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Sample records for 17o nmr measurements

  1. Water permeability of polyunsaturated lipid membranes measured by 17O NMR.

    PubMed

    Huster, D; Jin, A J; Arnold, K; Gawrisch, K

    1997-08-01

    Diffusion-controlled water permeation across bilayers of polyunsaturated phospholipids was measured by 17O nuclear magnetic resonance. In 100-nm extruded liposomes containing 50 mM MnCl2, water exchange between internal and external solutions was monitored via changes in the linewidth of the 17O water resonance of external water. Liposome size and shape were characterized by light scattering methods and determination of liposome trapped volume. At 25 degrees C, the following water permeability coefficients were determined: 18:0-18:1n-9 PC, 155 +/- 24 microns/s; 18:0-18:3n-3 PC, 330 +/- 88 microns/s; and 18:0-22:6n-3 PC, 412 +/- 91 microns/s. The addition of 1 M ethanol reduced permeability coefficients to 66 +/- 15 microns/s for 18:0-18:1n-9 PC and to 239 +/- 67 microns/s for 18:0-22:6n-3 PC. Furthermore, the addition of 50 mol% 18:1n-9-18:1n-9 PE reduced the water permeability from 122 +/- 21 microns/s for pure 18:1n-9-18:1n-9 PC to 74 +/- 15 microns/s for the mixture. The significant increase in water permeation for membranes with polyunsaturated hydrocarbon chains correlates with looser packing of polyunsaturated lipids at the lipid-water interface and the suggested deeper penetration of water into these bilayers. Ethanol may block water diffusion pathways by occupying points of water entry into bilayers at the interface. The addition of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine increases lipid packing density and, consequently, reduces permeation rates.

  2. Direct measurement of the Mn(II) hydration state in metal complexes and metalloproteins through 17O NMR line widths.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Zhu, Jiang; Caravan, Peter

    2013-12-11

    Here we describe a simple method to estimate the inner-sphere hydration state of the Mn(II) ion in coordination complexes and metalloproteins. The line width of bulk H2(17)O is measured in the presence and absence of Mn(II) as a function of temperature, and transverse (17)O relaxivities are calculated. It is demonstrated that the maximum (17)O relaxivity is directly proportional to the number of inner-sphere water ligands (q). Using a combination of literature data and experimental data for 12 Mn(II) complexes, we show that this method provides accurate estimates of q with an uncertainty of ±0.2 water molecules. The method can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers working at fields of 7 T and higher. The hydration number can be obtained for micromolar Mn(II) concentrations. We show that the technique can be extended to metalloproteins or complex:protein interactions. For example, Mn(II) binds to the multimetal binding site A on human serum albumin with two inner-sphere water ligands that undergo rapid exchange (1.06 × 10(8) s(-1) at 37 °C). The possibility of extending this technique to other metal ions such as Gd(III) is discussed.

  3. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  4. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole.

  5. Natural abundant (17) O NMR in a 1.5-T Halbach magnet.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Morten K; Bakharev, Oleg N; Jensen, Ole; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-06-01

    We present mobile, low-field (17) O NMR as a means for monitoring oxygen in liquids. Whereas oxygen is one of the most important elements, oxygen NMR is limited by a poor sensitivity related to low natural abundance and gyro-magnetic ratio of the NMR active (17) O isotope. Here, we demonstrate (17) O NMR detection at a Larmor frequency of 8.74 MHz in a 1.5-T Halbach neodymium magnet with a home-built digital NMR instrument suitable for large-scale production and in-line monitoring applications. The proposed (17) O NMR sensor may be applied for direct, noninvasive measurements of water content in, for example, oil, manure, or food in automated quality or process control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25641664

  6. 17O NMR and Raman spectra of water with different calcium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ying; Ou, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Hui-ping

    2014-09-01

    17O NMR and Raman spectra of water with different calcium salts have been measured. Different water samples were prepared by adding nano-materials, calcium gluconate, calcium citrate and calcium chloride into distilled water. Both 17O NMR and Raman spectra of different water samples were recorded. The effects of temperature and time on 17O NMR line-width of different water samples were analyzed as well. The experimental results showed that Raman spectra of water with these four calcium salts were almost the same as those for distilled water when the temperature increased to 40 °C. The 17O NMR line-width of distilled water decreased from 76.8 Hz to 46.9 Hz and 65.8 Hz after nano-materials and calcium chloride were added, respectively. Besides, the 17O NMR line-width of distilled water increased from 76.8 Hz to 131.6 Hz after calcium citrate was added, while the 17O NMR line-width of distilled water increased from 76.8 Hz to 77.2 Hz after calcium gluconate was added. The 17O NMR line-width of water with calcium chloride increased while the other three water samples were nearly stable as the temperature increased from 30 °C to 85 °C. The 17O NMR line-width of water with nano-materials kept steady while the 17O NMR line-width of the other three water samples all increased in 42 days.

  7. Natural-abundance 17O NMR of monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Lauterwein, Jürgen; Sheppard, Norman

    Natural-abundance "high-resolution" 17O NMR spectra of D-glucose, D-mannose, D-galactose, and some methoxy derivatives of D-glucose were recorded in aqueous solution. The sensitivity and spectral resolution was improved by optimizing the accumulation and manipulation of data. The water solvent peak was suppressed through use of 17O-depleted water or displaced by addition of paramagnetic shift reagents. With Dy 3+ the 17O NMR spectrum of D-glucose remained unaltered; however, the water peak was shifted outside the carbohydrate spectral region. The 17O NMR resonances were assigned from earlier data for some specifically 17O-enriched monosaccharide derivatives. The anomeric hydroxyl resonances could also be located because of their exchange with the 17O-depleted water. Although the chemical shifts of the monosacharides generally parallel the sequence of chemical shifts for simple primary and secondary alcohols and substituted ethers, several exceptions were found and discussed in terms of steric and electrostatic repulsive forces between oxygens.

  8. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore » of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  9. Dynamic NMR of low-sensitivity fast-relaxing nuclei: (17)O NMR and DFT study of acetoxysilanes.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Mameli, Giulia; Mocci, Francesca; Luhmer, Michel; Cerioni, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    (17)O NMR is not routinely used for structure characterization, and kinetic studies of fluxional organic compounds are seldom undertaken because poor sensitivity and fast quadrupole relaxation are frequently regarded as intractable issues. This work shows how, nowadays, quantitative (17)O dynamic NMR studies on small organic molecules are feasible without enrichment being needed. It reports on acetoxysilanes, a class of fluxional compounds whose structure and dynamics were to be clarified. Natural abundance (17)O NMR spectra were recorded over a wide range of temperatures using standard instrumentation. The analysis relies on simple linewidth measurements and directly provides the activation parameters. The activation enthalpy is found to decrease with increasing number of acetoxy groups bound to silicon. Density functional theory calculations properly predict this trend and show that a single oxygen atom of the acetoxy group is bound to silicon, excluding chelation as binding mode, and that the dynamic process involves the shift of the silicon atom between the two oxygen atoms of the acetoxy group.

  10. (17)O NMR and Raman Spectroscopies of Green Tea Infusion with Nanomaterial to Investigate Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changyan; Zhang, Huiping; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Xinya

    2016-09-01

    (17)O NMR and Raman spectrograms of green tea infusions with nanomaterial were investigated. Different green tea infusions were prepared by steeping tea powder with different concentrations of nanomaterial aqueous solution. The tea infusions were tested with (17)O NMR and Raman spectroscopies. The (17)O NMR results showed that line width increased to 90 in the tea infusions after nanomaterial was added as a result of the effects of the self-association of Ca(2+) and tea polyphenol. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that, in tea infusions, the enhancement of C─C and C─O stretching vibrations suggest an increase in the number of effective components in water.

  11. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  12. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  13. {sup 17}O NMR investigation of oxidative degradation in polymers under gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; ASSINK,ROGER A.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    2000-03-08

    The {gamma}-irradiated-oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}) and the polymer polyisoprene was investigated as a function of oxidation level using {sup 17}O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas during the {gamma}-irradiation process, details about the oxidative degradation mechanisms can be directly obtained from the analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra. Production of carboxylic acids is the primary oxygen-containing functionality during the oxidation of pentacontane, while ethers and alcohols are the dominant oxidation product observed for polyisoprene. The formation of ester species during the oxidation process is very minor for both materials, with water also being produced in significant amounts during the radiolytic oxidation of polyisoprene. The ability to focus on the oxidative component of the degradation process using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy demonstrates the selectivity of this technique over more conventional approaches.

  14. Onset of Superconductivity in YBCO in Very High Fields from ^17O and ^63Cu NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, William

    2000-03-01

    We have used NMR to study the onset of superconductivity in near optimally doped YBCO in fields from 1 to 27 T. We have compared Knight shift(^17O), spin-spin relaxation measurements(^17O), and spin lattice relaxation measurements (^63Cu and ^17O). The measurements have been performed as a function of temperature above and below the transition region. The Knight shift can be measured with considerable precision directly giving the Pauli spin susceptibility. We show that the onset of superconductivity in a magnetic field is really a crossover region from normal state behavior to a vortex liquid for which we determine a H-T phase diagram up to high field. The relaxation measurements show clear evidence for the opening of a pseudo gap near 100 K in the transition region. The different NMR experiments are sensitive to the susceptibility dependence on wave vector from different regions of the Brillouin zone indicating possible origins of such a gap including superconducting fluctuations or a gap in the spin excitation spectrum. Magnetic field dependence of the data allows discrimination. Intercomparison between samples near optimal doping as well as the work from other laboratories will be made. This work was performed in collaboration with V. F. Mitović, H. N. Bachman, E. E. Sigmund, M. Eschrig, J. A. Sauls, A. P. Reyes, P. Kuhns, and W. G. Moulton. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  15. (17)O NMR and Raman Spectroscopies of Green Tea Infusion with Nanomaterial to Investigate Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changyan; Zhang, Huiping; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Xinya

    2016-09-01

    (17)O NMR and Raman spectrograms of green tea infusions with nanomaterial were investigated. Different green tea infusions were prepared by steeping tea powder with different concentrations of nanomaterial aqueous solution. The tea infusions were tested with (17)O NMR and Raman spectroscopies. The (17)O NMR results showed that line width increased to 90 in the tea infusions after nanomaterial was added as a result of the effects of the self-association of Ca(2+) and tea polyphenol. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that, in tea infusions, the enhancement of C─C and C─O stretching vibrations suggest an increase in the number of effective components in water. PMID:27461881

  16. Solid-state (17)O NMR as a sensitive probe of keto and gem-diol forms of alpha-keto acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Geris, Amanda J; Wu, Gang

    2009-08-28

    We have used solid-state (17)O NMR experiments to measure the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors for two alpha-keto acids: sodium [2-(17)O]pyruvate and lithium [2,2'-(17)O(2)]pyruvate. In the solid state, sodium [2-(17)O]pyruvate is in the keto form (-C(double bond (17)O)-) whereas lithium [2,2'-(17)O(2)]pyruvate takes the gem-diol form (-C((17)OH)(2)-). This study represents the first time that a full set of (17)O NMR tensors are experimentally determined for alpha-keto acids in these two different tautomeric forms. We have found that the two forms exhibit drastically different (17)O QC and CS tensors: for the keto form, delta(iso) = 543 +/- 1 ppm, C(Q) = 10.8 +/- 0.2 MHz, eta(Q) = 0.48 +/- 0.05, delta(11) = 1020 +/- 10, delta(22) = 640 +/- 10, delta(33) = -40 +/- 10 ppm, alpha = 80 +/- 5 degrees, beta = 90 +/- 2 degrees, and gamma = 83 +/- 2 degrees; for the gem-diol form, delta(iso) = 62 +/- 1 ppm, C(Q) = 8.5 +/- 0.5 MHz, eta(Q) = 1.0 +/- 0.05, delta(11) = 140 +/- 5, delta(22) = 45 +/- 5, delta(33) = 0 +/- 5 ppm, alpha = 55 +/- 5 degrees, beta = 90 +/- 5 degrees, and gamma = 80 +/- 2 degrees. The (17)O chemical shift tensor observed for the gem-diol functional group also represents the first such measurement for any -ol functional group (e.g., alcohols, phenols, carbohydrates, etc.) Using these accurate experimental (17)O NMR tensors, we were able to evaluate the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations. Our results showed that quantum chemical calculations using the crystal lattice approach are in much better agreement with the experimental solid-state (17)O NMR data than those calculated using the molecular cluster approach. Quantum chemical calculations have also provided information about the sign of the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constants and about the (17)O NMR tensor orientations in the molecular frame of reference. Our findings suggest that solid-state (17)O NMR may be useful in probing the tautomeric form of the alpha

  17. Characterizing Oxygen Local Environments in Paramagnetic Battery Materials via (17)O NMR and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ieuan D; Middlemiss, Derek S; Halat, David M; Trease, Nicole M; Pell, Andrew J; Grey, Clare P

    2016-08-01

    Experimental techniques that probe the local environment around O in paramagnetic Li-ion cathode materials are essential in order to understand the complex phase transformations and O redox processes that can occur during electrochemical delithiation. While Li NMR is a well-established technique for studying the local environment of Li ions in paramagnetic battery materials, the use of (17)O NMR in the same materials has not yet been reported. In this work, we present a combined (17)O NMR and hybrid density functional theory study of the local O environments in Li2MnO3, a model compound for layered Li-ion batteries. After a simple (17)O enrichment procedure, we observed five resonances with large (17)O shifts ascribed to the Fermi contact interaction with directly bonded Mn(4+) ions. The five peaks were separated into two groups with shifts at 1600 to 1950 ppm and 2100 to 2450 ppm, which, with the aid of first-principles calculations, were assigned to the (17)O shifts of environments similar to the 4i and 8j sites in pristine Li2MnO3, respectively. The multiple O environments in each region were ascribed to the presence of stacking faults within the Li2MnO3 structure. From the ratio of the intensities of the different (17)O environments, the percentage of stacking faults was found to be ca. 10%. The methodology for studying (17)O shifts in paramagnetic solids described in this work will be useful for studying the local environments of O in a range of technologically interesting transition metal oxides. PMID:27404908

  18. Solid-state 17O NMR of pharmaceutical compounds: salicylic acid and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianqi; Shan, Melissa; Terskikh, Victor; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Wu, Gang

    2013-08-22

    We report solid-state NMR characterization of the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors in five site-specifically (17)O-labeled samples of salicylic acid and o-acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin). High-quality (17)O NMR spectra were obtained for these important pharmaceutical compounds under both static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions at two magnetic fields, 14.0 and 21.1 T. A total of 14 (17)O QC and CS tensors were experimentally determined for the seven oxygen sites in salicylic acid and Aspirin. Although both salicylic acid and Aspirin form hydrogen bonded cyclic dimers in the solid state, we found that the potential curves for the concerted double proton transfer in these two compounds are significantly different. In particular, while the double-well potential curve in Aspirin is nearly symmetrical, it is highly asymmetrical in salicylic acid. This difference results in quite different temperature dependencies in (17)O MAS spectra of the two compounds. A careful analysis of variable-temperature (17)O MAS NMR spectra of Aspirin allowed us to obtain the energy asymmetry (ΔE) of the double-well potential, ΔE = 3.0 ± 0.5 kJ/mol. We were also able to determine a lower limit of ΔE for salicylic acid, ΔE > 10 kJ/mol. These asymmetrical features in potential energy curves were confirmed by plane-wave DFT computations, which yielded ΔE = 3.7 and 17.8 kJ/mol for Aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively. To complement the solid-state (17)O NMR data, we also obtained solid-state (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra for salicylic acid and Aspirin. Using experimental NMR parameters obtained for all magnetic nuclei present in salicylic acid and Aspirin, we found that plane-wave DFT computations can produce highly accurate NMR parameters in well-defined crystalline organic compounds.

