers should be expected; however, HFO-1234yf is not inert and a biomolecule may mediate reductive transformation in low redox environments, albeit at low rates.

  11. [Evaluation of thermostable yellow fever vaccine from the Pasteur Institute on international travellers].

    PubMed

    Wolga, J; Rodhain, F; Hannoun, C; Dodin, A; Fritzell, B; Loucq, C; Stahl, J P; Mallaret, M R; Micoud, M

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the tolerance and efficacy of the new stabilized 17D yellow fever vaccine produced by Pasteur Vaccins, on 50 international travellers at the University Hospital of Grenoble (France), comparing it with the standard 17D yellow fever vaccine. The short-term and long-term tolerance in all the travellers was excellent. The serological efficacy was estimated by seroneutralization assay with the vaccine virus Rockefeller 17D, which is the most sensitive and the most specific method. The seroconversion rate was 93.8%, the same as the rate obtained with the standard yellow fever vaccine in 50 other travellers. The authors studied also the serological response to the standard yellow fever vaccine associated with other vaccines (diphtheria, tetanus, oral or injectable poliomyelitis, and oral cholera): the seroconversion rates were similar to those obtained with the yellow fever vaccine alone, thus demonstrating that these associated vaccines do not interfere with immunization against yellow fever.

  12. 17 CFR 270.17d-1 - Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans. 270.17d-1 Section 270.17d-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17d-1 Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit... effect any transaction in connection with, any joint enterprise or other joint arrangement or...

  13. 17 CFR 270.17d-1 - Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans. 270.17d-1 Section 270.17d-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17d-1 Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit... effect any transaction in connection with, any joint enterprise or other joint arrangement or...

  14. 17 CFR 270.17d-1 - Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans. 270.17d-1 Section 270.17d-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17d-1 Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit... effect any transaction in connection with, any joint enterprise or other joint arrangement or...

  15. 17 CFR 270.17d-1 - Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... enterprises or arrangements and certain profit-sharing plans. 270.17d-1 Section 270.17d-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17d-1 Applications regarding joint enterprises or arrangements and certain profit... effect any transaction in connection with, any joint enterprise or other joint arrangement or...

  16. 75 FR 18915 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    .... 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory duplication in these and other... paragraph (c) of Rule 17d-2, the Commission may declare such a plan effective if, after providing for...), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed 17d-2 Plan The proposed 17d-2 Plan is intended to...

  17. 75 FR 18920 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    .... 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory duplication in these and other... paragraph (c) of Rule 17d- 2, the Commission may declare such a plan effective if, after providing for...), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed 17d-2 Plan The proposed 17d-2 Plan is intended to...

  18. Aerodynamic and acoustic behavior of a YF-12 inlet at static conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Feltz, E. P.; Godby, L. A.; Miller, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    An aeroacoustic test program was performed with a YF-12 aircraft at ground static conditions. The objective was to collect acoustic and aerodynamic data that could determine the cause of YF-12 inlet noise suppression observed earlier. The results showed that the far-field noise level was lower with the YF-12 inlet than with a bellmouth inlet at engine speeds above 5500 rpm. The differences were about 5 PNdB to 11 PNdB, depending on YF-12 inlet configuration and on engine speed. Measurements showed that YF-12 inlet noise suppression was not caused by flow choking. The spike support struts were probably responsible, as in that region the spectral peak near the blade passing frequency disappeared between 6000 and 6600 rpm, and multiple pure tones were greatly reduced.

  19. Core noise measurements on a YF-102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A. M.; Penko, P. F.; Mcardle, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Core noise from a YF-102 high bypass ratio turbofan engine was investigated through the use of simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressures and far field noise. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the compressor exit, in the combustor, at the turbine exit, and in the core nozzle, were employed to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Spectra showed that the internal signals were free of tones, except at high frequency where machinery noise was present. Data obtained over a wide range of engine conditions suggest that below 60% of maximum fan speed the low frequency core noise contributes significantly to the far field noise.

  20. Additives and solvents-induced phase and morphology modification of NaYF4 for improving up-conversion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jianle; Yang, Xianfeng; Wang, Jing; Lei, Bingfu; Liu, Yingliang; Wu, Mingmei

    2016-01-01

    Both cubic and hexagonal NaYF4 were synthesized in different reaction systems via hydro/solvo-thermal route. The effects of reaction temperature, solvents, and additives on the synthesis of NaYF4 have been studied in detail. It has been shown that phase transformation from cubic NaYF4 to hexagonal NaYF4 always occurred. The sequence of the ability for inducing the phase transformation was ethanol>H2O>acetic acid. It is found that ethanol can not only facilitate the formation of hexagonal NaYF4 but also control the growth of the crystal. This is quite unusual for the growth of H-NaYF4. The up-conversion emission properties of Yb/Er co-doped NaYF4 have also been investigated and the results demonstrated some general principles for improving up-conversion emission.

  1. Description of a Prospective 17DD Yellow Fever Vaccine Cohort in Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; da Silva, Maria da Paz C.; Magalhães, Maria Cecília F.; Gonzales Gil, Laura Helena Vega; Freese de Carvalho, Eduardo M.; Braga-Neto, Ulisses M.; Bertani, Giovani Rota; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório

    2011-01-01

    From September 2005 to March 2007, 238 individuals being vaccinated for the first time with the yellow fever (YF) -17DD vaccine were enrolled in a cohort established in Recife, Brazil. A prospective study indicated that, after immunization, anti-YF immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-YF IgG were present in 70.6% (IgM) and 98.3% (IgG) of the vaccinated subjects. All vaccinees developed protective immunity, which was detected by the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) with a geometric mean titer of 892. Of the 238 individuals, 86.6% had IgG antibodies to dengue virus; however, the presence of anti-dengue IgG did not interfere significantly with the development of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies. In a separate retrospective study of individuals immunized with the 17DD vaccine, the PRNT values at 5 and 10 years post-vaccination remained positive but showed a significant decrease in neutralization titer (25% with PRNT titers < 100 after 5 years and 35% after 10 years). PMID:21976581

  2. Risk of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease among the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Ellen; Duclos, Philippe; Yactayo, Sergio; Schuster, Melanie

    2013-12-01

    Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) is a rare and serious adverse event of the yellow fever (YF) vaccine that mimics wild-type YF. Research shows there may be an increased risk of YEL-AVD among the elderly population (≥ 60-65 years old), however this research has yet to be accumulated and reviewed in order to make policy recommendations to countries currently administering the YF vaccine. This paper systematically reviewed all information available on YEL-AVD to determine if there is an increased risk among the elderly, for both travelers and endemic populations. Age-specific reporting rates (RRs) were re-calculated from the literature using the Brighton Collaboration case definition for YEL-AVD and were then analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the RRs of younger and older age groups. Two out of the five studies found a significantly higher rate of YEL-AVD among the elderly population. Our findings suggest unexposed elders may be at an increased risk of developing YEF-AVD, however the evidence remains limited. Therefore, our findings for YF vaccination of elderly populations support the recommendations made by the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) in their April 2013 meeting, mainly vaccination of the elderly should be based on a careful risk-benefit analysis.

  3. Risk of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease among the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Ellen; Duclos, Philippe; Yactayo, Sergio; Schuster, Melanie

    2013-12-01

    Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) is a rare and serious adverse event of the yellow fever (YF) vaccine that mimics wild-type YF. Research shows there may be an increased risk of YEL-AVD among the elderly population (≥ 60-65 years old), however this research has yet to be accumulated and reviewed in order to make policy recommendations to countries currently administering the YF vaccine. This paper systematically reviewed all information available on YEL-AVD to determine if there is an increased risk among the elderly, for both travelers and endemic populations. Age-specific reporting rates (RRs) were re-calculated from the literature using the Brighton Collaboration case definition for YEL-AVD and were then analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the RRs of younger and older age groups. Two out of the five studies found a significantly higher rate of YEL-AVD among the elderly population. Our findings suggest unexposed elders may be at an increased risk of developing YEF-AVD, however the evidence remains limited. Therefore, our findings for YF vaccination of elderly populations support the recommendations made by the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) in their April 2013 meeting, mainly vaccination of the elderly should be based on a careful risk-benefit analysis. PMID:24079979

  4. Tuning upconversion through a sensitizer/activator-isolated NaYF4 core/shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shuai; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Qu, Junle; Prasad, Paras N.

    2015-02-01

    The ability to tune the emission color of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) will greatly enhance the scope of their applications, ranging from infrared solar cells to volumetric multiplexed bioimaging. Conventional methods to tune upconversion are to vary the type and/or the concentration of doped rare-earth ions in these nanoparticle formulations. Here, we introduce a different approach to vary the emission colors of the frequently used sensitizer/activator pairs of Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Ho, Er, Tm) via utilization of a sensitizer/activator-isolated NaYF4 core-shell structure. We show that the typical green, yellow, and blue luminescent colors from Yb3+/Ho3+-, Yb3+/Er3+-, and Yb3+/Tm3+-co-doped NaYF4 UCNPs can be converted into the quasi-white, green, and pink blue, when corresponding core-shell structures of NaYF4:Yb3+ @NaYF4:Ho3+, NaYF4:Yb3+ @NaYF4:Er3+ and NaYF4:Yb3+ @NaYF4:Tm3+ are built. Time-resolved spectra indicate that decay lifetimes of the emission bands from the sensitizer/activator-isolated core-shell structure significantly vary from that of the sensitizer/activator-codoped NaYF4 UCNPs, verifying the strain-induced modulation of emission channels in the core-shell structure. These sensitizer-activator-isolated core-shell UCNPs have implications for a range of biophotonic or photonic applications.The ability to tune the emission color of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) will greatly enhance the scope of their applications, ranging from infrared solar cells to volumetric multiplexed bioimaging. Conventional methods to tune upconversion are to vary the type and/or the concentration of doped rare-earth ions in these nanoparticle formulations. Here, we introduce a different approach to vary the emission colors of the frequently used sensitizer/activator pairs of Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Ho, Er, Tm) via utilization of a sensitizer/activator-isolated NaYF4 core-shell structure. We show that the typical green, yellow, and blue luminescent colors from Yb3+/Ho3+-, Yb3+/Er

  5. Lanthanide-doped Sr2YF7 nanoparticles: controlled synthesis, optical spectroscopy and biodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuhan; Tu, Datao; Zheng, Wei; Liu, Yongsheng; Huang, Ping; Ma, En; Li, Renfu; Chen, Xueyuan

    2014-09-01

    Sr2YF7, as an important matrix for trivalent lanthanide (Ln3+) ions to fabricate upconversion (UC) or downshifting (DS) phosphors, has been rarely reported. Herein, monodisperse and size-controllable tetragonal-phase Ln3+-doped Sr2YF7 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a facile thermal decomposition method. Upon excitation at 980 nm, UC luminescence properties of Sr2YF7:Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln = Tm, Er) NPs were systematically surveyed. Particularly, after coating an inert Sr2YF7 shell, the UC luminescence intensities of Sr2YF7:Tm3+/Yb3+ and Sr2YF7:Er3+/Yb3+ NPs were enhanced by ~22 and 4 times, respectively. Furthermore, intense multicolor DS luminescence was also achieved in Ce3+/Tb3+ or Eu3+ doped Sr2YF7 NPs, with absolute quantum yields of 55.1% (Tb3+) and 11.2% (Eu3+). The luminescence lifetimes of 5D4 (Tb3+) and 5D0 (Eu3+) were determined to be 3.7 and 8.1 ms, respectively. By utilizing the long-lived luminescence of Ln3+ in these Sr2YF7 NPs, we demonstrated their application as sensitive heterogeneous time-resolved photoluminescence bioprobes to detect the protein of avidin and the tumor marker of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with their limits of detection down to 40.6 and 94.9 pM, and thus reveal the great potential of these Sr2YF7:Ln3+ nanoprobes in cancer diagnosis.Sr2YF7, as an important matrix for trivalent lanthanide (Ln3+) ions to fabricate upconversion (UC) or downshifting (DS) phosphors, has been rarely reported. Herein, monodisperse and size-controllable tetragonal-phase Ln3+-doped Sr2YF7 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a facile thermal decomposition method. Upon excitation at 980 nm, UC luminescence properties of Sr2YF7:Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln = Tm, Er) NPs were systematically surveyed. Particularly, after coating an inert Sr2YF7 shell, the UC luminescence intensities of Sr2YF7:Tm3+/Yb3+ and Sr2YF7:Er3+/Yb3+ NPs were enhanced by ~22 and 4 times, respectively. Furthermore, intense multicolor DS luminescence was also achieved in Ce3+/Tb3+ or Eu3

  6. Biotransformation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul; Bertermann, Ruediger; Rusch, Georg M.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is a non-ozone-depleting fluorocarbon replacement with a low global warming potential and is developed as refrigerant. Due to lethality observed after high concentration inhalation exposures of HFO-1234yf in a developmental toxicity study with rabbits, the biotransformation of HFO-1234yf was investigated in this species. Female New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to air containing 2000; 10,000; or 50,000 ppm (n = 3/concentration) HFO234yf. All inhalation exposures were conducted for 6 h in a dynamic exposure chamber. Animals were individually housed in metabolic cages after the end of the exposures and urines were collected at 12 h intervals for 60 h. For metabolite identification, urine samples were analyzed by {sup 1}H-coupled and {sup 1}H-decoupled {sup 19}F-NMR and by LC/MS-MS or GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts, signal multiplicity, {sup 1}H-{sup 19}F coupling constants and by comparison with synthetic reference compounds. In urine samples of rabbits exposed to 2000; 10,000; or 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf, the predominant metabolite was N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)-L-cysteine and accounted for app. 48% of total {sup 19}F-NMR signal intensities. S-(3,3,3-Trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)mercaptolactic acid, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane, 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanol and inorganic fluoride were also present as urinary metabolites. In incubations of rabbit liver S9 fractions containing glutathione, NADPH and HFO-1234yf, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane, S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)glutathione, 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanol and inorganic fluoride were identified as metabolites of HFO-1234yf by {sup 19}F-NMR. The quantity of recovered metabolites in urine suggest a low extent (< 0.1% of dose received) of biotransformation of HFO-1234yf in rabbits, and 95% of all metabolites were excreted within 12 h after the end of the exposures (t{sub 1/2} app. 9.5 h). The obtained

  7. YF-12 Lockalloy ventral fin program, volume 1. [design analysis, fabrication, and manufacturing of aircraft structures using aluminum and beryllium alloys for the lockheed YF-12 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, R. J.; Haramis, A. C.; Marks, R. F.; Payne, L.; Sessing, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of the YF-12 Lockalloy Ventral Fin Program which was carried out by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation - Advanced Development Projects for the joint NASA/USAF YF-12 Project. The primary purpose of the program was to redesign and fabricate the ventral fin of the YF-12 research airplane (to reduce flutter) using Lockalloy, and alloy of beryllium and aluminum, as a major structural material. A secondary purpose, was to make a material characterization study (thermodynamic properties, corrosion; fatigue tests, mechanical properties) of Lockalloy to validate the design of the ventral fin and expand the existing data base on this material. All significant information pertinent to the design and fabrication of the ventral fin is covered. Emphasis throughout is given to Lockalloy fabrication and machining techniques and attendant personnel safety precautions. Costs are also examined. Photographs of tested alloy specimens are shown along with the test equipment used.

  8. Safety assessment and probiotic evaluation of Enterococcus faecium YF5 isolated from sourdough.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qianglai; Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Peng, Shanshan; Dong, Suqin; Wang, Baogui; Li, Ping; Chen, Tingtao; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2013-04-01

    Enterococcus faecium YF5, a strain previously isolated from sourdough, was assessed for safety and probiotic potential. Its virulence and antibiotic resistant phenotypes (cytolysin and gelatinase production, antibiotic susceptibility) and genes (cylA, gelE, ace, agg, esp, and vanA) were surveyed. Results indicated that the tested virulence determinants were nontoxic. In addition, E. faecium YF5 was sensitive to 3 antibiotics such as amoxicillin, vancomycin, and chloramphenicol. Furthermore, results of in vivo animal acute oral toxicity of E. faecium YF5 studies were similar to the control group that indicated no abnormalities. In addition, E. faecium YF5 stably survived in low pH, bile salts, gastric, and intestinal fluids in vitro. Moreover, E. faecium YF5 was found to adhere to human colon cancer cell line HT-29 at 3.39 (±0.67) × 10(5) CFU/mL. When cocultured with pathogenic organisms (Enterobacter sakazakii CMCC45402, Escherichia coli CMCC44102, enterohemorrhage Escherichia coli O157: H7 CMCC44828, Salmonella Typhimurium CMCC50071, Shigella flexneri 301, and Shigella sonnei ATCC 29930) and 2 gram-positive strains (Listeria monocytogenes CMCC54001 and Staphylococcus aureus CMCC 26003), it inhibited these foodborne pathogens with exception of S. aureus. Therefore, E. faecium YF5 can be regarded as a safe strain and it may be used as a probiotic preparation or for microecologics. PMID:23488799

  9. Drosulfakinin activates CCKLR-17D1 and promotes larval locomotion and escape response in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Peterson, Jonathan; Nachman, Ronald J.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are ubiquitous in both mammals and invertebrates and play essential roles in regulation and modulation of many developmental and physiological processes through activation of G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCRs). However, the mechanisms by which many of the neuropeptides regulate specific neural function and behaviors remain undefined. Here we investigate the functions of Drosulfakinin (DSK), the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK), which is the most abundant neuropeptide in the central nervous system. We provide biochemical evidence that sulfated DSK-1 and DSK-2 activate the CCKLR-17D1 receptor in a cell culture assay. We further examine the role of DSK and CCKLR-17D1 in the regulation of larval locomotion, both in a semi-intact larval preparation and in intact larvae under intense light exposure. Our results suggest that DSK/CCKLR-17D1 signaling promote larval body wall muscle contraction and is necessary for mediating locomotor behavior in stress-induced escape response. PMID:22885328

  10. 75 FR 28078 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... COMMISSION Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and Declaring Effective a Plan for the Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Between the Financial Industry... allocation of regulatory responsibilities, dated March 31, 2010 (``17d- 2 Plan'' or the ``Plan''). The...

  11. 75 FR 28080 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... COMMISSION Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and Declaring Effective a Plan for the Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Between the Financial Industry... allocation of regulatory responsibilities, dated March 31, 2010 (``17d- 2 Plan'' or the ``Plan''). The...

  12. 78 FR 46656 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory.... 12935 (October 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed Plan The proposed 17d-2 Plan is... Authority, Inc. and Topaz Exchange, LLC July 26, 2013. Pursuant to Section 17(d) of the Securities...

  13. 75 FR 49005 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... an Amended 17d-2 Plan Between the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. and the Chicago Stock... Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (``FINRA'') and the Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc. (``CHX'') (together... 240.17d-2, respectively. \\8\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41...

  14. YF-12A #935 with test pilot Donald L. Mallick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    NASA test pilot Don Mallick, in full pressure suit, stands in front of the YF-12A (60-6935). Don is ready for a flight across the Western United States. Donald L. Mallick joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Langley Aeronautical Laboratory at Hampton, Virginia, as a research pilot, in June 1957. He transferred to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in February 1963. Mallick attended Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, for the period 1948-1949, studying Mechanical Engineering before entering the U.S. Navy for pilot training. Don served during the Korean War period, 1950-1954, flying F2H-2 Banshee jets from the carriers, USS F.D. Roosevelt and the USS Wasp. Later in 1954 he returned to school at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, graduating with Honors in June 1957 and earning his degree in aeronautical engineering. Don joined the Naval Reserves and served in almost all categories of Reserve operations before retiring in 1970 as a Lieutenant Commander. As a research pilot at NACA-NASA Langley Don flew quantitative stability-&-control and handling-qualities tests on modified helicopters. On the Vertol VZ-2 Vertical Short Take-off and Landing research aircraft, he performed qualitative evaluation flights. Other aircraft flown for flight tests were: F2H-1 Banshee, F-86D, F9F-2 and F8U-3, F11F-1 Tigercat, and F-100C. Don also flew support and photo flights. In his capacity as research pilot at the NASA Flight Research Center Don was assigned to NASA's Lockheed Jetstar General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS). He flew all of the tests, with the majority being as project pilot. Mallick made a flight in the lightweight M2-F1 lifting body on January 30, 1964. In 1964, Don was assigned to and completed the USAF Test pilot school, Class 64A. Later in 1964, he flew as the co-project pilot on the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) making over seventy

  15. Formalin-inactivated whole virus and recombinant subunit flavivirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Eckels, Kenneth H; Putnak, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of arthropod-borne, enveloped, RNA viruses that contain important human pathogens such as yellow fever (YF), Japanese encephalitis (JE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), West Nile (WN), and the dengue (DEN) viruses. Vaccination is the most effective means of disease prevention for these viral infections. A live-attenuated vaccine for YF, and inactivated vaccines for JE and TBE have significantly reduced the incidence of disease for these viruses, while licensed vaccines for DEN and WN are still lacking despite a significant disease burden associated with these infections. This review focuses on inactivated and recombinant subunit vaccines (non-replicating protein vaccines) in various stages of laboratory development and human testing. A purified, inactivated vaccine (PIV) candidate for DEN will soon be evaluated in a phase 1 clinical trial, and a second-generation JE PIV produced using similar technology has advanced to phase 2/3 trials. The inactivated TBE vaccine used successfully in Europe for almost 30 years continues to be improved by additional purification, new stabilizers, an adjuvant, and better immunization schedules. The recent development of an inactivated WN vaccine for domestic animals demonstrates the possibility of producing a similar vaccine for human use. Advances in flavivirus gene expression technology have led to the production of several recombinant subunit antigen vaccine candidates in a variety of expression systems. Some of these vaccines have shown sufficient promise in animal models to be considered as candidates for evaluation in clinical trials. Feasibility of non-replicating flavivirus vaccines has been clearly demonstrated and further development is now warranted. PMID:14714438

  16. Controllable Phase Transformation and Mid-infrared Emission from Er3+-Doped Hexagonal-/Cubic-NaYF4 Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dandan; Chen, Dongdan; He, Huilin; Pan, Qiwen; Xiao, Quanlan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-07-01

    The morphology of hexagonal phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal method changed greatly after a continuing calcination, along with a phase transformation to cubic phase. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that mid-infrared (MIR) emission was obtained in both hexagonal and cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals for the first time. And the MIR emission of NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals enhanced remarkably at higher calcination temperature. To prevent uncontrollable morphology from phase transformation, the cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanospheres with an average size of ~100 nm were prepared via a co-precipitation method directly. In contrast, the results showed better morphology and size of cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals have realized when calcined at different temperatures. And PL spectra demonstrated a more intense MIR emission in the cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals with an increasing temperature. Besides, the MIR emission peak of Er3+ ions had an obvious splitting in cubic phase NaYF4. Therefore, cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanospheres with more excellent MIR luminescent properties seems to provide a new material for nanocrystal-glass composites, which is expected to open a broad new field for the realization of MIR lasers gain medium.

  17. Controllable Phase Transformation and Mid-infrared Emission from Er3+-Doped Hexagonal-/Cubic-NaYF4 Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dandan; Chen, Dongdan; He, Huilin; Pan, Qiwen; Xiao, Quanlan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of hexagonal phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal method changed greatly after a continuing calcination, along with a phase transformation to cubic phase. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that mid-infrared (MIR) emission was obtained in both hexagonal and cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals for the first time. And the MIR emission of NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals enhanced remarkably at higher calcination temperature. To prevent uncontrollable morphology from phase transformation, the cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanospheres with an average size of ~100 nm were prepared via a co-precipitation method directly. In contrast, the results showed better morphology and size of cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals have realized when calcined at different temperatures. And PL spectra demonstrated a more intense MIR emission in the cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals with an increasing temperature. Besides, the MIR emission peak of Er3+ ions had an obvious splitting in cubic phase NaYF4. Therefore, cubic phase NaYF4:Er3+ nanospheres with more excellent MIR luminescent properties seems to provide a new material for nanocrystal-glass composites, which is expected to open a broad new field for the realization of MIR lasers gain medium. PMID:27453150

  18. Controllable Phase Transformation and Mid-infrared Emission from Er(3+)-Doped Hexagonal-/Cubic-NaYF4 Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dandan; Chen, Dongdan; He, Huilin; Pan, Qiwen; Xiao, Quanlan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of hexagonal phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal method changed greatly after a continuing calcination, along with a phase transformation to cubic phase. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that mid-infrared (MIR) emission was obtained in both hexagonal and cubic phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanocrystals for the first time. And the MIR emission of NaYF4:Er(3+) nanocrystals enhanced remarkably at higher calcination temperature. To prevent uncontrollable morphology from phase transformation, the cubic phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanospheres with an average size of ~100 nm were prepared via a co-precipitation method directly. In contrast, the results showed better morphology and size of cubic phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanocrystals have realized when calcined at different temperatures. And PL spectra demonstrated a more intense MIR emission in the cubic phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanocrystals with an increasing temperature. Besides, the MIR emission peak of Er(3+) ions had an obvious splitting in cubic phase NaYF4. Therefore, cubic phase NaYF4:Er(3+) nanospheres with more excellent MIR luminescent properties seems to provide a new material for nanocrystal-glass composites, which is expected to open a broad new field for the realization of MIR lasers gain medium. PMID:27453150

  19. Aerodynamic and acoustic behavior of a YF-12 inlet at static conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Feltz, E. P.; Godby, L. A.; Miller, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    An aeroacoustic test program to determine the cause of YF-12 inlet noise suppression was performed with a YF-12 aircraft at ground static conditions. Data obtained over a wide range of engine speeds and inlet configurations are reported. Acoustic measurements were made in the far field and aerodynamic and acoustic measurements were made inside the inlet. The J-58 test engine was removed from the aircraft and tested separately with a bellmouth inlet. The far field noise level was significantly lower for the YF-12 inlet than for the bellmouth inlet at engine speeds above 5500 rpm. There was no evidence that noise suppression was caused by flow choking. Multiple pure tones were reduced and the spectral peak near the blade passing frequency disappeared in the region of the spike support struts at engine speeds between 6000 and 6600 rpm.

  20. PHOTONIC CRYSTAL SURFACE ENHANCED UPCONVERSION EMISSION OF YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ NANOPARTICLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Li, Jun; Liao, Jiayan; Lai, Shenfeng; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng

    2015-11-01

    The opal photonic crystals made of polystyrene microspheres with 155, 230, 270 or 410 nm in diameter were used to enhance upconversion (UC) emission of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles, respectively. The red or green UC emission of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles can be selectively enhanced when the red or green UC emission wavelength overlapped with the photonic bandgaps of opals, which is attributed to Bragg reflection of photonic bandgap. In addition, when the 980 nm excitation light wavelength was in the region of the photonic bandgap, red and green UC emissions of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles were enhanced due to the enhancement of excitation field.

  1. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; ...

  2. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Meertens, Laurent; Chazal, Maxime; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Zamborlini, Alessia; Despres, Philippe; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E) protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation. PMID:26861019

  3. Characterization of competing distortions in YF e2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, J.; Lafuerza, S.; García, J.; Subías, G.; Cuartero, V.; García-Muñoz, J. L.; Popescu, C.; Peral, I.

    2016-05-01

    We report the structural changes of three YF e2O4 -δ (δ <0.1 ) specimens using high resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction between 80 and 300 K. All samples adopt a rhombohedral cell at room temperature (space group R 3 ¯m ). This cell becomes unstable for the three samples on cooling, and the oxygen-poor specimen (δ ˜0.1 ) shows a single transition at 240 K. The nearly stoichiometric (δ ≤0.03 ) compounds exhibit two structural transitions with decreasing temperature at about 240 and 200 K. Each transition is revealed by an anomaly in the heat capacity measurements and a jump in the electric resistivity. Below 240 K, a strong splitting of some diffraction peaks is accompanied by the occurrence of superstructure peaks that follow the propagation vector k =(1 /7 ,-2 /7 ,9 /7 ) . The cell symmetry is then triclinic, and the structural transition is characterized by an expansion of the c axis coupled to a contraction of the other two lattice parameters. There are 49 nonequivalent sites for Fe atoms with a maximum charge disproportionation of ˜0.5 e- . Upon cooling at 200 K, the previous superstructure peaks begin to vanish, and finally they are replaced by a new set of superstructure peaks following the propagation vector k =(1 /4 ,1 /2 ,1 /4 ) with respect to the rhombohedral cell. The transition is also reflected in sudden changes in the lattice parameters that seem to smooth the changes observed in the previous transition. The new cell is also triclinic, and there are 48 nonequivalent Fe sites with a maximum charge disproportionation of ˜0.7 e- . Both phases coexist in a wide temperature range because this second transition is not completed at 80 K. A symmetry mode analysis indicates a complicated pattern for the charge distribution in the Fe sublattice of both distorted structures but clearly discard any bimodal distribution of only two types of Fe cations. Therefore, the sharp jumps in the electric resistivity at the phase transitions are

  4. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Emission Properties of NaYF4:Er3+/Yb3+ Upconversion Nanoluminophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Lam Thi Kieu; Marciniak, Lukasz; Hreniak, Dariusz; Anh, Tran Kim; Minh, Le Quoc

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new method to prepare Er3+/Yb3+-codoped β-NaYF4 upconversion nanoluminophores, allowing creation of single-crystalline-phase β-NaYF4: Er3+/Yb3+ with concentrations up to 20 mol.% through a hydrothermal process. Using hexagonal-phase Y(OH)3 precursors with different nanostructures (nanosheets, nanorods, nanotubes, etc.), one can obtain many types of one-dimensional nano-NaYF4:Er3+/Yb3+ materials and significantly improve the multiphase phenomenon, which is a common challenge facing many research groups that use a hydrothermal process for synthesis of NaYF4 compounds. Upon near-infrared laser excitation at 976 nm, the obtained β-NaYF4:Er3+/Yb3+ nanorods emit in green (2H11/2, 4S3/2 → 4I15/2) and red (4F9/2 → 4I15/2) spectral regions with high intensity. Moreover, it is shown that one can change the luminescence integrated intensity ratio between the red and green emissions by varying the concentration and components of Er3+ and Yb3+ in the NaYF4 host material. Comparative studies on the luminescence kinetics of the NaYF4:Er3+/Yb3+ nanoluminophores were also conducted to explain the influence of Yb3+ ion on the upconversion processes.

  5. Uniform NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Tm hexagonal submicroplates: Controlled synthesis and enhanced UV and blue upconversion luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjuan; Ding, Mingye; Huang, Hengming; Jiang, Chenfei; Song, Yan; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► β-NaYF{sub 4} phosphors as an excellent upconversion materials. ► Oleic acid can promote the transformation of α → β phase NaYF{sub 4}. ► The shape and size of β-NaYF{sub 4} submicroplate can be tuned by reactant concentration. ► Enhanced UV and blue peaks can be obtained by varying Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} concentration. -- Abstract: We reported the preparation of cubic (α-) and hexagonal (β-) NaYF{sub 4} particles in high boiling organic solvents 1-octadecene (ODE) and oleic acid (OA), through a thermal decomposition synthesis route. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectra. By tuning the OA/ODE volume ratio and reactant concentration, we could manipulate the morphology, size, and crystal structure of the products. Highly uniform β-NaYF{sub 4} submicroplates were obtained from α-NaYF{sub 4} nanoparticles by increasing the OA/ODE volume ratio, while the phase kept unchanged with the increasing of reactant concentration. Upconversion emissions from UV to NIR emissions were observed in β-NaYF{sub 4} hexagonal submicroplates under 980 nm laser diode excitation. In addition, the enhanced UV and blue upconversion emissions were obtained by varying Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ion concentration.

  6. Active controls for flutter suppression and gust alleviation in supersonic aircraft. [YF-17 flutter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of work done on active controls on the modified YF-17 flutter model are summarized. The basic derivation of a suitable control law is discussed. It is shown that discrepencies found between analysis and wind tunnel tests originate from the lack of proper implementation of the desired control law. Program capabilities are described.

  7. Long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8+ T cells with a naïve-like profile upon yellow fever vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Cagnon, Laurène; Gannon, Philippe O; Allard, Mathilde; Abed Maillard, Samia; Montandon, Nicole; Rufer, Nathalie; Waldvogel, Sophie; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-04-01

    Efficient and persisting immune memory is essential for long-term protection from infectious and malignant diseases. The yellow fever (YF) vaccine is a live attenuated virus that mediates lifelong protection, with recent studies showing that the CD8(+) T cell response is particularly robust. Yet, limited data exist regarding the long-term CD8(+) T cell response, with no studies beyond 5 years after vaccination. We investigated 41 vaccinees, spanning 0.27 to 35 years after vaccination. YF-specific CD8(+) T cells were readily detected in almost all donors (38 of 41), with frequencies decreasing with time. As previously described, effector cells dominated the response early after vaccination. We detected a population of naïve-like YF-specific CD8(+) T cells that was stably maintained for more than 25 years and was capable of self-renewal ex vivo. In-depth analyses of markers and genome-wide mRNA profiling showed that naïve-like YF-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccinees (i) were distinct from genuine naïve cells in unvaccinated donors, (ii) resembled the recently described stem cell-like memory subset (Tscm), and (iii) among all differentiated subsets, had profiles closest to naïve cells. Our findings reveal that CD8(+) Tscm are efficiently induced by a vaccine in humans, persist for decades, and preserve a naïveness-like profile. These data support YF vaccination as an optimal mechanistic model for the study of long-lasting memory CD8(+) T cells in humans.