  19. Predicting (17)O NMR chemical shifts of polyoxometalates using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rupali; Zhang, Jie; Ohlin, C André

    2016-03-21

    We have investigated the computation of (17)O NMR chemical shifts of a wide range of polyoxometalates using density functional theory. The effects of basis sets and exchange-correlation functionals are explored, and whereas pure DFT functionals generally predict the chemical shifts of terminal oxygen sites quite well, hybrid functionals are required for the prediction of accurate chemical shifts in conjunction with linear regression. By using PBE0/def2-tzvp//PBE0/cc-pvtz(H-Ar), lanl2dz(K-) we have computed the chemical shifts of 37 polyoxometalates, corresponding to 209 (17)O NMR signals. We also show that at this level of theory the protonation-induced pH dependence of the chemical shift of the triprotic hexaniobate Lindqvist anion, [HxNb6O19]((8-x)), can be reproduced, which suggests that hypotheses regarding loci of protonation can be confidently tested. PMID:26925832

  20. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  1. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  2. 23 Na and 17O NMR studies of hyperkagome Na4Ir3O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, Abigail; Bert, Fabrice; Orain, Jean-Christophe; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Mendels, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Na4Ir3O8 is a unique case of a 3D corner sharing triangular lattice which can be decorated with quantum spins. It has spurred a lot of theoretical interest as a spin liquid candidate of a new kind where the Hamiltonian might not be thought in terms of a simple Heisenberg case because of spin orbit coupling on the Ir 5d element. We present a comprehensive set of NMR data taken on both the 23Na and 17O sites. We have found that magnetic freezing of all Ir sites sets in below Tf ~ 7.5K ~ 0 . 019 J with a clear hyperfine field transferred from Ir moments and a drastic decrease of 1 /T1 . Above Tf, physical properties are expected to be a landmark of frustration in this exotic geometry. We will discuss our shift and relaxation data in the temperature range of 300K to 7.5 K in the light of published thermodynamic measurements (Y. Okamotoa et al, PRL 99 137207, 2007 and Y. Singh et al, PRB 88 220413(R), 2013) and comment on their implications for the already existing large body of theoretical work.

  3. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  4. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  5. Probing surface hydrogen bonding and dynamics by natural abundance, multidimensional, 17O DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Chaudhary, Umesh; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek

    2016-05-06

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly being used as a tool for the atomic-level characterization of surface sites. DNP surface-enhanced SSNMR spectroscopy of materials has, however, been limited to studying relatively receptive nuclei, and the particularly rare 17O nuclide, which is of great interest for materials science, has not been utilized. We demonstrate that advanced 17O SSNMR experiments can be performed on surface species at natural isotopic abundance using DNP. We use 17O DNP surface-enhanced 2D SSNMR to measure 17O{1H} HETCOR spectra as well as dipolar oscillations on a series of thermally treatedmore » mesoporous silica nanoparticle samples having different pore diameters. These experiments allow for a nonintrusive and unambiguous characterization of hydrogen bonding and dynamics at the surface of the material; no other single experiment can give such details about the interactions at the surface. Lastly, our data show that, upon drying, strongly hydrogen-bonded surface silanols, whose motions are greatly restricted by the interaction when compared to lone silanols, are selectively dehydroxylated.« less

  6. /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy: torsion angle relationships in aryl carboxylic esters, acids, and amides

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, A.L.; Balakrishnan, P.; Dotrong, M.; McCloskey, C.J.; Oakley, M.G.; Boykin, D.W.

    1987-02-18

    /sup 1/ /sup 7/O NMR spectroscopic data (natural abundance in acetonitrile at 75/sup 0/C) were obtained for the following series of electronically similar, sterically hindered compounds: aromatic methyl esters, aromatic carboxylic acids, and aromatic amides. Torsional angles were calculated by the molecular mechanics (MM2) method. Linear regression analysis of the estimated torsion angles and the /sup 17/O chemical shift data for each series yielded the following results (series, slope delta/degree, correlation coefficient): esters (C=O), 0.70, 0.997; esters (-0-), 0.43, 0.992; acids (-CO/sub 2/H), 0.56, 0.994; amides (C=O), 0.84, 0.942; N,N-dimethylamides (C=O), 0.6, 0.991. The results are discussed in terms of minimization of repulsive van der Waals interactions by rotation of the functional group out of the plane of the aromatic ring.

  7. Vortex Lattice Formation in High Magnetic Fields in an Underdoped Single Crystal of Hg1201 from 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongseop; Xin, Yizhou; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    The vortex lattice in HgBa2CuO4+δ forms at a vortex melting temperature, Tv, typically ~40K for underdoped crystals with a hole doping ~ 0.11. We present our results from 17O NMR for investigation of the vortex lattice as a function of external magnetic field up to 30 T and temperature as low as 5 K. The vortex contribution to the NMR linewidth can be separated from inhomogeneous broadening by deconvolution of the normal state spectra which was measured separately above, Tv. The vortex melting temperature was measured for two underdoped samples marked by the onset of extra linewidth broadening due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution from the solid vortex lattice consistent with transverse relaxation measurements. We have found evidence for a change in the vortex lattice symmetry as a function of external fields. This work was supported by the DOE BES under Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46248 and the NHMFL through the NSF and State of Florida.

  8. Magnetic Field-Independent ^17O and ^63, 65Cu Normal State Spin Lattice Relaxation as Inferred by ^17O T2 NMR up to 28 T in YBa_2Cu_3O_7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, V. F.; Bachman, H. N.; Halperin, W. P.

    1998-03-01

    ^17O spin-spin relaxation NMR (T_2) is a powerful probe of vortex fluctuations in high Tc cuprates.(H. N. Bachman et al)., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 41, 467 (1996). It is important to understand the normal state T2 relaxation in order to extract the vortex field fluctuations.^1,(C. H. Recchia et al)., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3543 (1997). The study of T2 in YBCO has shown that, in the normal state, copper and oxygen spin fluctuations (T1 processes) dominate the time scales for T_2, the spin-echo height decay. Thus, measurements of T2 as a function of magnetic field are an indicator of ^17O and ^63, 65Cu T1 behavior. We report new T2 measurements taken in the normal state from 3.2 T up to 28.2 T in which the spin-spin relaxation rate is observed to be completely field independent. By comparison with the predicted spin echo height decay given by the Gaussian Phase Approximation model we show that T1 of ^63, 65Cu and ^17O must not deviate from their published low-field values, within experimental error, over the entire magnetic field range. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  9. First-principles calculation of the 17O NMR parameters in Ca oxide and Ca aluminosilicates: the partially covalent nature of the Ca-O bond, a challenge for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Profeta, Mickaël; Benoit, Magali; Mauri, Francesco; Pickard, Chris J

    2004-10-01

    We apply density functional theory (DFT) to the calculation of the (17)O NMR parameters in Ca and Mg oxides and aluminosilicates. We study the accuracy of the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation to DFT in the description of these systems and the origin of the experimentally observed large dependence of the (17)O chemical shift on the alkaline earth ion. We find that (i) the partially covalent nature of the Ca-O bond has a huge impact on the O chemical shifts. The Ca-O covalence alone explains why in Ca oxides and aluminosilicates the (17)O chemical shifts are much more deshielded than those of the corresponding Mg compounds. (ii) The Ca-O covalence is overestimated by the PBE functional. Thus PBE-DFT is not able to reproduce the measured (17)O NMR parameters in Ca oxide and Ca aluminosilicates. (iii) It is possible to correct for the PBE-DFT deficiency in a simple and transferable way and to predict very accurate (17)O NMR parameters. Such accuracy allows us to assign the (17)O NMR spectra of two important model systems: the grossite aluminate (CaAl(4)O(7)) and the wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) silicate.

  10. 17O and 29Si NMR parameters of MgSiO3 phases from high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Berry, Andrew J; Frost, Daniel J; Gregorovic, Alan; Pickard, Chris J; Readman, Jennifer E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-10-31

    The 29Si and 17O NMR parameters of six polymorphs of MgSiO3 were determined through a combination of high-resolution solid-state NMR and first-principles gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) formalism calculations using periodic boundary conditions. MgSiO3 is an important component of the Earth's mantle that undergoes structural changes as a function of pressure and temperature. For the lower pressure polymorphs (ortho-, clino-, and protoenstatite), all oxygen species in the 17O high-resolution triple-quantum magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were resolved and assigned. These assignments differ from those tentatively suggested in previous work on the basis of empirical experimental correlations. The higher pressure polymorphs of MgSiO3 (majorite, akimotoite, and perovskite) are stabilized at pressures corresponding to the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle, with perovskite being the major constituent at depths >660 km. We present the first 17O NMR data for these materials and confirm previous 29Si work in the literature. The use of high-resolution multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) and satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) experiments allows us to resolve distinct oxygen species, and full assignments are suggested. The six polymorphs exhibit a wide variety of structure types, providing an ideal opportunity to consider the variation of NMR parameters (both shielding and quadrupolar) with local structure, including changes in coordination number, local geometry (bond distances and angles), and bonding. For example, we find that, although there is a general correlation of increasing 17O chemical shift with increasing Si-O bond length, the shift observed also depends upon the exact coordination environment.

  11. 17O NMR study of the doped electrons in lightly oxygen-deficient cubic SrMnO3 -x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trokiner, A.; Verkhovskii, S.; Volkova, Z.; Gerashenko, A.; Mikhalev, K.; Germov, A.; Yakubovskii, A.; Korolev, A.; Dabrowski, B.; Tyutyunnik, A.

    2016-05-01

    The spin susceptibility of the localized Mn (t2 g) electrons, χs, and the spatially distributed spin density of the doped electrons were investigated by 17O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the paramagnetic (PM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases of electron-doped SrMnO3 -x ceramics with the cubic structure. Three lightly doped samples (2 x <0.015 ) were studied with TN=220 K-240 K. In the PM state χs increases gradually from TN and reaches a broad maximum above ˜1.5 TN . The gapped behavior of χs indicates a low-dimensional short-range spin order persisting above TN. These short-range one-dimensional correlations are consistent with 17O NMR results obtained at room temperature, which show that Mn magnetic moments are aligned along the edges of the cubic unit cell. Above 350 K all doped electrons are fast-moving eg electrons. They provide the uniform polarization of the localized spins which increases χs and the increasing doping shifts the oxygen-deficient SrMnO3 -x oxide towards a ferromagnetic (FM) metallic state. At lower T the doped electrons are heterogeneously distributed in the oxide: The fraction of the fast-moving electrons diminishes and vanishes below 100 K, while the remaining doped electrons slow down their hopping and each of them creates a FM domain. These FM domains which are detected below 10 K by 55Mn NMR can be considered as small-size magnetic polarons. Their T -activated hopping in the G-type AF lattice was probed by 17O spin-echo experiments. The energy barrier of hopping shows a trend to grow with increasing doping, indicating that the de Gennes metallic ground state cannot be achieved in oxygen-deficient SrMnO3 -x oxides, probably due to detrimental oxygen vacancy defects.

  12. Measurement of δ18O, δ17O, and 17O-excess in water by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berman, Elena S F; Levin, Naomi E; Landais, Amaelle; Li, Shuning; Owano, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Stable isotopes of water have long been used to improve understanding of the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate. Recently, there has been increasing interest in measurement and use of the less-abundant (17)O isotope in addition to (2)H and (18)O. Off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is demonstrated for accurate and precise measurements δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water. OA-ICOS involves no sample conversion and has a small footprint, allowing measurements to be made by researchers collecting the samples. Repeated (514) high-throughput measurements of the international isotopic reference water standard Greenland Ice Sheet Precipitation (GISP) demonstrate the precision and accuracy of OA-ICOS: δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP = -24.74 ± 0.07‰ (1σ) and δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP = -13.12 ± 0.05‰ (1σ). For comparison, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) value for δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP is -24.76 ± 0.09‰ (1σ) and an average of previously reported values for δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP is -13.12 ± 0.06‰ (1σ). Multiple (26) high-precision measurements of GISP provide a (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP of 23 ± 10 per meg (1σ); an average of previously reported values for (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP is 22 ± 11 per meg (1σ). For all these OA-ICOS measurements, precision can be further enhanced by additional averaging. OA-ICOS measurements were compared with two independent isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) laboratories and shown to have comparable accuracy and precision as the current fluorination-IRMS techniques in δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess. The ability to measure accurately δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water inexpensively and without sample conversion is expected to increase vastly the application of δ(17)O and (17)O-excess measurements for scientific understanding of the water cycle, atmospheric convection, and climate modeling among others. PMID:24032448

  13. Constraining 17O and 27Al NMR spectra of high-pressure crystals and glasses: New data for jadeite, pyrope, grossular, and mullite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, K.E.; Stebbins, J.F.; Du, L.-S.; Hankins, B.

    2007-01-01

    The 17O NMR spectra of glasses quenched from melts at high pressure are often difficult to interpret due to overlapping peaks and lack of crystalline model compounds. High-pressure aluminosilicate glasses often contain significant amounts of [5]Al and [6]Al, thus these high-pressure glasses must contain oxygen bonded to high-coordinated aluminum. The 17O NMR parameters for the minerals jadeite, pyrope, grossular, and mullite are presented to assist interpretation of glass spectra and to help test quantum chemical calculations. The 17O NMR parameters for jadeite and grossular support previous peak assignments of oxygen bonded to Si and high-coordinated Al in high-pressure glasses as well as quantum chemical calculations. The oxygen tricluster in mullite is very similar to the previously observed tricluster in grossite (CaAl4 O7) and suspected triclusters in glasses. We also present 27Al NMR spectra for pyrope, grossular, and mullite.

  14. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State 17O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A.; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules and experimental solid-state 17O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state 17O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases and in particular each of the prior computational work is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing systems. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method and basis sets for metal and non-metal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups, X= H, C, N, P, and metal. The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported 17O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors towards relatively general and accurate predictions of 17O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied various kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9880 and mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and R2 of 0.9926 for all shift tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of 17O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate bound proteins. PMID:26274812

  15. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  16. Measurments and Modeling of Δ 17O Vatiations in Atmospheric Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, G. M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2002-12-01

    , the ability to more accurately quantify nitrate deposition, and its insensitivity to post deposition fractionations (chemical, physical, biological) make Δ 17O measurements superior to current δ 18O methods for deposition studies.

  17. Improvement of the high-accuracy 17O(p ,α )14N reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-06-01

    The 17O(p ,α )14N and 17O(p ,γ )18F reactions are of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RGs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, they govern the destruction of 17O and the formation of the short-lived radioisotope 18F, which is of special interest for γ -ray astronomy. At temperatures typical of the above-mentioned astrophysical scenario, T =0.01 -0.1 GK for RG, AGB, and massive stars and T =0.1 -0.4 GK for a classical nova explosion, the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction cross section is dominated by two resonances: one at about ERc m=65 keV above the 18F proton threshold energy, corresponding to the EX=5.673 MeV level in 18F, and another one at ERc m=183 keV (EX=5.786 MeV). We report on the indirect study of the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction via the Trojan Horse method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the strength of narrow resonance at ultralow energies. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature. This value was used as input parameter for reaction-rate determination and its comparison with the result of the direct measurement is also discussed in the light of the electron screening effect.

  18. Preparation and Tungsten-183 NMR Characterization of [alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)](10)(-), [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-), and [alpha-2-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-).

    PubMed

    Bartis, Judit; Kunina, Yuliya; Blumenstein, Michael; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    1996-03-13

    The preparation of the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers of the Wells-Dawson 17 tungsto derivatives by standard methods is accompanied by a significant proportion of the other isomer present as an impurity. In this study, the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers of [Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) have been prepared in >98% purity by reacting isomerically pure K(9)Li[alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)] and K(10)[alpha-2-P(2)W(17)O(61)], respectively, with ZnCl(2), while rigorously controlling the pH at 4.7. The molecules were isolated as potassium salts. For (183)W NMR and (31)P NMR characterization, both molecules were ion exchanged by cation-exchange chromatography, maintaining the pH at 4.7, to obtain the lithium salts. Removal of water and isolation of a solid sample of [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) was achieved by lyophilization at -40 degrees C. The chemical shift data from (31)P and (183)W NMR spectroscopy of the isolated [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) and [alpha-2-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) isomers are consistent with a mixture of the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers reported previously;(1) the molecules have the expected C(1) and C(s)() symmetry, respectively. The [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) isomer is stable in the pH range of 4.6-6 at temperatures <35 degrees C. Using the same ion exchange and lyophilization techniques, the lacunary [alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)](10)(-) isomer was isolated as the lithium salt; characterization by (183)W NMR spectroscopy confirms the C(1) symmetry.

  19. Practice and applications of 17-O-excess measurements of water using novel laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, K. J.; Steig, E. J.; Vasileios, G.; Schauer, A. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2014-12-01

    17O-excess, defined as the deviation from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) in a plot of ln(δ18O+1) vs. ln(δ17O+1), is an evolving tool for understanding the modern water cycle and reconstructing past climate regimes. Because of competing effects between equilibrium and kinetic fractionation small variations in 17O-excess can be used, for example, to (i) infer changes in temperature and sea ice across glacial-interglacial cycles in Antarctica (Schoenemann et al., 2014), (ii) study the role of rain re-evaporation during convective events thereby improving the incorporation of isotopes into GCMs (Landais et al., 2010), and (iii) assess the role of stratospheric water vapor intrusions at high altitudes or in polar regions (Winkler et al., 2013). In natural waters, variability in 17O-excess is very small (on the order of tens of per meg, where 1 per meg is 0.001‰). Until recently, only measurements made via Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) could achieve the required precision, following time-consuming front-end chemistry that converted H2O into O2 for analysis of m/z+ 32, 33 and 34. Recent improvements in laser-based spectroscopy, e.g., Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), are enabling quicker and easier measurement of 17O-excess in water (Steig et al., 2013; 2014). The Picarro L2140-i is certified with a precision of ≤ 0.015‰; however implementation of best practices can result in an achievable precision of ≤ 0.008‰, thereby demonstrating comparable performance to IRMS. We will review our recommendations for achieving high-precision measurements of 17O-excess on the Picarro L2140-i, including how to calibrate the system, the frequency of standards analysis, the number of replicate injections and vials required, and approaches to dealing with sample-to-sample memory. We will also compare the external accuracy achieved by three distinct Picarro L2140-i analyzers for multiple waters with distinct isotopic composition.

  20. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic–Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State 17O MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic–electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution 17O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic 17O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  1. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State (17)O MAS NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halat, David M; Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Kim, Gunwoo; Dunstan, Matthew T; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2016-09-14

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution (17)O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic (17)O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  2. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  3. Simple (17) O NMR method for studying electron self-exchange reaction between UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Bányai, István; Farkas, Ildikó; Tóth, Imre

    2016-06-01

    (17) O NMR spectroscopy is proven to be suitable and convenient method for studying the electron exchange by following the decrease of (17) O-enrichment in U(17) OO(2+) ion in the presence of U(4+) ion in aqueous solution. The reactions have been performed at room temperature using I = 5 M ClO4 (-) ionic medium in acidic solutions in order to determine the kinetics of electron exchange between the U(4+) and UO2 (2+) aqua ions. The rate equation is given as R = a[H(+) ](-2)  + R', where R' is an acid independent parallel path. R' depends on the concentration of the uranium species according to the following empirical rate equation: R' = k1 [UO(2 +) ](1/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2)  + k2 [UO(2 +) ](3/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2) . The mechanism of the inverse H(+) concentration-dependent path is interpreted as equilibrium formation of reactive UO2 (+) species from UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions and its electron exchange with UO2 (2+) . The determined rate constant of this reaction path is in agreement with the rate constant of UO2 (2+) -UO2 (+) , one electron exchange step calculated by Marcus theory, match the range given experimentally of it in an early study. Our value lies in the same order of magnitude as the recently calculated ones by quantum chemical methods. The acid independent part is attributed to the formation of less hydrolyzed U(V) species, i.e. UO(3+) , which loses enrichment mainly by electron exchange with UO2 (2+) ions. One can also conclude that (17) O NMR spectroscopy, or in general NMR spectroscopy with careful kinetic analysis, is a powerful tool for studying isotope exchange reactions without the use of sophisticated separation processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854521

  4. Isotopic Water Analyzer for Highly Precise Measurements of δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Fortson, S.; Snaith, S.; Gupta, M.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ18O and δ17O) of both liquid water and water vapor are widely used in hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and biogeochemistry to determine the migration of water through an ecosystem. Previously, discrete samples were collected (or condensed) and transported to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer for characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies were generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the continued development of a field-portable Isotopic Water Analyzer that exploits cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g. Off-Axis ICOS) to accurately and rapidly quantify δ2H, δ18O and δ17O of both liquid water and water vapor. The instrument is thermally-controlled to better than ±8 mK and is capable of measuring over 90 liquid samples/day with δ2H, δ18O and δ17O precisions exceeding ±0.2 ‰, ±0.05 ‰, and ±0.06 ‰ respectively. Subsequent averaging yields δ2H, δ18O and δ17O precisions exceeding ±0.077 ‰, ±0.023 ‰, and ±0.03 ‰ respectively with over 22 samples/day. The accuracy of the liquid analyzer was confirmed over a very wide dynamic range (δ2H = -455 to +671 ‰ with comparable δ18O and δ17O values) by direct comparison to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Moreover, the ability to directly measure 17O-excess, vapor samples, and unnatural waters (e.g. plant water, soil water, urine, blood, saliva…) will also be presented.

  5. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  6. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  7. Structure and disorder in iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses and melts: High-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding of the effect of iron content on the structure (Si coordination environment and the degree of polymerization) of iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses is essential for studying their macroscopic properties and diverse geological processes in Earth's interior. Although the recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques provide detailed structural information of a diverse iron-free oxide glasses with varying composition (e.g., Lee, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Lee and Sung, Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Lee et al., Phys. Rev., 103, 095501, 2009), their application to iron-bearing silicate glasses has a limited usefulness in resolving atomic configurations due to the effect of paramagnetic cation (i.e., Fe) on the NMR spectra. Here, we report the first ^{29}Si and ^{17}O NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses with varying iron content (Na_{2}O-Fe_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} glasses, up to 34.60 wt% Fe_{2}O_{3}), revealing previously unknown details of iron-induced changes in structure and disorder. While signal intensity decreases and peak width increases exponentially with increasing iron content [=Fe_{2}O_{3}/(Na_{2}O+Fe_{2}O_{3})], ^{29}Si MAS NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses present the slight peak shift and an asymmetrical peak broadening toward higher Q^{n} species with increasing iron content. This result implies an increase in the degree of polymerization with increasing iron content. Additionally, ^{29}Si spin-relaxation time (T_{1}) for the glasses decreases with increasing of iron content by several orders of magnitude. ^{17}O 3QMAS NMR spectra for the glasses show well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) even at relatively high iron content, providing the first direct experimental estimation of the degree of polymerization. In sodium-iron silicate glasses, the fraction of NBO decreases with increasing iron

  8. Effects of the degree of polymerization on the structure of sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts: An 17O NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2009-02-01

    Revealing the atomic structure and disorder in oxide glasses, including sodium silicates and aluminosilicates, with varying degrees of polymerization, is a challenging problem in high-temperature geochemistry as well as glass science. Here, we report 17O MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra for binary sodium silicate and ternary sodium aluminosilicate glasses with varying degrees of polymerization (Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio and Na 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio), revealing in detail the extent of disorder (network connectivity and topological disorder) and variations of NMR parameters with the glass composition. In binary sodium silicate glasses [Na 2O- k(SiO 2)], the fraction of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs, Na-O-Si) increases with the Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio ( k), as predicted from the composition. The 17O isotropic chemical shifts ( 17O δiso) for both bridging oxygen (BO) and NBO increase by about 10-15 ppm with the SiO 2 content (for k = 1-3). The quadrupolar coupling products of BOs and NBOs also increase with the SiO 2 content. These trends suggest that both NBOs and BOs strongly interact with Na; therefore, the Na distributions around BOs and NBOs are likely to be relatively homogenous for the glass compositions studied here, placing some qualitative limits on the extent of segregation of alkali channels from silica-enriched regions as suggested by modified random-network models. The peak width (in the isotropic dimension) and thus bond angle and length distributions of Si-O-Si and Na-O-Si increase with the SiO 2 content, indicating an increase in the topological disorder with the degree of polymerization. In the ternary aluminosilicate glasses [Na 2O] x[Al 2O 3] 1-xSiO 2, the NBO fraction decreases while the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al fractions apparently increase with increasing Al 2O 3 content. The variation of oxygen cluster populations suggests that deviation from "Al avoidance" is more apparent near the charge-balanced join (Na/Al = 1). The Si-O-Si fraction, which is closely related to the activity

  9. Correction for the 17O interference in δ(13C) measurements when analyzing CO2 with stable isotope mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Assonov, Sergey S.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of δ(13C) determined on CO2 with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) must be corrected for the amount of 17O in the CO2. For data consistency, this must be done using identical methods by different laboratories. This report aims at unifying data treatment for CO2 IRMS by proposing (i) a unified set of numerical values, and (ii) a unified correction algorithm, based on a simple, linear approximation formula. Because the oxygen of natural CO2 is derived mostly from the global water pool, it is recommended that a value of 0.528 be employed for the factor λ, which relates differences in 17O and 18O abundances. With the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) of 0.011 180(28) in VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) reevaluation of data yields a value of 0.000 393(1) for the oxygen isotope ratio N(17O)/N(16O) of the evolved CO2. The ratio of these quantities, a ratio of isotope ratios, is essential for the 17O abundance correction: [N(17O)/N(16O)]/[N(13C)/N(12C)] = 0.035 16(8). The equation [δ(13C) ≈ 45δVPDB-CO2 + 2 17R/13R (45δVPDB-CO2 – λ46δVPDB-CO2)] closely approximates δ(13C) values with less than 0.010 ‰ deviation for normal oxygen-bearing materials and no more than 0.026 ‰ in extreme cases. Other materials containing oxygen of non-mass-dependent isotope composition require a more specific data treatment. A similar linear approximation is also suggested for δ(18O). The linear approximations are easy to implement in a data spreadsheet, and also help in generating a simplified uncertainty budget.

  10. High precision delta(17)O isotope measurements of oxygen from silicates and other oxides: method and applications.

    PubMed

    Miller; Franchi; Sexton; Pillinger

    1999-07-01

    The use of infrared laser-assisted fluorination to release oxygen from milligram quantities of silicates or other oxide mineral grains is a well-established technique. However, relatively few studies have reported the optimisation of this procedure for oxygen-17 isotope measurements. We describe here details of an analytical system using infrared (10 µm) laser-assisted fluorination, in conjunction with a dual inlet mass spectrometer of high resolving power ( approximately 250) to provide (17)O and (18)O oxygen isotope measurements from 0.5-2 mg of silicates or other oxide mineral grains. Respective precisions (1) of typically 0.08 and 0.04 per thousand are obtained for the complete analytical procedure. Departures from the mass-dependent oxygen isotope fractionation line are quantified by Delta(17)O; our precision (1) of such measurements on individual samples is shown to be +/-0.024 per thousand. In turn, this permits the offset between parallel, mass-dependent fractionation lines to be characterised to substantially greater precision than has been possible hitherto. Application of this system to investigate the (17)O versus (18)O relationship for numerous terrestrial whole-rock and mineral samples, of diverse geological origins and age, indicates that the complete data set may be described by a single, mass-dependent fractionation line of slope 0.5244+/- 0.00038 (standard error). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

  12. 17O solid-state NMR and first-principles calculations of sodium trimetaphosphate (Na3P3O9), tripolyphosphate (Na5P3O10), and pyrophosphate (Na4P2O7).

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Filipe; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-Francois; Tricot, Grégory; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Montagne, Lionel; Mauri, Francesco; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-08-18

    The assignment of high-field (18.8 T) (17)O MAS and 3QMAS spectra has been completed by use of first-principles calculations for three crystalline sodium phosphates, Na 3P 3O 9, Na 5P 3O 10, and Na 4P 2O 7. In Na 3P 3O 9, the calculated parameters, quadrupolar constant ( C Q), quadrupolar asymmetry (eta Q), and the isotropic chemical shift (delta cs) correspond to those deduced experimentally, and the calculation is mandatory to achieve a complete assignment. For the sodium tripolyphosphate Na 5P 3O 10, the situation is more complex because of the free rotation of the end-chain phosphate groups. The assignment obtained with ab initio calculations can however be confirmed by the (17)O{ (31)P} MAS-J-HMQC spectrum. Na 4P 2O 7 (17)O MAS and 3QMAS spectra show a complex pattern in agreement with the computed NMR parameters, which indicate that all of the oxygens exhibit very similar values. These results are related to structural data to better understand the influence of the oxygen environment on the NMR parameters. The findings are used to interpret those results observed on a binary sodium phosphate glass. PMID:18642900

  13. Measurements and Modeling of 16O12C17O Spectroscopic Parameters at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, David; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Coleman, Max; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    Nearly 1000 line intensities of 16O12C17O between 4604 and 5126 wn were measured using an isotopically-enriched mixture sample having 40 % (determined by mass spectrometry). Spectra were recorded at 0.0056 wn resolution with a Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL) configured to a Herriott cell with a 20.946 m absorption path. Since collisional narrowing effects were observed, the Rautian profile was systematically applied (instead of the Voigt profile) using a multispectrum retrieval procedure. Transition dipole moments and Herman-Wallis factors were derived for 15 bands, and a global comparison with theoretical calculations and predictions was obtained. Accuracies for the line intensities ranged between 2 - 3 % for strong bands and 6 - 30 % for weak bands. Retrieved line positions were calibrated using CO, HCl and some well-known 16O12C16O transitions. For both measured and calculated line positions, the accuracies fell between 0.1 - 1×10-3 wn. Self-broadening was also obtained for a few bands. Complete line lists were generated to support atmospheric remote sensing of the Earth (e.g., OCO-2 mission), Mars and Venus. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. High-Precision Measurement of The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Tropospheric O2: Implications for Δ17O of air as a Biosignature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Ziegler, K.