  8. Energy transfer processes between Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) in LiYF4. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezen, Goenuel

    1991-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the crystal LiYF4 doped with Thulium (Tm) and Holmium (Ho) ions are studied. The basic processes are discussed that regulate the transfer of energy between these two ions in this crystal. In this system Tm is considered the donor ion and the Ho the acceptor ion. Spectral data were obtained on three samples available: LiYF4:Tm(3+) (0.5 percent), LiYF4:Ho(3+) (1 percent), and LiYF4:Tm(3+) (5 percent), Ho(3+) (0.2 percent). Spectral data, which include absorption, luminescence, excitation, and the response to pulsed excitation in a wide range of temperatures, allowed to look at the energy transfer processes by considering the kinetic evolution of the emission of the two ions (donor and acceptor) involved in the process and the basic spectroscopic properties related to them. This inclusive approach has led to the validation of the physical model.

  9. Sequential growth of sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell-shell nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huang-Yong; Ding, Bin-Bin; Ma, Yin-Chu; Sun, Shi-Qi; Tao, Wei; Guo, Yan-Chuan; Guo, Hui-Chen; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Qian, Hai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Upconversion (UC) nanostructures have attracted much interest for their extensive biological applications. In this work, we describe a sequential synthetic route to prepare sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell upconversion nanoparticles. The as-prepared products were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, JEM 2100F), respectively. The as-prepared core-shell nanoparticles of NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb are composed of elliptical nanoparticles with a length of 80 nm and width of 42 nm, which show efficient upconversion fluorescence excited at 808 nm indicating the formation of core-shell-shell sandwiched nanostructures. In addition, the as-prepared sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell upconversion nanoparticles also show strong upconversion fluorescence excited at 980 nm. Amphiphilic mPEG2k-b-PEBEP6K copolymers (denoted as PPE) were chosen to transfer these hydrophobic UCNPs into the aqueous phase for biological application. In vitro photodynamic therapy of cancer cells show that the viability of cells incubated with the nanoparticles loaded with MC 540 was significantly lower as compared to the nanoparticles without photosensitizers exposed to NIR laser.

  10. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  11. The synthesis and mechanism exploration of europium-doped LiYF4 micro-octahedron phosphors with multilevel interiors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Minqiang; Ding, Jijun; Deng, Jianping; Ran, Chenxin; Yang, Zhi

    2014-04-14

    Multi-layered hollow LiYF4:Eu(3+) micro-octahedrons, with about 400 nm of single-layer thickness and 300 nm of interlayer space, have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route in the presence of surfactant ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The mechanisms of the morphology evolution of the LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons are investigated in detail. Time-dependent experiments indicate that the growth of the micro-octahedrons undergoes four different stages including the aggregation growth of the primary YF3 particle, the transformation of the substance from the orthorhombic-phase YF3 to the tetragonal-phase LiYF4 by the Kirkendall effect with the inward diffusion of quasi-steady state LiF species, adsorption and in situ crystallization, and local Ostwald ripening. The Ostwald ripening process is terminated by the organic adsorption of interlaminar leading to a hollow structure with multilevel interiors. The LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons are annealed under the designed temperatures, which leads to the collapse of octahedral structures indicating the role of EDTA on building the octahedron. The spectral measurements show that the calcination approach has a stronger effect on the luminescence tuning of the LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons due to the modification of the crystal phase, structure and size. The present study is of great importance in the preparation of rare-earth ion doped LiYF4 hollow materials as well as in applications as building blocks for functional devices. PMID:24522524

  12. The synthesis and mechanism exploration of europium-doped LiYF4 micro-octahedron phosphors with multilevel interiors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Minqiang; Ding, Jijun; Deng, Jianping; Ran, Chenxin; Yang, Zhi

    2014-04-14

    Multi-layered hollow LiYF4:Eu(3+) micro-octahedrons, with about 400 nm of single-layer thickness and 300 nm of interlayer space, have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route in the presence of surfactant ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The mechanisms of the morphology evolution of the LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons are investigated in detail. Time-dependent experiments indicate that the growth of the micro-octahedrons undergoes four different stages including the aggregation growth of the primary YF3 particle, the transformation of the substance from the orthorhombic-phase YF3 to the tetragonal-phase LiYF4 by the Kirkendall effect with the inward diffusion of quasi-steady state LiF species, adsorption and in situ crystallization, and local Ostwald ripening. The Ostwald ripening process is terminated by the organic adsorption of interlaminar leading to a hollow structure with multilevel interiors. The LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons are annealed under the designed temperatures, which leads to the collapse of octahedral structures indicating the role of EDTA on building the octahedron. The spectral measurements show that the calcination approach has a stronger effect on the luminescence tuning of the LiYF4:Eu micro-octahedrons due to the modification of the crystal phase, structure and size. The present study is of great importance in the preparation of rare-earth ion doped LiYF4 hollow materials as well as in applications as building blocks for functional devices.

  13. Future emissions and atmospheric fate of HFC-1234yf from mobile air conditioners in Europe.

    PubMed

    Henne, Stephan; Shallcross, Dudley E; Reimann, Stefan; Xiao, Ping; Brunner, Dominik; O'Doherty, Simon; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene) is under discussion for replacing HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) as a cooling agent in mobile air conditioners (MACs) in the European vehicle fleet. Some HFC-1234yf will be released into the atmosphere, where it is almost completely transformed to the persistent trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Future emissions of HFC-1234yf after a complete conversion of the European vehicle fleet were assessed. Taking current day leakage rates and predicted vehicle numbers for the year 2020 into account, European total HFC-1234yf emissions from MACs were predicted to range between 11.0 and 19.2 Gg yr(-1). Resulting TFA deposition rates and rainwater concentrations over Europe were assessed with two Lagrangian chemistry transport models. Mean European summer-time TFA mixing ratios of about 0.15 ppt (high emission scenario) will surpass previously measured levels in background air in Germany and Switzerland by more than a factor of 10. Mean deposition rates (wet + dry) of TFA were estimated to be 0.65-0.76 kg km(-2) yr(-1), with a maxium of ∼2.0 kg km(-2) yr(-1) occurring in Northern Italy. About 30-40% of the European HFC-1234yf emissions were deposited as TFA within Europe, while the remaining fraction was exported toward the Atlantic Ocean, Central Asia, Northern, and Tropical Africa. Largest annual mean TFA concentrations in rainwater were simulated over the Mediterranean and Northern Africa, reaching up to 2500 ng L(-1), while maxima over the continent of about 2000 ng L(-1) occurred in the Czech Republic and Southern Germany. These highest annual mean concentrations are at least 60 times lower than previously determined to be a safe level for the most sensitive aquatic life-forms. Rainwater concentrations during individual rain events would still be 1 order of magnitude lower than the no effect level. To verify these results future occasional sampling of TFA in the atmospheric environment should be considered. If future HFC-1234yf

  14. Synthesis of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 nanoparticles coated with PAM by in-situ polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nanting; Zhou, Xingping; Li, Xie; Wang, Xiaqin

    2013-03-01

    Rare earth co-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which can convert a radiation from a longer wavelength to a shorter wavelength, have great potential uses in bio-labeling and imaging. In this work, NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs were coated with poly(acrylic amide) (PAM) by in situ polymerization for the first time. The resulting UCNPs and the PAM coated nanocomposites were characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Effects of reaction temperature, acrylic amide content, and the reaction time on the formed nanocomposites were investigated. The XRD result indicated that the as-prepared UCNPs exhibited a pure hexagonal phase. TEM results displayed that well-dispersed UCNPs having an obvious core-shell structure and a mean size of 110 nm were obtained at 0 °C with 14.0 wt% acrylic amide content (the content percentage in the whole reaction system) within 250 min. Meanwhile, the FT-IR spectra and TGA curves revealed that these NPs were coated successfully with PAM and had a high UC luminescent intensity as from the PL spectra. In addition, the settlement tests revealed that PAM-coated NaYF4 nanocomposites had more favorable dispersion stability than uncoated UCNPs in a distilled water system. These nanocomposites with excellent water-solubility and amino-functionalization could be used for biological detection and bio-imaging.

  15. 75 FR 18925 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Securities Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory... 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976) (``Rule 17d-2 Adopting Release''). ] II. Proposed Plan On... Securities Exchange Act Release No. 60598 (September 1, 2009), 74 FR 46280 (September 8, 2009)....

  16. 75 FR 57998 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory duplication in these and... 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed Plan The proposed 17d-2 Plan is intended to..., 2008), 73 FR 48247 (August 18, 2008) (File No. 4-566) (notice of filing of proposed plan). See...

  17. 75 FR 64765 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... 240.17d-2. \\3\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 62935 (September 17, 2010), 75 FR 57998. I... Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory... Release No. 12935 (October 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed Plan The proposed...

  18. 75 FR 76758 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Order Approving and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... CBOE. \\2\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 63230 (November 2, 2010), 75 FR 68632. I... 240.17d-2, respectively. \\8\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR.... \\9\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 12935 (October 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8,...

  19. 75 FR 68632 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41 FR 18808 (May 7, 1976). To address regulatory duplication in these and... 28, 1976), 41 FR 49091 (November 8, 1976). II. Proposed Plan The proposed 17d-2 Plan is intended to... (August 13, 2008), 73 FR 48247 (August 18, 2008) (File No. 4-566) (notice of filing of proposed plan)....

  20. 76 FR 79714 - Program for Allocation of Regulatory Responsibilities Pursuant to Rule 17d-2; Notice of Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... pattern of multiple examinations of broker-dealers that maintain memberships in more than one SRO... the Act \\6\\ was intended, in part, to eliminate unnecessary multiple examinations and regulatory... 240.17d-2, respectively. \\9\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 12352 (April 20, 1976), 41...

  1. 17 CFR 270.17d-3 - Exemption relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR 270.17d-1), to the extent necessary to permit any such person or principal underwriter to enter... joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of a registered open-end... relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of...

  2. 17 CFR 270.17d-3 - Exemption relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 270.17d-1), to the extent necessary to permit any such person or principal underwriter to enter... joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of a registered open-end... relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of...

  3. 17 CFR 270.17d-3 - Exemption relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 270.17d-1), to the extent necessary to permit any such person or principal underwriter to enter... joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of a registered open-end... relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of...

  4. 17 CFR 270.17d-3 - Exemption relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR 270.17d-1), to the extent necessary to permit any such person or principal underwriter to enter... joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of a registered open-end... relating to certain joint enterprises or arrangements concerning payment for distribution of shares of...

  5. Mathematical study of the thermoluminescence process in K2YF5:Tb(3+).

    PubMed

    Kadari, Ahmed; Mostefa, Rabah; Marcazzó, Julián; Kadri, Dahane

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of studying the simulated thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with trivalent optically active Tb(3+) ions (K2YF5:Tb(3+)). Samples have been irradiated with different doses (0.24, 2.4 and 24 Gy) of beta particles. Four trapping states and one kind of recombination-centre model have been used in this simulation. The activation energy and order of kinetics are determined using the general-order kinetic model. The results obtained using the authors' proposed models were tested and compared with the experimental glow curve of K2YF5:Tb(3+). The comparison has shown that the proposed model can predict more accurately and easily the behaviour of the TL glow curve at three different doses. PMID:25543131

  6. Radiation-induced defects in Pr3+-activated LiYF4 laser host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhoble, S. J.; Deshpande, S. P.; Pode, R. B.; Dhoble, N. S.; Gundurao, T. K.

    2004-11-01

    Rare earth doped fluorides have been used in laser applications. Not much is known about the effect of ionizing radiation on the lasing and other properties of fluorides. Therefore, in recent years much attention has been paid to the study of radiation-induced defects in laser materials, as they affect the optical and stimulated emission properties. The defect formation by gamma-ray irradiation in Pr3+ activated LiYF4, powder prepared by melt method, have been studied by thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance techniques and are reported in this paper. It is shown that LiYF4:Pr3+ is sensitive to gamma-ray radiation. Characterization of this laser material using ESR and photoluminescence techniques is also described.

  7. Biotransformation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf)

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul; Bertermann, Ruediger; Snow, Timothy A.; Han Xing; Rusch, George M.; Jepson, Gary W.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is a non-ozone-depleting fluorocarbon replacement with a low global warming potential which has been developed as refrigerant. The biotransformation of HFO-1234yf was investigated after inhalation exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to air containing 2000, 10,000, or 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf for 6 h and male B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf for 3.5 h in a dynamic exposure chamber (n = 5/concentration). After the end of the exposure, animals were individually housed in metabolic cages and urines were collected at 6 or 12-hour intervals for 48 h. For metabolite identification, urine samples were analyzed by {sup 1}H-coupled and decoupled {sup 19}F-NMR and by LC/MS-MS or GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts, signal multiplicity, {sup 1}H-{sup 19}F coupling constants and by comparison with synthetic reference compounds. In all urine samples, the predominant metabolites were two diastereomers of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine. In {sup 19}F-NMR, the signal intensity of these metabolites represented more than 85% (50,000 ppm) of total {sup 19}F related signals in the urine samples. Trifluoroacetic acid, 3,3,3-trifluorolactic acid, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1-hydroxyacetone, 3,3,3-trifluoroacetone and 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane were present as minor metabolites. Quantification of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine by LC/MS-MS showed that most of this metabolite (90%) was excreted within 18 h after the end of exposure (t{sub 1/2} app. 6 h). In rats, the recovery of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine excreted within 48 h in urine was determined as 0.30 {+-} 0.03, 0.63 {+-} 0.16, and 2.43 {+-} 0.86 {mu}mol at 2000, 10,000 and 50,000 ppm, respectively suggesting only a low extent (<< 1% of dose received) of biotransformation of HFO-1234yf. In mice, the recovery of this metabolite was 1.774 {+-} 0.4 {mu

  8. Flight and analytical investigations of a structural mode excitation system on the YF-12A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Murphy, R. C.; Beranek, J. A.; Davis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural excitation system, using an oscillating canard vane to generate force, was mounted on the forebody of the YF-12A airplane. The canard vane was used to excite the airframe structural modes during flight in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. Structural modal responses generated by the canard vane forces were measured at the flight test conditions by airframe-mounted accelerometers. Correlations of analytical and experimental aeroelastic results were made. Doublet lattice, steady state double lattice with uniform lag, Mach box, and piston theory all produced acceptable analytical aerodynamic results within the restrictions that apply to each. In general, the aerodynamic theory methods, carefully applied, were found to predict the dynamic behavior of the YF-12A aircraft adequately.

  9. Results of NASTRAN modal analyses and ground vibration tests on the YF-12A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, E. E.; Curtis, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The YF-12A aircraft, a delta-winged vehicle powered by two jet engines, was utilized in an investigation of the structural dynamic characteristics of a large, flexible, supersonic research vehicle. A large NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element model was used to compute the ten lowest frequency symmetric and ten lowest frequency antisymmetric modes for the YF-12A aircraft. The results of the analysis were compared with experimental data obtained in a ground vibration test conducted with the completed aircraft. It was found that the finite-element structural model employed provides an adequate prediction of the dynamic behavior of the aircraft structure in the case of basic wing and body modes.

  10. Mathematical study of the thermoluminescence process in K2YF5:Tb(3+).

    PubMed

    Kadari, Ahmed; Mostefa, Rabah; Marcazzó, Julián; Kadri, Dahane

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of studying the simulated thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with trivalent optically active Tb(3+) ions (K2YF5:Tb(3+)). Samples have been irradiated with different doses (0.24, 2.4 and 24 Gy) of beta particles. Four trapping states and one kind of recombination-centre model have been used in this simulation. The activation energy and order of kinetics are determined using the general-order kinetic model. The results obtained using the authors' proposed models were tested and compared with the experimental glow curve of K2YF5:Tb(3+). The comparison has shown that the proposed model can predict more accurately and easily the behaviour of the TL glow curve at three different doses.

  11. A Strategy to enhance Eu3+ emission from LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors and green-to-orange multicolor tunable, transparent nanophosphor-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Yu-Ho; Jang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-01

    LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors with a single tetragonal phase are synthesized, and various strategies to enhance the Eu3+ emission from the nanophosphors are investigated. The optimized Eu3+ concentration is 35 mol%, and the red emission peaks due to the 5D0 -->7FJ (J = 1 and 2) transitions of Eu3+ ions are further enhanced by energy transfer from a sensitizer pair of Ce3+ and Tb3+. The triple doping of Ce, Tb, and Eu into the LiYF4 host more effectively enhances the Eu3+ emission than the core/shell strategies of LiYF4:Eu(35%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%) and LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%)/LiYF4:Eu(35%) architectures. Efficient energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu3+ through Tb3+ results in three times higher Eu3+ emission intensity from LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%), Eu(1%) nanophosphors compared with LiYF4:Eu(35%), which contains the optimized Eu3+ concentration. Owing to the energy transfer of Ce3+ --> Tb3+ and Ce3+ --> Tb3+ --> Eu3+, intense green and red emission peaks are observed from LiYF4:Ce(13%), Tb(14%), Eu(1-5%) (LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu) nanophosphors, and the intensity ratio of green to red emission is controlled by adjusting the Eu3+ concentration. With increasing Eu3+ concentration, the LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors exhibit multicolor emission from green to orange. In addition, the successful incorporation of LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) facilitates the preparation of highly transparent nanophosphor-PDMS composites that present excellent multicolor tunability.

  12. Physiologic and anti-G suit performance data from YF-16 flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillingham, K. K.; Winter, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Biomedical data were collected during high-G portions of 11 YF-16 test flights. Test pilots monitored revealed increased respiratory rate and volume, decreased tidal volume, and increased heart rate at higher G levels, with one pilot exhibiting various cardiac arrhythmias. Anti-G suit inflation and pressurization lags varied inversely with G-onset rate, and suit pressurization slope was near the design value.

  13. YF 102 in-duct combustor noise measurements with a turbine nozzle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, C. A.; Oconnell, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The internal noise generated by an Avco Lycoming YF-102 engine combustor installed in a test rig was recorded. Two configurations were tested one with and one without the first stage turbine nozzle installed. Acoustic probes and accessories were used. Internal dynamic pressure level measurements were made at ten locations within the combustor. The combustor rig, the test procedures, and data acquisition and reduction systems are described. Tables and plots of narrow band and one third octave band pressure level spectra are included.

  14. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  15. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of europium doped NaYF ₄ nanoparticles in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Jia, Guang; Duan, Jianlei; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4) nanoparticles exhibit novel optical properties which make them be widely used in various fields. The extensive applications increase the chance of human exposure to these nanoparticles and thus raise deep concerns regarding their riskiness. In the present study, we have synthesized europium doped NaYF4 (NaYF4:Eu(3+)) nanoparticles with three diameters and used endothelial cells (ECs) as a cell model to explore the potential toxic effect. The cell viability, cytomembrane integrity, cellular uptake, intracellular localization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis detection, caspase-3 activity and expression of inflammatory gene were studied. The results indicated that these nanoparticles could be uptaken into ECs and decrease the cell viability, induce the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, increase the ROS level, and decrease the cell MMP in a size-dependent manner. Besides that, the cells were suffered to apoptosis with the caspase-3 activation, and the inflammation specific gene expressions (ICAM1 and VCAM1) were also increased. Our results suggest that the damage pathway may be related to the ROS generation and mitochondrial damage. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate their toxicity mechanisms and may be helpful for more rational applications of these compounds in the future.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of α-NaYF4: Yb, Er nanoparticles by reverse microemulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaseelan, M.; Senthilselvan, J.

    2016-05-01

    A simple and cost effective reverse microemulsion system was newly designed to synthesis NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Er upconverting luminescent nanoparticles. XRD results confirms the cubic structure of NaYF4 nanophosphor in the as prepared condition without any other impurity phases. The as-prepared sample itself having highly crystalline nanoparticle with well dispersed uniform morphology is the advantage of this reverse microemulsion process. HRTEM images of as prepared and calcined samples revealed spherical nanoclusters morphology with size of ~210 nm and ~245 nm respectively. The characteristic absorption wavelength that occurs at 980 nm due to transition of energy levels 2F5/2 to 2F7/2 for Yb3+ rare earth ion in as prepared and calcined upconversion nanoparticle confirms the presence of Yb3+ by UV-Visible spectroscopy which can act as a sensitizer for photonic upconversion. Therefore the absorption at NIR region and emission spectrum at visible region suggests that NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Er is suitable for upcoversion process, due to its optical property and chemical stability this material also be useful for bio imaging applications.

  17. Metastable NaYF 4 fluorite at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzechnik, Andrzej; Bouvier, Pierre; Crichton, Wilson A.; Farina, Luca; Köhler, Jürgen

    2002-06-01

    High-pressure high-temperature behavior of metastable NaYF 4 fluorite (Fm 3¯m, Z=4), with the Na and Y atoms randomly distributed in the cationic sublattice, is studied with synchrotron angle-dispersive powder X-ray diffraction in diamond anvil (DAC) and large-volume Paris-Edinburgh cells and synthesis in a multi-anvil apparatus. The onset of a pressure-induced phase transition at room temperature takes place above 10 GPa as observed in DACs loaded with different hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure media (nitrogen, paraffin oil, or ethanol:methanol media). In situ powder X-ray diffraction measurements in the Paris-Edinburgh cell and syntheses using the multi-anvil apparatus at high pressures and high temperatures show that the new polymorph is of the gagarinite-type (P6 3/m, Z=1) with partially ordered cations, the formula being Na 1.5Y 1.5F 6. This phase is structurally related to the Na 1.5Y 1.5F 6 modification (P 6¯, Z=1) stable at ambient conditions. At higher temperatures, the new pressure-induced hexagonal variant of NaYF 4 eventually decomposes into a non-stoichiometric gagarinite-like phase and yttrium fluoride YF 3 (Pnma, Z=4).

  18. Fabrication and upconversion luminescence properties of YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers via monoaxial electrospinning combined with fluorination method.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Dong, Xiangting; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2014-06-01

    YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers were successfully fabricated via fluorination of the relevant Y2O3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers which were obtained by calcining the electrospun PVP/[Y(NO3)3 + Er(NO3)3] composite nanofibers. The morphology and properties of the products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and fluorescence spectrometer. YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers were pure orthorhombic phase with space group Pnma and were hollow-centered structure with the mean diameter of 172 +/- 23 nm, and YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers were composed of nanoparticles with the diameter ranging from 30 nm to 50 nm. Upconversion emission spectrum analysis manifested that YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers emitted strong green and weak red upconversion emission centering at 524 nm, 543 nm and 653 nm, respectively. The green emissions and the red emission were respectively originated from 2H11/2/4S3/2 --> 4I15/2 and 4F9/2 --> 4I15/2 energy levels transitions of the Er3+ ions. Moreover, the emitting colors of YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers were located in the green region in CIE chromaticity coordinates diagram. The luminescent intensity of YF3:Er3+ hollow nanofibers was increased remarkably with the increasing doping concentration of Er3+ ions. The possible formation mechanism of YF3:Er3+ upconversion luminescence hollow nanofibers was also discussed. This preparation technique could be applied to prepare other rare earth fluoride upconversion luminescence hollow nanofibers.

  19. Dengue-2 and yellow fever 17DD viruses infect human dendritic cells, resulting in an induction of activation markers, cytokines and chemokines and secretion of different TNF-α and IFN-α profiles.

    PubMed

    Gandini, Mariana; Reis, Sonia Regina Nogueira Ignacio; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Galler, Ricardo; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2011-08-01

    Flaviviruses cause severe acute febrile and haemorrhagic infections, including dengue and yellow fever and the pathogenesis of these infections is caused by an exacerbated immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are targets for dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YF) replication and are the first cell population to interact with these viruses during a natural infection, which leads to an induction of protective immunity in humans. We studied the infectivity of DENV2 (strain 16681), a YF vaccine (YF17DD) and a chimeric YF17D/DENV2 vaccine in monocyte-derived DCs in vitro with regard to cell maturation, activation and cytokine production. Higher viral antigen positive cell frequencies were observed for DENV2 when compared with both vaccine viruses. Flavivirus-infected cultures exhibited dendritic cell activation and maturation molecules. CD38 expression on DCs was enhanced for both DENV2 and YF17DD, whereas OX40L expression was decreased as compared to mock-stimulated cells, suggesting that a T helper 1 profile is favoured. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in cell cultures was significantly higher in DENV2-infected cultures than in cultures infected with YF17DD or YF17D/DENV. In contrast, the vaccines induced higher IFN-α levels than DENV2. The differential cytokine production indicates that DENV2 results in TNF induction, which discriminates it from vaccine viruses that preferentially stimulate interferon expression. These differential response profiles may influence the pathogenic infection outcome.

  20. Dengue vaccines: Are they safe for travelers?

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Aguiar, Maira

    2016-01-01

    The four dengue viruses (DENV) circulate among nearly one-half of the world's population in tropical and semitropical countries imposing a huge morbidity burden on travelers. Sanofipasteur has developed a tetravalent live-attenuated vaccine, Dengvaxia, recently approved by the World Health Organization and licensed in four dengue-endemic countries. An additional two dengue vaccines, developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA and Takeda, are entering phase III testing. Dengvaxia is composed of four yellow fever 17D-DENV chimeras, the NIAID vaccine contains three mutagenized DENV and one DENV2/4 chimera while the Takeda vaccine contains an attenuated DENV 2 and three DENV 2-DENV chimeras. Which of these vaccines might be useful in protecting travelers against dengue infections and disease? Dengvaxia requires three doses administered over the course of one year but in addition has safety signals suggesting that susceptible individuals should not be vaccinated. The NIAID vaccine is promising as a travel vaccine as a single dose fully protected susceptible adults against live dengue 2 virus challenge. The protective efficacy and safety of the Takeda vaccine remain to be demonstrated. PMID:27343438

  1. Genome shuffling of Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis YF11 for improving nisin Z production and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Liu, S Y; Du, Y H; Feng, W J; Liu, J H; Qiao, J J

    2014-05-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative to increase the shelf time of many foods. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to improve nisin Z production of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis YF11 (YF11) via recursive protoplast fusion. Ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis were used to generate parental strains for genome shuffling. After 4 rounds of genome shuffling, the best-performing strain F44 was obtained, which showed dramatic improvements in tolerance to both glucose (ranging from 8 to 15% (wt/vol) and nisin (ranging from 5,000 to 14,000 IU/mL). Fed-batch fermentation showed that the nisin titer of F44 was up to 4,023 IU/mL, which was 2.4 times that of the starting strain YF11. Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of YF11 and F44 revealed the apparent differences in cell morphology. Whereas YF11 displayed long and thin cell morphology, F44 cells were short and thick and with a raised surface in the middle of the cell. With the increasing glucose and nisin content in the medium, cells of both YF11 and F44 tended to become shrunken; however, alterations in YF11 cells were more pronounced than those of F44 cells, especially when cultured in tolerance medium containing both nisin and glucose. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis demonstrated that the structure of nisin from YF11 and F44 was the same. Expression profiling of nisin synthesis related genes by real-time quantitative PCR showed that the transcription level of nisin structural gene nisZ and immunity gene nisI of F44 was 48 and 130% higher than that of the starting strain YF11, respectively. These results could provide valuable insights into the molecular basis underlying the nisin overproduction mechanism in L. lactis, thus facilitating the future construction of industrial strains for nisin production. PMID:24612797

  2. Genome shuffling of Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis YF11 for improving nisin Z production and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Liu, S Y; Du, Y H; Feng, W J; Liu, J H; Qiao, J J

    2014-05-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative to increase the shelf time of many foods. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to improve nisin Z production of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis YF11 (YF11) via recursive protoplast fusion. Ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis were used to generate parental strains for genome shuffling. After 4 rounds of genome shuffling, the best-performing strain F44 was obtained, which showed dramatic improvements in tolerance to both glucose (ranging from 8 to 15% (wt/vol) and nisin (ranging from 5,000 to 14,000 IU/mL). Fed-batch fermentation showed that the nisin titer of F44 was up to 4,023 IU/mL, which was 2.4 times that of the starting strain YF11. Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of YF11 and F44 revealed the apparent differences in cell morphology. Whereas YF11 displayed long and thin cell morphology, F44 cells were short and thick and with a raised surface in the middle of the cell. With the increasing glucose and nisin content in the medium, cells of both YF11 and F44 tended to become shrunken; however, alterations in YF11 cells were more pronounced than those of F44 cells, especially when cultured in tolerance medium containing both nisin and glucose. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis demonstrated that the structure of nisin from YF11 and F44 was the same. Expression profiling of nisin synthesis related genes by real-time quantitative PCR showed that the transcription level of nisin structural gene nisZ and immunity gene nisI of F44 was 48 and 130% higher than that of the starting strain YF11, respectively. These results could provide valuable insights into the molecular basis underlying the nisin overproduction mechanism in L. lactis, thus facilitating the future construction of industrial strains for nisin production.

  3. Synthesis of NaYF4 and NaLuF4 Based Upconversion Nanocrystals and Comparison of Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Juan; Yin, Dongguang; Song, Kailin; Wang, Chengcheng; Liu, Bing; Wu, Minghong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, four kinds of upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) have been successfully synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The morphology, crystalline phase, composition, grain size, upconversion luminescence and cell image of the UCNs were investigated. The properties of the NaLuF4-based UCNs were compared with the counterparts of NaYF4-based UCNs. It is found that the NaLuF4-based UCNs are apt to form hexagonal phase structures, while NaYF4-based UCNs of NaYF4:Yb, Er and NaYF4:Gd, Yb, Er are cubic and hexagonal phases respectively. The upconversion emission intensities of the NaLuF4-based UCNs are higher than that of NaYF4-based UCNs, and Gd3+ presented UCNs are higher than that of Gd3+ absented UCNs. The bioimaging application of NaLuF4:Gd, Yb, Er shows that bright upconversion luminescence can be observed when UCNs-labeled HeLa cells are excited with 980 nm light. PMID:26353495

  4. Synthesis of NaYF4 and NaLuF4 Based Upconversion Nanocrystals and Comparison of Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Juan; Yin, Dongguang; Song, Kailin; Wang, Chengcheng; Liu, Bing; Wu, Minghong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, four kinds of upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) have been successfully synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The morphology, crystalline phase, composition, grain size, upconversion luminescence and cell image of the UCNs were investigated. The properties of the NaLuF4-based UCNs were compared with the counterparts of NaYF4-based UCNs. It is found that the NaLuF4-based UCNs are apt to form hexagonal phase structures, while NaYF4-based UCNs of NaYF4:Yb, Er and NaYF4:Gd, Yb, Er are cubic and hexagonal phases respectively. The upconversion emission intensities of the NaLuF4-based UCNs are higher than that of NaYF4-based UCNs, and Gd3+ presented UCNs are higher than that of Gd3+ absented UCNs. The bioimaging application of NaLuF4:Gd, Yb, Er shows that bright upconversion luminescence can be observed when UCNs-labeled HeLa cells are excited with 980 nm light.

  5. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  6. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  7. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  8. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  10. Yellow fever vaccination in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in recent years in the Americas have prompted concern about the possible urbanization of jungle fever. Vaccination, using the 17D strain of yellow fever virus, provides an effective, practical method of large scale protection against the disease. Because yellow fever can reappear in certain areas after a 2-year dormancy period, some countries maintain routine vaccination programs in areas where jungle yellow fever is endemic. The size of the endemic area (approximately half of South America), transportation and communication difficulties, and the inability to ensure a reliable cold chain are problems facing these programs. In addition, the problem of reaching dispersed and isolated populations has been addressed by the use of mobile teams, radio monitoring, and educational methods. During yellow fever outbreaks, many countries institute massive vaccination campaigns, targeted at temporary workers and migrants. Because epidemics in South America may involve extensive areas, these campaigns may not effectively address the problem. The ped-o-jet injector method, used in Brazil and Colombia, should be used in outbreak situations, as it is effective for large-scale vaccination. Vaccine by needle, suggested for maintenance programs, should be administered to those above 1 year of age. An efficient monitoring method to avoid revaccination, and to assess immunity, should be developed. The 17D strain produces seroconversion in 95% of recipients, and most is prepared in Brazil and Colombia. But, problems with storage methods, instability in seed lots, and difficulties in large-scale production were identified in 1981 by the Pan American Health Organization and WHO. The group recommended modernization of current production techniques and further research to develop a vaccine that could be produced in cell cultures. Brazil and Colombia have acted on these recommendations, modernizing vaccine production and researching thermostabilizing media for

  11. Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped beta-phase NaYF4 microprisms: controlled synthesis and upconversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Hairong; Gao, Dangli; He, Enjie; Li, Jiao; Tu, Yinxun

    2014-06-01

    Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped hexagonal NaYF4(beta-NaYF4) microprisms were synthesized by the hydrothermal method, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was introduced to control the size of the microcrystal samples. Bright upconverted fluorescence emission was observed when the samples were excited with an infrared (IR) laser at 976.4 nm. The emission was found to originate from the transitions of 3P0-3F2, 3P0-3H6 or 1G4-3H4, 3P1-3H6, 3P0-3H5, 3P1-3H5, and 3P0-3H4 of Pr3+ ions. Possible mechanisms for upconversion fluorescence and concentration dependence as well as the crystal structure and its formation of NaYF4:Yb3+/Pr3+ microprisms were explored and discussed based on the experimental observations.