    2006-05-01

    Here we present high-precision measurements of 18O/16O and 17O/16O in samples of tropospheric O2 using a standard calibrated with measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rock samples. These new data provide a measure of Δ17O on an absolute scale that aids in the interpretation of the cause of the disparity in Δ17O between O2 in the troposphere and terrestrial rocks. We measured the isotopic composition of four separate aliquotes of ground-level air O2. Oxygen was isolated from air cryogenically using molecular sieve substrates. Correction was made for the influence of Ar scattered across the Faraday collectors (~0.06 per mil in δ17O) of the gas- source mass spectrometer. The reference gas used as an internal standard was calibrated against terrestrial rock samples and meteorites analyzed using infrared laser heating fluorination. All results are reported as linearized delta values (signified with a prime superscript symbol). With a mean terrestrial rock Δ17O'of 0.00 ‰ ± 0.02 we obtain Δ17O values of -0.25 ‰ ± 0.04 1σ, -0.22 ‰ ± 0.03, and -0.23 ‰ ± 0.05 for 5 mesosiderite meteorites, 7 pallasites, and 12 HED meteorites, respectively. The latter meteorite data are consistent with results from three other laboratories and serve to establish the absolute scale for the air O2 measurements. Our results for the O2 samples give a mean linearized δ18O' of 23.237 ‰ ± 0.008 1 std err (corresponding to a normal, non-linearized δ18O SMOW value of 23.509 ‰), a mean δ17O' of 11.922 ‰ ± 0.018, and a mean linearized Δ17O' of -0.347 ‰ ± 0.018 based on a rock-water terrestrial fractionation reference line with a slope (β) of 0.528. The latter is the exponent in a normal fractionation law described by the relation α17=(α18)β. This result can be reconciled with the suggestion by Young et al (2002) that the whole of the departure in Δ17O' of tropospheric O2 relative to terrestrial rocks can be attributed to respiration (a Δ17O Dole effect

  15. Effect of iron content on the structure and disorder of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses: A high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Im; Sur, Jung Chul; Lee, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its geochemical importance and implications for the properties of natural magmatic melts, understanding the detailed structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses remains among the outstanding problems in geochemistry. This is mainly because solid-state NMR techniques, one of the most versatile experimental methods to probe the structure of oxide glasses, cannot be fully utilized for exploring the structural details of iron-bearing glasses as the unpaired electrons in Fe induce strong local magnetic fields that mask the original spectroscopic features (i.e., paramagnetic effect). Here, we report high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR spectra of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses (Na2O-Fe2O3-SiO2, Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.89 ± 0.04, thus containing both ferric and ferrous iron) with varying XFe2O3 [=Fe2O3/(Na2O + Fe2O3)], containing up to 22.9 wt% Fe2O3. This compositional series involves Fe-Na substitution at constant SiO2 contents of 66.7 mol% in the glasses. For both nuclides, the NMR spectra exhibit a decrease in the signal intensities and an increase in the peak widths with increasing iron concentration partly because of the paramagnetic effect. Despite the intrinsic difficulties that result from the pronounced paramagnetic effect, the 29Si and 17O NMR results yield structural details regarding the effect of iron content on Q speciation, spatial distribution of iron, and the extent of polymerization in the iron-bearing silicate glasses. The 29Si NMR spectra show an apparent increase in highly polymerized Q species with increasing XFe2O3 , suggesting an increase in the degree of melt polymerization. The 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra exhibit well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) peaks with varying iron concentration. By replacing Na2O with Fe2O3 (and thus with increasing iron content), the fraction of Na-O-Si decreases. Quantitative consideration of this effect confirms that the degree of polymerization is likely to

  16. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L. La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  17. Reformulated 17O correction of mass spectrometric stable isotope measurements in carbon dioxide and a critical appraisal of historic 'absolute' carbon and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Mass-spectrometric stable isotope measurements of CO 2 use molecular ion currents at mass-to-charge ratios m/ z 44, 45 and 46 to derive the elemental isotope ratios n( 13C)/ n( 12C) and n( 18O)/ n( 16O), abbreviated 13C/ 12C and 18O/ 16O, relative to a reference. The ion currents have to be corrected for the contribution of 17O-bearing isotopologues, the so-called ' 17O correction'. The magnitude of this correction depends on the calibrated isotope ratios of the reference. Isotope ratio calibrations are difficult and are therefore a matter of debate. Here, I provide a comprehensive evaluation of the existing 13C/ 12C ( 13R), 17O/ 16O ( 17R) and 18O/ 16O ( 18R) calibrations of the reference material Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) and CO 2 generated from the reference material Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) by reaction with 100% H 3PO 4 at 25 °C (VPDB-CO 2). I find 17R/10-6=382.7-2.1+1.7, 18RVSMOW/10 -6 = 2005.20 ± 0.45, 13R/10-6= 11124 ± 45, 17R/10-6=391.1-2.1+1.7 and 18R/10-6=2088.37±0.90. I also rephrase the calculation scheme for the 17O correction completely in terms of relative isotope ratio differences ( δ values). This reveals that only ratios of isotope ratios (namely, 17R/ 13R and 13R17R/ 18R) are required for the 17O correction. These can be, and have been, measured on conventional stable isotope mass spectrometers. I then show that the remaining error for these ratios of isotope ratios can lead to significant uncertainty in the derived relative 13C/ 12C difference, but not for 18O/ 16O. Even though inter-laboratory differences can be corrected for by a common 'ratio assumption set' and/or normalisation, the ultimate accuracy of the 17O correction is hereby limited. Errors of similar magnitude can be introduced by the assumed mass-dependent relationship between 17O/ 16O and 18O/ 16O isotope ratios. For highest accuracy in the 13C/ 12C ratio, independent triple oxygen isotope measurements are required. Finally, I propose an experiment that

  18. NMR Measures of Heterogeneity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Hans W.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced solid state NMR spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about structure and dynamics of complex systems. On a local scale, multidimensional solid state NMR has elucidated the geometry and the time scale of segmental motions at the glass transition. The higher order correlation functions which are provided by this technique led to the notion of dynamic heterogeneities, which have been characterized in detail with respect to their rate memory and length scale. In polymeric and low molar mass glass formers of different fragility, length scales in the range 2 to 4 nm are observed. In polymeric systems, incompatibility of backbone and side groups as in polyalkylmethacrylates leads to heteogeneities on the nm scale, which manifest themselves in unusual chain dynamics at the glass transition involving extended chain conformations. References: K. Schmidt-Rohr and H.W. Spiess, Multidimensional Solid-State NMR and Polymers,Academic Press, London (1994). U. Tracht, M. Wilhelm, A. Heuer, H. Feng, K. Schmidt-Rohr, H.W. Spiess, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2727 (1998). S.A. Reinsberg, X.H. Qiu, M. Wilhelm, M.D. Ediger, H.W. Spiess, J.Chem.Phys. 114, 7299 (2001). S.A. Reinsberg, A. Heuer, B. Doliwa, H. Zimmermann, H.W. Spiess, J. Non-Crystal. Solids, in press (2002)

  19. Measurement of the reaction 17O(α,n)20Ne and its impact on the s process in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, A.; Beard, M.; Görres, J.; Couder, M.; deBoer, R.; Falahat, S.; Güray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Özkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2013-04-01

    Background: The ratio between the rates of the reactions 17O(α,n)20Ne and 17O(α,γ)21Ne determines whether 16O is an efficient neutron poison for the s process in massive stars, or if most of the neutrons captured by 16O(n,γ) are recycled into the stellar environment. This ratio is of particular relevance to constrain the s process yields of fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity.Purpose: Recent results on the (α,γ) channel have made it necessary to measure the (α,n) reaction more precisely and investigate the effect of the new data on s process nucleosynthesis in massive stars.Method: The 17O(α,n(0+1)) reaction has been measured with a moderating neutron detector. In addition, the (α,n1) channel has been measured independently by observation of the characteristic 1633 keV γ transition in 20Ne. The reaction cross section was determined with a simultaneous R-matrix fit to both channels. (α,n) and (α,γ) resonance strengths of states lying below the covered energy range were estimated using their known properties from the literature.Result: The reaction channels 17O(α,n0)20Ne and 17O(α,n1γ)20Ne were measured in the energy range Eα=800 keV to 2300 keV. A new 17O(α,n) reaction rate was deduced for the temperature range 0.1 GK to 10 GK. At typical He burning temperatures, the combination of the new (α,n) rate with a previously measured (α,γ) rate gives approximately the same ratio as current compilations. The influence on the nucleosynthesis of the s process in massive stars at low metallicity is discussed.Conclusions: It was found that in He burning conditions the (α,γ) channel is strong enough to compete with the neutron channel. This leads to a less efficient neutron recycling compared to a previous suggestion of a very weak (α,γ) channel. S process calculations using our rates confirm that massive rotating stars do play a significant role in the production of elements up to Sr, but they strongly reduce the s process contribution to

  20. Oxygen isotopes in nitrate: New reference materials for 18O:17O:16O measurements and observations on nitrate-water equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Despite a rapidly growing literature on analytical methods and field applications of O isotope-ratio measurements of NO3- in environmental studies, there is evidence that the reported data may not be comparable because reference materials with widely varying ?? 18O values have not been readily available. To address this problem, we prepared large quantities of two nitrate salts with contrasting O isotopic compositions for distribution as reference materials for O isotope-ratio measurements: USGS34 (KNO3) with low ??18O and USGS35 (NaNO3) with high ??18O and 'mass-independent' ??17O. The procedure used to produce USGS34 involved equilibration of HNO3 with 18O-depleted meteoric water. Nitric acid equilibration is proposed as a simple method for producing laboratory NO3- reference materials with a range of ??18O values and normal (mass-dependent) 18O: 17O:16O variation. Preliminary data indicate that the equilibrium O isotope-fractionation factor (??) between [NO 3-] and H2O decreases with increasing temperature from 1.0215 at 22??C to 1.0131 at 100??C. USGS35 was purified from the nitrate ore deposits of the Atacama Desert in Chile and has a high 17O:18O ratio owing to its atmospheric origin. These new reference materials, combined with previously distributed NO3- isotopic reference materials IAEA-N3 (=IAEA-NO-3) and USGS32, can be used to calibrate local laboratory reference materials for determining offset values, scale factors, and mass-independent effects on N and O isotope-ratio measurements in a wide variety of environmental NO 3- samples. Preliminary analyses yield the following results (normalized with respect to VSMOW and SLAP, with reproducibilities of ??0.2-0.3???, 1??): IAEA-N3 has ??18O = +25.6??? and ??17O = +13.2??? USGS32 has ?? 18O = +25.7??? USGS34 has ??18O = -27. 9??? and ??17O = -14.8??? and USGS35 has ?? 18O = +57.5??? and ??17O = +51.5???.

  1. Elastic scattering measurement for the system 17O + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies with silicon strip detectors exploiting ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, C.; Manea, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Di Meo, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Boiano, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Sandoli, M.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Veronese, F.

    2013-03-01

    The quasi elastic scattering of a 17O projectile from a 58Ni target has been studied at beam energies ranging from 42.5 to 55.0 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The total reaction cross sections were derived from the measured angular distributions by using an optical model fit within the coupled-channel code FRESCO. These cross sections are very similar to those measured for 17F (loosely bound by 0.6 MeV), mirror nucleus of 17O (tightly bound by 4.14 MeV). This outcome points out that, in this energy range, the small binding energy of the 17F valence proton has negligible influence onto the reactivity of such a loosely bound projectile, contrary to simple expectations, and to what observed for other loosely bound nuclei. The reaction dynamics seems to be influenced mainly by the Coulomb interaction which is similar for both mirror projectiles.

  2. Enrichment of H(2)(17)O from tap water, characterization of the enriched water, and properties of several (17)O-labeled compounds.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Brinda; Lewis, Andrew R; Plettner, Erika

    2011-01-01

    A low-abundance form of water, H(2)(17)O, was enriched from 0.04% to ∼90% by slow evaporation and fractional distillation of tap water. The density and refractive index for H(2)(17)O are reported. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of (16)O- and (17)O-1-hexanols and their trimethyl silyl ethers and of (16)O- and (17)O-hexamethyl disiloxanes was used to determine the percentage of (17)O enrichment in the H(2)(17)O. Furthermore, the chemical shifts of labeled and nonlabeled water dissolved in CDCl(3) differed sufficiently that we could verify the enrichment of H(2)(17)O. (17)O hexanol was synthesized by the reaction of iodohexane with Na(17)OH. (17)O-Labeled trimethylsilanol and (17)O-labeled hexamethyldisiloxane were prepared by the reaction of H(2)(17)O with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). To generate standards for (17)O NMR, H(2)(17)O(2), and (17)O camphor were prepared. H(2)(17)O was electrolyzed to form (17)O-labeled hydrogen peroxide which was quantified using two colorimetric assays. (17)O-Labeled camphor was prepared by exchanging the ketone oxygen of camphor using H(2)(17)O. The (17)O-labeled compounds were characterized using (17)O, (1)H, and (13)C NMR and GC-MS. While we were characterizing the labeled camphor, we also detected an unexpected oxygen exchange reaction of primary alcohols, catalyzed by electrophilic ketones such as camphor. The reaction is a displacement of the alcohol OH group by water. This is an example of the usefulness of (17)O NMR in the study of a reaction mechanism that has not been noticed previously. PMID:21128590

  3. A direct underground measurement of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction cross-section at energies of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, C. G.; Collaboration, LUNA

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction plays a key role in many stellar sites, including classical novae and massive stars. Our knowledge of these scenarios might be improved by a precise measurement of the reaction’s cross-section at astrophysical energies. A direct attempt is currently underway in the Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy, using the underground LUNA 400kV accelerator. The background reduction afforded by the underground environment is essential to the success of this challenging measurement. A purpose-built experimental setup has been simulated and commissioned. Preliminary results are presented.

  4. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  5. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  6. First direct measurement of the 17O(p,γ)18F reaction cross section at Gamow energies for classical novae.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Caciolli, A; Di Leva, A; Formicola, A; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Campeggio, M; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Menegazzo, R; Marta, M; Napolitani, E; Prati, P; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Somorjai, E; Salvo, C; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Terrasi, F; Trezzi, D

    2012-11-16

    Classical novae are important contributors to the abundances of key isotopes, such as the radioactive (18)F, whose observation by satellite missions could provide constraints on nucleosynthesis models in novae. The (17)O(p,γ)(18)F reaction plays a critical role in the synthesis of both oxygen and fluorine isotopes, but its reaction rate is not well determined because of the lack of experimental data at energies relevant to novae explosions. In this study, the reaction cross section has been measured directly for the first time in a wide energy range E(c.m.)~/= 200-370 keV appropriate to hydrogen burning in classical novae. In addition, the E(c.m.)=183 keV resonance strength, ωγ=1.67±0.12 μeV, has been measured with the highest precision to date. The uncertainty on the (17)O(p,γ)(18)F reaction rate has been reduced by a factor of 4, thus leading to firmer constraints on accurate models of novae nucleosynthesis. PMID:23215474

  7. Ice Core Measurements and GCM Simulation of the Spatial Distribution and Glacial-Interglacial Change of 17O-excess in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenemann, S.; Ding, Q.; Steig, E.; Schauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotope ratios of water in polar precipitation, as measured in ice cores, have been fundamental to the quantification of past climate variability and change. Recent development of techniques to measure the 17O/16O ratio precisely has allowed 17Oexcess to be added to the ice-core isotope toolbox. The combination of δ17O with the conventional measurements of δ18O and δD - giving the parameter 17Oexcess - provides valuable new information on the evaporative conditions of the oceanic moisture sources for Antarctic precipitation. We measured δ17O and δ18O from a number of Antarctic ice cores (West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide, Siple Dome, Taylor Dome), and determined 17Oexcesson modern, Holocene, and glacial timescales. These results, combined with the work of Landais et al. [2008] and Winkler et al. [2011] at Talos Dome, Dome C, and Vostok, provide the most complete spatial and temporal view of Antarctic 17Oexcess to date. We have added 17Oexcess to the independent isotope modules of two atmospheric general circulation models (CCSM CAM3 and ECHAM4.6). Both models are capable of qualitatively reproducing the observed spatial distribution of modern 17Oexcess in Antarctic precipitation, although our current implementation of CAM3 currently overestimates the average value of 17Oexcess. Simulation of glacial-interglacial changes in ECHAM4.6 also realistically captures the differences in magnitude of the glacial/interglacial changes in 17Oexcess between different ice core sites, with the details dependent on the magnitude of sea ice changes and to a lesser degree the chosen supersaturation parameter. Both models show strong gradients in 17Oexcess at the ocean-sea ice boundary, associated with the strong gradient in near surface water vapor concentration (i.e., the normalized relative humidity). Our results suggest that the low 17Oexcess values found at Talos Dome and Siple Dome reflect their proximity to local moisture sources (e.g. from sea ice leads and polynyas

  8. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  9. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  10. NMR Measurements of Granular Flow and Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to measure statistical distributions of granular flow velocity and fluctuations of velocity, as well as spatial distributions of particulate concentration, flow velocity, its fluctuations, and other parameters that may be derived from these. All measurements have been of protons in liquid-containing particles such as mustard seeds or pharmaceutical pills. Our favorite geometry has been the slowly rotating partially filled rotating drum with granular flow taking place along the free surface of the particles. All the above-mentioned parameters have been studied as well as a spatial distribution of particulate diffusion coefficients, energy dissipation due to collisions, as well as segregation of non-uniform mixtures of granular material. Finally, we describe some motions of granular material under periodic vibrations.

  11. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  12. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  13. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  14. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  15. On the Δ17O budget of atmospheric O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Edward D.; Yeung, Laurence Y.; Kohl, Issaku E.