  12. MOLTEN SALT SYNTHESIS OF YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+(Ln = Er3+, Tm3+) MICROSHEETS WITH MULTICOLOR UPCONVERSION LUMINESCENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingye; Lu, Chunhua; Cao, Linhai; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, highly crystalline YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+(Ln = Er3+, Tm3+) microsheets were successfully synthesized by a surfactant-free molten salt method for the first time. The results indicated that the as-obtained samples belonged to orthorhombic system and exhibited microsheets morphology with side lengths of 30 to 80 μm and wall thickness from 1 to 1.5 μm. By changing the dopant's species (Ln3+), multicolor (yellow and blue) upconversion emission can be observed in YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+ microsheets under 980 nm laser diode (LD) excitation. The upconversion mechanisms in co-doping YF3 samples were analyzed in detail based on the emission spectra. Importantly, this approach not only proposes a new alternative in synthesizing such materials, but also opens the possibility to meet the increasing commercial demand.

  13. Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped beta-phase NaYF4 microprisms: controlled synthesis and upconversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Hairong; Gao, Dangli; He, Enjie; Li, Jiao; Tu, Yinxun

    2014-06-01

    Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped hexagonal NaYF4(beta-NaYF4) microprisms were synthesized by the hydrothermal method, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was introduced to control the size of the microcrystal samples. Bright upconverted fluorescence emission was observed when the samples were excited with an infrared (IR) laser at 976.4 nm. The emission was found to originate from the transitions of 3P0-3F2, 3P0-3H6 or 1G4-3H4, 3P1-3H6, 3P0-3H5, 3P1-3H5, and 3P0-3H4 of Pr3+ ions. Possible mechanisms for upconversion fluorescence and concentration dependence as well as the crystal structure and its formation of NaYF4:Yb3+/Pr3+ microprisms were explored and discussed based on the experimental observations. PMID:24738388

  14. Theoretical investigations of the optical and EPR spectra for trivalent cerium and ytterbium ions in orthorhombic YF3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2016-09-01

    The optical spectra and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors and hyperfine structure constants A) for trivalent cerium and ytterbium ions in YF3 crystal with orthorhombic structure are investigated together by the complete diagonalization (of energy matrix) method (CDM). The obtained results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental ones. More importantly, two magnetically nonequivalent centers in YF3 crystal observed in EPR experiments are confirmed and ascribed to their specific positions in a unit cell by our calculations based on superposition model (SPM) analysis. Such identification of local sites with different magnetic properties would help us to understand not only the EPR spectra and magnetic susceptibility of other lanthanide ions doped in crystals with the same structure as YF3 but also the energy transfer scheme between two lanthanide ions occupying such two sites. All results are discussed carefully.

  15. A force field for 3,3,3-fluoro-1-propenes, including HFO-1234yf.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Gabriele; Maginn, Edward J

    2010-08-12

    The European Union (EU) legislation 2006/40/EC bans from January 2011 the cooperative marketing of new car types that use refrigerants in their heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems with global warming potentials (GWP) higher than 150. Thus, the phase-out of the presently used tetrafluoroethane refrigerant R134a necessitates the adoption of alternative refrigerants. Fluoropropenes such as 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf) are currently regarded as promising low GWP refrigerants, but the lack of experimental data on their thermophysical properties hampers independent studies on their performance in HVAC systems or in other technical applications. In principle, molecular modeling can be used to predict the relevant properties of refrigerants, but adequate intermolecular potential functions ("force fields") are lacking for fluoropropenes. Thus, we developed a transferable force field for fluoropropenes composed of CF(3)-, -CF=, -CH=, CF(2)=, and CH(2)= groups and applied the force field to study 3,3,3 trifluoro-1-propene (HFO-1243zf), 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), and hexafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1216). We performed Gibbs ensemble simulations on these three fluoropropenes to compute the vapor pressure, saturated densities, and heats of vaporization. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to provide predictions for the density, thermal expansivity, isobaric heat capacity, and transport properties of liquid HFO-1234yf in the temperature range from 263.15 to 310 K and pressures up to 2 MPa. Agreement between simulation results and experimental data and/or correlations (when available) was good, thereby validating the predictive ability of the force field. PMID:20684636

  16. The Human NK Cell Response to Yellow Fever Virus 17D Is Primarily Governed by NK Cell Differentiation Independently of NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Nicole; Ivarsson, Martin A; Blom, Kim; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Braun, Monika; Falconer, Karolin; Gustafsson, Rasmus; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Sandberg, Johan K; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    NK cells play an important role in the defense against viral infections. However, little is known about the regulation of NK cell responses during the first days of acute viral infections in humans. In this study, we used the live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D as a human in vivo model to study the temporal dynamics and regulation of NK cell responses in an acute viral infection. YFV induced a robust NK cell response in vivo, with an early activation and peak in NK cell function at day 6, followed by a delayed peak in Ki67 expression, which was indicative of proliferation, at day 10. The in vivo NK cell response correlated positively with plasma type I/III IFN levels at day 6, as well as with the viral load. YFV induced an increased functional responsiveness to IL-12 and IL-18, as well as to K562 cells, indicating that the NK cells were primed in vivo. The NK cell responses were associated primarily with the stage of differentiation, because the magnitude of induced Ki67 and CD69 expression was distinctly higher in CD57(-) NK cells. In contrast, NK cells expressing self- and nonself-HLA class I-binding inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors contributed, to a similar degree, to the response. Taken together, our results indicate that NK cells are primed by type I/III IFN in vivo early after YFV infection and that their response is governed primarily by the differentiation stage, independently of killer cell Ig-like receptor/HLA class I-mediated inhibition or education.

  17. Enhanced Red Upconversion Luminescence in Yb-Er Codoped NaYF4 Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiye; Bi, Xueqing; Guo, Xingyuan; Liu, Shushen; Qin, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    In this work the effects of NaYF4:Yb,Er (NYE) structure on the enhanced red upconversion luminescence (UC) was investigated. α-NYE nanocrystals (NCs) and β-NYE NCs were fabricated by a high temperature decomposition reaction method. The prepared NCs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results show that the red UC luminescence of α-NYE NCs is significantly enhanced compared with that of β-NYE. Furthermore, a possible energy transfer mechanism was proposed on the basis of our experimental results. PMID:27451746

  18. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines. [YF 102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines were measured using a technique which requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine vore. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an Avco Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  19. UPCONVERSION LUMINESCENCE ENHANCEMENT OF NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ NANOPARTICLES ON INVERSE OPAL SURFACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiayan; Yang, Zhengwen; Wu, Hangjun; Lai, Shenfeng; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Yin, Zhaoyi

    2014-01-01

    LaPO4 inverse opal photonic crystals with different photonic band gaps were fabricated by template-assisted method. The Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles were deposited on the surfaces of the inverse opals, and their up-conversion emission properties were investigated. The upconversion emissions of Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles on the inverse opal surfaces have been enhanced when the upconversion emission bands of the nanoparticles are in the range of photonic band gaps of the inverse opals, which is attributed to an efficient and selective reflection of photonic band gaps.

  20. [Vaccinations 1979].

    PubMed

    Herzog, C; Just, M

    1980-05-17

    On the basis of the Federal Health Department's "Swiss Vaccination Scheme" of 1976, some up to data additions and alterations are proposed mainly with regard to combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccination during the second year of life together with the first tetanus, diphtheria and poliomyelitis booster. Oral vaccination against poliomyelitis is not contraindicated during pregnancy. Among the inoculations not considered in the official vaccination scheme, regular influenza vaccination is only indicated for certain chronically ill people. Whether this is also true of the pneumococcal vaccine newly licensed in Switzerland remains uncertain. The (likewise new) meningococcal vaccine is only effective against type A and C and not against the type B meningococci prevalent in Switzerland. In view of its safety, only HDC vaccine produced with human tissue cultures should be used for anti-rabies vaccination. For counselling prior to travel abroad, a simple vaccination scheme is provided and the importance of other prophylactic measures is emphasized. PMID:7394495

  1. A historical perspective of the YF-12A thermal loads and structures program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.; Quinn, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Around 1970, the Y-F-12A loads and structures efforts focused on numerous technological issues that needed defining with regard to aircraft that incorporate hot structures in the design. Laboratory structural heating test technology with infrared systems was largely created during this program. The program demonstrated the ability to duplicate the complex flight temperatures of an advanced supersonic airplane in a ground-based laboratory. The ability to heat and load an advanced operational aircraft in a laboratory at high temperatures and return it to flight status without adverse effects was demonstrated. The technology associated with measuring loads with strain gages on a hot structure was demonstrated with a thermal calibration concept. The results demonstrated that the thermal stresses were significant although the airplane was designed to reduce thermal stresses. Considerable modeling detail was required to predict the heat transfer and the corresponding structural characteristics. The overall YF-12A research effort was particularly productive, and a great deal of flight, laboratory, test and computational data were produced and cross-correlated.

  2. Case Study of R-1234yf Refrigerant: Implications for the Framework for Responsible Innovation.

    PubMed

    Wodzisz, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    Safety and care for the natural environment are two of the most important values that drive scientific enterprise in twentieth century. Researchers and innovators often develop new technologies aimed at pollution reduction, and therefore satisfy the strive for fulfilment of these values. This work is often incentivized by policy makers. According to EU directive 2006/40/EC on mobile air conditioning since 2013 all newly approved vehicles have to be filled with refrigerant with low global warming potential (GWP). Extensive and expensive research financed by leading car manufacturers led to invention of R-1234yf refrigerant with GWP < 1, which was huge improvement. For the proper understanding of this case it will be useful to refer it to the idea of responsible innovation (RI), which is now being developed and quickly attracts attention. I proceed in the following order. Firstly, I present the relevant properties of R-1234yf and discuss the controversy associated with its marketing. Secondly, I examine framework for responsible innovation. In greater detail I discuss the notions of care for future generations and collective responsibility. Thirdly, I apply the offered framework to the case study at hand. Finally, I draw some conclusions which go in two directions: one is to make some suggestions for improving the framework of RI, and the second is to identify missed opportunities for developing truly responsible refrigerant.

  3. Secretory expression of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis YF38 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Jia, Shifang; Sun, Yufang; Chen, Meiling; Chen, Xiuzhu; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-11-01

    Nattokinase producing bacterium, B. subtilis YF38, was isolated from douchi, using the fibrin plate method. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cytoplasmic expression of this enzyme in E. coli resulted in inactive inclusion bodies. But with the help of two different signal peptides, the native signal peptide of nattokinase and the signal peptide of PelB, active nattokinase was successfully expressed in E. coli with periplasmic secretion, and the nattokinase in culture medium displayed high fibrinolytic activity. The fibrinolytic activity of the expressed enzyme in the culture was determined to reach 260 urokinase units per micro-liter when the recombinant strain was induced by 0.7 mmol l(-1) isopropyl-beta-D- thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) at 20 degrees C for 20 h, resulting 49.3 mg active enzyme per liter culture. The characteristic of this recombinant nattokinase is comparable to the native nattokinase from B. subtilis YF38. Secretory expression of nattokinase in E. coli would facilitate the development of this enzyme into a therapeutic product for the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases.

  4. Intervene before leaving: clustered lot quality assurance sampling to monitor vaccination coverage at health district level before the end of a yellow fever and measles vaccination campaign in Sierra Leone in 2009

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In November 2009, Sierra Leone conducted a preventive yellow fever (YF) vaccination campaign targeting individuals aged nine months and older in six health districts. The campaign was integrated with a measles follow-up campaign throughout the country targeting children aged 9–59 months. For both campaigns, the operational objective was to reach 95% of the target population. During the campaign, we used clustered lot quality assurance sampling (C-LQAS) to identify areas of low coverage to recommend timely mop-up actions. Methods We divided the country in 20 non-overlapping lots. Twelve lots were targeted by both vaccinations, while eight only by measles. In each lot, five clusters of ten eligible individuals were selected for each vaccine. The upper threshold (UT) was set at 90% and the lower threshold (LT) at 75%. A lot was rejected for low vaccination coverage if more than 7 unvaccinated individuals (not presenting vaccination card) were found. After the campaign, we plotted the C-LQAS results against the post-campaign coverage estimations to assess if early interventions were successful enough to increase coverage in the lots that were at the level of rejection before the end of the campaign. Results During the last two days of campaign, based on card-confirmed vaccination status, five lots out of 20 (25.0%) failed for having low measles vaccination coverage and three lots out of 12 (25.0%) for low YF coverage. In one district, estimated post-campaign vaccination coverage for both vaccines was still not significantly above the minimum acceptable level (LT = 75%) even after vaccination mop-up activities. Conclusion C-LQAS during the vaccination campaign was informative to identify areas requiring mop-up activities to reach the coverage target prior to leaving the region. The only district where mop-up activities seemed to be unsuccessful might have had logistical difficulties that should be further investigated and resolved. PMID:22676225

  5. Thermostability and efficacy in the field of a new, stabilized yellow fever virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Georges, A J; Tible, F; Meunier, D M; Gonzalez, J P; Beraud, A M; Sissoko-Dybdahl, N R; Abdul-Wahid, S; Fritzell, B; Girard, M; Georges-Courbot, M C

    1985-09-01

    Samples of the new, stabilized 17D virus vaccine from Pasteur Vaccins, France were stored for up to six months at +10 +/- 2 degrees C in the hospital of Bouar, Central African Republic. Each month during this study, the vaccine ampoules were put into an ice box without ice and taken into the field to be used as part of a vaccination programme. No significant loss of infectious virus titre was observed under these conditions. Efficacy of the vaccine was determined from percent seroconversions in vaccinated children. No loss of efficacy of the vaccine was observed after five months storage at +10 degrees C and five trips in the field, confirming the high heat stability of the new vaccine.

  6. Response to comment on "Environmental fate of the next generation refrigerant 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf)

    DOE PAGES

    Im, Jeongdae; Walshe-Langford, Gillian E.; Moon, Ji Won; Loeffler, Frank E.

    2015-06-11

    In this study, refrigerant 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) has been developed for use in mobile air conditioning systems to replace 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), which has a much greater global warming potential.

  7. 77 FR 16988 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule for Motor Vehicle Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... procedure, Air pollution control, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Stratospheric ozone layer. Dated... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 RIN 2060-AR20 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule... substitute for ozone- depleting substances (ODSs) in the motor vehicle air conditioning end- use within...

  8. The acute, developmental, genetic and inhalation toxicology of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf).

    PubMed

    Tveit, Ann; Rusch, George M; Muijser, Hans; Tegelenbosch-Schouten, Mariska-M

    2013-10-01

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is being developed as a refrigerant because it has a very low global warming potential (less than 10), as contrasted to the hydrofluorocarbons, which is intended to replace with values of over 500. Several toxicology studies were conducted to develop a toxicology profile for this material. There was no lethality in mice and rats receiving single 4-hour exposures up to 101,850 or 405,800 ppm, respectively. Additionally, there was no mortality or clinical signs of toxicity when rabbits were exposed to 100,000 ppm for 1 hour. Exposures up to 120,000 ppm did not induce cardiac sensitization to adrenalin in dogs. Rats were exposed to HFO-1234yf at levels of 5000, 20,000 and 50,000 ppm 6 hours/day 5 days/week for 2 weeks and at levels of 5000, 15,000 and 50,000 ppm for 4 weeks and for 90 days. No treatment-related adverse effects were noted in these studies. HFO-1234yf was not genotoxic in a mouse and a rat micronucleus assay, and unscheduled DNA synthesis assay and was not clastogenic in human lymphocytes. HFO-1234yf was mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 and Escherichia coli (WP2 uvrA) at concentrations of 20% and higher in the presence of metabolic activation only. There were no biologically significant effects in a rat developmental toxicity study with exposures up to 50,000 ppm.

  9. Synthesis and upconversion emission of rare earth-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Niu, Mutong; Yu, Yunlong; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuansheng

    2010-01-15

    The olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles were fabricated via a two-step route. The precursor NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages sized 8 nm with hollow interiors were first synthesized in a solid reaction at room temperature. In the course of subsequent hydrothermal treating, the unstable NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages were decomposed, resulted in the formation of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} micro-tubes. Prolonging the hydrothermal reaction induced the further decomposition of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} to produce YF{sub 3} nano-crystals, which then aggregated together forming the final olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles. For the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles, intense visible upconversion emissions were measured under 976 nm excitation owing to the partition of rare earth ions in the lattice, indicating this material a promising luminescent host.

  10. Intense ultraviolet upconversion emission from water-dispersed colloidal YF3:Yb3+/Tm3+ rhombic nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hailong; Chen, Guanying; Fan, Rongwei; Yang, Liming; Liu, Cheng; Hao, Shuwei; Sailor, Michael J; Ågren, Hans; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2014-01-21

    Intense ultraviolet upconversion emission has been observed in water-dispersed uniform rhombic nanodisks (side length of ~14 nm and thickness of ~2.5 nm) of YF3 co-doped with Yb(3+) sensitizer and Tm(3+) activator ions, when excited at ~980 nm.

  11. CD8+ T cells complement antibodies in protecting against yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Kongsgaard, Michael; Steffensen, Maria A; Fenger, Christina; Rasmussen, Michael; Skjødt, Karsten; Finsen, Bente; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2015-02-01

    The attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine (YF-17D) was developed in the 1930s, yet little is known about the protective mechanisms underlying its efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the relative contribution of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to the vaccine-induced protection in a murine model of YF-17D infection. Using different strains of knockout mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells, B cells, and Abs are required for full clinical protection of vaccinated mice, whereas CD8(+) T cells are dispensable for long-term survival after intracerebral challenge. However, by analyzing the immune response inside the infected CNS, we observed an accelerated T cell influx into the brain after intracerebral challenge of vaccinated mice, and this T cell recruitment correlated with improved virus control in the brain. Using mice deficient in B cells we found that, in the absence of Abs, YF vaccination can still induce some antiviral protection, and in vivo depletion of CD8(+) T cells from these animals revealed a pivotal role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling virus replication in the absence of a humoral response. Finally, we demonstrated that effector CD8(+) T cells also contribute to viral control in the presence of circulating YF-specific Abs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that YF-specific CD8(+) T cells have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity in vivo.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis and tunable luminescence of Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} codoped YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals with uniform morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yue; Chen, Baojiu; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu; Tian, Bining; Sun, Jiashi; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang; Zhong, Hua; Hua, Ruinian

    2012-12-15

    Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} codoped YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals with the morphologies of ellipsoid-like nanoplate, spindle, sandwich-structural rhombus and nanoaggregate were synthesized through a solvothermal method. The morphologies of the prepared products can be tailored by controlling the volume ratio of ethylene glycol (EG) to H{sub 2}O, solvent type or the reaction time. A possible formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3} phosphor was proposed. The emitting colors of YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} phosphors can be easily tuned from yellowish green, yellow to orange by increasing Eu{sup 3+} concentration. The energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in YF{sub 3} phosphors was studied. It was found that the interaction type between Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} is electric dipole-dipole interaction. - Graphical abstract: Sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized through a solvothermal process. The formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphors was studied. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals were synthesized through solvothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3} was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emitting colors of YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} phosphors can be tuned. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} is confirmed as electric dipole-dipole interaction.

  13. Mutual interference on the immune response to yellow fever vaccine and a combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella.

    PubMed

    Nascimento Silva, Juliana Romualdo; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B; Siqueira, Marilda M; Freire, Marcos de Silva; Castro, Yvone P; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S; Yamamura, Anna Maya Y; Martins, Reinaldo M; Leal, Maria de Luz F

    2011-08-26

    A randomized trial was conducted to assess the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of yellow fever vaccines (YFV) given either simultaneously in separate injections, or 30 days or more after a combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Volunteers were also randomized to YFV produced from 17DD and WHO-17D-213 substrains. The study group comprised 1769 healthy 12-month-old children brought to health care centers in Brasilia for routine vaccination. The reactogenicity was of the type and frequency expected for the vaccines and no severe adverse event was associated to either vaccine. Seroconversion and seropositivity 30 days or more after vaccination against yellow fever was similar across groups defined by YFV substrain. Subjects injected YFV and MMR simultaneously had lower seroconversion rates--90% for rubella, 70% for yellow fever and 61% for mumps--compared with those vaccinated 30 days apart--97% for rubella, 87% for yellow fever and 71% for mumps. Seroconversion rates for measles were higher than 98% in both comparison groups. Geometric mean titers for rubella and for yellow fever were approximately three times higher among those who got the vaccines 30 days apart. For measles and mumps antibodies GMTs were similar across groups. MMR's interference in immune response of YFV and YFV's interference in immune response of rubella and mumps components of MMR had never been reported before but are consistent with previous observations from other live vaccines. These results may affect the recommendations regarding primary vaccination with yellow fever vaccine and MMR.

  14. [Dengue vaccines].

    PubMed

    Morita, Kouichi

    2008-10-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito borne virus infection in the tropics. Based on the effects of global warming, it is expected that dengue epidemic areas will further expand in the next decades unless effective and affordable vaccines are made available soon. At the moment, several vaccine developers have utilized live-attenuated live tetravalent vaccines and two of them have already completed phase two trials. However, the risk of antibody-dependent enhancement infection is not well elucidated and thus further and careful evaluation of the safety on proposed candidate vaccines are essential. At the moment, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation strongly support the vaccine development through the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

  15. Wild-type Escherichia coli producing microcins B17, D93, J25, and L; cloning of genes for microcin L production and immunity.

    PubMed

    Sablé, S; Duarte, M; Bravo, D; Lanneluc, I; Pons, A M; Cottenceau, G; Moreno, F

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, an Escherichia coli strain producing four microcins (Mcc), B17, D93, J25, and L, and showing immunity to Mcc V was isolated and characterized. Each of the gene clusters encoding the production of Mcc B17, D93, and L was cloned separately. The gene cluster for Mcc L was cloned within a 13.5-kb HindIII-SalI fragment, which includes the Mcc V immunity gene, cvi.

  16. Deposition and rainwater concentrations of trifluoroacetic acid in the United States from the use of HFO-1234yf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the most common refrigerant in automobile air conditioners. This high global warming potential substance (100 year GWP of 1370) will likely be phased out and replaced with HFO-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene) that has a 100 year GWP of 4. HFO-1234yf will be oxidized to produce trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in clouds. TFA, a mildly toxic substance with detrimental effects on some aquatic organisms at high concentrations (≥100μgL-1), would be transported by rain to the surface and enter bodies of water. We investigated the dry and wet deposition of TFA from HFO-1234yf over the contiguous USA using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting model (ARW) with interactive chemical, aerosol, and cloud processes (WRF/Chem) model. Special focus was placed on emissions from three continental USA regions with different meteorological characteristics. WRF/Chem simulated meteorology, cloud processes, gas and aqueous phase chemistry, and dry and wet deposition between May and September 2006. The model reproduced well the multimonth total sulfate wet deposition (4% bias) and its spatial variability (r = 0.86) observed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. HFO-1234yf emissions were obtained by assuming the number of automobile air conditioners to remain unchanged, and substituting HFO-1234yf, mole-per-mole for HFC-134a. Our estimates of current HFC-134a emissions were in agreement with field data. Average TFA rainwater concentration was 0.89μgL-1, with peak values of 7.8μgL-1, for the May-September 2006 period over the contiguous USA. TFA rainwater concentrations over the dry western USA were often significantly higher, but wet-deposited TFA amounts remained relatively low at such locations.

  17. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are examples. Killed (inactivated) vaccines are made from ... countries. Some countries require this record. COMMON VACCINES ... DTaP immunization (vaccine) Hepatitis A vaccine Hepatitis B ...

  18. Diphtheria Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination Pronounced (dif-THEER-ee-a) Recommend on Facebook ... Related Pages Pertussis Tetanus Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Abbreviations DTaP=Pediatric - Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis ...

  19. Fabrication methods for YF-12 wing panels for the Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E. L.; Payne, L.; Carter, A. L.

    1975-01-01

    Advanced fabrication and joining processes for titanium and composite materials are being investigated by NASA to develop technology for the Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program. With Lockheed-ADP as the prime contractor, full-scale structural panels are being designed and fabricated to replace an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 aircraft. The program involves ground testing and Mach 3 flight testing of full-scale structural panels and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens. Fabrication methods and test results for weldbrazed and Rohrbond titanium panels are discussed. The fabrication methods being developed for boron/aluminum, Borsic/aluminum, and graphite/polyimide panels are also presented.

  20. Tailoring Plasmonic Enhanced Upconversion in Single NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Lan; Mohammadi Estakhri, Nasim; Johnson, Amber; Li, Hai-Yang; Xu, Li-Xiang; Zhang, Zhenyu; Alù, Andrea; Wang, Qu-Quan; Shih, Chih-Kang (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    By using silver nanoplatelets with a widely tunable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), and their corresponding local field enhancement, here we show large manipulation of plasmonic enhanced upconversion in NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocrystals at the single particle level. In particular, we show that when the plasmonic resonance of silver nanolplatelets is tuned to 656 nm, matching the emission wavelength, an upconversion enhancement factor ~5 is obtained. However, when the plasmonic resonance is tuned to 980 nm, matching the nanocrystal absorption wavelength, we achieve an enhancement factor of ~22 folds. The precise geometric arrangement between fluorescent nanoparticles and silver nanoplatelets allows us to make, for the first time, a comparative analysis between experimental results and numerical simulations, yielding a quantitative agreement at the single particle level. Such a comparison lays the foundations for a rational design of hybrid metal-fluorescent nanocrystals to harness the upconversion enhancement for biosensing and light harvesting applications. PMID:25976870

  1. Synthesis of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles in normal microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shu-Nan; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Jia, Neng-Qin

    2011-01-01

    An interface-controlled reaction in normal microemulsions (water/ethanol/sodium oleate/oleic acid/n-hexane) was designed to prepare NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles. The phase diagram of the system was first studied to obtain the appropriate oil-in-water microemulsions. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometer measurements revealed that the as-prepared nanoparticles were spherical, monodisperse with a uniform size of 20 nm, and of cubic phase with good crystallinity. Furthermore, these nanoparticles have good dispersibility in nonpolar organic solvents and exhibit visible upconversion luminescence of orange color under continuous excitation at 980 nm. Then, a thermal treatment for the products was found to enhance the luminescence intensity. In addition, because of its inherent merit in high yielding and being economical, this synthetic method could be utilized for preparation of the UCNPs on a large scale. PMID:21968102

  2. Synthesis of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles in normal microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shu-Nan; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Jia, Neng-Qin

    2011-10-01

    An interface-controlled reaction in normal microemulsions (water/ethanol/sodium oleate/oleic acid/ n-hexane) was designed to prepare NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles. The phase diagram of the system was first studied to obtain the appropriate oil-in-water microemulsions. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometer measurements revealed that the as-prepared nanoparticles were spherical, monodisperse with a uniform size of 20 nm, and of cubic phase with good crystallinity. Furthermore, these nanoparticles have good dispersibility in nonpolar organic solvents and exhibit visible upconversion luminescence of orange color under continuous excitation at 980 nm. Then, a thermal treatment for the products was found to enhance the luminescence intensity. In addition, because of its inherent merit in high yielding and being economical, this synthetic method could be utilized for preparation of the UCNPs on a large scale.

  3. The impact of shell host (NaYF4/CaF2) and shell deposition methods on the up-conversion enhancement in Tb3+, Yb3+ codoped colloidal α-NaYF4 core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Katarzyna; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gnach, Anna; Misiak, Malgorzata; Sobczyk, Marcin; Strek, Wieslaw

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide doped, up-converting nanoparticles have found considerable interest as luminescent probes in the field of bio-detection. Although the nanoparticles (NPs) have already been successfully applied for fluorescent bio-imaging and bio-assays, the efficiency of the up-conversion process seems to be the bottle-neck in rigorous applications. In this work, we have shown enhancement of the up-conversion in colloidal α-NaYF4:Yb3+, Tb3+ doped nanocrystals owing to passivation of their surface. We have studied quantitatively the influence of the shell type (NaYF4 and CaF2), its thickness, as well as the shell deposition method (i.e. single thick shell vs. multi-layer shell) on the luminescent properties of the nanoparticles. The results showed that up to 40-fold up-conversion intensity enhancement may be obtained for the core-shell nanoparticles in comparison with the bare core nanoparticles, irrespective of the shell type and deposition method. Moreover, the suitability of the NaYF4:Yb3+, Tb3+ core-shell NPs for multi-color emission and spectral multiplexing has been presented.Lanthanide doped, up-converting nanoparticles have found considerable interest as luminescent probes in the field of bio-detection. Although the nanoparticles (NPs) have already been successfully applied for fluorescent bio-imaging and bio-assays, the efficiency of the up-conversion process seems to be the bottle-neck in rigorous applications. In this work, we have shown enhancement of the up-conversion in colloidal α-NaYF4:Yb3+, Tb3+ doped nanocrystals owing to passivation of their surface. We have studied quantitatively the influence of the shell type (NaYF4 and CaF2), its thickness, as well as the shell deposition method (i.e. single thick shell vs. multi-layer shell) on the luminescent properties of the nanoparticles. The results showed that up to 40-fold up-conversion intensity enhancement may be obtained for the core-shell nanoparticles in comparison with the bare core nanoparticles

  4. Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Not Get Chickenpox Vaccine Types of Chickenpox Vaccine Child and Adult Immunization Schedules Possible Side Effects of Chickenpox Vaccine Childcare and School Vaccine Requirements Also Known As & Abbreviations ...

  5. Plasmonic enhanced emissions from cubic NaYF4:Yb: Er/Tm nanophosphors

    PubMed Central

    Sudheendra, L.; Ortalan, Volkan; Dey, Sanchita; Browning, Nigel D.; Kennedy, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    A metal shell was used in this study to provide significant enhancement of the up-converted emission from cubic NaYF4 nanoparticles, creating a valuable composite material for labeling in biology and other applications – use of the cubic form of the material obviates the need to undertake a high temperature transformation to the naturally more efficient hexagonal phase. The NaYF4 matrix contained ytterbium sensitizer and an Erbium (Er) or Thulium (Tm) activator. The particle sizes of the as-synthesized nanoparticles were in the range of 20–40 nm with a gold shell thickness of 4–8 nm. The gold shell was macroscopically amorphous. The synthesis method was based on a citrate chelation. In this approach, we exploited the ability of the citrate ion to act as a reductant and stabilizer. Confining the citrate ion reductant on the nanophosphor surface rather than in the solution was critical to the gold shell formation. The plasmonic shell enhanced the up-conversion emission of Tm from visible and near-infrared regions by up to a factor of 8, in addition to imparting a visible color arising from the plasmon absorption of the gold shell. The up-conversion enhancement observed with Tm and Er were different for similar gold coverages, with local crystal field changes as a possible route to enhance up-conversion emission from high symmetry structural hosts. These novel up-converting nanophosphor particles combine the phosphor and features of a gold shell, providing a unique platform for many biological imaging and labeling applications. PMID:21709812

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-01

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes.

  7. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  8. Tuning upconversion luminescence of LiYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ microcrystals synthesized through a molten salt process.

    PubMed

    Niu, Na; He, Fei; Wang, Liuzhen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yan; Gai, Shili; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, well-defined tetragonal-phase LiYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ micro-crystals with octahedral morphology were successfully prepared through a surfactant-free molten salt process for the first time. By gradually increasing the LiF content in the NaNO3-KNO3 reaction medium, the crystal phase transforms from a mixture of YF3 and LiYF4 to pure tetragonal-phase LiYF4. The possible formation process for the phase and morphology evolution is also presented. Moreover, upon 980 nm laser diode (LD) excitation, the lanthanide ions (Yb3+, Er3+/Tm3+/Ho3+) doped LiYF4 crystals exhibit intense upconversion emission lights. By tuning the sensitizer concentrations of Yb3+ ions in LiYF4:Yb3+,Er3+, the relative intensities of green and red emissions can be precisely adjusted under single wavelength excitation. Consequently, multicolor upconversion emissions can be obtained. On the other hand, UC mechanisms were also given based on the emission spectra and the plot of luminescence intensity to pump power.

  9. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  10. Laser performance of in-band pumped Er : LiYF4 and Er : LiLuF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kurilchik, S. V.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Nizamutdinov, A. S.; Korableva, S. L.; Semashko, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Er : LiLuF4 and Er : LiYF4 crystals in the spectral region near 1.5 μm and the lasing characteristics of these crystals under in-band pumping at a wavelength of 1522 nm are studied. With the Er : LiLuF4 crystal, the maximum slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 44% at a wavelength of 1609 nm. Continuous-wave operation of an inband pumped Er : LiYF4 laser is obtained for the first time. The output power at a wavelength of 1606 nm was 58 mW with a slope efficiency of 21%.