    2014-06-01

    We modeled the Δ17O of atmospheric O2 using 27 ordinary differential equations comprising a box model composed of the stratosphere, troposphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Results show that 57% of the deficit in 17O in O2 relative to a reference water fractionation line is the result of kinetic isotope fractionation attending the Dole effect, 33% balances the positive Δ17O of O(1D) in the stratosphere, and 10% is from evapotranspiration. The predicted Δ‧17O O2 relative to waters is -0.410‰ as measured at the δ18O of air. The value for Δ‧17O O2 varies at fixed δ18O with the concentration of atmospheric CO2, gross primary production, and net primary production as well as with reaction rates in the stratosphere. Our model prediction is consistent with our measurements of the oxygen isotopic composition of air O2 compared with rocks if rocks define a fractionation line with an intercept in δ‧17O = 103ln(δ17O/103 + 1) vs. δ‧18O = 103ln(δ18O/103 + 1) space less than SMOW but more positive than some recent measurements imply. The predicted Δ17O is less negative than that obtained from recent measurements of O2 directly against SMOW. Underestimation of Δ‧17O O2 can only be ameliorated if the integrated (bulk) Δ‧17O for stratospheric CO2 is significantly greater than measurements currently allow. Our results underscore the need for high-precision comparisons of the 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios of atmospheric O2, VSMOW, and rocks.

  16. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  17. Improved Direct Measurement of the 64.5 keV Resonance Strength in the 17O (p ,α )14N Reaction at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, C. G.; Scott, D. A.; Aliotta, M.; Formicola, A.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Cavanna, F.; Ciani, G. F.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; Di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Piatti, D.; Prati, P.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The 17O (p ,α ) 14N reaction plays a key role in various astrophysical scenarios, from asymptotic giant branch stars to classical novae. It affects the synthesis of rare isotopes such as 17O and 18F, which can provide constraints on astrophysical models. A new direct determination of the ER=64.5 keV resonance strength performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) accelerator has led to the most accurate value to date ω γ =10.0 ±1. 4stat±0. 7syst neV , thanks to a significant background reduction underground and generally improved experimental conditions. The (bare) proton partial width of the corresponding state at Ex=5672 keV in 18F is Γp=35 ±5stat±3syst neV . This width is about a factor of 2 higher than previously estimated, thus leading to a factor of 2 increase in the 17O (p , α ) 14N reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures relevant to shell hydrogen burning in red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. The new rate implies lower 17O/16O ratios, with important implications on the interpretation of astrophysical observables from these stars.

  18. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  19. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra.

  20. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGES

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  1. The effect of the recent 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion cross section measurements in the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion reactions and to extract the strengths of the resonances that more contribute to the reaction rates at astrophysical energies. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. Since, proton-induced fusion reactions on 17O and 18O belong to the CNO cycle network for H-burning in stars, the new estimates of the cross sections have been introduced into calculations of Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis to determine their impact on astrophysical environments. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains. These solids form in the cold and dusty envelopes that surround AGB stars and once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of fusion reactions in astrophysical environments.

  2. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  3. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  4. Measurement of the cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n,{alpha}){sup 17}O in the neutron-energy between 4 and 7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khryachkov, V. A.; Bondarenko, I. P.; Kuzminov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2012-04-15

    The cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O was measured in the neutron-energy range 4-7 MeV. An ionization chamber equipped with a Frisch grid combined with a pulse-shape digitizer was used as a detector. Gaseous neon that served as a target on which the reaction being studied proceeded was added to the gas filling the ionization chamber. The partial cross sections for the {alpha}{sub 0}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 3} channels of the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O were obtained for the first time.

  5. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  6. Measurement of the D/H, 18O/16O, and 17O/16O Isotope Ratios in Water by Laser Absorption Spectroscopy at 2.73 μm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Weidong; Fertein, Eric; Masselin, Pascal; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Yingjian; Koeth, Johannes; Brückner, Daniela; He, Xingdao

    2014-01-01

    A compact isotope ratio laser spectrometry (IRLS) instrument was developed for simultaneous measurements of the D/H, 18O/16O and 17O/16O isotope ratios in water by laser absorption spectroscopy at 2.73 μm. Special attention is paid to the spectral data processing and implementation of a Kalman adaptive filtering to improve the measurement precision. Reduction of up to 3-fold in standard deviation in isotope ratio determination was obtained by the use of a Fourier filtering to remove undulation structure from spectrum baseline. Application of Kalman filtering enables isotope ratio measurement at 1 s time intervals with a precision (<1‰) better than that obtained by conventional 30 s averaging, while maintaining a fast system response. The implementation of the filter is described in detail and its effects on the accuracy and the precision of the isotope ratio measurements are investigated. PMID:24854363

  7. Corrections for 17O interference, effects on Δ47 determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; He, B.; Colman, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The measurements of 13C on CO2 samples are routinely corrected for 17O contribution to the m/z 45 signal (Craig, 1957; Santrock, et al., 1985). The 17O abundance affects the Δ47 calculation, and the amount of 17O present is routinely determined using the relationship between 18O and 17O presented in IAEA TECDOC 825 (Dennis, et al., 2011; Huntington, et al., 2009; Gonfiantini, et al., 1995). In 2010, the IAEA released new recommendations for 17O determinations to be used for 13C corrections (Brand, et al., 2010). We compare the effect of using different ways to determine 17O interference, as well as using the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) value for VPDB (Brand, et al., 2010), on heated gas lines, model data, and on CO2 gases made to have similar δ47 and Δ47, but with highly contrasting δ18O and δ13C values. The 2010 IAEA recommendations give a better fit for heated gas data than the TECDOC 825 recommendations. Comparing differences in the data points relative to their respective fitted lines, we see differences on the order of 5 to 10 ppm in Δ47. That corresponds to a systematic error of 2 °C in the temperature estimate (room temperature range), and one that varies with δ13C and δ18O, but not necessarily with δ47. The preliminary work on equilibrated CO2 gases having similar δ47, but very different δ13C and δ18O, showed large (ca. 70 ppm) differences in Δ47 when using the (standard) TECDOC 825 recommendations. The Δ47 values were much closer when the 2010 IUPAC recommendations were used. This also serves as a test of the updated factors for 17O determination, as well as the overall robustness of the Δ47 measurement.

  8. Development and Characterization of NMR Measurements for Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Zachary; Whitney, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are systems of water, gelatin, and monomers which form polymers upon irradiation. The gelatin matrix retains dose distribution in 3D form, facilitating truly integrated measurements of complex dose plans for radiation therapy. Polymer gels have two proton pools coupled by exchange: free solvent protons and bound polymerized macromolecular protons. Measuring magnetization transfer (MT) and relaxation affords useful insights into particle rigidity and chemical exchange effects on relaxation in polymer gels. Polymer gel dose response has been previously quantified with several techniques, most often in terms of MRI parameters, usually at field strengths of 1.5 T and below. The research described here investigates the dose response of a revised MAGIC gel dosimeter via both high-field imaging and simpler nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This includes both transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (R2 and R1) and quantitative MT parameters. We investigated estimating polymer molecular weight for a given applied dose using the Rouse model and R2 data from the imaging study. Finally, we began development of NMR methods for studying dose response, requiring adaption of NMR experiments to accommodate for radiation damping.

  9. 17O-Decoupled 1H Spectroscopy and Imaging with a Surface Coil: STEAM Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, Sridhar R.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Dandora, Rahul; Stolpen, Alan H.; Leigh, J. S.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2000-03-01

    17O-decoupled 1H spin-echo imaging has been reported as a means of indirect 17O detection, with potential application to measurement of blood flow and metabolism. In its current form, 17O decoupling requires large RF amplitudes and a 180° refocusing pulse, complicating its application in volume and surface coils, respectively. To overcome this problem, we have developed an 17O-decoupled proton stimulated echo sequence ("STEAM decoupling") to allow 17O detection with a surface coil. A high B1 amplitude is easily generated, allowing complete decoupling of 17O and 1H. Slice-selective, 17O-decoupled 1H imaging is readily performed and the sequence is easily adapted for localized spectroscopy. Intrinsic correction for variations in B1 and further compensation for B1 inhomogeneity are discussed.

  10. Rheo-NMR Measurements of Cocoa Butter Crystallized Under

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, E.; Mazzanti, G

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of a benchtop NMR instrument were made to apply temperature control to a shearing NMR cell. This has enabled the determination in situ of the solid fat content (SFC) of cocoa butter under shearing conditions. The cocoa butter was cooled at 3 C/min to three final temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 C with applied shear rates between 45 and 720 s-1. Polymorphic transitions of the cocoa butter were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an identical shearing system constructed of Lexan. Sheared samples were shown to have accelerated phase transitions compared to static experiments. In experiments where form V was confirmed to be the dominant polymorph, the final SFC averaged around 50%. However, when other polymorphic forms were formed, a lower SFC was measured because the final temperature was within the melting range of that polymorph and only partial crystallization happened. A shear rate of 720 s-1 delayed phase transitions, likely due to viscous heating of the sample. Pulsed NMR is an invaluable tool for determining the crystalline fraction in hydrogen containing materials, yet its use for fundamental and industrial research on fat or alkanes crystallization under shear has only recently been developed.

  11. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  12. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores. PMID:15833638

  13. Measurement of fibrin concentration by fast field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Broche, Lionel M; Ismail, Saadiya R; Booth, Nuala A; Lurie, David J

    2012-05-01

    The relaxation of (1)H nuclei due to their interaction with quadrupolar (14)N nuclei in gel structures is measured using fast field-cycling NMR. This phenomenon called quadrupolar dips has been reported in different (1)H-(14)N bond-rich species. In this study, we have studied quadrupolar dips in fibrin, an insoluble protein that is the core matrix of thrombi. Fibrin was formed by the addition of thrombin to fibrinogen in 0.2% agarose gel. T(1)-dispersion curves were measured using fast field-cycling NMR relaxometry, over the field range of 1.5-3.5 MHz (proton Larmor frequency), and were analyzed using a curve-fitting algorithm. A linear increase of signal amplitude with increasing fibrin concentration was observed. This agrees with the current theory that predicts a linear relationship of signal amplitude with the concentration of contributing (14)N spins in the sample. Interestingly, fibrin formation gave rise to the signal, regardless of crosslinking induced by the transglutaminase factor XIIIa. To investigate the effect of proteins that might be trapped in the thrombi in vivo, the plasma protein albumin was added to the fibrin gel, and an increase in the quadrupolar signal amplitude was observed. This study can potentially be useful for thrombi classification by fast field-cycling MRI techniques.

  14. Understanding the symmetric line shape in the 17O MAS spectra for hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Oki, Shinobu; Deguchi, Kenzo; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state 17O Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 17O-enriched hexagonal ice, [17O]-Ih, between 173 and 253 K were presented. Marked changes in the line shape were clearly observed, indicating water molecular reorientation in the crystal structure. At 173 K, molecular motions were considered to be frozen and analysis of the 1D MAS spectrum yielded the following parameters: quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) = 6.6 ± 0.2 MHz and asymmetry parameter (ηQ) = 0.95 ± 0.05. At 232 K and above, contrary to the conventional explanation, pseudo-symmetric line shapes appeared in the 17O MAS NMR spectra arising from the contribution of second-order quadrupole interactions. As a chemical exchange model to describe these isotropic 17O MAS NMR spectra, a modified Ratcliffe model, which consider the effects of proton disorder, was proposed, and the resulting theoretical spectra could well reproduce the experimental spectra.

  15. Tracing atmospheric nitrate deposition in a complex semiarid ecosystem using delta17O.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Greg; Meixner, Thomas; Fenn, Mark; Hernandez, Larry; Sirulnik, Abby; Allen, Edith; Thiemens, Mark

    2004-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrate collected from aerosols, fog, and precipitation was measured and found to have a large 17O anomaly with delta17O values ranging from 20 percent per thousand to 30% percent per thousand (delta17O = delta17O - 0.52(delta18O)). This 17O anomaly was used to trace atmospheric deposition of nitrate to a semiarid ecosystem in southern California. We demonstrate that the delta17O signal is a conserved tracer of atmospheric nitrate deposition and is a more robust indicator of N deposition relative to standard delta18O techniques. The data indicate that a substantial portion of nitrate found in the local soil, stream, and groundwater is of atmospheric origin and does not undergo biologic processing before being exported from the system.

  16. Experimental determination of the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2007-03-15

    The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reactions are of major importance to hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis in a number of different stellar sites. In particular, {sup 17}O and {sup 18}F nucleosynthesis in classical novae is strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rates of these two reactions. The previously estimated rate for {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N carries very large uncertainties in the temperature range of classical novae (T=0.01-0.4 GK), whereas a recent measurement has reduced the uncertainty of the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate. We report on the observation of a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub c.m.}=183.3 keV in the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}=(1.6{+-}0.2)x10{sup -3} eV. We studied in the same experiment the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction by an activation method, and the resonance strength was found to amount to {omega}{gamma}{sub p{gamma}}=(2.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6} eV. The excitation energy of the corresponding level in {sup 18}F was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV in a Doppler shift attenuation method measurement, which yielded a value of {tau}<2.6 fs for the level lifetime. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates were calculated using the measured resonance properties and reconsidering some previous analyses of the contributions of other levels or processes. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N rate is now well established below T=1.5 GK, with uncertainties reduced by orders of magnitude in the temperature range T=0.1-0.4 GK. The uncertainty in the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate is somewhat larger because of remaining obscurities in the knowledge of the direct capture process. These new resonance properties have important consequences for {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray emission of classical novae.

  17. Systematic bias in NMR diffusion measurements on polydisperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Xu, Kaipin; Zhang, Shanmin

    2015-03-01

    Least-squares fitting of the Stejskal-Tanner equation is a routine process in the measurement of molecular diffusion coefficient (MDC) using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. It is simple and elegant. However, a bias of the MDC is noticed when the system is polydispersed. This is due to improper accounts of the diffusion coefficient distribution. Eventually, it leads to a discrepancy between the observed MDC and the statistical mean value of the distribution. To reveal the discrepancy, an analytical solution is derived when the diffusion data is taken a logarithmic linearization. Computer simulation is also applied to obtain a non-linear regression result. For a Gaussian distribution of the MDCs, the bias is proportional to the square of the distribution width (linear regression), but it is also inversely proportional to the statistical mean value of the distribution (non-linear regression). This indicates that the MDC derived from Stejskal-Tanner equation only holds well for narrow distribution of MDCs. Otherwise, molecular radius derived from the Stokes-Einstein equation needs to be reconsidered due to the incorrect estimation of the MDC.

  18. Systematic bias in NMR diffusion measurements on polydisperse systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Xu, Kaipin; Zhang, Shanmin

    2015-03-01

    Least-squares fitting of the Stejskal-Tanner equation is a routine process in the measurement of molecular diffusion coefficient (MDC) using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. It is simple and elegant. However, a bias of the MDC is noticed when the system is polydispersed. This is due to improper accounts of the diffusion coefficient distribution. Eventually, it leads to a discrepancy between the observed MDC and the statistical mean value of the distribution. To reveal the discrepancy, an analytical solution is derived when the diffusion data is taken a logarithmic linearization. Computer simulation is also applied to obtain a non-linear regression result. For a Gaussian distribution of the MDCs, the bias is proportional to the square of the distribution width (linear regression), but it is also inversely proportional to the statistical mean value of the distribution (non-linear regression). This indicates that the MDC derived from Stejskal-Tanner equation only holds well for narrow distribution of MDCs. Otherwise, molecular radius derived from the Stokes-Einstein equation needs to be reconsidered due to the incorrect estimation of the MDC.

  19. Experimental Study of 17O(p,{alpha})14N and 17O(p,{gamma})18F for Classical Nova Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2006-04-26

    We investigated the proton-capture reactions on 17O occurring in classical nova explosions. We observed a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub R}{sup lab}=194.1{+-}0.6 keV in the 17O(p,{alpha})14N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}=1.6{+-}0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the 17O(p,{gamma})18F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}/{omega}{gamma}p{gamma}=470{+-}50. The corresponding excitation energy in the 18F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV by {gamma}-ray measurements using the 14N({alpha},{gamma})18F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for 17O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray astronomy of classical novae.

  20. Hydrogen Burning of {sup 17}O in Classical Novae

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2005-07-15

    We report on the observation of a previously unknown resonance at E{sub R}{sup lab}=194.1{+-}0.6 keV in the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}=1.6{+-}0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}/{omega}{gamma}{sub p{gamma}}=470{+-}50. The corresponding excitation energy in the {sup 18}F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV by {gamma}-ray measurements using the {sup 14}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray astronomy of classical novae.

  1. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  3. Continental scale variation in 17O-excess of meteoric waters in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuning; Levin, Naomi E.; Chesson, Lesley A.

    2015-09-01

    High-precision triple oxygen isotope analysis of waters is an emerging tool in hydrological and paleoclimate research. The existing research on 17O-excess in waters includes surveys of meteoric waters and region-specific studies of high-latitude snow and tropical storms. However, a better understanding of the variation in 17O-excess of waters across large geographic regions is needed to expand the utility of triple oxygen isotope measurements. Here we present 17O-excess data from tap waters across the continental U.S., which we used as a proxy for precipitation. The 17O-excess values of tap waters ranged from -6 to +43 per meg and averaged 17 ± 11 per meg which is lower than the average 17O-excess reported for global meteoric waters, but overlaps with reported 17O-excess values of rainfall from the tropics. We observed relatively high 17O-excess values (>25 per meg) of tap waters in the northwestern U.S. and some of the lowest 17O-excess values (<5 per meg) in the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The latitudinal variation of 17O-excess among tap waters likely reflects the different controls on 17O-excess in precipitation. For example, re-evaporation of precipitation and convective processes influence the isotopic composition of tap waters from the southern portions of the U.S., resulting in relatively low 17O-excess values. In contrast, these effects are reduced in tap waters from the northern portions of the U.S. where snow and cold-season rainfall are primarily responsible for the majority of annual precipitation. Exceptions to the latitudinal trend are prevalent in the central portions of the U.S., where mixing and convection are likely responsible for 17O-excess values that are lower than would be expected at their latitudes. The results of this study provide both a first look at the variation of 17O-excess in meteoric waters on a continental scale and a predictive map for 17O-excess of meteoric waters in the U.S.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal relaxation times in crowded 1H NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional maximum quantum (MAXY) NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Ye, Chaohui; Farrant, R. Duncan; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    Methods for measuring longitudinal relaxation times of protons in heavily overlapped 1H NMR spectra are introduced and exemplified using a solution of cholesteryl acetate. The methods are based on 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional maximum quantum NMR spectroscopy (MAXY), which makes possible the selective detection of CH, CH2 and CH31H NMR resonances. A modification of the BIRD pulse sequence to achieve selective inversion of protons bonded to either 12C or 13C is given. The approach should find application in studies of molecular dynamics where isotopic enrichment is not possible and the level of available sample dictates the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  5. δ17O and Δ47—The Heavens can Wait.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Most terrestrial systems fall on or close to the Global Meteoric Water Line, GMWL, for 17O and 18O isotopes. Luz and Barken (2010) recently discussed variations from the GMWL, and typically the differences were in the 50 per meg, or 0.05‰, 17O excess. Landais et al. also looked at water from a Vostok ice core, covering the past 150,000 years, and see differences from GMWL on the order of 45 per meg 17O excess. Carbonate samples are analyze for their 13C and 18O to help understand paleo-climate, water sources, and by looking at clumped isotopes, Δ47, the excess of 13C-18O bonds measured by mass spectroscopy on m/z 47. Those samples will also carry thru the 17O-excess in their waters of formation. We modeled the effect of 17O excess on Δ47 and basically there is little effect in the 50 per meg 17O excess range. We also looked at what would happen with 18O spiked samples, presuming the spike does not add 17O. In that case, a 100 ‰ shift in 18O would give rise to -49‰ 17O excess anomaly. That shows a significant effect, a 1.8 ‰ shift in Δ47 and even a 3.5 ‰ shift in the δ13C reading. So spiked samples are not good candidates for clumped isotope analysis, terrestrial samples probably will not have enough of a 17O excess to affect Δ47 measurements, and extra-terrestrial samples will have to be checked.

  6. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J R; Branch, C A; Helpern, J A; Smith, M B; Butt, S M; Welch, K M

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  7. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  8. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J R; Branch, C A; Helpern, J A; Smith, M B; Butt, S M; Welch, K M

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans. PMID:2645693

  9. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  10. HIGH-PRECISION C{sup 17}O, C{sup 18}O, AND C{sup 16}O MEASUREMENTS IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS: ANALOGUES FOR CO SELF-SHIELDING IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rachel L.; Young, Edward D.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Morris, Mark R.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. E-mail: pontoppi@gps.caltech.edu E-mail: morris@astro.ucla.edu

    2009-08-10

    Using very high resolution ({lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 95 000) 4.7 {mu}m fundamental and 2.3 {mu}m overtone rovibrational CO absorption spectra obtained with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph infrared spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report detections of four CO isotopologues-C{sup 16}O, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O, and the rare species, C{sup 17}O-in the circumstellar environment of two young protostars: VV CrA, a binary T Tauri star in the Corona Australis molecular cloud, and Reipurth 50, an intermediate-mass FU Ori star in the Orion Molecular Cloud. We argue that the observed CO absorption lines probe a protoplanetary disk in VV CrA, and a protostellar envelope in Reipurth 50. All CO line profiles are spectrally resolved, with intrinsic line widths of {approx}3-4 km s{sup -1} (FWHM), permitting direct calculation of CO oxygen isotopologue ratios with 5%-10% accuracy. The rovibrational level populations for all species can be reproduced by assuming that CO absorption arises in two temperature regimes. In the higher temperature regime, in which the column densities are best determined, the derived oxygen isotope ratios in VV CrA are: [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 18}O] =690 {+-} 30; [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 17}O] =2800 {+-} 300, and [C{sup 18}O]/[C{sup 17}O]=4.1 {+-} 0.4. For Reipurth 50, we find [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 18}O] =490 {+-} 30; [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 17}O] =2200 {+-} 150, [C{sup 18}O]/[C{sup 17}O] = 4.4 {+-} 0.2. For both objects, {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C are on the order of 100, nearly twice the expected interstellar medium (ISM) ratio. The derived oxygen abundance ratios for the VV CrA disk show a significant mass-independent deficit of C{sup 17}O and C{sup 18}O relative to C{sup 16}O compared to ISM baseline abundances. The Reipurth 50 envelope shows no clear differences in oxygen CO isotopologue ratios compared with the local ISM. A mass-independent fractionation can be interpreted as being due to selective photodissociation of CO in the disk

  11. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  12. NMR measurements in a hydrogen/helium slush at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiak, Marcin; Hamida, Jaha; Ihas, Gary G.; Sullivan, Neil

    2003-03-01

    Matrix isolation of various atoms in solid hydrogen presents both pure and applied research possibilities. When single atom properties are measured with NMR in the background of a quantum solid, insight into electronic interactions and quantum diffusion may be obtained. A cell has been constructed which, when filled with liquid helium, may have various gases injected into it. If this gas is a mixture of hydrogen and, say, boron, NMR may be performed on both the H and the B nuclei. Crystal or amorphous structures and atomic diffusion may be investigated. Design and construction of the apparatus will be presented. The first pulsed NMR data on H will be presented and interpreted.

  13. J-GFT NMR for precise measurement of mutually correlated nuclear spin-spin couplings.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Hanudatta S; Garcia, Erwin; Shen, Yang; Szyperski, Thomas

    2007-01-24

    G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) NMR spectroscopy is presented for accurate and precise measurement of chemical shifts and nuclear spin-spin couplings correlated according to spin system. The new approach, named "J-GFT NMR", is based on a largely extended GFT NMR formalism and promises to have a broad impact on projection NMR spectroscopy. Specifically, constant-time J-GFT (6,2)D (HA-CA-CO)-N-HN was implemented for simultaneous measurement of five mutually correlated NMR parameters, that is, 15N backbone chemical shifts and the four one-bond spin-spin couplings 13Calpha-1Halpha, 13Calpha-13C', 15N-13C', and 15N-1HNu. The experiment was applied for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in an 8 kDa protein Z-domain aligned with Pf1 phages. Comparison with RDC values extracted from conventional NMR experiments reveals that RDCs are measured with high precision and accuracy, which is attributable to the facts that (i) the use of constant time evolution ensures that signals do not broaden whenever multiple RDCs are jointly measured in a single dimension and (ii) RDCs are multiply encoded in the multiplets arising from the joint sampling. This corresponds to measuring the couplings multiple times in a statistically independent manner. A key feature of J-GFT NMR, i.e., the correlation of couplings according to spin systems without reference to sequential resonance assignments, promises to be particularly valuable for rapid identification of backbone conformation and classification of protein fold families on the basis of statistical analysis of dipolar couplings.

  14. {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne for the weak s process

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Gueray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Oezkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2012-11-20

    The ratio of the reaction rates of the competing channels {sup 17}O({alpha}{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne determines the efficiency of {sup 16}O as a neutron poison in the s process in low metallicity rotating stars. It has a large impact on the element production, either producing elements to the mass range of A=90 in case of a significant poisoning effect or extending the mass range up to the region of A=150 if the {gamma} channel is of negligible strength. We present an improved study of the reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, including an independent measurement of the {sup 17}O({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 20}Ne channel. A simultaneous R-Matrix fit to both the n{sub 0} and the n{sub 1} channels has been performed. New reaction rates, including recent data on the {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne reaction, have been calculated and used as input for stellar network calculations and their impact on the s process in rotating massive stars is discussed.

  15. NMR measurement of hydrodynamic dispersion in porous media subject to biofilm mediated precipitation reactions.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Seymour, Joseph D; Schultz, Logan N; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B; Codd, Sarah L

    2011-03-01

    Noninvasive measurements of hydrodynamic dispersion by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are made in a model porous system before and after a biologically mediated precipitation reaction. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was unable to detect the small scale changes in pore structure visualized during light microscopy analysis after destructive sampling of the porous medium. However, pulse gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSE NMR) measurements clearly indicated a change in hydrodynamics including increased pore scale mixing. These changes were detected through time-dependent measurement of the propagator by PGSE NMR. The dynamics indicate an increased pore scale mixing which alters the preasymptotic approach to asymptotic Gaussian dynamics governed by the advection diffusion equation. The methods described here can be used in the future to directly measure the transport of solutes in biomineral-affected porous media and contribute towards reactive transport models, which take into account the influence of pore scale changes in hydrodynamics.

  16. 17O(p, α) 14N study at the LUNA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. A.; Bruno, C.; Caciolli, A.; LUNA Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen burning of 17O sensitively influences nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, the ratio between reaction rates of 17O(p, α) 14N (Q=1.2 MeV) and 17O(p, γ) 18F (Q=5.6 MeV) channels on 17O is one of the most important parameters for the galactic synthesis of 17O, the stellar production of radioactive 18F, and for predicted O isotopic ratios in premolar grains. Now the LUNA collaboration is preparing a new effort to study the (p, α) channel on 17O at astrophysical energies. To reach this goal a new chamber has been constructed which allows to place 8 silicons detectors in backward directions. The setup improves the efficiency which is a crucial parameter in measuring nuclear reaction at such low energies. Aluminum foils are placed on the silicon in order to stop the elastic backscattered protons which otherwise produce non-negligible background on the silicons.

  17. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR. PMID:26967906

  18. Multitude of 2+ discrete states in 124Sn observed via the (17O 17O'γ) reaction: Evidence for pygmy quadrupole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Tsoneva, N.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Lenske, H.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Isocrate, R.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Lunardi, S.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    A multitude of discrete 2+ states in 124Sn with energy up to 5 MeV were populated and identified with the (17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV. Cross sections were compared with distorted wave Born approximation predictions and in general a good agreement was found. The measured energy and intensity distributions of the 2+ states are very similar to the predictions based on self-consistent density functional theory and extended QRPA approach accounting for multiphonon degrees of freedom. This provides evidence of the excitation of the pygmy quadrupole resonance in skin nuclei.

  19. Spatial Distribution of 17O-excess of Tap Waters in the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Levin, N. E.; Chesson, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    17O-excess is the deviation from the average relationship between δ18O and δ17O values in meteoric waters. This parameter is similar to d-excess in that it is sensitive to relative humidity during evaporation, but unlike d-excess it is largely insensitive to temperature. Therefore, 17O-excess may be used to provide independent information on relative humidity during evaporative processes in hydrological and climatic models. Here we report the first national-level survey of 17O-excess of tap waters collected from 92 localities across the conterminous United States (US). Since tap water primarily originates from rivers, reservoirs and groundwater, our results should approximate the seasonally integrated 17O-excess of precipitation at any given locality. The average of these 17O-excess values for measured US tap waters is 0.028±0.005%, which is consistent with the global average (0.033±0.005%). The spatial distributions of the measured 17O-excess values are likely controlled by the effects of evaporation in two different types of settings: (1) evaporation in oceanic regions that vary in relative humidity, which results in air masses carrying moisture with distinct 17O-excess values, and (2) evaporation of water either during or after precipitation events. To first order, we observed high 17O-excess values (0.036±0.005 to 0.065±0.005%) in tap waters from the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, west of the Great Plains and the Mississippi Delta region; whereas low 17O-excess values (-0.015±0.005 to 0.010±0.005%) are observed in the majority of the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. These data suggest that the high 17O-excess values may be the results of moisture from relatively dry oceanic sources, while the low 17O-excess values may be due to moisture from a relatively humid source such as the Gulf of Mexico. We also found some second-order features in the 17O-excess distribution of the tap waters, which could be attributed to the local evaporation

  20. Measurement of pH by NMR Spectroscopy in Concentrated Aqueous Fluoride Buffers

    PubMed Central

    Gerken, James B.

    2010-01-01

    An NMR spectroscopic technique has been developed to give rapid, accurate pH measurements on tenth-milliliter samples of concentrated acidic aqueous solutions buffered by fluoride ion in the pH 1.5 – 4.5 range. The fluoride 19F chemical shift has been calibrated as a function of pH at 0.1 and 1.0 M concentration by reference to an internal 3-fluoropyridine standard. Subsequent measurements of fluoride buffer pH required no additives and only two NMR spectra in the presence of an external reference standard. PMID:21278857

  1. Estimation and measurement of flat or solenoidal coil inductance for radiofrequency NMR coil design.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Jan K; DeVries, Jeffrey S; Sykes, Brian D

    2007-07-01

    The inductance of a radiofrequency coil determines its compatibility with a given NMR probe circuit. However, calculation (or estimation) of inductance for radiofrequency coils of dimensions suitable for use in an NMR probe is not trivial, particularly for flat-coils. A comparison of a number of formulae for calculation of inductance is presented through the use of a straightforward inductance measurement circuit. This technique relies upon instrumentation available in many NMR laboratories rather than upon more expensive and specialized instrumentation often utilized in the literature. Inductance estimation methods are suggested and validated for both flat-coils and solenoids. These have proven very useful for fabrication of a number of new coils in our laboratory for use in static solid-state NMR probes operating at (1)H frequencies of 300 and 600MHz. Solenoidal coils with very similar measured and estimated inductances having inner diameters from 1 to 5mm are directly compared as an example of the practical application of inductance estimation for interchange of coils within an existing solid-state NMR probe.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization of 17O: direct polarization.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization of (17)O was studied using four different polarizing agents: the biradical TOTAPOL and the monoradicals trityl and SA-BDPA, as well as a mixture of the latter two. Field profiles, DNP mechanisms, and enhancements were measured to better understand and optimize directly polarizing this low-gamma quadrupolar nucleus using both mono- and biradical polarizing agents. Enhancements were recorded at <88 K and were >100 using the trityl (OX063) radical and <10 with the other polarizing agents. The >10,000-fold savings in acquisition time enabled a series of biologically relevant small molecules to be studied with small sample sizes and the measurement of various quadrupolar parameters. The results are discussed with comparison to room temperature studies and GIPAW quantum chemical calculations. These experimental results illustrate the strength of high field DNP and the importance of radical selection for studying low-gamma nuclei.