  11. Mechanochemical preparation of nanocrystalline NaYF4:Gd3+/Yb3+/Tm3+: An efficient upconversion phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Riesen, Hans

    2015-11-01

    We report on a mechanochemical preparation route for NaYF4:Gd3+/Yb3+/Tm3+ nanoparticles by ball-milling NaF, YF3, GdF3, YbF3 and TmF3 at room temperature. An analysis by XRD and TEM demonstrates that the resulting materials are mainly (∼88% after 4 h ball-milling) in the hexagonal phase and are on the nanoscale with an average crystallite size of ∼20 nm. The prepared nanoparticles display efficient upconversion emission; upon excitation by a 980 nm laser diode, bright visible blue light emission can be observed. However, in accord with previous results, the strongest emission is observed in the NIR at 800 nm.

  12. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Eu3+ Doped NaYF4 and KYF4 Micro/Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Siling; Cao, Chunyan; Cao, Renping

    2016-04-01

    Through a hydrothermal method, 1 mol% Eu3+ doped NaYF4 and KYF4 micro/nanocrystals have been synthesized. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images, room temperature photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra, and luminescent dynamic decay curves. The XRD analysis suggested the crystalline structures of the obtained samples. The FE-SEM images indicated the morphology and size of the obtained samples. The PL spectra illustrate the optical properties of Eu3+ in the two samples. Since it is sensitive to the local environment of the ion, the Eu3+ presents different optical properties in the NaYF4 and KYF4 materials. PMID:27451724

  13. Testing and analysis of dual-mode adaptive landing gear, taxi mode test system for YF-12A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dual mode adaptive landing gear system in reducing the dynamic response of an airplane during ground taxiing was studied. The dynamic taxi tests of the YF-12A research airplane are presented. A digital computer program which simulated the test conditions is discussed. The dual mode system as tested provides dynamic taxi response reductions of 25 percent at the cg and 30 to 45 percent at the cockpit.

  14. Enhanced photoelectric conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells by the incorporation of dual-mode luminescent NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Pan, Kai; Wang, Guofeng; Jiang, Baojiang; Tian, Chungui; Zhou, Wei; Qu, Yang; Liu, Shuai; Feng, Li; Fu, Honggang

    2013-06-14

    This work focuses on the design of composite photoanodes with dual-mode luminescent function as well as the effects of luminescent phosphors on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. Specifically, hexagonal phase NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) microcrystals were prepared by a hydrothermal method and added to the TiO2 photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells. The results indicated that the TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) composite photoanodes can emit visible light under 495 or 980 nm excitation, and then the visible light can be absorbed by dye N719 to improve light harvesting and thereby the efficiency of the solar cell. Under simulated solar radiation in the wavelength range of λ≥ 400 nm, the photoelectric conversion efficiency of TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) cell was increased by 10% compared to pure TiO2 cell. For the electrodes with the same thickness, the amount of dye adsorption of the photoanodes decreased a little after adding NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+), which was attributed to the decrease of TiO2 in the photoanodes. The electron transport and interfacial recombination kinetics were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy. The TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) cell has longer electron recombination time as well as electron transport time than pure TiO2 cell. The charge collection efficiency of TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) cell was little lower than that of pure TiO2 cell. In addition, the interfacial resistance of the TiO2-dye|I3(-)/I(-) electrolyte interface of TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) cell was much bigger than that of pure TiO2 cell. All these results indicated that the charge transport cannot be improved by adding NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+). And thus, the enhanced photoelectric conversion efficiencies of TiO2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) cells were closely related to the dual-mode luminescent function of NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+).

  15. Upconversion and tribological properties of β-NaYF4:Yb,Er film synthesized on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanying; Cheng, Xianhua

    2016-05-01

    In this work, β-NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion (UC) film was successfully prepared on silicon (Si) substrate via self-assemble method for the first time. The chemical composition and surface morphology of the UC film were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA), X-ray power diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. To investigate the effects of KH-560 primer film and chemical reactions on the UC luminescence properties of β-NaYF4:Yb,Er UC film, decay profiles of the 540 nm and 655 nm radiations were measured. Furthermore, tribological test was applied to qualitatively evaluate the adhesion of the UC film. The results indicate that the UC film has been successfully prepared on Si substrate by covalent chemical bonds. This work provides a facile way to synthesize β-NaYF4:Yb,Er UC film with robust adhesion to the substrate, which can be applicable for other UC films.

  16. Meningococcal Vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Sullivan, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcal bacterium, is a common asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonizer that may infrequently lead to invasive disease in the form of meningitis or bacteremia. Six serogroups (A, B, C, W, X and Y) are responsible for the majority of invasive infections. Increased risk of disease occurs in specific population groups including infants, adolescents, those with asplenia or complement deficiencies, and those residing in crowded living conditions such as in college dormitories. The incidence of invasive meningococcal disease varies geographically with some countries (e.g., in the African meningitis belt) having both high endemic disease rates and ongoing epidemics, with annual rates reaching 1000 cases per 100,000 persons. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with meningococcal disease, it remains a major global health threat best prevented by vaccination. Several countries have implemented vaccination programs with the selection of specific vaccine(s) based on locally prevalent serogroup(s) of N. meningitidis and targeting population groups at highest risk. Polysaccharide meningococcal vaccines became available over 40 years ago, but are limited by their inability to produce immunologic memory responses, poor immunogenicity in infants/children, hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses, and lack of efficacy against nasopharyngeal carriage. In 1999, the first meningococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced and have been successful in overcoming many of the shortcomings of polysaccharide vaccines. The implementation of meningococcal conjugate vaccination programs in many areas of the world (including the massive campaign in sub-Saharan Africa using a serogroup A conjugate vaccine) has led to dramatic reductions in the incidence of meningococcal disease by both individual and population protection. Progressive advances in vaccinology have led to the recent licensure of two effective vaccines against serogroup B

  17. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated?Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in ...

  18. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  19. [HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Stronski Huwiler, Susanne; Spaar, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Viruses are associated with genital carcinoma (of the cervix, anus, vulva, vagina and the penis) as well as with non-genital carcinoma (oropharyngeal carcinoma) and genital warts. In Switzerland two highly efficient and safe vaccines are available. The safety of these vaccines has been repeatedly subject of controversial discussions, however so far post marketing surveillance has always been able to confirm the safety. In Switzerland girls and young women have been offered the HPV vaccination within cantonal programmes since 2008. 2015 the recommendation for the HPV-vaccination for boys and young men was issued, and starting July 1, 2016 they as well will be offered vaccination free of charge within the cantonal programmes. This article discusses the burden of disease, efficacy and safety of the vaccines and presents facts which are important for vaccinating these young people. Specifically, aspects of the decisional capacity of adolescents to consent to the vaccination are presented. Finally, the future perspective with a focus on a new vaccine with an enlarged spectrum of HPV-types is discussed. PMID:27268446

  20. Tunable multicolor and white-light upconversion luminescence in Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ tri-doped NaYF4 micro-crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2015-09-01

    NaYF4 micro-crystals with various concentrations of Yb(3+) /Tm(3+) /Ho(3+) were prepared successfully via a simple and reproducible hydrothermal route using EDTA as the chelating agent. Their phase structure and surface morphology were studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD patterns revealed that all the samples were pure hexagonal phase NaYF4. SEM images showed that Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)/Ho(3+) tri-doped NaYF4 were hexagonal micro-prisms. Upconversion photoluminescence spectra of Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)/Ho(3+) tri-doped NaYF4 micro-crystals with various dopant concentrations under 980 nm excitation with a 665 mW pump power were studied. Tunable multicolor (purple, purplish blue, yellowish green, green) and white light were achieved by simply adjusting the Ho(3+) concentration in 20%Yb(3+)/1%Tm(3+)/xHo(3+) tri-doped NaYF4 micro-crystals. Furthermore, white-light emissions could be obtained using different pump powers in 20%Yb(3+)/1%Tm(3+)/1%Ho(3+) tri-doped NaYF4 micro-crystals at 980 nm excitation. The pump power-dependent intensity relationship was studied and relevant energy transfer processes were discussed in detail. The results suggest that Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) Ho(3+) tri-doped NaYF4 micro-crystals have potential applications in optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaic, plasma display panel and white-light-emitting diodes.

  1. From research to phase III: preclinical, industrial and clinical development of the Sanofi Pasteur tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Barrere, Beatrice; Malinowski, Claire; Saville, Melanie; Teyssou, Remy; Lang, Jean

    2011-09-23

    Dengue vaccine development has reached a major milestone with the initiation, in 2010, of the first phase III clinical trial to investigate the Sanofi Pasteur CYD tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV). The CYD TDV candidate is composed of four recombinant, live, attenuated vaccines (CYD-1-4) based on a yellow fever vaccine 17D (YFV 17D) backbone, each expressing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of one of the four dengue virus serotypes. The vaccine is genetically and phenotypically stable, non-hepatotropic, less neurovirulent than YFV 17D, and does not infect mosquitoes by the oral route. In vitro and in vivo preclinical studies showed that CYD TDV induces controlled stimulation of human dendritic cells, and significant immune responses in monkeys. Scale up and industrialization are being conducted in parallel with preclinical and clinical development to fulfill the needs of phase II/III trials, and to anticipate and facilitate supply and access to vaccine in the countries where the dengue disease burden makes it an urgent public health priority. The vaccine has now been administered to more than 6000 children and adults from dengue endemic and non-endemic areas and no safety concerns have arisen in any of the completed or ongoing trials. A three-dose vaccination regimen induces an immune response against all four serotypes in the large majority of vaccinees. Preexisting flavivirus immunity favors quicker and higher immune responses to CYD TDV, without adversely effecting clinical safety or increasing vaccine viremia. The observed level and nature of the cellular immune responses in humans are consistent with the good safety and immunogenicity profile of the vaccine. Preliminary results of an ongoing, proof-of-concept efficacy and large scale safety study in Thai children are expected by the end of 2012. Here we discuss the different steps and challenges of developing CYD TDV, from research to industrialization, and summarize some of the challenges to the successful

  2. Biologic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, KATHERINE T.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of new disease pandemics has spurred the development of biologic vaccines, which promise tremendous improvements in global and local health. Several lend themselves to the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. But the uncertainties of whom to vaccinate raise the question of whether the health care system can make these promising products viable. PMID:22478749

  3. [Pretravel vaccination].

    PubMed

    Koch, Claus

    2005-10-17

    Vaccination is a simple and effective way to protect against certain infectious diseases and is nearly always to be recommended when one is travelling to countries with lesser hygienic standards. This report provides guidance on immunization concerns and describes the individual vaccines most commonly used in travel medicine.

  4. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause problems like genital warts and some kinds of cancer, a vaccine is an important step in preventing infection and protecting against the spread of HPV. That's why doctors recommend that all girls and guys get the vaccine at these ages: ...

  5. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  6. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be given at least 2 weeks before travel to allow the vaccine time to work. A booster dose is needed every ... should be given at least 1 week before travel to allow the vaccine time to work. Swallow each dose about an hour ...

  7. Dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai

    2005-11-01

    Dengue is an expanding health problem. About two-fifths of the world population are at risk for acquiring dengue with 50-100 million cases of acute febrile illness yearly including about 500,000 cases of DHF/DSS. No antiviral drugs active against the flavivirus exist. Attempts to control mosquito vector has been largely unsuccessful. Vaccination remains the most hopeful preventive measure. Dengue vaccine has been in development for more than 30 years, yet none has been licensed. The fact that enhancing antibody from previous infection and high level of T cell activation during secondary infection contribute to immunopathology of DHF, the vaccine must be able to induce protective response to four dengue serotypes simultaneously. Inactivated vaccine is safe but needs a repeated booster thus, development is delayed. Tetravalent live attenuated vaccine and chimeric vaccine using yellow fever or dengue viruses as a backbone are being carried out in human trials. DNA vaccine and subunit vaccine are being carried out in animal trials.

  8. Th17 master transcription factors RORα and RORγ regulate the expression of IL-17C, IL-17D and IL-17F in Cynoglossus semilaevis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Heng; Bøgwald, Jarl; Dalmo, Roy Ambli; Zhang, Wenjie; Hu, Yong-hua

    2016-02-01

    The RAR-related orphan receptors (RORs) are members of the nuclear receptor family of intracellular transcription factors. In this study, we examined the regulatory properties of RORα (CsRORα) and RORγ (CsRORγ) in tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsRORα and CsRORγ expression was detected in major lymphoid organs and altered to significant extents after bacterial and viral infection. CsRORα enhanced the activities of CsIL-17C, CsIL-17D, and CsIL-17F promoters, which contain CsRORα and CsRORγ binding sites. CsRORγ also upregulated the promoter activities of CsIL-17D and CsIL-17F but not CsIL-17C. CsRORα and CsRORγ proteins were detected in the nucleus, and overexpression of CsRORα in tongue sole significantly increased the expression of CsIL-17C, CsIL-17D, and CsIL-17F, whereas overexpression of CsRORγ significantly increased the expression of CsIL-17C and CsIL-17F but no CsIL-17D. These results indicate that RORα and RORγ in teleost regulate the expression of IL-17 members in different manners. PMID:26547017

  9. Up-conversion luminescence polarization control in Er3+-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhang; Yun-Hua, Yao; Shi-An, Zhang; Chen-Hui, Lu; Zhen-Rong, Sun

    2016-02-01

    We propose a femtosecond laser polarization modulation scheme to control the up-conversion (UC) luminescence in Er3+-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals dispersed in the silicate glass. We show that the UC luminescence can be suppressed when the laser polarization is changed from linear through elliptical to circular, and the higher repetition rate will yield the lower control efficiency. We theoretically analyze the physical control mechanism of the UC luminescence polarization modulation by considering on- and near-resonant two-photon absorption, energy transfer up-conversion, and excited state absorption, and show that the polarization control mainly comes from the contribution of near-resonant two-photon absorption. Furthermore, we propose a method to improve the polarization control efficiency of UC luminescence in rare-earth ions by applying a two-color femtosecond laser field. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304396), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474096 and 51132004), and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. 14JC1401500).

  10. Composition tuning the upconversion emission in NaYF4:Yb/Tm hexaplate nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Yujing; Lin, Yungchen; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-03-01

    Single crystal hexagonal NaYF4:Yb/Tm nanocrystals have been synthesized with uniform size, morphology and controlled chemical composition. Spectroscopic studies show that these nanocrystals exhibit strong energy upconversion emission when excited with a 980 nm diode laser, with two primary emission peaks centered around 452 nm and 476 nm. Importantly, the overall and relative emission intensity at these wavelengths can be readily tuned by controlling the concentration of the trivalent rare earth element dopants at the beginning of the synthesis which has been confirmed by EDX for the first time. Through systematic studies, the optimum rare earth ion doping concentration can be determined for the strongest emission intensity at the selected peak(s). Confocal microscopy studies show that the upconversion emission from individual NCs can be readily visualized. These studies demonstrate a rational approach for fine tuning the upconversion properties in rare-earth doped nanostructures and can broadly impact areas ranging from energy harvesting, energy conversion to biomedical imaging and therapeutics. PMID:21264435

  11. Combination Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Skibinski, David AG; Baudner, Barbara C; Singh, Manmohan; O’Hagan, Derek T

    2011-01-01

    The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B); and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines. PMID:21572611

  12. Licensed Dengue Vaccine: Public Health Conundrum and Scientific Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    A tetravalent live attenuated vaccine composed of chimeras of yellow fever 17D and the four dengue viruses (chimeric yellow fever dengue [CYD]) manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur has completed phase III clinical testing in over 35,000 children 2–16 years of age. The vaccine was recently licensed in four countries. During the first 2 years of observation, CYD vaccine efficacy ranged between 30% and 79% in 10 different countries with an overall efficacy of 56.8%. During year 3, there was an overall efficacy against hospitalization of 16.7%, but a relative risk of hospitalization of 1.6 among children younger than 9 years and 4.95 in children 5 years of age and younger. Vaccination of seronegative children resulted in universal broad dengue neutralizing antibody responses, but poor protection against breakthrough dengue cases. Unless proven otherwise, such breakthrough cases in vaccinated subjects should be regarded as vaccine antibody-enhanced (ADE). The provenance of these cases can be studied serologically using original antigenic sin immune responses in convalescent sera. In conventional dengue vaccine efficacy clinical trials, persons vaccinated as seronegatives may be hospitalized with breakthrough ADE infections, whereas in the placebo group, dengue infection of monotypic immunes results in hospitalization. Vaccine efficacy trial design must identify dengue disease etiology by separately measuring efficacy in seronegatives and seropositives. The reason(s) why CYD vaccine failed to raise protective dengue virus immunity are unknown. To achieve a safe and protective dengue vaccine, careful studies of monotypic CYD vaccines in humans should precede field trials of tetravalent formulations. PMID:27352870

  13. Paramagnetism and improved upconversion luminescence properties of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaGdF4 nanocomposites synthesized by a boiling water seed-mediated route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Qing; Li, Ao-Ju; Guo, Wei; Tian, Peng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Zhong-Xin; Cao, Yang; Sun, Zhong-Liang

    2016-03-01

    In a route boiling water served as reaction medium, a stoichiometric amount of rare-earth compound and fluoride are put into this system to form α-NaYF4:Yb, Er nuclei. Then prepared sample is heated at elevated temperature to improve the fluorescence intensity, and next a NaGdF4 shell grows on the surface of NaYF4 nuclei. NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaGdF4 core-shell structured upconversion nanoparticles (CSUCNPs) have been successfully synthesized by above route. The use of boiling water decreases the cubic-to-hexagonal phase transition temperature of NaYF4:Yb,Er to 350°C and increases its upconversion (UC) luminescence intensity. A heterogeneous NaGdF4 epitaxially growing on the surface of Ln3+-doped NaYF4 not only improves UC luminescence, but also creates a paramagnetic shell, which can be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The solution of CSUCNPs shows bright green UC fluorescence under the excitation at 980 nm in a power density only about 50 mW·cm-2. A broad spectrum with a dominant resonance at g of about 2 is observed by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of CSUCNPs. Above properties suggest that the obtained CSUCNPs could be potential candidates for dual-mode optical/magnetic bioapplications.

  14. Ozone and TFA impacts in North America from degradation of 2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf), a potential greenhouse gas replacement.

    PubMed

    Luecken, Deborah J; L Waterland, Robert; Papasavva, Stella; Taddonio, Kristen N; Hutzell, William T; Rugh, John P; Andersen, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    We use a regional-scale, three-dimensional atmospheric model to evaluate U.S. air quality effects that would result from replacing HFC-134a in automobile air conditioners in the U.S. with HFO-1234yf. Although HFO-1234yf produces tropospheric ozone, the incremental amount is small, averaging less than 0.01% of total ozone formed during the simulation. We show that this production of ozone could be compensated for by a modest improvement in air conditioner efficiency. Atmospheric decomposition of HFO-1234yf produces trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which is subject to wet and dry deposition. Deposition and concentrations of TFA are spatially variable due to HFO-1234yf's short atmospheric lifetime, with more localized peaks and less global transport when compared to HFC-134a. Over the 2.5 month simulation, deposition of TFA in the continental U.S. from mobile air conditioners averages 0.24 kg km(-2), substantially higher than previous estimates from all sources of current hydrofluorocarbons. Automobile air conditioning HFO-1234yf emissions are predicted to produce concentrations of TFA in Eastern U.S. rainfall at least double the values currently observed from all sources, natural and man-made. Our model predicts peak concentrations in rainfall of 1264 ng L(-1), a level that is 80x lower than the lowest level considered safe for the most sensitive aquatic organisms.

  15. Near-infrared light triggered superior photocatalytic activity from MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chatti, Manjunath; Adusumalli, Venkata N K B; Ganguli, Sagar; Mahalingam, Venkataramanan

    2016-08-01

    A near infrared (NIR) responsive photocatalyst, composed of a narrow band gap semiconductor (i.e. MoS2) and an optical material possessing upconverting ability (i.e. NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)) has been successfully prepared via a simple hydrothermal method. The latter has the ability to convert NIR light into visible light while the MoS2 uses the light to degrade organic pollutants. Upon near infrared (NIR) excitation of the MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocomposites, the energy of the strong green and the red emissions along with the weak violet emissions from the NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystals (NCs) is transferred to MoS2. This results in enhanced NIR light triggered photocatalytic performance, as verified by studying the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye under 980 nm laser excitation. The strong photocatalytic activity of MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) composites is attributed to the layered nature of the photocatalyst which leads to the efficient separation of photogenerated carriers (electron-hole pairs) and excellent upconversion properties of NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) NCs. The study also shows the importance of the composite formation, as the physical mixture leads to only very low photocatalytic activity. Our results can be helpful in the structural design and development of high-performance photocatalysts. PMID:27424735

  16. Ozone and TFA impacts in North America from degradation of 2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf), a potential greenhouse gas replacement.

    PubMed

    Luecken, Deborah J; L Waterland, Robert; Papasavva, Stella; Taddonio, Kristen N; Hutzell, William T; Rugh, John P; Andersen, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    We use a regional-scale, three-dimensional atmospheric model to evaluate U.S. air quality effects that would result from replacing HFC-134a in automobile air conditioners in the U.S. with HFO-1234yf. Although HFO-1234yf produces tropospheric ozone, the incremental amount is small, averaging less than 0.01% of total ozone formed during the simulation. We show that this production of ozone could be compensated for by a modest improvement in air conditioner efficiency. Atmospheric decomposition of HFO-1234yf produces trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which is subject to wet and dry deposition. Deposition and concentrations of TFA are spatially variable due to HFO-1234yf's short atmospheric lifetime, with more localized peaks and less global transport when compared to HFC-134a. Over the 2.5 month simulation, deposition of TFA in the continental U.S. from mobile air conditioners averages 0.24 kg km(-2), substantially higher than previous estimates from all sources of current hydrofluorocarbons. Automobile air conditioning HFO-1234yf emissions are predicted to produce concentrations of TFA in Eastern U.S. rainfall at least double the values currently observed from all sources, natural and man-made. Our model predicts peak concentrations in rainfall of 1264 ng L(-1), a level that is 80x lower than the lowest level considered safe for the most sensitive aquatic organisms. PMID:19994849

  17. Near-infrared light triggered superior photocatalytic activity from MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chatti, Manjunath; Adusumalli, Venkata N K B; Ganguli, Sagar; Mahalingam, Venkataramanan

    2016-08-01

    A near infrared (NIR) responsive photocatalyst, composed of a narrow band gap semiconductor (i.e. MoS2) and an optical material possessing upconverting ability (i.e. NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)) has been successfully prepared via a simple hydrothermal method. The latter has the ability to convert NIR light into visible light while the MoS2 uses the light to degrade organic pollutants. Upon near infrared (NIR) excitation of the MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocomposites, the energy of the strong green and the red emissions along with the weak violet emissions from the NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystals (NCs) is transferred to MoS2. This results in enhanced NIR light triggered photocatalytic performance, as verified by studying the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye under 980 nm laser excitation. The strong photocatalytic activity of MoS2-NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) composites is attributed to the layered nature of the photocatalyst which leads to the efficient separation of photogenerated carriers (electron-hole pairs) and excellent upconversion properties of NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) NCs. The study also shows the importance of the composite formation, as the physical mixture leads to only very low photocatalytic activity. Our results can be helpful in the structural design and development of high-performance photocatalysts.

  18. Simultaneous size and luminescence control of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) microcrystals via Li+ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2015-07-01

    Enhancement of upconversion (UC) luminescence is imperative for the applications of UC microcrystals (MCs). In this work, NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) MCs via Li+ doping were successfully prepared by a simple hydrothermal process with the assistance of citric acid. The UC luminescence intensities of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) are significantly enhanced via Li+ doping at different concentrations. Compared to Li+-absent sample, UC luminescence intensities of blue emission (477 nm) and red emission (649 nm) in NaYF4:Yb3+/Tm3+ MCs via 15 mol% Li+ doping are improved by 10 and 9 times, respectively; UC luminescence intensities of green emission (538 nm) and red emission (644 nm) in NaYF4:Yb3+/Ho3+ MCs via 15 mol% Li+ doping are improved by 12 and 3 times, respectively. The mechanism of the enhancement via Li+ doping is discussed in details, which may be attributed to the fact that Li+ doping can cause the distortion of the local symmetry around RE ions. Our results indicate that the enhanced UC luminescence of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) MCs via Li+ doping may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and plasma display panel.

  19. Semi-emprical and ab initio study of lanthanide and transition metal ions doped in hexagonol beta-NaYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ge

    Lanthanide and transition metal doped hexagonal beta-NaYF4 nanocrystals have a wide variety of applications in bioimaging, solar concentrators, display panel technology, photodynamic therapy, and security printing. This dissertation research employed two complementary approaches to characterizing the photoactive properties of lanthanides and transition metals doped in beta-NaYF 4. One approach was a semi-empirical method, based on Judd-Ofelt theory, used to calculate the optical transition intensity parameters for Er 3+ doped in beta-phase NaYF4:Yb3+ from measured emission intensity ratios and the diffuse reflectance spectrum. The second approach was based on first-principles density functional theory, investigating the effect of doping on the electronic structure of the materials of interest. In this latter approach, models of beta-NaYF4 with different numbers of atoms in supercells were built, where supercells were reproduced through translational symmetry creating periodic boundary conditions. The models were tested for convergence of local structure and energy as a function of supercell size. First, a converged model for the un-doped "parent" structure of the host material was developed using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional. Then, a systematic investigation of the optimized geometry and electronic structure of the doped beta-NaYF4: Ln3+ nanocrystals, was conducted using both spin-polarized DFT and non-collinear-spin DFT. For transition metal doping, the relationship between site symmetry and spin state with different doping concentrations was also demonstrated.

  20. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  1. Meningococcal Vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Sullivan, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcal bacterium, is a common asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonizer that may infrequently lead to invasive disease in the form of meningitis or bacteremia. Six serogroups (A, B, C, W, X and Y) are responsible for the majority of invasive infections. Increased risk of disease occurs in specific population groups including infants, adolescents, those with asplenia or complement deficiencies, and those residing in crowded living conditions such as in college dormitories. The incidence of invasive meningococcal disease varies geographically with some countries (e.g., in the African meningitis belt) having both high endemic disease rates and ongoing epidemics, with annual rates reaching 1000 cases per 100,000 persons. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with meningococcal disease, it remains a major global health threat best prevented by vaccination. Several countries have implemented vaccination programs with the selection of specific vaccine(s) based on locally prevalent serogroup(s) of N. meningitidis and targeting population groups at highest risk. Polysaccharide meningococcal vaccines became available over 40 years ago, but are limited by their inability to produce immunologic memory responses, poor immunogenicity in infants/children, hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses, and lack of efficacy against nasopharyngeal carriage. In 1999, the first meningococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced and have been successful in overcoming many of the shortcomings of polysaccharide vaccines. The implementation of meningococcal conjugate vaccination programs in many areas of the world (including the massive campaign in sub-Saharan Africa using a serogroup A conjugate vaccine) has led to dramatic reductions in the incidence of meningococcal disease by both individual and population protection. Progressive advances in vaccinology have led to the recent licensure of two effective vaccines against serogroup B

  2. [Rabbies vaccination].

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    With very few exceptions, rabies is occurring around the globe. The clinical course of this mammal-transmitted infection is almost universally fatal. Thus, the disease is causing more human deaths than any other zoonosis. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, pre- or post-exposure vaccination remains the only effective means to avoid development of fatal disease. Save and highly effective cell culture vaccines which have been available for decades provide long-lasting protection. Various vaccination schedules have been tested and are being recommended. PMID:27268449

  3. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khurana, S K; Talib, V H

    1996-12-01

    Recently it has become evident that he same candidate antigen can be shared by several of the parasite stages, and thus the concept of a multistage vaccine is becoming more and more attractive. A TDR Task Force evaluated the promise and stage of development of some 20 existing asexual blood stage candidate antigens and prepared a strategy for their development leading to clinical testing and field trials, Amongst these are merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1), Serine Rich Antigen (SERA), Apical Membrane Antigen (AMA-1), and Erythrocyte Binding Antigen (EBA). A field study conducted in Tanzanian children showed that the SPf66 Colombian vaccine was safe, induced antibodies, and reduced the risk of developing clinical malaria by around 30%. This study, confirmed the potential of the vaccine to confer partial protection in areas of high as well as low intensity of transmission. Pfs25 is a leading candidate antigen for a transmission blocking vaccine. It is found in the ookinete stage of the parasite in the mosquito midgut. Gramme amounts of GMP-grade material have been produced and a vaccine based on the Pfs25 antigen formulated with alum should have gone into phase I and II clinical trials in the USA and Africa during 1995. Because the first malaria prototype vaccine to be tried out in people on a large scale has been the polymerized synthetic peptide developed by patarroye on the basis of the SPf66 antigen of P. faliciparum, the results are with much interest. It is still premature to predict the effectiveness of this vaccine globally, but its development will encourage further progress in a fields that has repeatedly been characterized by raised and then dashed drops. These various vaccines are based on the classical approach to vaccination, which is to raise host immunity against the parasite so as to reduce parasite densities or to sterilize an infection. A newer approach is development of antidisease vaccines which aim to alleviate morbidity by suppressing

  4. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot) • One dose ...

  5. Influence of Shell Formation on Morphological Structure, Optical and Emission Intensity on Aqueous Dispersible NaYF4:Ce/Tb Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Anees A; Parchur, A K; Kumar, B; Rai, S B

    2016-07-01

    A highly water-dispersible NaYF4:Ce/Tb (core), NaYF4:Ce/Tb@NaYF4(core/shell) and NaYF4:Ce/Tb@NaYF4@SiO2 (core/shell/SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a general synthesis approach. The growth of an inert NaYF4 and silica shell (~14 nm) around the core-NPs resulted in an increase of the average size of the nanopaticles as well as broadening of their size distribution. The optical band-gap energy slightly decreases after shell formation due to the increase the crystalline size. To optimize the influence of shell formation a comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties (excitation, emission, and luminescence decay time) of the core, core/shell, and core/shell/SiO2 NPs were measured. The emission intensity was significantly enhanced after inert shell formation around the surface of the core NPs. The Commission International de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of the emission spectrum of core, core/shell, core/shell/SiO2 NPs lie closest to the standard green color emission at 545 nm. By quantitative spectroscopic measurements of surface-modified core-NPs, it was suggested that encapsulation with inert and silica layers was found to be effective in retaining both luminescence intensity and dispersibility in aqueous environment. Considering the high aqueous dispersion and enhanced luminescence efficiency of the core-NPs make them an ideal luminescent material for luminescence bioimaging and optical biosensors. PMID:27207570

  6. Influence of Shell Formation on Morphological Structure, Optical and Emission Intensity on Aqueous Dispersible NaYF4:Ce/Tb Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Anees A; Parchur, A K; Kumar, B; Rai, S B

    2016-07-01

    A highly water-dispersible NaYF4:Ce/Tb (core), NaYF4:Ce/Tb@NaYF4(core/shell) and NaYF4:Ce/Tb@NaYF4@SiO2 (core/shell/SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a general synthesis approach. The growth of an inert NaYF4 and silica shell (~14 nm) around the core-NPs resulted in an increase of the average size of the nanopaticles as well as broadening of their size distribution. The optical band-gap energy slightly decreases after shell formation due to the increase the crystalline size. To optimize the influence of shell formation a comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties (excitation, emission, and luminescence decay time) of the core, core/shell, and core/shell/SiO2 NPs were measured. The emission intensity was significantly enhanced after inert shell formation around the surface of the core NPs. The Commission International de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of the emission spectrum of core, core/shell, core/shell/SiO2 NPs lie closest to the standard green color emission at 545 nm. By quantitative spectroscopic measurements of surface-modified core-NPs, it was suggested that encapsulation with inert and silica layers was found to be effective in retaining both luminescence intensity and dispersibility in aqueous environment. Considering the high aqueous dispersion and enhanced luminescence efficiency of the core-NPs make them an ideal luminescent material for luminescence bioimaging and optical biosensors.

  7. Experimental Performance of R-1234yf and R-1234ze as Drop-in Replacements for R-134a in Domestic Refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Karber, Kyle M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about anthropogenic climate change have generated an interest in low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants and have spawned policies and regulations that encourage the transition to low GWP refrigerants. Recent research has largely focused on hydrofluoroolefins (HFOs), including R-1234yf (GWP = 4) as a replacement for R-134a (GWP = 1430) in automotive air-conditioning applications. While R-1234yf and R-1234ze (GWP = 6) have been investigated theoretically as a replacements for R-134a in domestic refrigeration, there is a lack of experimental evidence. This paper gives experimental performance data for R-1234yf and R-1234ze as drop-in replacements for R134a in two household refrigerators one baseline and one advanced technology. An experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare the performance of R-134a to R-1234yf and R-1234ze, using AHAM standard HRF-1 to evaluate energy consumption. These refrigerants were tested as drop-in replacements, with no performance enhancing modifications to the refrigerators. In Refrigerator 1 and 2, R-1234yf had 2.7% and 1.3% higher energy consumption than R-134a, respectively. This indicates that R-1234yf is a suitable drop-in replacement for R-134a in domestic refrigeration applications. In Refrigerator 1 and 2, R-1234ze had 16% and 5.4% lower energy consumption than R-134a, respectively. In order to replace R-134a with R-1234ze in domestic refrigerators the lower capacity would need to be addressed, thus R-1234ze might not be suitable for drop-in replacement.