  3. Simulating the budget and distribution of Δ17O in CO2 with a global atmosphere-biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Wouter; Schneider, Linda; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; van der Velde, Ivar; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The isotope ratios of 16O, 17O and 18O in CO2 are referred to as the triple-oxygen isotope composition of CO2, and have long held promise to better understand terrestrial carbon cycling. However, measurement precision as well as an incomplete understanding of fractionation during equilibrium exchange and diffusion of CO2 have been a challenge, especially for the estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and respiration from measured δ17O and δ18O isotope ratios in CO2. The excess-17O in CO2 (Δ17O), defined as the deviation of the δ17O and δ18O ratios from an expected mass-dependent fractionation line, is in principle easier to interpret as many processes that simultaneously affect δ17O and δ18O are not reflected in Δ17O. Two global box model simulations suggest that atmospheric Δ17O is therefore mostly determined by transport of relatively δ17O enriched CO2 from the stratosphere, and its equilibration in leaf-water back to an excess of close to zero, following diffusion as part of photosynthetic CO2 uptake by vegetation. This makes Δ17O an interesting tracer for photosynthesis at the global scale, and the first decadal time series have recently been published that indeed suggest strong GPP-driven variations in atmospheric Δ17O. In this study, we expand the modeling of Δ17O beyond the current two global box model results published by explicitly simulating the global atmospheric Δ17O distribution over a five year period. We specifically are interested whether regional gradients in Δ17O in areas with large GPP such as Amazonia leave an imprint on Δ17O that can be measured with the rapidly improving measurement precision (10-40 permeg currently). Therefore, we used the SIBCASA biosphere model at 1x1 degrees globally to simulate hourly fluxes of Δ17O into and out of C3 and C4 vegetation as well as soils. These fluxes were then fed into the TM5 atmospheric transport model at 6x4 degrees horizontal resolution to simulate the hourly spatial gradients in

  4. Analyzing drivers of variability in the Δ17O of nitrate in the northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Chung, S. H.; Welker, J. M.; Harlow, B.; Evans, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Δ17O of nitrate (NO3-) has beens used to track atmospheric inputs to ecosystems with biological sources near 0‰ and atmospheric sources from 20 to 40‰. The elevated Δ17O of atmospheric NO3- is due to oxidation with ozone. We analyzed the isotope composition of NO3- in weekly precipitation samples from 8 NADP/USNIP sites in the northwestern US between 1997-2004. Each site exhibits annual variation with lowest Δ17O during summer and highest Δ17O during winter. WA24 and WA19 exhibited the greatest (14.0‰) and least (8.9‰) annual variation, respectively. This significant and variable amount of seasonal change motivated analyzing drivers of this variability. Potential factors that influence Δ17O were evaluated with linear regression. Meteorological variables were tested which may account for inter-week variation. Measures of fire activity were included for effects on atmospheric oxidation. Lastly, NADP ion concentrations were used as potential indicators of marine influence which could introduce halogen chemistry and alter oxidation. Temperature was the only variable to significantly correlate with Δ17O at all sites (P<0.0001 at ID11 to P=0.05 at WA98). Fire activity (number of fires, area burned) significantly correlated with Δ17O at 4 of 8 sites (p<0.05) and suggested potential influence at 3 additional sites (0.1> P >0.05). No potential indicators of marine influence showed a relationship with Δ17O at coastal sites (WA19 and WA98), but there was a significant relationship between concentrations of Na and Cl with Δ17O at UT01 site which is influenced by the Great Salt Lake. Overall, temperature and fire activity best explain variability in the Δ17O of NO3- in the northwestern US. Understanding this variability is crucial to correctly attribute NO3- sources in ecological studies between biological and atmospheric inputs in mixing models. Incorrect accounting of variability leads to unnecessary error and incorrect identification of NO3- sources in

  5. Combining SIP and NMR Measurements to Develop Improved Estimates of Permeability in Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability is traditionally measured in-situ by inducing groundwater flow using pumping, slug, or packer tests; however, these methods require the existence of wells, can be labor intensive and can be constrained by measurement support volumes. Indirect estimates of permeability based on geophysical techniques benefit from relatively short measurement times, do not require fluid extraction, and are non-invasive when made from the surface (or minimally invasive when made in a borehole). However, estimates of permeability based on a single geophysical method often require calibration for rock type, and cannot be used to uniquely determine all of the physical properties required to accurately determine permeability. In this laboratory study we present the first critical step towards developing a method for estimating permeability based on the synergistic coupling of two complementary geophysical methods: spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To develop an improved model for estimating permeability, laboratory SIP and NMR measurements were collected on a series of sandstone cores, covering a wide range of permeabilities. Current models for estimating permeability from each individual geophysical measurement were compared to independently obtained estimates of permeability. The comparison confirmed previous research showing that estimates from SIP or NMR alone only yield the permeability within order of magnitude accuracy and must be calibrated for rock type. Next, the geophysical parameters determined from SIP and NMR were compared to independent measurements the physical properties of the sandstone cores including gravimetric porosity and pores-size distributions (obtained from mercury injection porosimetry); this comparison was used to evaluate which geophysical parameter more consistently and accurately predicted each physical property. Finally, we present an improved method for estimating permeability in sandstone cores based

  6. An introduction to NMR-based approaches for measuring protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kleckner, Ian R; Foster, Mark P

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are inherently flexible at ambient temperature. At equilibrium, they are characterized by a set of conformations that undergo continuous exchange within a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales ranging from nanometers to micrometers and femtoseconds to hours. Dynamic properties of proteins are essential for describing the structural bases of their biological functions including catalysis, binding, regulation and cellular structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring these essential features of proteins. Here we provide an introduction to NMR-based approaches for studying protein dynamics, highlighting eight distinct methods with recent examples, contextualized within a common experimental and analytical framework. The selected methods are (1) Real-time NMR, (2) Exchange spectroscopy, (3) Lineshape analysis, (4) CPMG relaxation dispersion, (5) Rotating frame relaxation dispersion, (6) Nuclear spin relaxation, (7) Residual dipolar coupling, (8) Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. PMID:21059410

  7. 1H NMR and calorimetric measurements on rabbit eye lenses.

    PubMed

    Gutsze, A; Bodurka, J; Olechnowicz, R; Buntkowsky, G; Limbach, H H

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic properties of water molecules in the rabbit lens were studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance line shape analysis, measurements of relaxation times as a function of temperature and calorimetric measurements. The experiments prove, as already suggested by other authors, that there are two types of water in the lens of rabbit eyes, namely bound unfreezable hydration water and bulk freezable water. Line shape analysis and relaxometry showed, that this two types of water exist in two different environments, which may be identified as the nucleus and the cortex of the lens. The line shape analysis showed furthermore that water molecules in the rabbit lens has a common spin lattice relaxation time (T1), but two different transverse relaxation times (T2A and T2B). The tentative model of fast water exchange on the T1 time scale and slow water exchange on the T2 time scale, was used to explain experimental proton relaxation data of the rabbit lens. An estimation for this exchange rate kex by comparing it to the relaxation times is given (T1(-1) < kex < T1(-1)). It has also been shown by a calorimetric measurements, that the lenses can be easily under-cooled to temperatures well below the freezing point of water. The achievable maximum undercooling temperature of the lens is a function of the cooling rate KC, therefore it has to be considered as an experimentally adjustable parameter which is not characteristic for the investigated sample. Thus it must be noted that any previous discussions about the specific value of the temperature of water crystallisation in biological systems need to be carefully reconsidered.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of 17O- and 18O-enriched carbon dioxide: Line positions and intensities in the 4681-5337 cm-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkov, Yu. G.; Jacquemart, D.; Lyulin, O. M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    The line positions and intensities of carbon dioxide isotopologues have been retrieved in the 4681-5337 cm-1 spectral range from Fourier transform spectra of carbon dioxide recorded in LADIR (Paris, France) with the Bruker IFS 125-HR [Jacquemart D, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2012;113:961-975]. In total 6386 line positions and intensities of 89 bands of 12 isotopologues 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C18O, 16O12C17O, 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O, 18O12C18O, 17O12C18O, 17O12C17O, 18O13C18O, 17O13C18O, and 17O13C17O have been retrieved. 23 bands were newly assigned. All studied bands belong to the ΔP=7 series of transitions, where P = 2V1 +V2 + 3V3 is the polyad number (Vi are vibrational quantum numbers). The accuracy of the line position measurement is about 0.3×10-3 cm-1 for the unblended and not very weak lines. The accuracy of the line intensities varies from 4% to 15% depending on the isotopologue, on the intensity of the line and on the extent of the line overlapping. The observed intensities were used to fit the effective dipole moment parameters for the ΔP=7 series of transitions in 16O12C18O, 16O12C17O, 12C17O2, 17O12C18O, 16O13C17O, 13C17O2 and 17O13C18O isotopologues of carbon dioxide.

  9. Equilibrium exchange of dimethyl methylphosphonate across the human red cell membrane measured using NMR spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Kiaran; Kuchel, Philip W.

    The 31P NMR spectrum of dimethyl methylphosphonate, in a suspension of human erythrocytes in a hypertonic medium, is characterized by separate intra- and extracellular resonances. The compound crosses the red cell membrane too rapidly for its transport to be monitored using conventional NMR time-course techniques. In the present work we adapted the saturation transfer method to measure the unidirectional flux of dimethyl methylphosphonate into the cell at equilibrium and thereby gained an estimate of its permeability coefficient. Repeated measurements on low hematocrit cell suspensions showed no significant variation in the permeability coefficients for cells from five different donors. Saturation transfer measurements conducted over a range of hematocrits demonstrated the hematocrit dependence of the unidirectional rate constant for dimethyl methylphosphonate influx. The calculated permeability coefficient was independent of hematocrit.

  10. Measurement and Imaging of Planar Electromagnetic Phantoms Based on NMR Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frollo, I.; Andris, P.; Přibil, J.; Vojtíšek, L.; Dermek, T.; Valkovič, L.

    2010-01-01

    Planar electromagnetic phantom design for measurement and imaging using NMR has been performed. Electromagnetic phantom computation and testing on a NMR 0.178 Tesla Esaote Opera imager were accomplished. The classical geometrical and chemical phantoms are generally used for testing of NMR imaging systems. They are simple cylindrical or rectangular objects with different dimensions and shapes with holes filled with specially prepared water solutions. In our experiments a homogeneous phantom (reference medium) - a container filled with water - was used. The resultant image represents the magnetic field distribution in the homogeneous phantom. An image acquired by this method is actually a projection of the sample properties onto the homogeneous phantom. The goal of the paper is to map and image the magnetic field deformation using NMR imaging methods. We are using a double slender rectangular vessel with constant thickness filled with specially prepared water solution in our experiments. For detection a carefully tailored gradient-echo imaging method, susceptible to magnetic field homogeneity, was used.

  11. Are Protein Force Fields Getting Better? A Systematic Benchmark on 524 Diverse NMR Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Kyle A; Lin, Yu-Shan; Das, Rhiju; Pande, Vijay S

    2012-04-10

    Recent hardware and software advances have enabled simulation studies of protein systems on biophysically-relevant timescales, often revealing the need for improved force fields. Although early force field development was limited by the lack of direct comparisons between simulation and experiment, recent work from several labs has demonstrated direct calculation of NMR observables from protein simulations. Here we quantitatively evaluate recent molecular dynamics force fields against a suite of 524 chemical shift and J coupling ((3)JH(N)H(α), (3)JH(N)C(β), (3)JH(α)C', (3)JH(N)C', and (3)JH(α)N) measurements on dipeptides, tripeptides, tetra-alanine, and ubiquitin. Of the force fields examined (ff96, ff99, ff03, ff03*, ff03w, ff99sb*, ff99sb-ildn, ff99sb-ildn-phi, ff99sb-ildn-nmr, CHARMM27, OPLS-AA), two force fields (ff99sb-ildn-phi, ff99sb-ildn-nmr) combining recent side chain and backbone torsion modifications achieve high accuracy in our benchmark. For the two optimal force fields, the calculation error is comparable to the uncertainty in the experimental comparison. This observation suggests that extracting additional force field improvements from NMR data may require increased accuracy in J coupling and chemical shift prediction. To further investigate the limitations of current force fields, we also consider conformational populations of dipeptides, which were recently estimated using vibrational spectroscopy.

  12. Measuring chirality in NMR in the presence of a time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.; Harris, Robert A.

    2014-06-21

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are “blind” to chirality since the spectra for left and right handed enantiomers are identical in an achiral medium. However, theoretical arguments have suggested that the effective Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 nuclei in the presence of electric and magnetic fields can be different for left and right handed enantiomers, thereby enabling NMR to be used to spectroscopically detect chirality even in an achiral medium. However, most proposals to detect the chiral NMR signature require measuring signals that are equivalent to picomolar concentrations for {sup 1}H nuclei, which are outside current NMR detection limits. In this work, we propose to use an AC electric field that is resonantly modulated at the Larmor frequency, thereby enhancing the effect of the chiral term by four to six orders of magnitude. We predict that a steady-state transverse magnetization, whose direction will be opposite for different enantiomers, will build up during application of an AC electric field. We also propose an experimental setup that uses a solenoid coil with an AC current to generate the necessary periodic electric fields that can be used to generate chiral signals which are equivalent to the signal from a {sup 1}H submicromolar concentration.

  13. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  14. Discriminating between Lüders and von Neumann measuring devices: An NMR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer Kumar, C. S.; Shukla, Abhishek; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum state after measuring a degenerate observable is given by Lüders and von Neumann state update rules. While the former preserves superpositions, the latter does not. Even though both rules are valid and realizable, which rule a given measuring device ("Black Box") obeys, depends on its internal details. Recently Hegerfeldt and Mayato (2012) [5] had formulated a protocol to discriminate between the two kinds of measuring devices. Here we have reformulated this protocol for system and measuring qubits. We then experimentally investigated this protocol on an NMR spectrometer, and found that Lüders rule is favoured.

  15. Distal and proximal ligand interactions in heme proteins: Correlations between C-O and Fe-C vibrational frequencies, oxygen-17 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, and oxygen-17 nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in C sup 17 O- and sup 13 CO-labeled species

    SciTech Connect

    Ki Deok Park; Guo, K.; Adebodun, F.; Chiu, M.L.; Sligar, S.G.; Oldfield, E. )

    1991-03-05

    The authors have obtained the oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a variety of C{sup 17}O-labeled heme proteins, including sperm whale (Physeter catodon) myoglobin, two synthetic sperm whale myoglobin mutants (His E7 {yields} Val E7; His E7 {yields} Phe E7), adult human hemoglobin, rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) hemoglobin, horseradish (Cochlearia armoracia) peroxidase isoenzymes A and C, and Caldariomyces fumago chloroperoxidase, in some cases as a function of pH, and have determined their isotropic {sup 17}O NMR chemical shifts, {delta}{sub i}, and spin-lattice relaxation times, T{sub 1}. They have also obtained similar results on a picket fence prophyrin. The results show an excellent correlation between the infrared C-O vibrational frequencies, {nu}(C-O), and {delta}{sub i}, between {nu}(C-O) and the {sup 17}O nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, and as expected between e{sup 2}qQ/h and {delta}{sub i}. The results suggest the IR and NMR measurements reflect the same interaction, which is thought to be primarily the degree of {pi}-back-bonding from Fe d to CO {pi}* orbitals, as outlined previously.