  8. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  9. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  10. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... The best way to prevent it is through vaccinations. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping ...

  11. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  12. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  13. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er(3+)/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er(3+)/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy. PMID:26137385

  14. Surface plasmon enhanced up-conversion from NaYF4:Yb/Er/Gd nano-rods.

    PubMed

    Wang, PengHui; Li, ZhiQiang; Salcedo, Walter J; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, SuMei; Brolo, Alexandre G

    2015-06-28

    The surface plasmons that are enabled by grating coupling in two-dimensional gold nano-particle arrays (AuNPAs) affected the spectral characteristics of the up-conversion (UC) emission from Yb(3+)-Er(3+)-Gd(3+) co-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4:Yb/Er/Gd) nano-rods. The red emission of NaYF4:Yb/Er/Gd nano-rods at 660 nm (excited with a 980 nm diode laser) was significantly enhanced by the interaction with the AuNPAs. The geometric characteristics of the gold nanoparticles influenced the position of the surface plasmon resonance, and their near field strengths. The intensity of the red emission normalized versus the green emission reached 1.4, measured against a reference film in the absence of the metallic nanostructures. The lifetime for the green and red emission decreased steadily as the periodicity decreased (relative to the reference), reaching about 6% reduction for the 350 nm AuNPA. A qualitative agreement was obtained between the experimental results and finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. PMID:26033554

  15. Infrared spectral properties for α-NaYF4 single crystal of various Er3+doping concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Xia, Haiping; Feng, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhixiong; Jiang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jian; He, Shinan; Tang, Qingyang; sheng, Qiguo; Gu, Xuemei; Zhang, Yuepin; Chen, Baojiu; Jiang, Haochuan

    2016-08-01

    The α-NaYF4 single crystals doped with 0.2 mol%, 0.5 mol%, 1 mol%, 2 mol% and 3 mol% Er3+ ions were fabricated by an improved Bridgman method. The ~1.5 μm and ~2.7 μm emission properties were investigated in detail through the measured absorption and emission spectra. A Judd-Ofelt analysis of Er3+in α-NaYF4 samples is performed. The Judd-Ofelt parameters are obtained (Ω2=2.71×10-20 cm2, Ω4=2.28×10-20 cm2, Ω6=0.84×10-20 cm2) and the radiative lifetimes of Er3+energy levels and the branching ratios of Er3+transitions are calculated. The calculated maximum emission cross section by McCumber theory for ~1.5 μm and ~2.7 μm reached 1.35×10-20 cm2 and 2.2×10-20 cm2, respectively. The gain cross section spectra were calculated based on the absorption and emission cross section spectra. All these spectral properties indicated that this kind of fluoride crystal has potential application as host material for infrared lasers.

  16. Structural investigations of sol-gel-derived LiYF{sub 4} and LiGdF{sub 4} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Lepoutre, S.; Boyer, D. Potdevin, A.; Dubois, M.; Briois, V.; Mahiou, R.

    2007-11-15

    A soft synthesis route based on the sol-gel process was used for preparing rare-earth tetrafluoride powders from alkoxide precursors. In-situ fluorination was performed by decomposition of a fluorine containing organic compound named 1,1,1-trifluoro-5-methyl-2,4-hexanedione when sintering the as-prepared xerogel to produce crystallized samples. Both to insure complete departure of organic residues as well as to avoid any oxidation into oxyfluoride, annealing treatment was carried out under fluorine atmosphere. Free-oxygen content of resulting samples was evidenced by infrared and Raman spectroscopies. X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS) and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that samples heat treated at 300 deg. C are already crystallized but for a full crystallization in LiGdF{sub 4} and LiYF{sub 4} a thermal treatment at 550 deg. C is needed. Temperature dependence of powder morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Graphical abstract: The sol-gel route is a soft process, which allows developing versatile-shaped compounds. A fluorine organic compound named 1,1,1-trifluoro-5-methyl-2,4-hexadione was used to synthesis LiGdF{sub 4} and LiYF{sub 4} powders based on the sol-gel method. These materials can be used as host lattices for rare-earth ions to provide phosphors.

  17. Nanoparticle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Seth, Arjun; Wibowo, Nani; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Mitter, Neena; Yu, Chengzhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology increasingly plays a significant role in vaccine development. As vaccine development orientates toward less immunogenic "minimalist" compositions, formulations that boost antigen effectiveness are increasingly needed. The use of nanoparticles in vaccine formulations allows not only improved antigen stability and immunogenicity, but also targeted delivery and slow release. A number of nanoparticle vaccines varying in composition, size, shape, and surface properties have been approved for human use and the number of candidates is increasing. However, challenges remain due to a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the in vivo behavior of nanoparticles, which can operate as either a delivery system to enhance antigen processing and/or as an immunostimulant adjuvant to activate or enhance immunity. This review provides a broad overview of recent advances in prophylactic nanovaccinology. Types of nanoparticles used are outlined and their interaction with immune cells and the biosystem are discussed. Increased knowledge and fundamental understanding of nanoparticle mechanism of action in both immunostimulatory and delivery modes, and better understanding of in vivo biodistribution and fate, are urgently required, and will accelerate the rational design of nanoparticle-containing vaccines. PMID:24295808

  18. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  19. Construction and characterization of recombinant flaviviruses bearing insertions between E and NS1 genes

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Mello, Samanta M; Trindade, Gisela F; Rangel, Aymara A; Duarte, Adriana S; Oliveira, Prisciliana J; Freire, Marcos S; Kubelka, Claire F; Galler, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Background The yellow fever virus, a member of the genus Flavivirus, is an arthropod-borne pathogen causing severe disease in humans. The attenuated yellow fever 17D virus strain has been used for human vaccination for 70 years and has several characteristics that are desirable for the development of new, live attenuated vaccines. We described here a methodology to construct a viable, and immunogenic recombinant yellow fever 17D virus expressing a green fluorescent protein variant (EGFP). This approach took into account the presence of functional motifs and amino acid sequence conservation flanking the E and NS1 intergenic region to duplicate and fuse them to the exogenous gene and thereby allow the correct processing of the viral polyprotein precursor. Results YF 17D EGFP recombinant virus was grew in Vero cells and reached a peak titer of approximately 6.45 ± 0.4 log10 PFU/mL at 96 hours post-infection. Immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the expression of the EGFP, which was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and not secreted from infected cells. The association with the ER compartment did not interfere with YF assembly, since the recombinant virus was fully competent to replicate and exit the cell. This virus was genetically stable up to the tenth serial passage in Vero cells. The recombinant virus was capable to elicit a neutralizing antibody response to YF and antibodies to EGFP as evidenced by an ELISA test. The applicability of this cloning strategy to clone gene foreign sequences in other flavivirus genomes was demonstrated by the construction of a chimeric recombinant YF 17D/DEN4 virus. Conclusion This system is likely to be useful for a broader live attenuated YF 17D virus-based vaccine development for human diseases. Moreover, insertion of foreign genes into the flavivirus genome may also allow in vivo studies on flavivirus cell and tissue tropism as well as cellular processes related to flavivirus infection. PMID

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Core–Shell Co0.16Fe2.84O4@NaYF4(Yb, Er) and Fe3O4@NaYF4(Yb, Tm) Nanoparticle as Trimodal (MRI, PET/SPECT, and Optical) Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal nanoparticulate materials are described, offering magnetic, radionuclide, and fluorescent imaging capabilities to exploit the complementary advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography/single-photon emission commuted tomography (PET/SPECT), and optical imaging. They comprise Fe3O4@NaYF4 core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) with different cation dopants in the shell or core, including Co0.16Fe2.84O4@NaYF4(Yb, Er) and Fe3O4@NaYF4(Yb, Tm). These NPs are stabilized by bisphosphonate polyethylene glycol conjugates (BP-PEG), and then show a high transverse relaxivity (r2) up to 326 mM–1 s–1 at 3T, a high affinity to [18F]-fluoride or radiometal-bisphosphonate conjugates (e.g., 64Cu and 99mTc), and fluorescent emissions from 500 to 800 nm under excitation at 980 nm. The biodistribution of intravenously administered particles determined by PET/MR imaging suggests that negatively charged Co0.16Fe2.84O4@NaYF4(Yb, Er)-BP-PEG (10K) NPs cleared from the blood pool more slowly than positively charged NPs Fe3O4@NaYF4(Yb, Tm)-BP-PEG (2K). Preliminary results in sentinel lymph node imaging in mice indicate the advantages of multimodal imaging. PMID:26172432

  1. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+)-incorporated nanocrystalline TiO2 electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Quanxin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Near infrared to visible up-conversion of light by rare earth ion-doped phosphors (NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+)) that convert multiple photons of lower energy to higher energy photons offer new possibilities for improved performance of photovoltaic devices. Here, up-conversion phosphor NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) doped nanocrystalline TiO2 films are designed and used as a electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells, and the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs based on composite electrodes are investigated. The results show the cell with NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) achieves a power conversion efficiency of 7.65% under one sun illumination (AM 1.5G, 100mWcm(-2)), which is an increase of 14% compared to the cell without NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) (6.71%). The performance improvement is attributed to the dual effects of enhanced light harvesting from extended light absorption range and increased light scattering, and lower electron transfer resistance.

  2. Remarkable enhancement of upconversion fluorescence and confocal imaging of PMMA Opal/NaYF(4):Yb(3+), Tm(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ze; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xu, Wen; Wang, Jing; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Shuang; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-01

    Novel PMMA opal photonic crystal/NaYF(4):Yb(3+), Tm(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystal composites were fabricated and tremendous improvement in upconversion luminescence (UCL) was observed under infrared 980 nm excitation. They were also explored to improve brightness of cell images. PMID:23539518

  3. UV, visible and near-infrared lights induced NOx destruction activity of (Yb,Er)-NaYF4/C-TiO2 composite

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyong; Yin, Shu; Dong, Qiang; Liu, Bin; Wang, Yuhua; Sekino, Tohru; Lee, Soo Wohn; Sato, Tsugio

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a well-known photocatalyst for environmental cleaning and energy conversion. However, it can only be excited by ultraviolet light for photocatalysis due to its wide band gap (3.2 eV). In this paper, we present a novel (Yb,Er)-NaYF4/C-TiO2 composite which can be perfectly induced not only by ultraviolet light but also weak visible and near infrared lights, owing to the increased carbon doping contents and optimal energy transfer between up-conversion phosphor and C doped TiO2 compared with that of solely C-TiO2. Consequently, the (Yb,Er)-NaYF4/C-TiO2 composite can present the outstanding continuous NOx gas destruction ability under the irradiation of ultraviolet, weak visible and infrared lights much superior to pure C-TiO2, P25 titania and even that of (Yb,Er)-NaYF4/N-TiO2 composite, due to the nice synergetic effect of (Yb,Er)-NaYF4 and C-TiO2, indicating a promising potential in the photocatalyst application with high efficiency of ultraviolet, visible and infrared lights induced photocatalysis simultaneously. PMID:24108086

  4. Ultraviolet upconversion enhancement in triply doped NaYF4:Tm3+, Yb3+ particles: The role of Nd3+ or Gd3+ Co-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab; Valdes, Carolina; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-08-01

    Upconversion (UC) particles are currently under intensive investigation, normally for their visible instead of ultraviolet (UV) light luminescence under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. As a commonly studied host, NaYF4 in particular is known to have low phonon energy and high UC efficiency. Here, we present our work on enhancing UC luminescence in the UV region by adding a third dopant into a binary-doped NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ host. More specifically, neodymium (Nd3+) or gadolinium (Gd3+) ions was co-doped into parent NaYF4:20mol%Yb3+,0.5mol%Tm3+ UC particles to enhance their UV UC luminescence. Experimental results demonstrated that these particles exhibited the highest degree of UV UC enhancements when co-doped with 0.05mol% Nd3+ or 2.0mol% Gd3+, expanding the potential of this type of materials into many possible applications by directly converting NIR irradiation into UV light. Fundamentally, the UV UC emission dependence of these triply doped NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ particles with different Nd3+ and Gd3+ doping concentrations was investigated in terms of ground state absorption, excited state absorption and energy transfer UC mechanisms.

  5. An upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/TiO2 core-shell nanoparticle photoelectrode for improved efficiencies of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Shen, Haiou; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shunhao; Zhu, Chuntao; Xue, Fang; Hou, Jinfeng; Su, Haiquan; Yuan, Zhuobin

    2013-03-01

    Novel upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized and used to prepare the photoelectrode (PE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The morphology, structure, photoluminescence characterization of the NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/TiO2 core-shell NPs and the photoelectric performance, alternating current impedance spectroscopy of DSSCs are characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, upconversion luminescence (UCL) spectrofluorimetry and electrochemistry. Compared with the pure TiO2 PE or the NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconversion NPs and TiO2 simply mixed prepared PE as the volume ratio of the core-shell structure, the DSSCs with the upconversion core-shell PE show a greater photovoltaic efficiency. The energy conversion efficiency of the DSSCs with a NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+/TiO2 PE is 23.1% higher than with a pure TiO2 PE and 99.1% higher than with a mixed PE using the same conditions. This enhancement is due to the UCL core extending the spectral response range of DSSCs to the infrared region and their particular shell structure, retaining its semiconductor character. This method represents a novel approach to increase the efficiencies of DSSCs.

  6. Fabrication of NaYF4:Yb,Er Nanoprobes for Cell Imaging Directly by Using the Method of Hydrion Rivalry Aided by Ultrasonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhihua; Miao, Haixia; Fu, Ying; Liu, Yuxiang; Zhang, Ran; Tang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    A novel method of fabricating water-soluble bio-probes with ultra-small size such as NaYF4:Yb,Er (18 nm), NaGdF4:Yb,Er (8 nm), CaF2:Yb,Er (10 nm), PbS (7 nm), and ZnS (12 nm) has been developed to provide for the solubility switch of nanoparticles from oil-soluble to water-soluble in terms of hydrion rivalry aided by ultrasonic. Using NaYF4:Yb,Er (18 nm) as an example, we evaluate the properties of as-prepared water-soluble nanoparticles (NPs) by using thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), zeta potential ( ζ) testing, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR). The measured ζ value shows that the newly prepared hydrophilic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs are the positively charged particles. Acting as reactive electrophilic moiety, the freshly prepared hydrophilic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs have carried out the coupling with amino acids and fluorescence labeling and imaging of HeLa cells directly. Experiments indicate that the method of hydrion rivalry aided by ultrasonic provides a simple and novel opportunity to transform hydrophobic NPs into hydrophilic NPs with good reactivity, which can be imaging some specific biological targets directly.

  7. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. PMID:27307452

  8. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Yu, Fuxun; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. PMID:27307452

  9. 2.0-μm emission and energy transfer of Ho3+/Yb3+ co-doped LiYF4 single crystal excited by 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuo; Xia, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Yong-Zhang; Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Jiang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jian; Gu, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Li; Jiang, Hao-Chuan; Chen, Bao-Jiu

    2015-06-01

    Ho3+/Yb3+ co-doped LiYF4 single crystals with various Yb3+ concentrations and ˜ 0.98 mol% Ho3+ concentration are grown by the Bridgman method under the conditions of taking LiF and YF3 as raw materials and a temperature gradient (40 °C/cm-50 °C/cm) for the solid-liquid interface. The luminescent performances of the crystals are investigated through emission spectra, infrared transmittance spectrum, emission cross section, and decay curves under excitation by 980 nm. Compared with the Ho3+ single-doped LiYF4 crystal, the Ho3+/Yb3+ co-doped LiYF4 single crystal has an obviously enhanced emission band from 1850 nm to 2150 nm observed when excited by a 980-nm diode laser. The energy transfer from Yb3+ to Ho3+ and the optimum fluorescence emission around 2.0 μm of Ho3+ ions are investigated. The maximum emission cross section of the above sample at 2.0 μm is calculated to be 1.08×10-20 cm2 for the LiYF4 single crystal of 1-mol% Ho3+ and 6-mol% Yb3+ according to the measured absorption spectrum. The high energy transfer efficiency of 88.9% from Yb3+ to Ho3+ ion in the sample co-doped by Ho3+ (1 mol%) and Yb3+ (8 mol%) demonstrates that the Yb3+ ions can efficiently sensitize the Ho3+ ions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51472125 and 51272109) and the K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China (Grant No. NBUWC001).

  10. Valuing vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  11. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  12. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  13. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  14. Observation of size dependence in multicolor upconversion in single Yb3+, Er3+ Codoped NaYF4 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Stefan; Menezes, Leonardo de S; Lauritzen, Björn; Benson, Oliver

    2009-06-01

    In this Letter we report on the investigation of the upconversion emission of single NaYF(4) nanocrystals codoped with Yb(3+) and Er(3+). Single nanocrystals on a coverslip are excited with continuous wave laser light at 973 nm in a confocal setup and the upconversion fluorescence is analyzed with a spectrometer. With the help of an atomic force microscope the size of the nanocrystals is simultaneously determined. A strong size-dependence of the spectral properties of the upconversion signal of individual nanocrystals is observed. We attribute this to a differing number of available phonons in the individual crystals for multiphonon relaxation processes, depending on their size. We believe that this result provides a new strategy in the synthesis of upconversion nanoparticles with different spectral properties by changing only their size as it is well-known from the case of semiconductor quantum dots.

  15. Mechanism of Biological Compatibility of Water-Soluble Yb3+, Er3+ Codoped NaYF4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Chen, Huan; Li, Shouying; Xu, Hong; Zhao, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Water soluble NaYF4 nanocrystals codoped with 20 mol% Yb3+, 2 mol% Er3+ were prepared by a facile solvothermal approach using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a surfactant. As a potential material for luminescent probes, in votroeffects of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) on human aenocarcinoma (SGC-7901) cells with different concentrations were observed. These effects range from cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, AnnexinV-FITC-propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection, and cell cycles. Our results demonstrated that the cells treated with UCNPs showed a decrease in cell viability accompanied the decreased MMP and the release of ROS. When treated with 400 µg/mL UCNPs, AnnexinV-FITC-PI apoptosis detection showed the UCNPs induced apoptosis, the cell cycle indicated the UCNPs suppressor cells in the G1 phase obviously, thereby reducing cell activity. PMID:27451683

  16. Luminescence properties of Eu3+-doped SiO2-LiYF4 glass-ceramic microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secu, C. E.; Secu, M.

    2015-09-01

    Photoluminescence properties of the glass-ceramics microrods containing Eu3+-doped LiYF4 nanocrystals have been studied and characterized. Judd-Ofelt parameters and quantum efficiency has been computed from luminescence spectra and discussed by comparison to the glass ceramic bulk and pellet. The radiative decay rate Arad is higher in the glass ceramic rods (221 s-1) than in the glass ceramic bulk (130 s-1) but the quantum efficiency computed is very low (21%) compared to the glass-ceramic bulk (97%). There are effective non-radiative decay channels that might be related to an influence of the dimensional constraints imposed by the membrane pores during xerogel formation and subsequent glass ceramization.

  17. A throat-bypass stability system for a YF-12 aircraft research inlet using self-acting mechanical valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Dustin, M. O.; Neiner, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel investigation are presented. The inlet was modified so that airflow can be removed through a porous cowl-bleed region in the vicinity of the throat. Bleed plenum exit flow area is controlled by relief type mechanical valves. Unlike valves in previous systems, these are made for use in a high Mach flight environment and include refinements so that the system could be tested on a NASA YF-12 aircraft. The valves were designed to provide their own reference pressure. The results show that the system can absorb internal-airflow-transients that are too fast for a conventional bypass door control system and that the two systems complement each other quite well. Increased tolerance to angle of attack and Mach number changes is indicated. The valves should provide sufficient time for the inlet control system to make geometry changes required to keep the inlet started.

  18. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs Tips for Finding Vaccine Records Trusted Sources of Vaccine ... PRETEENS Vaccines You Need ...

  19. Up-conversion luminescence of the NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanomaterials prepared with the solvothermal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, Emilia; Pihlgren, Laura; Tuomisto, Minnea; Laihinen, Tero; Hyppänen, Iko; Kankare, Jouko; Lastusaari, Mika; Soukka, Tero; Swart, Hendrik C.; Hölsä, Jorma

    2016-09-01

    Up-converting NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ (xYb: 0.20, xEr: 0.02) nanomaterials were prepared with a microwave assisted solvothermal synthesis to study how the synthesis parameters affect the structure and up-conversion luminescence of the materials and thus their usability as labels in biomedical applications. The purity of the materials was studied with Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and the particle size and morphology with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystal structure was characterized with X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) and the crystallite sizes were calculated with the Scherrer formula. Up-conversion luminescence and luminescence decays were studied with near infra-red (NIR) laser excitation at 970 nm. The presence of the oleic acid was observed in the FT-IR spectra. The TEM images showed small quasi-spherical nanoparticles as well as long nanorods. The XPD measurements revealed that both cubic and hexagonal forms of NaYF4 were present in the materials. The crystallite sizes ranged from ca. 20 to over 150 nm for the cubic and hexagonal phases, respectively. The characteristic up-conversion luminescence of Er3+ in red (640-685 nm; 4F9/2 → 4I15/2) and green (515-560 nm; 2H11/2, 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 transitions) wavelengths was observed. The most intense luminescence and the longest luminescence emission lifetime were obtained with the material annealed for 12 h at 177 °C with 1.8 MPa pressure due to the predominance of the well-crystallized hexagonal form of NaRF4 (R: Y, Yb, Er).

  20. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy, please see the MotherToBaby fact sheet Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot) during Pregnancy ( http: / / mothertobaby. org/ fact- sheets/ seasonal- influenza- vaccine- flu- shot- pregnancy/ pdf/ ). Nasal spray flu vaccines ...

  1. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  2. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [335 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  3. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  4. Sequential Infection with Common Pathogens Promotes Human-like Immune Gene Expression and Altered Vaccine Response.

    PubMed

    Reese, Tiffany A; Bi, Kevin; Kambal, Amal; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Beura, Lalit K; Bürger, Matheus C; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David; Haining, W Nicholas; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-05-11

    Immune responses differ between laboratory mice and humans. Chronic infection with viruses and parasites are common in humans, but are absent in laboratory mice, and thus represent potential contributors to inter-species differences in immunity. To test this, we sequentially infected laboratory mice with herpesviruses, influenza, and an intestinal helminth and compared their blood immune signatures to mock-infected mice before and after vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV-17D). Sequential infection altered pre- and post-vaccination gene expression, cytokines, and antibodies in blood. Sequential pathogen exposure induced gene signatures that recapitulated those seen in blood from pet store-raised versus laboratory mice, and adult versus cord blood in humans. Therefore, basal and vaccine-induced murine immune responses are altered by infection with agents common outside of barrier facilities. This raises the possibility that we can improve mouse models of vaccination and immunity by selective microbial exposure of laboratory animals to mimic that of humans. PMID:27107939

  5. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  6. Subviral Particle as Vaccine and Vaccine Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subvirual particles retain similar antigenic features of their authentic viral capsids and thus have been applied as nonreplicating subunit vaccines against viral infection and illness. Additionally, the self-assembled, polyvalent subviral particles are excellent platforms to display foreign antigens for immune enhancement for vaccine development. These subviral particle-based vaccines are noninfectious and thus safer than the conventional live attenuated and inactivated vaccines. While several VLP vaccines are available in the markets, numerous others, including dual vaccines against more than one pathogen, are under clinical or preclinical development. This article provides an update of these efforts. PMID:24662314

  7. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  8. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates successful in phase 1 Flu shot may prevent heart attacks and stroke CDX-1401 combined with TLR agonist: Positive phase 1 results Three MRSA vaccines in early clincial trials Ovarian cancer vaccine candidate DPX-Survivac: Positive interim results from phase 1 Chinese biotech partnership brings first hepatitis E vaccine to the market Therapeutic vaccine for treatment of genital herpes enters phase 2 Visionary concept: Printable vaccines PMID:23817319

  9. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  10. NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite: A highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst utilizing upconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong Sun, Songmei; Zhang, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Design and synthesis of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} based on upconversion. • NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite was prepared for the first time. • Core–shell structure benefits the properties. • Upconversion contributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Helps to understand the functionality of new type photocatalysts. - Abstract: NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite was designed and prepared for the first time based on upconversion. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The results revealed that the as-synthesized NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} consisted of spheres with a core diameter of about 26 nm and a shell diameter of around 6 nm. The core was upconversion illuminant NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb and the shell was Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} around the core, which was confirmed by EDS. The NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the photodecomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under the irradiation of Xe lamp and green light emitting diode (g-LED). The mechanism of the high photocatalytic activity was discussed by photoluminescence spectra (PL), which is mainly attributed to upconversion of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb in the NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite and the core–shell structure.

  11. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Vaccinated More Info Glossary Our Partners Related Websites AIDS.gov Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) CDC Vaccines Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program ...

  12. [Vaccination in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Kwetkat, A; Pletz, M W

    2013-10-01

    The aging immune system, so-called immunosenescence, is well documented as the cause of increased infection rates and severe, often complicated course of infections in the elderly with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Furthermore, it can lead to decreased efficacy of vaccination. The administration of more immunogenic vaccines can be beneficial in the elderly. Implementing vaccination recommendations for the elderly by STIKO can reduce burden of infectious diseases by prevention of infection or reduction of severity of infection. The following vaccinations are recommended by STIKO for all persons aged 60 and above: annual influenza vaccination (additionally all nursing home residents independently of age), once only pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination, completion of tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccination as well as regular revaccination. All adults should be vaccinated against pertussis with Tdap vaccine once. Meanwhile, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is allowed for administration in adults but is not recommended by STIKO yet. A lifelong course of vaccination may help to attenuate the effect of immunosenescence.

  13. Hexagonal β-NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoprism-Incorporated Upconverting Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells for Near-Infrared Sunlight Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jongmin; Yu, Haejun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-08-10

    Hexagonal β-NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoprisms, successfully prepared using a hydrothermal method, were incorporated into CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells (PSCs) as an upconverting mesoporous layer. Due to their near-infrared (NIR) sunlight harvesting, the PSCs based on the upconverting mesoporous layer exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 16.0%, an increase of 13.7% compared with conventional TiO2 nanoparticle-based PSCs (14.1%). This result suggests that the hexagonal β-NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoprisms expand the absorption range of the PSC via upconversion photoluminescence, leading to an enhancement of the photocurrent. PMID:27472304

  14. Designed Er3+-singly doped NaYF4 with double excitation bands for simultaneous deep macroscopic and microscopic upconverting bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuanyuan; Wang, Baoju; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; He, Sailing; Zhan, Qiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous deep macroscopic imaging and microscopic imaging is in urgent demand, but is challenging to achieve experimentally due to the lack of proper fluorescent probes. Herein, we have designed and successfully synthesized simplex Er3+-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with double excitation bands for simultaneous deep macroscopic and microscopic imaging. The material structure and the excitation wavelength of Er3+-singly doped UCNPs were further optimized to enhance the upconversion emission efficiency. After optimization, we found that NaYF4:30%Er3+@NaYF4:2%Er3+ could simultaneously achieve efficient two-photon excitation (2PE) macroscopic tissue imaging and three-photon excitation (3PE) deep microscopic when excited by 808 nm continuous wave (CW) and 1480 nm CW lasers, respectively. In vitro cell imaging and in vivo imaging have also been implemented to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of the proposed simplex Er3+-doped UCNPs as bioprobe. PMID:27375936

  15. Feasibility study for the use of a YF-12 aircraft as a scientific instrument platform for observing the 1970 solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific and engineering findings are presented of the feasibility study for the use of a YF-12 aircraft as a scientific instrument platform for observing the 1970 solar eclipse. Included in the report is the computer program documentation of the solar eclipse determination; summary data on SR-71A type aircraft capabilities and limitations as an observing platform for solar eclipses; and the recordings of an informal conference on observations of solar eclipses using SR-71A type aircraft.

  16. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Retinoschisin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Miller, Paul E.; Sharma, Alok K.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Howard, Kellie; Knop, David R.; Neuringer, Martha; McGill, Trevor; Stoddard, Jonathan; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation is developing rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for treatment of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an inherited retinal disease characterized by splitting (schisis) of retinal layers causing poor vision. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in normal cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of male animals (n = 6 per group) received an intravitreal injection in one eye of either vehicle, or rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 at one of two dose levels (4 × 1010 or 4 × 1011 vg/eye). Half the animals were sacrificed after 14 days and the others after 91 or 115 days. The intravitreal injection procedure was well tolerated in all groups. Serial ophthalmic examinations demonstrated a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that improved over time. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, electroretinography, visual evoked potential, hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal or moderate mononuclear infiltrates in 6 of 12 vector-injected eyes. Immunohistochemical staining showed RS1 labeling of the ganglion cell layer at the foveal slope in vector-injected eyes at both dose levels. Serum anti-AAV antibodies were detected in 4 of 6 vector-injected animals at the day 15 sacrifice and all vector-injected animals at later time points. No animals developed antibodies to RS1. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in clinical studies in patients with XLRS. PMID:26390090

  17. Luminescence energy transfer detection of PSA in red region based on Mn2+-enhanced NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Shaozhen; Gao, Ni; Feng, Dexiang; Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi

    2015-10-15

    A new turn-on luminescence energy transfer (LET) system has been designed for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA, a cancer marker) that utilizes Mn(2+)-enhanced long wavelength luminescence NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods as the donor and gold nanorods as the acceptor. The Mn(2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion luminescence nanorods with an emission peak located in the red region were synthesized. The presence of Mn(2+) markedly increased the luminescence intensity over that of the NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanomaterials (excited by a 980 nm continuous wavelength laser). The surfaces of Mn(2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods were modified with poly(acrylic acid). Antibodies against prostate specific antigen were bound to the surface of the carboxyl-functionalized upconversion nanorods, which acted as the energy donor in this LET system. Gold nanorods with an absorption band at ~666 nm were synthesized by the seed growth method, acted as the energy acceptor. The emission band of the upconversion nanorods overlapped well with the absorption band of the gold nanorods. The luminescence was quenched because of the electrostatic interactions that shortened the distance between the donor (negatively charged) and the accepter (positively charged).When the PSA antigen was added into the system, the energy acceptor and the energy donors were separated because the binding affinity between PSA and anti-PSA was greater than the electrostatic interactions, and thereby the luminescence was recovered. The linear range of detecting PSA was from 0.1172 to 18.75 ng/mL (R=0.995), with a limit of detection for PSA as low as 0.1129 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the sensing of PSA in human serum samples. PMID:25996781

  18. History of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  19. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... The hepatitis B vaccination is a non-infectious, vaccine prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, rather than human blood or plasma. There is no risk of contamination from other bloodborne pathogens nor is there any ... from the vaccine. The vaccine must be administered according to the ...

  20. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles. PMID:26496243

  1. Simultaneous morphology manipulation and upconversion luminescence enhancement of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microcrystals by simply tuning the KF dosage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingye; Chen, Daqin; Yin, Shilong; Ji, Zhenguo; Zhong, Jiasong; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2015-01-01

    A strategy has been adopted for simultaneous morphology manipulation and upconversion luminescence enhancement of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microcrystals by simply tuning the KF dosage. X-ray power diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to characterize the samples. The influence of molar ratio of KF to Y3+ on the crystal phase and morphology has been systematically investigated and discussed. It is found that the molar ratio of KF to Y3+ can strongly control the morphology of the as-synthesized β-NaYF4 samples because of the different capping effect of F− ions on the different crystal faces. The possible formation mechanism has been proposed on the basis of a series of time-dependent experiments. More importantly, the upconversion luminescence of β-NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ was greatly enhanced by increasing the molar ratio of KF to RE3+ (RE = Y, Yb, Er), which is attributed to the distortion of local crystal field symmetry around lanthanide ions through K+ ions doping. This synthetic methodology is expected to provide a new strategy for simultaneous morphology control and remarkable upconversion luminescence enhancement of yttrium fluorides, which may be applicable for other rare earth fluorides. PMID:26235808

  2. Multifunctional MnO2 nanosheet-modified Fe3O4@SiO2/NaYF4:Yb, Er nanocomposites as novel drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Yihua; Yang, Xiaoling; Shen, Jianhua; Jiang, Xin; Zong, Jie; Li, Chunzhong

    2014-01-14

    We report on a novel drug carrier which is based on the combination of magnetic and upconversion (UC) emission of Fe3O4@SiO2/NaYF4:Yb, Er (MSU) hybrids modified with MnO2 nanosheets (MSU/MnO2). The MSU hybrids were fabricated by covalently linking amino-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 particles with carboxyl-functionalized NaYF4:Yb, Er particles. The Fe3O4 core and the NaYF4:Yb, Er shell functioned successfully for magnetic targeting and fluorescence imaging, respectively. MnO2 nanosheets served as drug carriers and UC luminescence quenchers. The drug can be released by introducing glutathione (GSH) which reduces MnO2 to Mn(2+), and at the same time, UC luminescence can be turned on. These results clearly show that these MSU/MnO2 nanocomposites are promising platforms which can be applied to construct a smart drug delivery system with magnetic targeting and GSH-stimulation, as well as tracking by UC luminescence. PMID:24065169

  3. Upcoversion performance improvement of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er by Sn codoping: Enhanced emission intensity and reduced decay time

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Han; Cao, Wenbing; Huang, Qingming; Ma, En; Zhang, Xinqi; Yu, Jianchang

    2013-11-15

    In this manuscript we report a phenomenon that upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased obviously by Sn codoping with Yb/Er into hexagonal NaYF{sub 4} synchronously. X-ray powder diffiraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin-resonance spectroscopy and upconversion emission spectra were employed to explore the relation of crystal structure and properties. From these characterizations we found that symmetry of the rare earth ion local crystal field could be tuned by different Sn codoping concentration. For the variable valence property of Sn the local crystal field asymmetry and emission intensity of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er arrived to the maximum when 3 mol% Sn was codoped, while decay time was reduced. The study of this changing tends of upconversion emission intensity and decay time constant may be helpful for design and fabrication of high performance upconversion materials. - Graphical abstract: Variable-valenced Sn is introduced with Yb/Er into NaFY{sub 4} to tune structure and local crystal field. Upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaYF{sub 4}: Yb, Er was codoped with different concentration Sn. • Upconversion emission intensity was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. • Introduction of variable-valenced Sn is effective to tune structure and crystal field of NaFY{sub 4}.

  4. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles.

  5. Vaccine adverse events.

    PubMed

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  6. Countering Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn M; Hackell, Jesse M

    2016-09-01

    Immunizations have led to a significant decrease in rates of vaccine-preventable diseases and have made a significant impact on the health of children. However, some parents express concerns about vaccine safety and the necessity of vaccines. The concerns of parents range from hesitancy about some immunizations to refusal of all vaccines. This clinical report provides information about addressing parental concerns about vaccination. PMID:27573088

  7. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  8. Vaccine-Associated Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Benage, Matthew; Fraunfelder, Frederick W

    2016-01-01

    All of the widely administered vaccines have been reported to cause uveitis. The ocular inflammation is usually temporary and resolves with topical ocular steroids. During a 26-year period, a total of 289 cases of vaccine-associated uveitis were reported to three adverse reaction reporting databases. Hepatitis B vaccine, either alone or administered with other vaccines, appears to be the leading offender. Clinicians are encouraged to report cases of vaccine- or drug-associated ocular adverse reactions to www.eyedrugregistry.com.

  9. Vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates. PMID:21893544

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er core@shell monodisperse nanoparticles and their subsequent ligand exchange in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenli; Du, Sinan; Luo, Yang; Liao, Zhijian; Zuo, Fang; Luo, Jianbin; Liu, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We report the use of an efficient hydrothermal method to synthesize superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er nanoparticles (NPs) with core@shell structures via a seed-growth procedure. Oleic acid coated Fe3O4 (OA-Fe3O4) NPs were initially synthesized using a coprecipitation method. The as-synthesized OA-Fe3O4 NPs were then used as seeds, on which the red upconversion luminescent shell (Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er) was formed. Furthermore, hydrophobic to hydrophilic surface modification of the Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs was achieved via a ligand exchange method where oleic acid was displaced by a PEG phosphate ligand [PEG = poly(ethylene glycol)]. These materials were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The Fe3O4 cores were uniformly coated with a Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er shell, and the bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs were monodispersed. Furthermore, the Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs exhibited a saturated magnetization value of 6.2 emu/g and emitted red luminescence under a 980 nm laser. The obtained bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs may find potential applications in drug targeting, bioseparation, and diagnostic analysis. The synthetic method may be employed for the preparation of other bifunctional nanomaterials.

  11. Obesity vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  12. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control.

  13. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities. PMID:23171565

  14. Upconversion, size analysis, and fiber filling of NaYF4: Ho3+, Yb3+ crystals and nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald; Velentine, Maucus; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Ruben; Sarkisov, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Nano-colloids and nano-crystals doped with ions of rare-earth elements have recently attracted a lot of attention in the scientific community. This attention is due to unique physical, chemical and optical properties attributed to nanometer size of the particles. They have great potential of being used in applications spanning from new types of lasers, especially blue and UV ones, phosphorous display monitors, optical communications, and fluorescence imaging. In this paper we investigate the near-infrared upconversion luminescence in bulk crystals and nanocolloid filled photonic crystal fiber with ytterbium and holmium co-doped NaYF4 phosphor. The phosphor is prepared by using simple co-precipitation synthetic method. The initially prepared phosphor has very week upconversion fluorescence. The fluorescence significantly increased after the phosphor was annealed at a temperature of 600 °C. Nanocolloids of this phosphor were obtained using 1-propanol as solvent and they were utilized as laser filling medium in photonic crystal fibers. Under 980 nm diode laser excitation very strong upconversion signals were obtained for ytterbium and holmium co-doped phosphor at 541 nm, 646 nm and 751 nm. Pump power emissions, laser ablation and size analysis of the particles was conducted to understand the upconversion mechanisms. The particle sizes of the nanocolloids were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscope and Malvern Zetasizer instrument. The reported nanocolloids are good candidates for fluorescent biosensing applications and also as a new laser filling medium in fiber laser.

  15. Optical properties and size distribution of the nanocolloids made of rare-earth ion-doped NaYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas N.; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald M.; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Rueben; Valentine, Maucus; Wessley, Dennis; Sarkisov, Sergey; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate optical properties and size distribution of the nano-colloids made of trivalent rare-earth ion doped fluorides: holmium and ytterbium, thulium and ytterbium, and erbium and ytterbium co-doped NaYF4. These materials were synthesized by using simple co-precipitation synthetic method. The initially prepared micro-crystals had very weak or no visible upconversion fluorescence signals when being pumped with a 980-nm laser. The fluorescence intensity significantly increased after the crystals were annealed at a temperature of 400°C - 600°C undergoing the transition from cubic alpha to hexagonal beta phase of the fluoride host. Nano-colloids of the crystals were made in polar solvents using the laser ablation and ball milling methods. Size analyses of the prepared nano-colloids were conducted using a dynamic light scatterometer and atomic force microscope. The nano-colloids were filled in holey PCFs and their fluorescent properties were studied and the feasibility of new a type of fiber amplifier/laser was evaluated.

  16. Preparation of high-purity LiF, YF3, and YbF3 for laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Boncher, William L.; Melgaard, Seth D.; Blair, Michael W.; Jackson, Robert A.; Littleford, Thomas E.; Love, Steven P.

    2014-02-01

    The role of transition-metal impurities in Yb3+-doped YLiF4 (YLF) laser-cooling crystals is studied. Divalent 3d transition-metal ions, in particular Fe2+, are found to have strong absorptions at the laser cooling pump wavelength and degrade the cooling efficiency by introducing background absorption. A set of eight substitutional and chargecompensated defects that form upon introduction of 1+, 2+, and 3+ transition-metal ions into the YLF crystal lattice is proposed. A calculation of solution energies for each defect type and for a range of 3d ions is carried out. It indicates that divalent 3d ions preferentially substitute for Y3+ accompanied by a fluoride vacancy for charge compensation. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of a YLF crystal identifies Fe2+ in the crystal lattice, in agreement with the elemental analysis and the computational results. A strategy for purifying the YF3, LiF, and YbF3 starting materials for the YLF:Yb crystal growth is discussed. Chelate-assisted solvent extraction purification with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) for Y, Li, and Yb as well as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for Li was carried out.

  17. Controlled synthesis and upconversion luminescence properties of LiYF4:Yb0.2Er0.02 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; De, Gejihu; Zi, Lu; Xu, Yueshan; Liu, Songtao

    2016-07-01

    A series of high quality tetragonal LiYF4:Yb0.2Er0.02 nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition method. The influence of reaction conditions on final products has been investigated in detail. The TEM and XRD data show that the size, shape and crystallization of the samples depend on the reaction time and concentration. The upconversion luminescence (UCL) intensity gradually enhanced along with the sizes of the samples increasing. And when the reaction solvent system is oleic acid/1-octadecence (OA/ODE), the samples show smaller size and stronger emission compared with oleic acid/oleylamine/1-octadecence (OA/OM/ODE). Under 980 nm NIR laser diode excitation, all the samples show intense green emission between 510 and 570 nm wavelength from 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 and 2H11/2 → 4I15/2 transitions of Er3+ and intense red emission between 640 and 690 nm attributed to 2F11/2 → 4I15/2 transition of Er3+, both of the processes belong to two-photon energy absorption.

  18. Spectroscopy and excitation dynamics of the trivalent lanthanides Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) in LiYF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed study of the spectroscopy and excitation dynamics Tm3+ and Ho3+ in yttrium lithium fluoride, LiYF4 (YLF), has been done. Absorption spectroscopy is utilized in the Judd-Ofelt theory to determine radiative transition rates of spontaneous emission. Luminescence spectroscopy is studied under cw diode laser excitation at 785nm. The effect of dopant ion concentration and excitation power on the observed luminescence are considered in these measurements. An analysis of these measurements have been used to determine channels of energy transfer between Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions. The temporal response of Tm and Ho in singly and co-doped YLF to pulsed laser excitation with a Ti:Al2O3 laser and a CoMgF2 laser turned to various wavelengths have also been studied. The energy transfer mechanisms of cross relaxation, upconversion, and resonant energy transfer between Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions have been modeled, and the model parameters extracted by a fitting procedure to the measured temporal response curves. Rate equation approaches to modeling are presented that result in predictions of rate constants for energy transfer processes, as well as more conventional approaches to modeling such as the Forster-Dexter models, which give the interaction strengths in terms of microscopic interaction parameters.

  19. Influence of the Synthesis Parameters on the Properties of NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Plohl, Olivija; Majaron, Boris; Ponikvar-Svet, Maja; Makovec, Darko; Lisjak, Darja

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, especially fluorides, have received a great deal of interest due to their optical properties, making them suitable for applications in bio-imaging. For this reason they need to exhibit a superior chemical stability in aqueous media. We have studied the influence of the synthesis parameters on the chemical stability of NaYF(4) nanoparticles co-doped with Yb(3+) and Tm(3+). These nanoparticles have different crystal structures, and were synthesized hydrothermally or with thermal decomposition. The samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The up-conversion fluorescence of nanoparticles dispersed in water was measured at 400-900 nm. The partial dissolution of the fluorine in water was detected with an ion-selective electrode for all the samples. The dissolution of the other constituent ions was analysed with an optical emission spectrometer using inductively coupled plasma. The nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure and sizes of around 20 nm that were synthesized with thermal decomposition showed a superior chemical stability in water together with a superior up-conversion fluorescence yield. PMID:26680706

  20. Experimental demonstration of plasmon enhanced energy transfer rate in NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dawei; Mao, Chenchen; Cho, Suehyun K.; Ahn, Sungmo; Park, Wounjhang

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer upconversion (ETU) is known to be the most efficient frequency upconversion mechanism. Surface plasmon can further enhance the upconversion process, opening doors to many applications. However, ETU is a complex process involving competing transitions between multiple energy levels and it has been difficult to precisely determine the enhancement mechanisms. In this paper, we report a systematic study on the dynamics of the ETU process in NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanoparticles deposited on plasmonic nanograting structure. From the transient near-infrared photoluminescence under various excitation power densities, we observed faster energy transfer rates under stronger excitation conditions until it reached saturation where the highest internal upconversion efficiency was achieved. The experimental data were analyzed using the complete set of rate equations. The internal upconversion efficiency was found to be 56% and 36%, respectively, with and without the plasmonic nanograting. We also analyzed the transient green emission and found that it is determined by the infrared transition rate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of experimentally measured internal upconversion efficiency in plasmon enhanced upconversion material. Our work decouples the internal upconversion efficiency from the overall upconverted luminescence efficiency, allowing more targeted engineering for efficiency improvement. PMID:26739230

  1. Analysis of VUV and optical spectra of Cs 2NaYF 6 crystals doped with Tm 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chonggeng; Tanner, Peter A.; Xia, Shangda; Yin, Min

    2007-08-01

    This study presents a detailed interpretation and analysis of the reported interconfigurational spectra of Tm3+ in Cs2NaYF6 [V.N. Makhov, N.M. Khaidukov, D. Lo, J.C. Krupa, M. Kirm, E. Negodin, Opt. Mater. 27 (2005) 1131]. Since only spin-forbidden d-f emission bands are observed for Tm3+ in this host, it is unsuitable for use as a scintillator because the emission lifetime is too long. The d-f emission spectrum is well-explained by calculation and most of the intensity is located in one band: 4f115d1 (high-spin) → 4f123H6. Measurements from the bands in the d-f excitation spectrum do not provide the accurate separation energy of the high and low-spin states. Strict Oh point group selection rules are operative for the optical spectra. The electronic states of the 4f115d1 configuration (briefly, d-electron states, hereafter) are calculated to span from 58,318 cm-1 to 86,900 cm-1. At least five structured bands are observed in the excitation spectrum and their intensities are fairly well simulated by calculation. The 4f12 → 4f13 (np6)-1 charge transfer band is assigned between 140 and 120 nm (∼83,000-71,000 cm-1) and excitation into this band leads to f-f emission, bypassing the d-electron states.

  2. One-pot template-free synthesis of NaYF4 upconversion hollow nanospheres for bioimaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gan; Duan, Longsheng; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Yan, Liang; Zhou, Liangjun; Liu, Xiaodong; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Li, Jinxia; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-06-01

    Hollow-structured nanomaterials with fluorescent properties are extremely attractive for image-guided cancer therapy. In this paper, sub-100 nm and hydrophilic NaYF4 upconversion (UC) hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with multicolor UC luminescence and drug-delivery properties were successfully prepared by a facile one-pot template-free hydrothermal route using polyetherimide (PEI) polymer as the stabilizing agent. XRD, SEM, TEM, and N2-adsorption/desorption were used to characterize the as-obtained products. The growth mechanism of the HNSs has been systematically investigated on the basis of the Ostwald ripening. Under 980 nm excitation, UC emissions of HNSs can be tuned by a simple change of the concentration or combination of various upconverters. As a result, the PEI-coated HNSs could be used as efficient probes for in vitro upconversion luminescence (UCL) cell imaging. Furthermore, a doxorubicin storage/release behavior and cancer-cell-killing ability investigation reveal that the product has the potential to be a drug carrier for cancer therapy.

  3. EPR and optical spectroscopy of structural phase transition in a Rb2NaYF6 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falin, M. L.; Gerasimov, K. I.; Latypov, V. A.; Leushin, A. M.; Khaidukov, N. M.

    2013-03-01

    The structural phase transition has been observed for the first time in the Rb2NaYF6 crystal and studied by EPR and optical spectroscopy. EPR spectra of Dy3+ and Yb3+ ions present as unintentional dopants in the nominally undoped crystal and forming tetragonal paramagnetic centers have been identified. A characteristic splitting of some optical lines has been observed in the temperature dependence of the Yb3+ optical spectra. It indicates the splitting of the cubic quartet energy levels of Yb3+ ions by the tetragonal crystal field. The empirical schemes of the energy levels for cubic and tetragonal paramagnetic centers of Yb3+ ions have been established and parameters of the corresponding crystal fields have been determined. The latter have been used for analyzing the crystal lattice distortions occurring in the vicinity of the Yb3+ ion during the phase transition. It has been established using the superposition model that the nearest octahedral environment of the Yb3+ ion is distorted as follows: the fluorine ions are rotated by the angle of 2.1° around the fourfold axis; the F- ions located symmetrically in the plane perpendicular to the rotation axis approach the dopant by 0.0014 nm, whereas the F- ions located on the rotation axis move away by 0.0028 nm. It has been concluded that the studied phase transition includes the critical rotations of the octahedral F groups and noncritical displacement of atoms in the rotated fluorine octahedra.

  4. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  5. Mumps - Vaccine Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... containing vaccine, given as combination measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, separated by at least 28 days, are routinely ... been vaccinated should also receive 1 dose of MMR vaccine, but adults who work in healthcare, a school/ ...

  6. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  7. Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination The smallpox vaccine prevents smallpox. For most people, ... go away without treatment: The arm receiving the vaccination may be sore and red where the vaccine ...

  8. Vaccination: An Act of Love

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of vaccines. For this reason, we created Vaccination Week in the Americas to get vaccines to ... and no one gets left behind. Help the vaccination teams when they come to your town, your ...

  9. Vaccines against poverty.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  10. Narcolepsy Following Yellow Fever Vaccination: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Richard E; Farquhar, Michael; Gringras, Paul; Pal, Deb K

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the pediatric age group probably linked to the use of the Pandemrix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can "trigger" narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population. Here, we describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM) latency of 47 min, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 min with sleep onset REM in four out of four nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder. PMID:27559330

  11. Narcolepsy Following Yellow Fever Vaccination: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rosch, Richard E.; Farquhar, Michael; Gringras, Paul; Pal, Deb K.

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the pediatric age group probably linked to the use of the Pandemrix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can “trigger” narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population. Here, we describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM) latency of 47 min, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 min with sleep onset REM in four out of four nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder. PMID:27559330

  12. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  13. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  14. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  15. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  16. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  17. [Vaccination against poliomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Cellesi, C; Rossolini, A

    1984-01-01

    The authors, after a review of some data about the actual poliomyelitis epidemiology in the world, point out the necessity of periodical checks for poliomyelitis vaccination. To this purpose, preliminary data of a research, undertaken in the province of Siena, into the effectiveness and innocuity of oral poliovirus vaccine, are reported. This evaluation has been made through isolation and identification of vaccinal polioviruses from stool after the first, second and then third dose of vaccine, and through titration of serum neutralizing antibodies. Results confirm the high effectiveness and innocuity of oral poliovirus vaccine, but suggest the opportuneness of some changes in the way of giving the oral vaccine.

  18. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

  19. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Research : Vaccines Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Vaccines What Are Vaccines and What Do They Do? A vaccine—also ... immune response against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine ...

  20. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  1. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Cancer.gov

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  2. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Cancer.gov

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  3. Ethics of vaccination programs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jason L; Caplan, Arthur L

    2011-10-01

    Ethical issues are present at each stage in the vaccine product life cycle, the period extending from the earliest stages of research through the eventual design and implementation of global vaccination programs. Recent developments highlight fundamental principles of vaccine ethics and raise unique issues for ongoing vaccination activities worldwide. These include the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination campaign, renewed attention to the potential global eradication of polio, and the ongoing evaluation of vaccine risk controversies, most notably the alleged link between childhood vaccines and autism. These cases present ethical challenges for public health policy-makers, scientists, physicians, and other stakeholders in their efforts to improve the health of individuals, communities, and nations through vaccination. PMID:22440783

  4. Smallpox Vaccine Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... complications from the vaccinia virus can be severe. Benefit of Vaccine Following Exposure Vaccination within 3 days ... Policies About CDC.gov Link to Us All Languages Contact CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

  5. Shingles (Zoster) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... who has had chickenpox, or rarely, has gotten chickenpox vaccine, can get shingles. The virus stays in your ... a person who has never had chickenpox (or chickenpox vaccine) could get chickenpox from someone with shingles. This ...

  6. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  7. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  8. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  9. Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tetanus (lockjaw) ... Related Pages Diphtheria Pertussis Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Also Known As & Abbreviations Tetanus = Lockjaw DTaP = ...

  10. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... are at increased risk of developing meningococcal disease. Immunization Schedule Vaccination with MCV4 is recommended: when kids ...

  11. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy. PMID:26922172

  12. Vaccine Reaction Images

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Materials Q fever Info & Guidance for Clinicians Salmonella Shigella Smallpox Smallpox Basics Vaccine Basics Clinicians Vaccination ... Metals Nerve Agents Pulmonary Agents Riot Control Agents Toxic Alcohols Vesicants Chemical-Specific Fact Sheets Toxicology FAQs ...

  13. Ethics of vaccination programs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jason L; Caplan, Arthur L

    2011-10-01

    Ethical issues are present at each stage in the vaccine product life cycle, the period extending from the earliest stages of research through the eventual design and implementation of global vaccination programs. Recent developments highlight fundamental principles of vaccine ethics and raise unique issues for ongoing vaccination activities worldwide. These include the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination campaign, renewed attention to the potential global eradication of polio, and the ongoing evaluation of vaccine risk controversies, most notably the alleged link between childhood vaccines and autism. These cases present ethical challenges for public health policy-makers, scientists, physicians, and other stakeholders in their efforts to improve the health of individuals, communities, and nations through vaccination.

  14. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  15. Human Vaccines: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    High safety marks for Merck’s Gardasil Cuba tests prostate cancer vaccine HIV’s weak spot: V2 Unique anti-cancer agent ColoAd1 enters the clinic Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza A and B discovered Clinical trials initiated: Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease The 20 top-selling vaccines in the first half of 2012 Influenza vaccine safe for pregnant women PMID:23151443

  16. Selectively enhanced red upconversion luminescence and phase/size manipulation via Fe3+ doping in NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Chen, Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Ligong; Luo, Yongshi; Wang, Xiaojun

    2015-08-01

    Red upconversion luminescence (UCL) is selectively enhanced by about 7 times via Fe3+ codoping into a NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystalline lattice. The maximum red-to-green ratio (R/G) as well as the overall integrated UCL intensity features at an Fe3+ content of 20 mol%. The size and phase of nanocrystals are simultaneously manipulated via Fe3+ doping with various concentrations by a facile hydrothermal method. Contrary to the literature, the pure hexagonal phase appears when Fe3+ concentrations are from 5 to 20 mol%, meanwhile, the size of NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals reaches its maximum at 10 mol%. The intensified visible UCL especially the dominant red emission is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer (ET) from |2F7/2, 4T1g > (Yb3+-Fe3+ dimer) to 4F9/2 (Er3+) states as well as the distortion of the crystalline field symmetry upon Fe3+ codoping. Dynamic investigation of 4S3/2 and 4F9/2 states under the pulsed laser excitation of 980 nm along with the diffuse reflectance data further supports the proposed mechanism of UC processes. The results show the remarkable promise of Fe3+-codoped NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals as upconverting nanoprobes with high sensitivity and penetrability in deeper tissue for multimodal biomedical imaging.Red upconversion luminescence (UCL) is selectively enhanced by about 7 times via Fe3+ codoping into a NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystalline lattice. The maximum red-to-green ratio (R/G) as well as the overall integrated UCL intensity features at an Fe3+ content of 20 mol%. The size and phase of nanocrystals are simultaneously manipulated via Fe3+ doping with various concentrations by a facile hydrothermal method. Contrary to the literature, the pure hexagonal phase appears when Fe3+ concentrations are from 5 to 20 mol%, meanwhile, the size of NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals reaches its maximum at 10 mol%. The intensified visible UCL especially the dominant red emission is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer (ET) from |2F7/2, 4T1g > (Yb3+-Fe3+ dimer) to 4F9/2 (Er3

  17. A Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-06-30

    Denvaxia is the first licensed vaccine for the prevention of dengue. It is a live vaccine developed using recombinant DNA technology. The vaccine is given as three doses over the course of a year and has the potential to prevent hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year. PMID:27368091

  18. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus.

  19. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  20. Vaccines in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitali M; Shah, Aishani C; Mahajan, Rashmi S; Bilimoria, Freny E

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a specific disease. More than two centuries have passed since the first successful vaccine for smallpox was developed. We’ve come a long way since. Today's vaccines are among the 21st century's most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing diseases. PMID:26120155

  1. Highly uniform YF{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln = Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) walnut-like microcrystals: Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojie; Sheng, Tianqi; Fu, Zuoling; Li, Wenhao; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The emission spectra of Y{sub 0.98−x}F{sub 3}:0.02Ce{sup 3+}, xTb{sup 3+} microcrystals with different Tb{sup 3+} concentrations demonstrated that energy transfer from the Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions is highly efficient. The concentration quenching phenomenon occurs when the x = 0.13. We have discussed it in detail based on experiments and quantitative calculations. Highlights: ► YF{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} walnut-like microcrystals were prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis. ► The optical properties of YF{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} phosphors have been investigated in detail. ► The energy transfer distance and efficiency from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions were calculated. ► The dipole–dipole interaction should be the dominant mechanism for energy transfer. - Abstract: Uniform and well-crystallized YF{sub 3} walnut-like microcrystals were prepared by a facile one-step hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline phase, size, morphology, and luminescence properties were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescent excitation spectra (PLE). The results revealed that the existence of Ce{sup 3+} (sensitizer) can dramatically enhance green emission centered at 545 nm of Tb{sup 3+} (activator) in codoped samples due to an efficient energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+}. The critical energy transfer distance between Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} was also calculated by methods of concentration quenching and spectral overlapping. Experimental analysis and theoretical calculations indicated that the dipole–dipole interaction should be the dominant mechanism for the Ce{sup 3+}–Tb{sup 3+} energy transfer.

  2. Biotransformation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) in male, pregnant and non-pregnant female rabbits after single high dose inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Tobias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Rusch, George M.; Hoffman, Gary M.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2012-08-15

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is a novel refrigerant intended for use in mobile air conditioning. It showed a low potential for toxicity in rodents studies with most NOAELs well above 10,000 ppm in guideline compliant toxicity studies. However, a developmental toxicity study in rabbits showed mortality at exposure levels of 5,500 ppm and above. No lethality was observed at exposure levels of 2,500 and 4,000 ppm. Nevertheless, increased subacute inflammatory heart lesions were observed in rabbits at all exposure levels. Since the lethality in pregnant animals may be due to altered biotransformation of HFO-1234yf and to evaluate the potential risk to pregnant women facing a car crash, this study compared the acute toxicity and biotransformation of HFO-1234yf in male, female and pregnant female rabbits. Animals were exposed to 50,000 ppm and 100,000 ppm for 1 h. For metabolite identification by {sup 19}F NMR and LC/MS-MS, urine was collected for 48 h after inhalation exposure. In all samples, the predominant metabolites were S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)-mercaptolactic acid and N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)-L-cysteine. Since no major differences in urinary metabolite pattern were observed between the groups, only N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)-L-cysteine excretion was quantified. No significant differences in recovery between non-pregnant (43.10 ± 22.35 μmol) and pregnant female (50.47 ± 19.72 μmol) rabbits were observed, male rabbits exposed to 100,000 ppm for one hour excreted 86.40 ± 38.87 μmol. Lethality and clinical signs of toxicity were not observed in any group. The results suggest that the lethality of HFO-1234yf in pregnant rabbits unlikely is due to changes in biotransformation patterns or capacity in pregnant rabbits. -- Highlights: ► No lethality and clinical signs were observed. ► No differences in metabolic pattern between pregnant and non-pregnant rabbits. ► Rapid and similar metabolite

  3. Reliability analysis of forty-five strain-gage systems mounted on the first fan stage of a YF-100 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.; Frause, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The reliability of 45 state-of-the-art strain gage systems under full scale engine testing was investigated. The flame spray process was used to install 23 systems on the first fan rotor of a YF-100 engine; the others were epoxy cemented. A total of 56 percent of the systems failed in 11 hours of engine operation. Flame spray system failures were primarily due to high gage resistance, probably caused by high stress levels. Epoxy system failures were principally erosion failures, but only on the concave side of the blade. Lead-wire failures between the blade-to-disk jump and the control room could not be analyzed.

  4. Experimental evaluation of a spinning-mode acoustic-treatment design concept for aircraft inlets. [suppression of YF-102 engine fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Rice, E. J.; Homyak, L.

    1980-01-01

    An aircraft-inlet noise suppressor method based on mode cutoff ratio was qualitatively checked by testing a series of liners on a YF-102 turbofan engine. Far-field directivity of the blade passing frequency was used extensively to evaluate the results. The trends and observations of the test data lend much qualitative support to the design method. The best of the BPF liners attained a suppression at design frequency of 19 dB per unit length-diameter ratio. The best multiple-pure-tone linear attained a remarkable suppression of 65.6 bB per unit length-diameter ratio.

  5. Synthesis of stable carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 nanoparticles with ultrathin shell for biolabeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy groups on the particle surface easily react with amino residues of biomolecules. As an example, we reported on the interactions of Ricinus Communis Agglutinin (RCA 120) conjugated UCNP@SiO2 with HeLa cells. The excellent performance of the RCA 120 conjugated UCNP@SiO2 in cellular fluorescence imaging was demonstrated.Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy

  6. NaYF4:Yb/Er@PPy core-shell nanoplates: an imaging-guided multimodal platform for photothermal therapy of cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Li, Bo; Peng, Chen; Song, Guosheng; Peng, Yuxuan; Xiao, Zhiyin; Liu, Xijian; Yang, Jianmao; Yu, Li; Hu, Junqing

    2015-12-01

    Imaging guided photothermal agents have attracted great attention for accurate diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Herein, multifunctional NaYF4:Yb/Er@polypyrrole (PPy) core-shell nanoplates are developed by combining a thermal decomposition reaction and a chemical oxidative polymerization reaction. Within such a composite nanomaterial, the core of the NaYF4:Yb/Er nanoplate can serve as an efficient nanoprobe for upconversion luminescence (UCL)/X-ray computed tomography (CT) dual-modal imaging, the shell of the PPy shows strong near infrared (NIR) region absorption and makes it effective in photothermal ablation of cancer cells and infrared thermal imaging in vivo. Thus, this platform can be simultaneously used for cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy, and compensates for the deficiencies of individual imaging modalities and satisfies the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The results further provide some insight into the exploration of multifunctional nanocomposites in the photothermal theragnosis therapy of cancers.Imaging guided photothermal agents have attracted great attention for accurate diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Herein, multifunctional NaYF4:Yb/Er@polypyrrole (PPy) core-shell nanoplates are developed by combining a thermal decomposition reaction and a chemical oxidative polymerization reaction. Within such a composite nanomaterial, the core of the NaYF4:Yb/Er nanoplate can serve as an efficient nanoprobe for upconversion luminescence (UCL)/X-ray computed tomography (CT) dual-modal imaging, the shell of the PPy shows strong near infrared (NIR) region absorption and makes it effective in photothermal ablation of cancer cells and infrared thermal imaging in vivo. Thus, this platform can be simultaneously used for cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy, and compensates for the deficiencies of individual imaging modalities and satisfies the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for

  7. Depositing CdS nanoclusters on carbon-modified NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanocrystals for NIR-light enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tou, Meijie; Mei, Yuanyuan; Bai, Song; Luo, Zhenguo; Zhang, Yong; Li, Zhengquan

    2015-12-01

    High-quality hexagonal NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) prepared in organic solutions display uniform sizes and strong UC emissions, but they possess a hydrophobic surface which hinders combining them with various semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to form a hybrid NIR-activated photocatalyst. Herein we present a facile approach to modify hydrophobic UCNs with a uniform carbon layer and enable them with hydrophilicity and surface functionalization. The carbon shell provides a good substrate for enriching with metal ions and in situ generation of CdS nanoclusters on the particle surface which can utilize both the upconverted UV and visible emissions. The developed NaYF4:Yb,Tm@C@CdS nanoparticles are characterized with TEM, SEM, XRD, PL and UV-Vis spectra and their formation mechanism is elucidated. The products display good photocatalytic activity under visible light and obviously enhanced performance under Vis-NIR light, due to the efficient utilization of UC emissions and the strong adsorption capacity of the carbon shell. The working mechanism of the hybrid photocatalysts is also proposed.High-quality hexagonal NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) prepared in organic solutions display uniform sizes and strong UC emissions, but they possess a hydrophobic surface which hinders combining them with various semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to form a hybrid NIR-activated photocatalyst. Herein we present a facile approach to modify hydrophobic UCNs with a uniform carbon layer and enable them with hydrophilicity and surface functionalization. The carbon shell provides a good substrate for enriching with metal ions and in situ generation of CdS nanoclusters on the particle surface which can utilize both the upconverted UV and visible emissions. The developed NaYF4:Yb,Tm@C@CdS nanoparticles are characterized with TEM, SEM, XRD, PL and UV-Vis spectra and their formation mechanism is elucidated. The products display good photocatalytic activity under

  8. Economics of animal vaccination.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A; Rushton, J

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the steps that might be used in assessing the economic justification for using vaccination to control animal disease, and the way that vaccination is financed and administered. It describes decisions that have been taken with respect to preserving international trade, and issues related to protection of livelihoods. Regardless of the motivation for vaccination, its costs can usually be shared between the public and private sectors. Cost-effective vaccination requires methods of delivery to be adapted to livestock production systems. The paper concludes by suggesting questions around the use of vaccination that would merit further economic analysis.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Paul; Bansal, Anju

    2014-12-01

    Although some success was achieved in recent years in HIV prevention, an effective vaccine remains the means with the most potential of curtailing HIV-1 infections worldwide. Despite multiple failed attempts, a recent HIV vaccine regimen demonstrated modest protection from infection. Although the protective efficacy in this trial was not sufficient to warrant licensure, it spurred renewed optimism in the field and has provided valuable insights for improving future vaccine designs. This review summarizes the pertinent details of vaccine development and discusses ways the field is moving forward to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV infection and disease progression.

  10. Routine vaccination against chickenpox?

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes both varicella and herpes zoster. In 1995 a varicella vaccine was licensed in the USA and was incorporated into the routine vaccination programme for children; a decline of varicella among children and adults, and a reduction in associated hospitalisation, complications and mortality, has resulted. In the UK, a policy of targeted vaccination of at-risk groups has been in place since the vaccine was introduced. Here we review the evidence for the different approaches to VZV vaccination policy.

  11. Vaccination for Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  12. [Development of HIV vaccines].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Riri

    2002-04-01

    An effective prophylactic vaccine should reduce frequency of new HIV infections in the target population and delay onset of immunodeficiency among those who become infected after vaccination. A variety of vaccine candidates have been developed, which induce neutralizing antibodies and/or cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. While many of those vaccine candidates exhibited some efficacy in primate model systems, their efficacy against natural HIV-1 infection can only be determined in large-scale phase III clinical trials. In this article, difficulties in HIV vaccine development will be discussed from scientific, technical, and business point of views. PMID:11968790

  13. Vaccinations for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K; Heine, R Phillips

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and neonatal benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and health care provider resources. PMID:25560127

  14. [Vaccinations for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Berens-Riha, N; Alberer, M; Löscher, T

    2014-03-01

    Vaccinations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. They can avoid or significantly reduce the risk of numerous infectious diseases. Until recently, vaccination against yellow fever was the only obligatory vaccination. However, according to updated international health regulations, other vaccinations and prophylactic measures may be required at entry from certain countries. For all routine vaccinations as recommended in Germany, necessary revaccination and catch-up of missed vaccinations should be administered before travel. At most destinations the risk of infection is higher than in Germany. Hepatitis A vaccine is generally recommended for travelers to areas of increased risk, polio vaccine for all destinations where eradication is not yet confirmed (Asia and Africa). The indications for other travel vaccines must take into consideration travel destination and itinerary, type and duration of travel, individual risk of exposure as well as the epidemiology of the disease to be prevented. Several vaccines of potential interest for travel medicine, e.g., new vaccines against malaria and dengue fever, are under development.

  15. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  16. Vaccinations for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Geeta K.; Heine, R. Phillips

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician–gynecologists are well-suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease–related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and infant benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and provider resources. PMID:25560127

  17. Vaccine epidemiology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course. PMID:27453836

  18. Vaccines for allergy.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic.

  19. Vaccine epidemiology: A review.

    PubMed

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course. PMID:27453836

  20. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  1. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  2. Phase transformation and intense 2.7 μm emission from Er3+ doped YF3/YOF submicron-crystals.

    PubMed

    Chai, Guanqi; Dong, Guoping; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhang, Qinyuan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Yttrium fluoride YF3:Er(3+) and yttrium oxyfluoride YOF:Er(3+) submicron-crystals with mid-infrared fluorescent emissions were synthesized for the first time. The rhombohedral phase YOF submicron-crystals were synthesized by the crystalline phase transformation from pure orthorhombic YF3 submicron-crystals, which were prepared by co-precipitation method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which showed that submicron-crystals were quasi-spherical with the particle size of ~400 nm. A novel formation mechanism of YOF submicron-crystals was proposed. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated the 2.7 μm emission of Er(3+) has remarkably enhanced with the increase of Er(3+) doping concentration, and a novel dynamic circulatory energy transfer mechanism was proposed. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) were used to demonstrate the change of hydroxyl content. These oxyfluoride submicron-crystals provide a new material for nano/submicron-crystals-glass composites, and open a brand new field for the realization of mid-infrared micro/nano-lasers.

  3. Gain Characteristics of Polymer Waveguide Amplifiers Based on NaYF4:Ybl+, Er3+ Nanocrystals at 0.54 µm Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Yin, Jiao; Jia, Zhixu; Song, Weiye; Wang, Xibin; Qin, Guanshi; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Weiping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming

    2016-04-01

    Gain characteristics of polymer waveguide amplifiers based on NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals (NCs) at 0.54 µm wavelength were investigated through numerical simulations. NaYF4:18%Yb3+, 1 0%Er3+ NCs were doped into SU-8 2005 polymer matrix as the core of a polymer waveguide. The absorption spectrum and photoluminescence spectrum of the NCs were recorded and analyzed. The Judd-Ofelt parameters were achieved by means of Judd-Ofelt theory: Ω2 = 6.302 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω4 = 0.69 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω6 =7.572 x 10(-20) cm2. We simulated the gain characteristics of the waveguide amplifier at 0.54 µm wavelength by combining the atomic rate equations with power propaga- tion equations. The gain curves had the saturation effects. A maximum gain -4.3 dB for the 5 cm waveguide with the Er3+ concentration of ~7.5 x 1025 m-3 was obtained.

  4. Effect of Mn and Cr doping on the up-conversion luminescence from NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomisto, Minnea; Palo, Emilia; Laihinen, Tero; Hyppänen, Iko; Lastusaari, Mika; Swart, Hendrik C.; Hölsä, Jorma

    2016-09-01

    The up-conversion luminescence where the absorption of two or more low-energy photons results in emission of a higher-energy photon has been highly effective in certain applications such as bioanalytical assays. Currently one of the most efficient up-converting materials is the NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+. However, some applications (e.g. solar cells) still require improvement of the up-conversion efficiency in order to have actual practical use. Therefore, it is important to enhance the performance of the materials. In this work, the effect of Mn and Cr doping on the up-conversion luminescence of NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ was studied. The materials were prepared using the co-precipitation method and the ratios of the doping ions were optimized for best up-conversion intensity. The as-prepared materials showed very similar sizes and morphologies. Cr co-doping was observed to increase the up-conversion luminescence whereas the addition of Mn resulted in quenching. Up-conversion luminescence was also measured with different excitation power densities and the results suggested that Cr co-doping enables the up-conversion in lower power densities than without Cr co-doping. Furthermore, the reasons for the changes in up-conversion luminescence intensity were discussed.

  5. Wind tunnel evaluation of YF-12 inlet response to internal airflow disturbances with and without control. [Lewis 10 by 10 ft supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Neiner, G. H.; Dustin, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    The response of terminal-shock position and static pressures in the subsonic duct of a YF-12 aircraft flight-hardware inlet to perturbations in simulated engine corrected airflow were obtained with and without inlet control. Frequency response data, obtained with inlet controls inactive, indicated the general nature of the inherent inlet dynamics, assisted in the design of controls, and provided a baseline reference for responses with active controls. All the control laws were implemented by means of a digital computer that could be programmed to behave like the flight inlet's existing analog control. The experimental controls were designed using an analytical optimization technique. The capabilities of the controls were limited primarily by the actuation hardware. The experimental controls provided somewhat better attenuation of terminal shock excursions than did the YF-13 inlet control. Controls using both the forward and aft bypass systems also provided somewhat better attenuation than those using just the forward bypass. The main advantage of using both bypasses is in the greater control flexibility that is achieved.

  6. Gain Characteristics of Polymer Waveguide Amplifiers Based on NaYF4:Ybl+, Er3+ Nanocrystals at 0.54 µm Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Yin, Jiao; Jia, Zhixu; Song, Weiye; Wang, Xibin; Qin, Guanshi; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Weiping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming

    2016-04-01

    Gain characteristics of polymer waveguide amplifiers based on NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals (NCs) at 0.54 µm wavelength were investigated through numerical simulations. NaYF4:18%Yb3+, 1 0%Er3+ NCs were doped into SU-8 2005 polymer matrix as the core of a polymer waveguide. The absorption spectrum and photoluminescence spectrum of the NCs were recorded and analyzed. The Judd-Ofelt parameters were achieved by means of Judd-Ofelt theory: Ω2 = 6.302 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω4 = 0.69 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω6 =7.572 x 10(-20) cm2. We simulated the gain characteristics of the waveguide amplifier at 0.54 µm wavelength by combining the atomic rate equations with power propaga- tion equations. The gain curves had the saturation effects. A maximum gain -4.3 dB for the 5 cm waveguide with the Er3+ concentration of ~7.5 x 1025 m-3 was obtained. PMID:27451666

  7. Phase Transformation and Intense 2.7 μm Emission from Er3+ Doped YF3/YOF Submicron-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Guanqi; Dong, Guoping; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhang, Qinyuan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Yttrium fluoride YF3:Er3+ and yttrium oxyfluoride YOF:Er3+ submicron-crystals with mid-infrared fluorescent emissions were synthesized for the first time. The rhombohedral phase YOF submicron-crystals were synthesized by the crystalline phase transformation from pure orthorhombic YF3 submicron-crystals, which were prepared by co-precipitation method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which showed that submicron-crystals were quasi-spherical with the particle size of ~400 nm. A novel formation mechanism of YOF submicron-crystals was proposed. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated the 2.7 μm emission of Er3+ has remarkably enhanced with the increase of Er3+ doping concentration, and a novel dynamic circulatory energy transfer mechanism was proposed. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) were used to demonstrate the change of hydroxyl content. These oxyfluoride submicron-crystals provide a new material for nano/submicron-crystals-glass composites, and open a brand new field for the realization of mid-infrared micro/nano-lasers. PMID:23604234

  8. Determination of ammonia in water based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between peroxymonocarbonate and branched NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2012-10-16

    The ultraweak chemiluminescence (CL) from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and carbonate is strongly enhanced by the branched NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanoparticle (NP) in the presence of aqueous ammonia. It was explained that ammonia catalyzes the decomposition of peroxymonocarbonate, which is the product of hydrogen peroxide mixing with bicarbonate, making the formation of (CO(2))(2)*, (O(2))(2)*, and (1)O(2). The excitation energy, carried by these emitter intermediates, can be transferred to NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) NP. The CL intensity is directly proportional to the concentration of ammonia present in the solution. A flow-injection CL system with high sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility is proposed for the determination of aqueous ammonia. The proposed method exhibited advantages in a larger linear range from 0.5 μmol L(-1) to 50 μmol L(-1) and a lower detection limit of 1.1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) (S/N = 3). This method has been successfully applied to the evaluation of ammonia in water samples with recoveries from 95% to 108%. The relative standard deviations are 1.8% and 4.1% for intra-assay and inter-assay precision, respectively.

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of 4f3↔4f25d interconfigurational transitions in Nd3+:LiYF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, A.; Guyot, Y.; Joubert, M. F.; Laroche, M.; Margerie, J.; Moncorgé, R.; Descroix, E.

    2003-07-01

    A complete spectroscopic investigation of the 4f3↔4f25d optical transitions of the Nd3+ ion is performed in the case of Nd:LiYF4, based on emission, excitation, ground-state absorption as well as excited-state absorption measurements. The global shape of all the experimental spectra is well reproduced by means of crystal-field calculations of the 4f25d sublevels, and the differences observed between polarized spectra on one hand, and between those recorded at low and room temperatures on the other hand, are successfully accounted for. It is also found that the absorption barycentre is shifted toward higher 4f25d energies when the chosen initial 4f3 sublevel itself is shifted toward higher energies. This behavior is assigned to a total or partial “memory” during the optical transition for the expectation values of different terms of the hamiltonian, especially the electrostatic ones. It is demonstrated that this effect should not be specific of Nd3+:LiYF4 and that it should occur, on the contrary, in every crystalline matrix and for any rare-earth ion from Pr3+ (4f2) to Tm3+ (4f12).

  10. Highly Efficient LiYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) Upconversion Single Crystal under Solar Cell Spectrum Excitation and Photovoltaic Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Wen; Song, Hongwei; Chen, Cong; Xia, Haiping; Zhu, Yongsheng; Zhou, Donglei; Cui, Shaobo; Dai, Qilin; Zhang, Jiazhong

    2016-04-13

    Luminescent upconversion is a promising way to harvest near-infrared (NIR) sunlight and transforms it into visible light that can be directly absorbed by active materials of solar cells and improve their power conversion efficiency (PCE). However, it is still a great challenge to effectively improve the PCE of solar cells with the assistance of upconversion. In this work, we demonstrate the application of the transparent LiYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) single crystal as an independent luminescent upconverter to improve the PCE of perovskite solar cells. The LiYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) single crystal is prepared by an improved Bridgman method, and its internal quantum efficiency approached to 5.72% under 6.2 W cm(-2) 980 nm excitation. The power-dependent upconversion luminescence indicated that under the excitation of simulated sunlight the (4)F(9/2)-(4)I(15/2) red emission originally results from the cooperation of a 1540 nm photon and a 980 nm photon. Furthermore, when the single crystal is placed in front of the perovskite solar cells, the PCE is enhanced by 7.9% under the irradiation of simulated sunlight by 7-8 solar constants. This work implies the upconverter not only can serve as proof of principle for improving PCE of solar cells but also is helpful to practical application.

  11. Vaccines for emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Marano, N; Rupprecht, C; Regnery, R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging infectious diseases represent a grave threat to animal and human populations in terms of their impact on global health, agriculture and the economy. Vaccines developed for emerging infections in animals can protect animal health and prevent transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. Examples in this paper illustrate how industry and public health can collaborate to develop a vaccine to prevent an emerging disease in horses (West Nile virus vaccine), how poultry vaccination can protect animals and prevent transmission to people (avian influenza vaccine), how regulatory changes can pave the way for vaccines that will control the carrier state in animals and thus prevent infection in humans (Bartonella henselae vaccine in cats) and how novel technologies could be applied to vaccinate wildlife reservoir species for rabies. Stemming from the realisation that zoonotic diseases are the predominant source of human emerging infectious diseases, it behoves academic, public health, and animal health agencies to consider creative constructive approaches to combat serious public health challenges. Vaccination of vector/reservoir species, when efficacious vaccines are available, offers significant advantages to combating zoonotic human disease. PMID:17633303

  12. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  13. Vaccine herd effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  14. Chikungunya vaccines in development

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Michael; Buchtele, Nina; Wadowski, Patricia Pia; Schoergenhofer, Christian; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus has become a global health threat, spreading to the industrial world of Europe and the Americas; no treatment or prophylactic vaccine is available. Since the late 1960s much effort has been put into the development of a vaccine, and several heterogeneous strategies have already been explored. Only two candidates have recently qualified to enter clinical phase II trials, a chikungunya virus-like particle-based vaccine and a recombinant live attenuated measles virus-vectored vaccine. This review focuses on the current status of vaccine development against chikungunya virus in humans and discusses the diversity of immunization strategies, results of recent human trials and promising vaccine candidates. PMID:26554522

  15. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Melief, Cornelis J M; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-09-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies.

  16. Systems immunogenetics of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael; McWeeney, Shannon; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Vaccines are the most cost effective public health measure for preventing viral infection and limiting epidemic spread within susceptible populations. However, the efficacy of current protective vaccines is highly variable, particularly in aging populations. In addition, there have been a number of challenges in the development of new vaccines due to a lack of detailed understanding of the immune correlates of protection. To identify the mechanisms underlying the variability of the immune response to vaccines, system-level tools need to be developed that will further our understanding of virus-host interactions and correlates of vaccine efficacy. This will provide critical information for rational vaccine design and allow the development of an analog to the "precision medicine" framework (already acknowledged as a powerful approach in medicine and therapeutics) to be applied to vaccinology.

  17. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination.

  18. Vaccines against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against leptospirosis followed within a year of the first isolation of Leptospira, with the first use of a killed whole cell bacterin vaccine in guinea pigs published in 1916. Since then, bacterin vaccines have been used in humans, cattle, swine, and dogs and remain the only vaccines licensed at the present time. The immunity elicited is restricted to serovars with related lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen. Likewise, vaccines based on LPS antigens have clearly demonstrated protection in animal models, which is also at best serogroup specific. The advent of leptospiral genome sequences has allowed a reverse vaccinology approach for vaccine development. However, the use of inadequate challenge doses and inappropriate statistical analysis invalidates many of the claims of protection with recombinant proteins. PMID:25388138

  19. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. PMID:26920587

  20. The action mechanism of TiO{sub 2}:NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+} cathode buffer layer in highly efficient inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyu; Chen, Huan; Zhao, Dan; Shen, Liang; He, Yeyuan; Guo, Wenbin E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn; Chen, Weiyou E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    We report the fabrication and characteristics of organic solar cells with 6.86% power conversion efficiency (PCE) by doping NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+} into TiO{sub 2} cathode buffer layer. The dependence of devices performance on doping concentration of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+} is investigated. Results indicate that short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) has an apparent improvement, leading to an enhancement of 22.7% in PCE for the optimized doping concentration of 0.05 mmol ml{sup −1} compared to the control devices. NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+} nanoparticles (NPs) can play threefold roles, one is that the incident light in visible region can be scattered by NaYF{sub 4} NPs, the second is that solar irradiation in infrared region can be better utilized by Up-conversion effect of Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions, the third is that electron transport property in TiO{sub 2} thin film can be greatly improved.

  1. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  2. What Vaccines Do You Need?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Adolescent and Adult Vaccine Quiz Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Españ ... adolescentes y adultos Did you know that certain vaccines are recommended for adults and adolescents?* Take this ...

  3. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  4. Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... need this vaccine? Yes, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends 5 doses of diphtheria and ...

  5. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  6. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  7. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  8. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents. PMID:16277033

  9. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  10. Emerging Vaccine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has proven to be an invaluable means of preventing infectious diseases by reducing both incidence of disease and mortality. However, vaccines have not been effectively developed for many diseases including HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV), tuberculosis and malaria, among others. The emergence of new technologies with a growing understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity may lead to efficacious vaccines against pathogens, previously thought impossible. PMID:26343196

  11. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two studies on optimal timing for measles vaccination Chinese scientists develop bird flu vaccine Influenza vaccination reduces risk of heart attack and stroke Two-dose vaccination program shows positive impact on varicella incidence WHO prequalifies Chinese-produced Japanese encephalitis vaccine Phase 3: RTS,S almost halves malaria cases in young children Herd immunity protects babies against whooping cough New developments in nanoparticle-based vaccination

  12. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied. PMID:8809469

  13. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  14. Vaccines and global health.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Brian; Salisbury, David; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    Vaccines have made a major contribution to global health in recent decades but they could do much more. In November 2011, a Royal Society discussion meeting, 'New vaccines for global health', was held in London to discuss the past contribution of vaccines to global health and to consider what more could be expected in the future. Papers presented at the meeting reviewed recent successes in the deployment of vaccines against major infections of childhood and the challenges faced in developing vaccines against some of the world's remaining major infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malaria and tuberculosis. The important contribution that development of more effective veterinary vaccines could make to global health was also addressed. Some of the social and financial challenges to the development and deployment of new vaccines were reviewed. The latter issues were also discussed at a subsequent satellite meeting, 'Accelerating vaccine development', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre. Delegates at this meeting considered challenges to the more rapid development and deployment of both human and veterinary vaccines and how these might be addressed. Papers based on presentations at the discussion meeting and a summary of the main conclusions of the satellite meeting are included in this issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

  15. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  16. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and otolaryngologists) and families should review the vaccination records of current and prospective cochlear implant recipients to ensure that all ... of Use Join Donate ENTConnect Contact Us ...

  17. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:25749248

  18. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases.

  19. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches.

  20. Acellular pertussis vaccines in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichan; Lei, Dianliang; Zhang, Shumin

    2012-11-26

    In China, whole-cell pertussis (Pw) vaccines were produced in the early 1960s and acellular pertussis (Pa) vaccines were introduced in 1995. Pa vaccines have now almost completely replaced Pw vaccines in the national immunization program. To strengthen the regulation of vaccines used in China, a vaccine lot release system was established in 2001 and Pa vaccines have been included in the system since 2006. This paper mainly described the current status of production and the quality control measures in place for Pa vaccines; and analyses quality control test data accumulated between 2006 and 2010.

  1. Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Adacel® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine) ... Boostrix® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine)

  2. [Lack of conviction about vaccination in certain Quebec vaccinators].

    PubMed

    Dionne, M; Boulianne, N; Duval, B; Lavoie, F; Laflamme, N; Carsley, J; Valiquette, L; Gagnon, S; Rochette, L; De Serres, G

    2001-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to all vaccinators in Quebec in 1998. The objective of this survey was to document vaccinators' attitudes, knowledge, and practices related to vaccination. Vaccinators generally believe in the security, efficacy and usefulness of vaccines given to young children. However, 41% of nurses do not fully agree with these opinions. More than 94% of pediatricians completely disagree that "certain practices (homeopathy, good eating habits and a healthy lifestyle) can eliminate the need for vaccination", compared with 85% of general practitioners and only 60% of nurses. Less than 25% of doctors recall children who are late in getting their immunizations; approximately 45% of vaccinators are in complete agreement with simultaneous injections of two vaccines; many circumstances are incorrectly seen as contra indications for vaccination. Public health authorities should target systematic interventions towards vaccinators to improve this situation and to increase nurses' conviction regarding the benefits of vaccination.

  3. Universal influenza vaccines: Shifting to better vaccines.

    PubMed

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Donnelly, John J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza virus causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections and is the most likely, among known pathogens, to cause a large epidemic in humans. Influenza virus mutates rapidly, enabling it to evade natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, influenza viruses can cross from animals to humans, generating novel, potentially pandemic strains. Currently available influenza vaccines induce a strain specific response and may be ineffective against new influenza viruses. The difficulty in predicting circulating strains has frequently resulted in mismatch between the annual vaccine and circulating viruses. Low-resource countries remain mostly unprotected against seasonal influenza and are particularly vulnerable to future pandemics, in part, because investments in vaccine manufacturing and stockpiling are concentrated in high-resource countries. Antibodies that target conserved sites in the hemagglutinin stalk have been isolated from humans and shown to confer protection in animal models, suggesting that broadly protective immunity may be possible. Several innovative influenza vaccine candidates are currently in preclinical or early clinical development. New technologies include adjuvants, synthetic peptides, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vectors, messenger RNA, viral vectors, and attenuated or inactivated influenza viruses. Other approaches target the conserved exposed epitope of the surface exposed membrane matrix protein M2e. Well-conserved influenza proteins, such as nucleoprotein and matrix protein, are mainly targeted for developing strong cross-protective T cell responses. With multiple vaccine candidates moving along the testing and development pipeline, the field is steadily moving toward a product that is more potent, durable, and broadly protective than previously licensed vaccines.

  4. [HPV prophylactic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Konopnicki, D

    2014-09-01

    Since 2007, two prophylactic vaccines against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV. induced lesions (both precancerous dysplasia and cancer) have been registered in Belgium. In multicentre randomized trials including more than 64,000 patients, these vaccines were shown to be highly efficient against the occurrence of condyloma and of dysplastic lesion in the cervix, vagina and vulva in females and in the anus in males. These vaccines display an excellent tolerance and safety profile, the most common adverse event being minor and transient side effects at the injection site. The protection given by these vaccines is more important in subjects that have not been in contact with HPV previously ; moreover the title of neutralizing antibodies against HPV are significantly higher in children vaccinated before 15 years-old age compared to young person vaccinated after this age. For these two reasons, it is recommended to vaccinate before the first sexual relationships. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that vaccination by two doses given at 0 and 6 months in children before 15 years-old was equivalent to the three doses scheme that should be given at 0, 1 or 2 and 6 months in subjects aged 15 years or more. In the countries that have achieved a high vaccine coverage among their young female population, the prevalence of HPV infection and the incidence of high grade cervical dysplasia have significantly decreased while condyloma has almost disappeared four years after the implementation of HPV vaccination. In HIV-positive subjects who are particularly susceptible to infection and lesions induced by HPV, vaccination brings levels of antibody comparable to what is found in the general population with similar safety. PMID:25675641

  5. Rare case of fatal yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease.

    PubMed

    Gerasimon, Gregg; Lowry, Kristie

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a case of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) that occurred after vaccination in a 22-year-old female. Our patient presented with a clinical syndrome of fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting, which quickly progressed to multiorgan failure and ultimately death on hospital day 4. YEL-AVD is an extremely rare condition reported only a few times in the literature. The yellow fever vaccine is a known stimulus of systemic inflammation in the body. A mild subclinical viremia develops, which results in a persistent and robust T-helper-cell-dependent antibody response with long-lasting immune protection. The very rare patient may have an aberrant response to the 17D vaccine strain, causing the multiple organ system failure seen in YEL-AVD. Predisposing host factors that contribute to YEL-AVD are not yet known. Treatment for YEL-AVD is supportive. To the authors' knowledge, this patient was the first to have YEL-AVD as a result of standard US military vaccination protocols.

  6. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines.

  7. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  8. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  9. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  10. The Human Hookworm Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Diemert, David; Bacon, Kristina M; Beaumier, Coreen; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brooker, Simon; Couto, Artur Roberto; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Homma, Akira; Lee, Bruce Y; Loukas, Alex; Loblack, Marva; Morel, Carlos Medicis; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Russell, Philip K

    2013-04-18

    Hookworm infection is one of the world's most common neglected tropical diseases and a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries. A Human Hookworm Vaccine is currently being developed by the Sabin Vaccine Institute and is in phase 1 clinical testing. The candidate vaccine is comprised of two recombinant antigens known as Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1, each of which is an important parasite enzyme required for hookworms to successfully utilize host blood as a source of energy. The recombinant proteins are formulated on Alhydrogel(®) and are being tested in combination with a synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist. The aim of the vaccine is to induce anti-enzyme antibodies that will reduce both host blood loss and the number of hookworms attached to the gut. Transfer of the manufacturing technology to the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ)/Bio-Manguinhos (a Brazilian public sector developing country vaccine manufacturer) is planned, with a clinical development plan that could lead to registration of the vaccine in Brazil. The vaccine would also need to be introduced in the poorest regions of Africa and Asia, where hookworm infection is highly endemic. Ultimately, the vaccine could become an essential tool for achieving hookworm control and elimination, a key target in the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases.

  11. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  12. Vaccination to Prevent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines stimulate the immune system, mimicking infectious attacks and thereby promoting the development of protective antibodies and/or cellular immunity so that the body is immune to infection when live native infections attack. Some of these infections are associated with cancer-causing changes in the body; thus some vaccines may help prevent cancer. PMID:27621345

  13. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  14. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  15. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Paul, Stephane; Haegel-Kronenberger, Helene; Calmels, Bastien; Squiban, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer-associated antigens represents an attractive option for cancer therapy in view of the comparatively low toxicity and, so far, excellent safety profile of this treatment. Nevertheless, it is now recognized that the vaccination strategies used for prophylactic vaccinations against infectious diseases cannot necessarily be used for therapeutic cancer vaccination. Cancer patients are usually immunosuppressed, and most cancer-associated antigens are self antigens. Therefore, various immunostimulation techniques are under investigation in an effort to bolster immune systems and to overcome immune tolerance to self antigens. Various strategies to stimulate antigen presentation, T-cell reactivity and innate immune activity are under investigation. Similarly, strategies to produce an immunological 'danger signal' at the site of the tumor itself are under evaluation, as it is recognized that while tumor-specific T-cells can be activated at the site of vaccination, they require appropriate signals to be attracted to a tumor. The detection, evaluation and quantification of specific immune responses generated by vaccination with cancer-associated antigens is another important area of therapeutic cancer vaccine evaluation receiving much attention and novel strategies. Multiple clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate therapeutic vaccines in patients. Aggressive protocols such as those combining specific stimulation of T-cells and chemotherapy or strategies to block immune regulation are having some success. PMID:15011780

  16. Pricing of new vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    New vaccine pricing is a complicated process that could have substantial long-standing scientific, medical and public health ramifications. Pricing can have a considerable impact on new vaccine adoption and, thereby, either culminate or thwart years of research and development and public health efforts. Typically, pricing strategy consists of the following eleven components: (1) Conduct a target population analysis; (2) Map potential competitors and alternatives; (3) Construct a vaccine target product profile (TPP) and compare it to projected or actual TPPs of competing vaccines; (4) Quantify the incremental value of the new vaccine's characteristics; (5) Determine vaccine positioning in the marketplace; (6) Estimate the vaccine price-demand curve; (7) Calculate vaccine costs (including those of manufacturing, distribution, and research and development); (8) Account for various legal, regulatory, third party payer and competitor factors; (9) Consider the overall product portfolio; (10) Set pricing objectives; (11) Select pricing and pricing structure. While the biomedical literature contains some studies that have addressed these components, there is still considerable room for more extensive evaluation of this important area. PMID:20861678

  17. Acceptability of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mande, R

    1977-01-01

    The acceptability of BCG vaccination varies a great deal according to the country and to the period when the vaccine is given. The incidence of complications has not always a direct influence on this acceptability, which depends, for a very large part, on the risk of tuberculosis in a given country at a given time.

  18. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics. PMID:26458840

  19. YF-17A

    NASA Video Gallery

    the 1976 flight test program included the study of maneuverability of this aircraft at transonic speeds and the collection of in-flight pressure data from around the afterbody of the aircraft to im...

  20. Developing new smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, S. R.; Merchlinsky, M.; Kleppinger, C.; Goldenthal, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    New stockpiles of smallpox vaccine are required as a contingency for protecting civilian and military personnel against deliberate dissemination of smallpox virus by terrorists or unfriendly governments. The smallpox vaccine in the current stockpile consists of a live animal poxvirus (Vaccinia virus [VACV]) that was grown on the skin of calves. Because of potential issues with controlling this earlier manufacturing process, which included scraping VACV lesions from calfskin, new vaccines are being developed and manufactured by using viral propagation on well-characterized cell substrates. We describe, from a regulatory perspective, the various strains of VACV, the adverse events associated with calf lymph-propagated smallpox vaccine, the issues regarding selection and use of cell substrates for vaccine production, and the issues involved in demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. PMID:11747717

  1. Neisseria meningitidis B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Invasive infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis are a serious public health problem worldwide and have a heavy economic impact. The incidence of invasive disease due to Neisseria meningitidis is highly variable according to geographical area and serogroup distribution. Since the introduction of vaccination programs with conjugated vaccine C in children and adolescents, most cases of invasive meningococcal disease in developed countries have been caused by meningococcus B. It is important to underline that invasive meningococcal disease will not be controlled until safe and effective vaccines for meningococcal B are available and widely used. The aims of this article are to describe the most recent developments in meningococcal B vaccines and to discuss how these vaccines can contribute to containing meningococcal disease.

  2. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    PubMed

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  3. [What vaccination has brought].

    PubMed

    Bégué, Pierre

    2004-03-15

    The vaccines have improved obviously and constantly the struggle against infectious diseases. When the immunisations have been well applied some diseases fell down dramatically: i.e. diphtheria, poliomyelitis and smallpox which was eradicated. Actually some efficacious vaccines as measles or rubella vaccines could eliminate the diseases. Nevertheless in many developed countries the immunisation coverage is not properly reached and the diseases are always circulating, with a shift of age towards adults, with more severe diseases or new epidemiology (i.e. pertussis). However measles have been eliminated from some countries as Finland, Sweden, United States. The adverse events of vaccines are nowadays enhanced and discourage immunisation among some doctors or patients. The benefit-risk ratio has to be made very clear to avoid a lack or a denial of immunisation after false fears about risk of some vaccines. An improvement of surveillance and of correct information is highly required.

  4. Vaccination against cestode parasites.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1993-10-01

    Cestodes are tapeworm parasites. Infection in the intermediate host with larval (metacestode) parasites causes medically and economically important diseases known as hydatidosis and cysticercosis. Immunization against experimental infection with metacestode parasites has been highly successful, in marked contrast with the relative ineffectiveness of vaccines against infection with most parasitic organisms. High levels of immunity against a challenge infection with taeniid cestode eggs can be stimulated by immunization with extracts of the parasites, particularly with extracts of the oncosphere life-cycle stage. This led to the production of a recombinant antigen vaccine against infection in sheep with the parasite Taenia ovis, the first highly effective, non-living vaccine against a parasitic infection in animals or humans. This paper reviews immunity to the adult and metacestode life-cycle stages of cestode parasites, development and application of the T. ovis vaccine, and prospects for vaccines against other cestode infections.

  5. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, M A

    2003-04-01

    The DNA vaccines are simple rings of DNA containing a gene encoding an antigen, and a promoter/terminator to make the gene express in mammalian cells. They are a promising new approach for generating all types of desired immunity: cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL), T helper cells and antibodies, whilst being a technology that has the potential for global usage in terms of manufacturing ease, broad population administration and safety. This review gives an overview of the mechanisms, preclinical and clinical efficacy of DNA vaccines, and point out the limitations of the first generation of such vaccines, and some of the promising second-generation developments. This technology is also being utilized in the field of proteomics as a tool to elucidate the function of genes. The breadth of applications for DNA vaccines thus ranges from prophylactic vaccines to immunotherapy for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:12653868

  6. Next generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines. PMID:22002157

  7. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  8. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  9. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  10. Vaccine safety--vaccine benefits: science and the public's perception.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C B; Marcuse, E K

    2001-11-01

    The development of cowpox vaccination by Jenner led to the development of immunology as a scientific discipline. The subsequent eradication of smallpox and the remarkable effects of other vaccines are among the most important contributions of biomedical science to human health. Today, the need for new vaccines has never been greater. However, in developed countries, the public's fear of vaccine-preventable diseases has waned, and awareness of potential adverse effects has increased, which is threatening vaccine acceptance. To further the control of disease by vaccination, we must develop safe and effective new vaccines to combat infectious diseases, and address the public's concerns.

  11. Vaccination coverage among adults, excluding influenza vaccination - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kim, David K; Pilishvili, Tamara; Hales, Craig M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and vaccination indication). Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster vaccination. Increases in vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low

  12. Vaccines against nicotine.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Erich H; Cerny, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Medications against any dependence-inducing drug face a dilemma: if they are efficient, they will induce withdrawal symptoms and the patient is likely to stop taking his medication. Anti drug vaccines are irreversible, provide protection over years and need booster injections far beyond the critical phase of acute withdrawal symptoms. Interacting rather with the drug in the blood than with a receptor in the brain, the vaccines are, in addition, free of side effects due to central interaction. For drugs like nicotine interacting with different types of receptors in many organs, this is a further advantage. There are three reasons that anti drug vaccines have first been developed against nicotine. Firstly, in most parts of the world 20 to 50% of the adult population smoke and any smoking cessation treatment will have an important impact on public health and be commercially a very attractive product. The second reason are the smokers themselves, who would like to quit in significant numbers and who have shown good compliance for any form of treatment. Thirdly, the quantities of cocaine or heroine taken by dependant persons are higher than the quantity of nicotine per cigarette, which makes an anti nicotine vaccine the easier vaccine project. Three anti nicotine vaccines are today in an advanced stage of clinical evaluation. We report here how those vaccines work, on the progress of the trials and future developments to expect. Results show that the efficiency of the vaccines is directly related to the antibody levels of the probates, a fact which will help to optimize further the vaccine effect. We expect the vaccines to appear on the market during a time window between 2009 and 2011. PMID:19276649

  13. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  14. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  15. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods. PMID:25108215

  16. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods.

  17. Fingermark detection on non-porous and semi-porous surfaces using NaYF4:Er,Yb up-converter particles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongliang; Bullock, Elicia; Maynard, Philip; Reedy, Brian; Shimmon, Ronald; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude; McDonagh, Andrew

    2011-04-15

    This article describes the first use of an anti-Stokes material, or up-converter, for the development of latent fingermarks on a range of non-porous surfaces. Anti-Stokes materials can absorb long-wavelength light and emit light at a shorter wavelength. This property is unusual in both natural and artificial materials and so fingermark detection techniques based on anti-Stokes luminescence are potentially sensitive and selective. Latent fingermarks on luminescent and non-luminescent substrates, including Australian polymer banknotes (a well-known 'difficult' surface), were developed with sodium yttrium tetrafluoride doped with erbium and ytterbium (NaYF(4):Er,Yb) by dry powder, wet powder, and cyanoacrylate staining techniques. This study illustrates the potential of up-converter phosphors for the detection of latent fingermarks.

  18. An experimental design approach for hydrothermal synthesis of NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+ upconversion microcrystal: UV emission optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani Darani, Masoume; Bastani, Saeed; Ghahari, Mehdi; Kardar, Pooneh

    2015-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) emissions of hydrothermally synthesized NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+ upconversion crystals were optimized using the response surface methodology experimental design. In these experimental designs, 9 runs, two factors namely (1) Tm3+ ion concentration, and (2) pH value were investigated using 3 different ligands. Introducing UV upconversion emissions as responses, their intensity were separately maximized. Analytical methods such as XRD, SEM, and FTIR could be used to study crystal structure, morphology, and fluorescent spectroscopy in order to obtain luminescence properties. From the photo-luminescence spectra, emissions centered at 347, 364, 452, 478, 648 and 803 nm were observed. Some results show that increasing each DOE factor up to an optimum value resulted in an increase in emission intensity, followed by reduction. To optimize UV emission, as a final result to the UV emission optimization, each design had a suggestion.

  19. Efficient green continuous-wave lasing of blue-diode-pumped solid-state lasers based on praseodymium-doped LiYF4.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nils-Owe; Bellancourt, Aude-Reine; Weichmann, Ulrich; Huber, Günter

    2010-07-10

    We report highly efficient laser operation of praseodymium-doped LiYF(4) in the green spectral range. The influence of the crystal length and pump light focusing on the laser performance has been studied. The pump radiation was delivered by InGaN laser diodes. Optimizing the setup for a 2.9 mm long crystal with a doping concentration of 0.5% led to an electric to green laser power conversion efficiency as high as 7.4%. With 500 and 1000 mW of pump light power, output powers of 179 and 358 mW have been reached, respectively. With respect to absorbed power, slope efficiencies of up to approximately 60% have been achieved.

  20. Continuous-output terminal-shock-position sensor for mixed-compression inlets evaluated in wind tunnel tests of YF-12 aircraft inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Cole, G. L.; Neiner, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An electronic sensor was built to measure the position of the terminal shock in a supersonic inlet. The sensor uses several static-pressure taps in the inlet wall. The sensor output is continuously proportional to shock position. When the sensor was installed in a YF-12 aircraft flight inlet during wind tunnel tests, it indicated shock position within + or - 5 percent of the total distance covered by the static-pressure-tap region. The maximum error caused by an angle of attack change of 4 deg was less than 25 percent. In the region of normal inlet operation, the angle of attack error is negligible. Frequency-response tests show the amplitude ratio is constant out to 60 Hz, and decreases to about 50 percent at 100 Hz, with a phase lag of 50 deg.

  1. Double pulse laser deposition of polymer nanocomposite: NaYF4:Tm3+,Yb3+ films for optical sensors and light emitting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Wilson, Simeon; Sarkisov, Sergey; Patel, Darayas

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing operationally Nanocomposite polymeric thin films for sensor and light emitting applications using the innovative modified double pulsed laser deposition (DPLD) technique. The existing PLD vacuum chamber was modified to accommodate multiple wavelength laser beams for in-situ-double-ablation/Deposition (DPLD) of multiple targets of host and dopants. Special design was made for cooling of the target to the threshold of the polymer ablation without interrupting the continuity of the ablation process. Multilayered of nanocomposites of acrylic polymers and nanoparticles of NaYF4:Tm3+ ,Yb3+ are fabricated using ultra-violet (UV) radiation (355 nm) ablating polymer targets and near-infra-red (near-IR) radiation (1064 nm) ablating inorganic targets. The films were characterized using the reflected high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), XRD , XRF, AFM, and FTIR absorption spectroscopy and tested as possible chemical sensors and light emitters.

  2. Fabrication of freestanding silk fibroin films containing Ag nanowires/NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocomposites with metal-enhanced fluorescence behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bing; Qi, Ning; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Gong, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    Solar cells containing upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) used as a power source in biomedical nanosystems have attracted great interest. However, such solar cells further need to be developed because their substrate materials should be biocompatible, flexible and highly luminescent. Here, we report that freestanding silk fibroin (SF) films containing a mesh of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and β-NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals with metal-enhanced fluorescence behavior can be fabricated. The freestanding composite films exhibit properties such as good optical transparency, conductivity and flexibility. Furthermore, they show significantly enhanced upconversion fluorescence due to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of AgNWs compared to the SF-UCNP films without AgNWs. The freestanding composite films with metal-enhanced fluorescence behavior show great promise for future applications in self-powered nanodevices such as cardiac pacemakers, biosensors and nanorobots.

  3. 19F nuclear spin relaxation and spin diffusion effects in the single-ion magnet LiYF4:Ho3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Vanyunin, M. V.; Graf, M. J.; Lago, J.; Borsa, F.; Lascialfari, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.; Barbara, B.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the 19F nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in a single crystal of LiYF4 doped with holmium are described by an approach based on a detailed consideration of the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between nuclei and impurity paramagnetic ions and nuclear spin diffusion processes. The observed non-exponential long time recovery of the nuclear magnetization after saturation at intermediate temperatures is in agreement with predictions of the spin-diffusion theory in a case of the diffusion limited relaxation. At avoided level crossings in the spectrum of electron-nuclear states of Ho3 + ions, rates of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation increase due to quasi-resonant energy exchange between nuclei and paramagnetic ions in contrast to the predominant role played by electronic cross-relaxation processes in the low-frequency ac-susceptibility.

  4. Core/shell structured NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+/Gd+3 nanorods with Au nanoparticles or shells for flexible amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. Q.; Li, X. D.; Liu, Q. Q.; Chen, X. H.; Sun, Z.; Liu, C.; Ye, X. J.; Huang, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple approach for preparing near-infrared (NIR) to visible upconversion (UC) NaYF4:Yb/Er/Gd nanorods in combination with gold nanostructures has been reported. The grown UC nanomaterials with Au nanostructures have been applied to flexible amorphous silicon solar cells on the steel substrates to investigate their responses to sub-bandgap infrared irradiation. Photocurrent-voltage measurements were performed on the solar cells. It was demonstrated that UC of NIR light led to a 16-fold to 72-fold improvement of the short-circuit current under 980 nm illumination compared to a cell without upconverters. A maximum current of 1.16 mA was obtained for the cell using UC nanorods coated with Au nanoparticles under 980 nm laser illumination. This result corresponds to an external quantum efficiency of 0.14% of the solar cell. Mechanisms of erbium luminescence in the grown UC nanorods were analyzed and discussed.

  5. A low-toxic site-directed mutant of Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin as a potential candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Xin, Wenwen; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), one of the most potent toxins known, is a potential biological weapon; therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is important for preventing intoxication or disease by ETX. In this study, genetically detoxified epsilon toxin mutants were developed as candidate vaccines. We used site-directed mutagenesis to mutate the essential amino acid residues (His106, Ser111 and Phe199). Six site-directed mutants of ETX (mETX (H106P) , mETX (S111H) , mETX (S111Y) , mETX (F199H) , mETX (F199E) , mETX (S111YF199E) ) were generated and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Both mETX (F199E) and mETX (H106P) with low or non-cytotoxicity that retained their immunogenicity were selected to immunize mice 3 times, and the mouse survival data were recorded after challenging with recombinant wild-type ETX. mETX (F199E) induces the same protection as mETX (H106P) , which was reported previously as a promising toxin mutant for vaccine, and both of them could protect immunized mice against a 100× LD₅₀ dose of active wild-type recombinant ETX. This work showed that mETX (F199E) is another promising candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia and other diseases caused by ETX. PMID:23835363

  6. Real-time, non-invasive monitoring of hydrogel degradation using LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) NIR-to-NIR upconverting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jalani, Ghulam; Naccache, Rafik; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Lerouge, Sophie; Haglund, Lisbet; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Cerruti, Marta

    2015-07-14

    To design a biodegradable hydrogel as cell support, one should know its in vivo degradation rate. A technique commonly used to track gel degradation is fluorescence spectroscopy. However, the fluorescence from conventional fluorophores quickly decays, and the fluorophores are often moderately cytotoxic. Most importantly, they require ultraviolet or visible (UV-Vis) light as the excitation source, which cannot penetrate deeply through biological tissues. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are exciting alternatives to conventional fluorophores because they can convert near-infrared (NIR) to UV-Vis-NIR light via a sequential multiphoton absorption process referred to as upconversion. NIR light can penetrate up to few cm inside tissues, thus making these UCNPs much better probes than conventional fluorophores for in vivo monitoring. Also, UCNPs have narrow emission bands, high photoluminescence (PL) signal-to-noise ratio, low cytotoxicity and good physical and chemical stability. Here, we show a nanocomposite system consisting of a biodegradable, in situ thermogelling injectable hydrogel made of chitosan and hyaluronic acid encapsulating silica-coated LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) UCNPs. We use these UCNPs as photoluminescent tags to monitor the gel degradation inside live, cultured intervertebral discs (IVDs) over a period of 3 weeks. PL spectroscopy and NIR imaging show that NIR-to-NIR upconversion of LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)@SiO2 UCNPs allows for tracking of the gel degradation in living tissues. Both in vitro and ex vivo release of UCNPs follow a similar trend during the first 5 days; after this time, ex vivo release becomes faster than in vitro, indicating a faster gel degradation ex vivo. Also, the amount of released UCNPs in vitro increases continuously up to 3 weeks, while it plateaus after 15 days inside the IVDs showing a homogenous distribution of UCNPs throughout the IVD tissue. This non-invasive optical method for real time, live tissue imaging holds

  7. Homogenous detection of fumonisin B(1) with a molecular beacon based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between NaYF4: Yb, Ho upconversion nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Li, Xiangli; Tan, Guiliang; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Zhouping; Wang, Hongxin

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we presented a new aptasensor for fumonisin B1 (FB1) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NaYF4: Yb, Ho upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The quenchers (AuNPs) were attached to the 5' end of the molecular beacon (MB), and the donors (UCNPs) were attached to the 3' end of the MB. In the absence of target DNA (DNA complementary to FB1 aptamers), the energy donors and acceptors were placed in close proximity, leading to quenching of the fluorescence of the UCNPs. Due to the combination of FB1 and FB1-specific aptamers, this caused some complementary DNA dissociating from the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). In the presence of the complementary DNA, the MBs underwent spontaneous conformational change and caused the UCNPs and AuNPs to detach from each other, resulting in restoration of the upconversion fluorescence. Therefore, the fluorescence of UCNPs was restored in a FB1 concentration-dependent manner, which was the basis of the FB1 quantification. The aptasensors showed a linear relationship from 0.01 to 100 ng mL(-1) for FB1 with a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL(-1) in an aqueous buffer. As a practical application, the aptasensor was used to monitor FB1 levels in naturally contaminated maize samples. The results were consistent with that of a classic ELISA method, indicating that the UCNPs-FRET aptasensor, which benefited from the near infrared excitation of NaYF4: Yb, Ho UCNPs, was effective for directly sensing FB1 in foodstuff samples without optical interference. This work also created the opportunity to develop aptasensors for other targets using this FRET system.

  8. Real-time, non-invasive monitoring of hydrogel degradation using LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) NIR-to-NIR upconverting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jalani, Ghulam; Naccache, Rafik; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Lerouge, Sophie; Haglund, Lisbet; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Cerruti, Marta

    2015-07-14

    To design a biodegradable hydrogel as cell support, one should know its in vivo degradation rate. A technique commonly used to track gel degradation is fluorescence spectroscopy. However, the fluorescence from conventional fluorophores quickly decays, and the fluorophores are often moderately cytotoxic. Most importantly, they require ultraviolet or visible (UV-Vis) light as the excitation source, which cannot penetrate deeply through biological tissues. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are exciting alternatives to conventional fluorophores because they can convert near-infrared (NIR) to UV-Vis-NIR light via a sequential multiphoton absorption process referred to as upconversion. NIR light can penetrate up to few cm inside tissues, thus making these UCNPs much better probes than conventional fluorophores for in vivo monitoring. Also, UCNPs have narrow emission bands, high photoluminescence (PL) signal-to-noise ratio, low cytotoxicity and good physical and chemical stability. Here, we show a nanocomposite system consisting of a biodegradable, in situ thermogelling injectable hydrogel made of chitosan and hyaluronic acid encapsulating silica-coated LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) UCNPs. We use these UCNPs as photoluminescent tags to monitor the gel degradation inside live, cultured intervertebral discs (IVDs) over a period of 3 weeks. PL spectroscopy and NIR imaging show that NIR-to-NIR upconversion of LiYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)@SiO2 UCNPs allows for tracking of the gel degradation in living tissues. Both in vitro and ex vivo release of UCNPs follow a similar trend during the first 5 days; after this time, ex vivo release becomes faster than in vitro, indicating a faster gel degradation ex vivo. Also, the amount of released UCNPs in vitro increases continuously up to 3 weeks, while it plateaus after 15 days inside the IVDs showing a homogenous distribution of UCNPs throughout the IVD tissue. This non-invasive optical method for real time, live tissue imaging holds

  9. The French neurotropic vaccine strain of yellow fever virus accumulates mutations slowly during passage in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, M R; Li, L; Suderman, M T; Wang, H; Barrett, A D

    2000-08-01

    This study of the yellow fever French neurotropic vaccine strain from the Institut Pasteur (FNV-IP) demonstrates that this viral genome is not as stable as that of the 17D-204 vaccine virus. FNV-IP was plaque-purified three times and then passaged eight times in Vero cells. Viral populations from the second and eighth passage post purification were sequenced and compared to the published sequences of FNV-IP. The passage-2 viral population had 31 nucleotide and nine amino acid changes compared to the parental virus while the passage-8 virus had six additional nucleotide changes encoding a single amino acid substitution. The plaque-purified virus also had two sequence deletions in the 3'-noncoding region. The plaque purification resulted in selection of a passage-2 virus that had a mouse LD(50) of 20 pfu/ml, 67-fold greater than parental FNV-IP which had an LD(50) of 0.3 pfu/ml. Subsequent passage in Vero cells resulted in a passage-8 virus which had increased neurovirulence with an LD(50) of 3.2 pfu/ml. The only amino acid difference between the passage-2 and passage-8 viruses was at amino acid 638 of NS5 which lies within domain V of the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase. Overall, these data indicate that FNV-IP virus has an inherently less stable genome than 17D vaccine virus and a variable viral population.

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of Brucella vaccines and vaccine targets using VIOLIN

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the commonest zoonotic diseases found worldwide in humans and a variety of animal species. While several animal vaccines are available, there is no effective and safe vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in humans. VIOLIN (http://www.violinet.org) is a web-based vaccine database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes published data of commercialized vaccines, and vaccines in clinical trials or in research. VIOLIN contains information for 454 vaccines or vaccine candidates for 73 pathogens. VIOLIN also contains many bioinformatics tools for vaccine data analysis, data integration, and vaccine target prediction. To demonstrate the applicability of VIOLIN for vaccine research, VIOLIN was used for bioinformatics analysis of existing Brucella vaccines and prediction of new Brucella vaccine targets. Results VIOLIN contains many literature mining programs (e.g., Vaxmesh) that provide in-depth analysis of Brucella vaccine literature. As a result of manual literature curation, VIOLIN contains information for 38 Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates, 14 protective Brucella antigens, and 68 host response studies to Brucella vaccines from 97 peer-reviewed articles. These Brucella vaccines are classified in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) system and used for different ontological applications. The web-based VIOLIN vaccine target prediction program Vaxign was used to predict new Brucella vaccine targets. Vaxign identified 14 outer membrane proteins that are conserved in six virulent strains from B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis that are pathogenic in humans. Of the 14 membrane proteins, two proteins (Omp2b and Omp31-1) are not present in B. ovis, a Brucella species that is not pathogenic in humans. Brucella vaccine data stored in VIOLIN were compared and analyzed using the VIOLIN query system. Conclusions Bioinformatics curation and ontological

  11. Technical transformation of biodefense vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2009-11-01

    Biodefense vaccines are developed against a diverse group of pathogens. Vaccines were developed for some of these pathogens a long time ago but they are facing new challenges to move beyond the old manufacturing technologies. New vaccines to be developed against other pathogens have to determine whether to follow traditional vaccination strategies or to seek new approaches. Advances in basic immunology and recombinant DNA technology have fundamentally transformed the process of formulating a vaccine concept, optimizing protective antigens, and selecting the most effective vaccine delivery approach for candidate biodefense vaccines. PMID:19837293

  12. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. PMID:27394026

  13. The need for new vaccines.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kate; Nguyen, Aurélia; Stéphenne, Jean

    2009-12-30

    Advances in biotechnology and immunology are yielding exciting progress in the development of new biologics and vaccines. Yet in both the developed and developing world, we see a backlog of new vaccines that are licensed but not yet used, an "innovation pile-up", which may prevent individuals and societies from benefiting from protection against preventable infectious diseases. What is the "need for new vaccines"? Reviewing the vaccines environment and the place of vaccination in public health, we present our business model that we use to sustainably deliver the benefits of vaccination and review potential solutions to accelerating the introduction and adoption of under-utilised and future vaccines.

  14. [Present status of vaccines in 1989].

    PubMed

    Roussey, M; Dabadie, A

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe 2 new vaccines now available in France: one is the GenHevac, an hepatitis B vaccine, the first virus recombinant vaccine; the other one is the Typhim Vi, a polysaccharide typhoid vaccine. Three other vaccines are currently used in foreign countries and will be soon available: the Hemophilus influenzae vaccine, the acellular pertussis vaccine and the varicella vaccine. Rotavirus and Cytomegalovirus vaccines are studied for their clinical efficacy.

  15. Vaccine beliefs of parents who oppose compulsory vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Allison M.; Brown, Cedric J.; Gust, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were the following: (1) to describe the sociodemographic factors, vaccine beliefs, and behaviors that are associated with parental opposition to compulsory vaccination, and (2) to determine if the availability of a philosophical exemption in a parent's state of residence is associated with parental opposition to compulsory vaccination. METHODS: Data from the 2002 HealthStyles survey were analyzed. Chi-square analysis was used to identify significant associations between belief and behavior questions and opposition to compulsory vaccination for school entry. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted using significant variables from the bivariate analysis to identify independent predictors of opposition to compulsory vaccination among surveyed parents. RESULTS: Of respondents with at least one child aged < or = 18 years living in the household (n=1,527), 12% were opposed to compulsory vaccination. Survey results indicate that a parent's belief regarding compulsory vaccination for school entry is significantly associated with beliefs in the safety and utility of vaccines, as well as intention to have the youngest child fully vaccinated. Residence in a state that permits philosophical exemption to vaccination also was significantly associated with a parent's opposition to compulsory vaccination for school entry. CONCLUSIONS: Providing basic information to parents regarding vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases may help reduce opposition to compulsory vaccination by reinforcing the safety and importance of routine childhood vaccinations. PMID:16134564

  16. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  17. Nanoparticles for transcutaneous vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus‐Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary The living epidermis and dermis are rich in antigen presenting cells (APCs). Their activation can elicit a strong humoral and cellular immune response as well as mucosal immunity. Therefore, the skin is a very attractive site for vaccination, and an intradermal application of antigen may be much more effective than a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. However, the stratum corneum (SC) is a most effective barrier against the invasion of topically applied vaccines. Products which have reached the stage of clinical testing, avoid this problem by injecting the nano‐vaccine intradermally or by employing a barrier disrupting method and applying the vaccine to a relatively large skin area. Needle‐free vaccination is desirable from a number of aspects: ease of application, improved patient acceptance and less risk of infection among them. Nanocarriers can be designed in a way that they can overcome the SC. Also incorporation into nanocarriers protects instable antigen from degradation, improves uptake and processing by APCs, and facilitates endosomal escape and nuclear delivery of DNA vaccines. In addition, sustained release systems may build a depot in the tissue gradually releasing antigen which may avoid booster doses. Therefore, nanoformulations of vaccines for transcutaneous immunization are currently a very dynamic field of research. Among the huge variety of nanocarrier systems that are investigated hopes lie on ultra‐flexible liposomes, superfine rigid nanoparticles and nanocarriers, which are taken up by hair follicles. The potential and pitfalls associated with these three classes of carriers will be discussed. PMID:21854553

  18. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  19. Hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Luisa; Paladini, Sara; Galli, Cristina; Raimondo, Giovanni; Pollicino, Teresa; Zanetti, Alessandro R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a worldwide leading cause of acute and chronic liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Effective vaccines have been available since the early '80s and vaccination has proved highly successful in reducing the disease burden, the development of the carrier state and the HB-related morbidity and mortality in the countries where vaccination has been implemented.   Neutralizing (protective) antibodies (anti-HBs) induced by vaccination are targeted largely towards the amino acid hydrophilic region, referred to as the common a determinant which is present on the outer protein coat or surface antigen (HBsAg), spanning amino acids 124-149. This provides protection against all HBV genotypes (from A to H) and is responsible for the broad immunity afforded by hepatitis B vaccination. Thus, alterations of residues within this region of the surface antigen may determine conformational changes that can allow replication of the mutated HBV in vaccinated people. An important mutation in the surface antigen region was identified in Italy some 25 years ago in infants born to HBsAg carrier mothers who developed breakthrough infections despite having received HBIG and vaccine at birth. This virus had a point mutation from guanosine to adenosine at nucleotide position 587, resulting in aa substitution from glycine (G) to arginine (R) at position 145 in the a determinant. Since the G145R substitution alters the projecting loop (aa 139-147) of the a determinant, the neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination are no longer able to recognize the mutated epitope. Beside G145R, other S-gene mutations potentially able to evade neutralizing anti-HBs and infect vaccinated people have been described worldwide. In addition, the emergence of Pol mutants associated with resistance to treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues can select viruses with crucial changes in the overlapping S-gene, potentially able to alter the S protein immunoreactivity. Thus

  20. Hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Luisa; Paladini, Sara; Galli, Cristina; Raimondo, Giovanni; Pollicino, Teresa; Zanetti, Alessandro R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a worldwide leading cause of acute and chronic liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Effective vaccines have been available since the early '80s and vaccination has proved highly successful in reducing the disease burden, the development of the carrier state and the HB-related morbidity and mortality in the countries where vaccination has been implemented.   Neutralizing (protective) antibodies (anti-HBs) induced by vaccination are targeted largely towards the amino acid hydrophilic region, referred to as the common a determinant which is present on the outer protein coat or surface antigen (HBsAg), spanning amino acids 124-149. This provides protection against all HBV genotypes (from A to H) and is responsible for the broad immunity afforded by hepatitis B vaccination. Thus, alterations of residues within this region of the surface antigen may determine conformational changes that can allow replication of the mutated HBV in vaccinated people. An important mutation in the surface antigen region was identified in Italy some 25 years ago in infants born to HBsAg carrier mothers who developed breakthrough infections despite having received HBIG and vaccine at birth. This virus had a point mutation from guanosine to adenosine at nucleotide position 587, resulting in aa substitution from glycine (G) to arginine (R) at position 145 in the a determinant. Since the G145R substitution alters the projecting loop (aa 139-147) of the a determinant, the neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination are no longer able to recognize the mutated epitope. Beside G145R, other S-gene mutations potentially able to evade neutralizing anti-HBs and infect vaccinated people have been described worldwide. In addition, the emergence of Pol mutants associated with resistance to treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues can select viruses with crucial changes in the overlapping S-gene, potentially able to alter the S protein immunoreactivity. Thus

  1. Anti-addiction vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts to eradicate it, addiction to both legal and illicit drugs continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. Anti-addiction vaccines can produce the antibodies to block the effects of these drugs on the brain, and have great potential to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with illicit drug intoxications. This review provides a current overview of anti-addiction vaccines that are under clinical trial and pre-clinical research evaluation. It also outlines the development challenges, ethical concerns, and likely future intervention for anti-addiction vaccines. PMID:22003367

  2. Developing vaccines against pandemic influenza.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J M

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza presents special problems for vaccine development. There must be a balance between rapid availability of vaccine and the safeguards to ensure safety, quality and efficacy of vaccine. Vaccine was developed for the pandemics of 1957, 1968, 1977 and for the pandemic alert of 1976. This experience is compared with that gained in developing vaccines for a possible H5N1 pandemic in 1997-1998. Our ability to mass produce influenza vaccines against a pandemic threat was well illustrated by the production of over 150 million doses of 'swine flu' vaccine in the USA within a 3 month period in 1976. However, there is cause for concern that the lead time to begin vaccine production is likely to be about 7-8 months. Attempts to reduce this time should receive urgent attention. Immunogenicity of vaccines in pandemic situations is compared over the period 1968-1998. A consistent feature of the vaccine trials is the demonstration that one conventional 15 microg haemagglutinin dose of vaccine is not sufficiently immunogenic in naive individuals. Much larger doses or two lower doses are needed to induce satisfactory immunity. There is some evidence that whole-virus vaccines are more immunogenic than split or subunit vaccines, but this needs substantiating by further studies. H5 vaccines appeared to be particularly poor immunogens and there is evidence that an adjuvant may be needed. Prospects for improving the development of pandemic vaccines are discussed. PMID:11779397

  3. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  4. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, Eva; Domínguez, Àngela; Fuentes, Miriam; Batalla, Joan; Cardeñosa, Neus; Plasencia, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged < 3 years recruited by random sampling from municipal districts of all health regions of Catalonia. The total sample was 630 children. Parents completed a standard questionnaire for each child, which included vaccination coverage and knowledge about vaccination. The level of knowledge of vaccination was scored according to parental answers. Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose) and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43) and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72). The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination. PMID:19473498

  5. Pneumococcal vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal vaccine is an immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae , a bacterium that frequently causes meningitis and pneumonia in the elderly, and people with chronic illnesses. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounts for 10 ...

  6. Smallpox vaccine revisited.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-12-01

    Smallpox is a serious contagious disease which is back in the public eye. Yet, most health care providers are unprepared for its return. Nurses will be key health care professionals in a smallpox outbreak or vaccination program.

  7. Antibacterials: A sweet vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundle, David

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination with a synthetic glycoconjugate, in combination with the administration of an inhibitor that blocks capsular polysaccharide synthesis in bacteria, could offer an alternative route to combat bacterial infections.

  8. Nanoparticles as synthetic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Josiah D; Morton, Logan D; Ulery, Bret D

    2015-08-01

    As vaccines have transitioned from the use of whole pathogens to only the required antigenic epitopes, unwanted side effects have been decreased, but corresponding immune responses have been greatly diminished. To enhance immunogenicity, a variety of controlled release vehicles have been proposed as synthetic vaccines, but nanoparticles have emerged as particularly impressive systems due to many exciting publications. In specific, nanoparticles have been shown capable of not only desirable vaccine release, but can also be targeted to immune cells of interest, loaded with immunostimulatory substances termed adjuvants, or even induce desirable immune activating effects on their own. In the present review, recent advances in the utilization of inorganic, polymeric, and biomolecular nanoparticles as synthetic vaccines are discussed.

  9. Ingredients of Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... more effective. Common substances found in vaccines include: Aluminum gels or salts of aluminum which are added as adjuvants to help the ... December 2003, pp. 1394-1397 ...quantities of mercury, aluminum, formaldehyde, human serum albumin, antibiotics, and yeast proteins ...

  10. [Development of new vaccines].

    PubMed

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases.

  11. Polymer hydrogels: Chaperoning vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-07-01

    A cationic nanosized hydrogel (nanogel) shows controlled antigen delivery in vivo following intranasal administration and hence holds promise for a clinically effective adjuvant-free and needle-free vaccine system.

  12. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a woman who becomes infected while pregnant Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine— Var Note: In February 2008, the Advisory ... recommendations. It had recommended giving the MMR and Varicella vaccines at the same time. Now it does ...

  13. Vaccines and Thimerosal

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause any harm. Thimerosal prevents the growth of bacteria in vaccines. Thimerosal is added to vials of ... dose vials) to prevent growth of germs, like bacteria and fungi. Introduction of bacteria and fungi has ...

  14. Vaccines: Engineering immune evasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascola, John R.

    2006-05-01

    One obstacle to realizing the promise of viral vectors for vaccine delivery is pre-existing immunity to such vectors. An adroit application of structure-based design points to a way around that problem.

  15. Autoimmune diseases and vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Vial, Thierry; Descotes, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The potential association between vaccination and autoimmune diseases has been largely questioned in the past few years, but this assumption has mostly been based on case reports. The available evidence derived from several negative epidemiological studies is reassuring and at least indicates that vaccines are not a major cause of autoimmune diseases. However, there are still uncertainties as to whether a susceptible subpopulation may be at a higher risk of developing an autoimmune disease without causing an overall increase in the disease incidence. Based on selected examples, this review highlights the difficulties in assessing this issue. We suggest that a potential link between vaccines and autoimmune diseases cannot be definitely ruled out and should be carefully explored during the development of new candidate vaccines. PMID:15196997

  16. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had a ... any unusual condition, such as a high fever, behavior changes, or flu-like symptoms that occur 1 ...

  17. Vaccines against typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Pearman, Jon; Collioud, Andre; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2006-05-01

    Because of high infectivity and significant disease burden, typhoid fever constitutes a major global health problem. Implementation of adequate food handling practices and establishment of safe water supplies are the cornerstone for the development of an effective prevention program. However, vaccination against typhoid fever remains an essential tool for the effective management of this disease. Currently, there are two well tolerated and effective licensed vaccines. One is based on defined subunit virulence (Vi) polysaccharide antigen and can be administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously and the other is based on the use of live attenuated bacteria for oral administration. The advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches taken in the development of a vaccine against typhoid fever are discussed, along with the potential for future vaccine candidates.

  18. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 16/18 vaccine: a combined analysis of five randomized controlled trials. Obstet Gynecol 114(6):1179-1188. ... types 16 and 18: pooled analysis of two randomized clinical trials. BMJ 340:C712. Winckworth LC and ...

  19. [Development of new vaccines].

    PubMed

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases. PMID:26341041

  20. Tetanus, Diphtheria (Td) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Tenivac® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids) ... Why get vaccinated?Tetanus and diphtheria are very serious diseases. They are rare in the United States today, but people who do become ...