  16. Measurements of heavy-atom isotope effects using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Kamiński, Rafał; Ciepielowski, Grzegorz; Jankowski, Stefan; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-10-01

    A novel method for measuring heavy-atom KIEs for magnetically active isotopes using (1)H NMR is presented. It takes advantage of the resonance split of the protons coupled with the heavy atom in the (1)H spectrum. The method is validated by the example of the (13)C-KIE on the hydroamination of styrene with aniline, catalyzed by phosphine-ligated palladium triflates.

  17. Width of the 3841-keV level in 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pietralla, N.; Zilges, A.

    1994-10-01

    The width of 3841-keV level in 17O was precisely measured in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility. The result of Γ(3841 keV)=(92+/-6) meV is compared with upper limits quoted in the literature. Possible particle-hole configurations of the 3841-keV level are discussed.

  18. An improved technique for computing permeability from NMR measurements in mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2011-08-01

    We develop a technique for extending nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) permeability estimation to clay-rich sediments. Our technique builds on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation by using porosity, grain size, specific surface, and magnetic susceptibility data to yield more accurate permeability estimation in mudstones with large pore surface areas and complex mineralogies. Based on measurements of natural sediments as well as resedimented laboratory mixtures of silica, bentonite, and kaolinite powders, we find that our method predicts permeability values that match measured values over four orders of magnitude and among lithologies that vary widely in grain size, mineralogy, and surface area. Our results show that the relationship between NMR data and permeability is a function of mineralogy and grain geometry, and that permeability predictions in clay-rich sediments can be improved with insights regarding the nature of the pore system made by the Kozeny theory. This technique extends the utility of NMR measurements beyond typical reservoir-quality rocks to a wide range of lithologies.

  19. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  20. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  1. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  2. Mechanism of decreased NMR-measured free magnesium in stored erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, J.L.; Wenz, B.; Gupta, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    P-31 NMR spectra of ebythrocytes stored with standard preservation media (ACD or CPDA-1) show a progressive upfield shift of the ..beta..P resonance of ATP. This would seem to indicate lower Mg-saturation of ATP and hence lower intracellular free magnesium (Mg/sub i/), but total intracellular Mg measured by AAS does not change. The authors have now observed similar spectral changes in erythrocytes stored in citrate-free media, hence the shifts are not an effect of citrate. Acidifying fresh blood to mimic the pH changes that occur with storage did not induce comparable shifts, nor did treatment of fresh blood with gramicidin, which causes Na/K redistribution across the erythrocyte membrane similar to that occurring with storage. The shifts were largely reversed when stored cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 1 hr with fresh citrated or heparinized plasma. Such incubation also increased ATP levels but did not increased 2,3-DPG, hence the shifts do not depend on disappearance of 2,3-DPG. P-31 NMR of acid extracts of stored cells show accumulation of some pyrophosphate, but probably not enough to account for the large apparent decreased in Mg/sub i/. The NMR estimation of decreased Mg/sub i/ in stored blood does not appear to be an artifact related to alterations in monovalent cations or in binding of ligands to hemoglobin. A possible mechanism is increased binding of Mg to the cell membrane.

  3. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners. PMID:25946616

  4. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners.

  5. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  6. ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O IN THE GALACTIC CENTRAL REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. S.; Sun, L. L.; Riquelme, D.; Henkel, C.; Lu, D. R.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Li, J.; Wang, M.

    2015-08-15

    The {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O isotopic ratio of oxygen is a crucial measure of the secular enrichment of the interstellar medium by ejecta from high-mass versus intermediate-mass stars. So far, however, there is a lack of data, particularly from the Galactic center (GC) region. Therefore, we have mapped typical molecular clouds in this region in the J = 1–0 lines of C{sup 18}O and C{sup 17}O with the Delingha 13.7 m telescope (DLH). Complementary pointed observations toward selected positions throughout the GC region were obtained with the IRAM 30 m and Mopra 22 m telescopes. C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios reflecting the {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O isotope ratios were obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C{sup 18}O and C{sup 17}O. For the first time, C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios are determined for Sgr C (V ∼ −58 km s{sup −1}), Sgr D (V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}), and the 1.°3 complex (V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}). Through our mapping observations, abundance ratios are also obtained for Sgr A (∼0 and ∼50 km s{sup −1} component) and Sgr B2 (∼60 km s{sup −1}), which are consistent with the results from previous single-point observations. Our frequency-corrected abundance ratios of the GC clouds range from 2.58 ± 0.07 (Sgr D, V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}, DLH) to 3.54 ± 0.12 (Sgr A, ∼50 km s{sup −1}). In addition, strong narrow components (line width less than 5 km s{sup −1}) from the foreground clouds are detected toward Sgr D (−18 km s{sup −1}), the 1.°3 complex (−18 km s{sup −1}), and M+5.3−0.3 (22 km s{sup −1}), with a larger abundance ratio around 4.0. Our results show a clear trend of lower C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios toward the GC region relative to molecular clouds in the Galactic disk. Furthermore, even inside the GC region, ratios appear not to be uniform. The low GC values are consistent with an inside-out formation scenario for our Galaxy.

  7. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Optimized slim-line logging NMR tool to measure soil moisture in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, Josefina; Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2013-08-01

    We report the optimization of a slim-line logging NMR tool carried out by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR measurements. The tool, based on cylindrical permanent magnets of 20 cm length and 5 cm diameter, has a penetration depth of about 2 cm measured from its surface. This is obtained thanks to a large radio frequency coil whose dimensions are comparable to the sensor size. An analytical expression of the SNR as a function of parameters which take into account the interaction between the radio frequency coil and the magnet shielding is developed. In view of the external constrains such as the one imposed by the excavation hole, a proper tool size is determined in the optimization process. Due to its size and properties, the sensor is suitable to measure water content in the vadose zone, which is the zone comprised within the first meters of the Earth surface and whose study is important for improving water management in agriculture and for refining climate models.

  9. Optimized slim-line logging NMR tool to measure soil moisture in situ.

    PubMed

    Perlo, Josefina; Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2013-08-01

    We report the optimization of a slim-line logging NMR tool carried out by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR measurements. The tool, based on cylindrical permanent magnets of 20 cm length and 5 cm diameter, has a penetration depth of about 2 cm measured from its surface. This is obtained thanks to a large radio frequency coil whose dimensions are comparable to the sensor size. An analytical expression of the SNR as a function of parameters which take into account the interaction between the radio frequency coil and the magnet shielding is developed. In view of the external constrains such as the one imposed by the excavation hole, a proper tool size is determined in the optimization process. Due to its size and properties, the sensor is suitable to measure water content in the vadose zone, which is the zone comprised within the first meters of the Earth surface and whose study is important for improving water management in agriculture and for refining climate models.

  10. Magnetism in CeRhIn5 at high fields measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, A. M.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    2015-03-01

    De Haas-van Alphen measurements of CeRhIn5 at ambient pressure show an abrupt change in the Fermi surface volume at high fields, H* ~ 30 T, and low temperatures resulting in antiferromagnetic phases with a small Fermi surface at fields below H* and a large Fermi surface at fields H such that H* < H < 50 T. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ideal probe for these magnetic states as the microscopic details are still lacking. Our preliminary NMR measurements find the magnetic order for H ∥ c is incommensurate up to 30 T as opposed to H ⊥ c which transitions from incommensurate to commensurate at H ~ 2 T. Furthermore, we find that the magnetic moment decreases near 17 T for H ∥ c . These measurements provide an insight into the magnetic anisotropy of CeRhIn5 and are a crucial step to studying its high field phases. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials and Engineering.

  11. High-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy of bicelles to measure the membrane interaction of ligands.

    PubMed

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2007-01-31

    Magnetically aligned bicelles are increasingly being used as model membranes in solution- and solid-state NMR studies of the structure, dynamics, topology, and interaction of membrane-associated peptides and proteins. These studies commonly utilize the PISEMA pulse sequence to measure dipolar coupling and chemical shift, the two key parameters used in subsequent structural analysis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the PISEMA and other rotating-frame pulse sequences are not suitable for the measurement of long-range heteronuclear dipolar couplings, and that they provide inaccurate values when multiple protons are coupled to a 13C nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a laboratory-frame separated-local-field experiment is capable of overcoming these difficulties in magnetically aligned bicelles. An extension of this approach to accurately measure 13C-31P and 1H-31P couplings from phospholipids, which are useful to understand the interaction of molecules with the membrane, is also described. In these 2D experiments, natural abundance 13C was observed from bicelles containing DMPC and DHPC lipid molecules. As a first application, these solid-state NMR approaches were utilized to probe the membrane interaction of an antidepressant molecule, desipramine, and its location in the membrane.

  12. Crystal structure and proton conductivity of BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3–δ: insights from neutron powder diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Rietveld fit of dry BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3–δ sample (Fig. S1). 119Sn (Fig. S2), 45Sc (Fig. S3–S6) and 17O (Fig. S7) spectra of all materials as a function of Sc doping concentration, 45Sc MQMAS of deuterated BaSn0.9Sc0.1O3–δ (Fig. S4), 45Sc MQMAS of dry and deuterated BaSn0.8Sc0.2O3–δ (Fig. S5), 45Sc MQMAS of dry and deuterated BaSn0.7Sc0.3O3–δ (Fig. S6), 17O MQMAS of 17O enriched BaSn0.8Sc0.2O3–δ and BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3–δ (Fig. S8). See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta09744d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Stefan T.; Knee, Christopher S.; Ahmed, Istaq; Hull, Stephen; Buannic, Lucienne; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Grey, Clare P.; Eriksson, Sten G.

    2016-01-01

    The solid-state synthesis and structural characterisation of perovskite BaSn1–xScxO3–δ (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) and its corresponding hydrated ceramics are reported. Powder and neutron X-ray diffractions reveal the presence of cubic perovskites (space group Pm3m) with an increasing cell parameter as a function of scandium concentration along with some indication of phase segregation. 119Sn and 45Sc solid-state NMR spectroscopy data highlight the existence of oxygen vacancies in the dry materials, and their filling upon hydrothermal treatment with D2O. It also indicates that the Sn4+ and Sc3+ local distribution at the B-site of the perovskite is inhomogeneous and suggests that the oxygen vacancies are located in the scandium dopant coordination shell at low concentrations (x ≤ 0.2) and in the tin coordination shell at high concentrations (x ≥ 0.3). 17O NMR spectra on 17O enriched BaSn1–xScxO3–δ materials show the existence of Sn–O–Sn, Sn–O–Sc and Sc–O–Sc bridging oxygen environments. A further room temperature neutron powder diffraction study on deuterated BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3–δ refines the deuteron position at the 24k crystallographic site (x, y, 0) with x = 0.579(3) and y = 0.217(3) which leads to an O–D bond distance of 0.96(1) Å and suggests tilting of the proton towards the next nearest oxygen. Proton conduction was found to dominate in wet argon below 700 °C with total conductivity values in the range 1.8 × 10–4 to 1.1 × 10–3 S cm–1 between 300 and 600 °C. Electron holes govern the conduction process in dry oxidizing conditions, whilst in wet oxygen they compete with protonic defects leading to a wide mixed conduction region in the 200 to 600 °C temperature region, and a suppression of the conductivity at higher temperature. PMID:27358734

  13. Pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn populated by inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Camera, F.; Lanza, E. G.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; De Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Krzysiek, M.; Litvinova, E.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Zieblinski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 124Sn was measured using the inelastic scattering of 17O at 340 MeV. The emitted γ rays were detected with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array and the scattered ions were detected in two segmented ΔE- E silicon telescopes. The angular distribution was measured both for the γ rays and the scattered 17O ions. An accumulation of E1 strength below the particle threshold was found and compared with previous data obtained with (γ ,γ‧) and (α ,α‧ γ) reactions. The present results of elastic scattering, and excitation of E2 and E1 states were analysed using the DWBA approach. From this comprehensive description the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states was extracted. The obtained values are based on the comparison of the data with DWBA calculations including a form factor deduced using a microscopic transition density.

  14. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  15. On the noninvasive measurement of intracellular free magnesium by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R K; Gupta, P; Yushok, W D; Rose, Z B

    1983-01-01

    We previously introduced a noninvasive measurement of the concentration of free Mg2+ in intact cells and tissues using 31P NMR. To resolve a controversy in the literature concerning the affinity of Mg2+ for ATP used in our procedure, the apparent dissociation constant of MgATP under simulated intracellular conditions has been determined by three independent magnetic resonance methods, including a newly developed combination procedure for determining this value at intracellular ATP levels. The new combination method, which utilizes 31P NMR to determine the degree of Mg2+ chelation of ATP and the dye antipyrylazo III for optical determination of free Mg2+, yielded a value of (50 +/- 10) microM for this apparent dissociation constant at pH 7.2 in the presence of 0.15 M K+ and 25 degrees C. We further show that hydroxyquinolines are not satisfactory indicators for optical determination of the Mg2+-nucleotide dissociation constant. From our determinations a low value of free Mg2+ (less than 1 mM) is established for all of the tissues studied, including perfused heart muscle, contrary to a recent report in the literature. Saturating human erythrocytes with Mg2+ results in an alpha- and beta-phosphorus resonance separation for intracellular ATP that is indistinguishable from that observed in a noncellular MgATP control under similar conditions, showing that MgATP resonances in this cell are unaffected by the cellular environment.

  16. 1H-NMR measurements of proton mobility in nano-crystalline YSZ.

    PubMed

    Hinterberg, Judith; Adams, Alina; Blümich, Bernhard; Heitjans, Paul; Kim, Sangtae; Munir, Zuhair A; Martin, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results on water saturated, dense, nano-crystalline YSZ samples (9.5 mol% yttria doped zirconia) which exhibit proton conductivity at temperatures as low as room temperature. (1)H-NMR spectra recorded under static and magic angle spinning conditions show two distinct signals. Their temperature-dependent behavior and their linewidths suggest that one can be attributed to (free) water adsorbed on the surface of the sample and the other one to mobile protons within the sample. This interpretation is supported by comparison with measurements on a single-crystalline sample. For the nano-crystalline samples motional narrowing is observed for the signal originating from protons in the sample interior. For these protons, the analysis of temperature and field dependent spin-lattice relaxation time T1 points towards diffusion in a confined two-dimensional geometry. We attribute this quasi two-dimensional motion to protons that are mobile along internal interfaces or nanopores of nano-crystalline YSZ.

  17. Use of 17O/16O to trace atmospherically-deposited sulfate in surface waters: A case study in alpine watersheds in the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Mast, M.A.; Kester, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Building on the discovery of excess 17O in atmospheric sulfate by Lee et al. (2001), we have carried out a case study to determine whether 17O might provide a new tool for quantifying the impact of atmospheric deposition on surface-water sulfate loads. In Rocky Mountain alpine regions, excess 17O was found to be characteristics of atmospheric sulfate deposited in snow. Excess 17O was also evident in stream sulfate in one of two high-elevation watersheds where analyses were made. Isotope mass balance calculations gave surprizingly low atmospheric contributions to stream sulfate suggesting that (1) despite abundant outcrop and sparse soil in these areas, significant sulfate may be taken up and released by soil microbes before being exported in streams, and (2) surface waters can carry multiple non-atmospheric sulfate types, some possibly anthropogenic. Measurements of 17O may prove very useful in studies of sulfate behavior in a variety of surficial environments.

  18. O-tert-Butyltyrosine, an NMR tag for high-molecular-weight systems and measurements of submicromolar ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Kuppan, Kekini Vahini; Lee, Michael David; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Huber, Thomas; Otting, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    O-tert-Butyltyrosine (Tby) is an unnatural amino acid that can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins using established orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA systems. Here we show that the tert-butyl group presents an outstanding NMR tag that can readily be observed in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra without any isotope labeling. Owing to rapid bond rotations and the chemical equivalence of the protons of a solvent-exposed tert-butyl group from Tby, the singlet resonance from the tert-butyl group generates an easily detectable narrow signal in a spectral region with limited overlap with other methyl resonances. The potential of the tert-butyl (1)H NMR signal in protein research is illustrated by the observation and assignment of two resonances in the Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaB hexamer (320 kDa), demonstrating that this protein preferentially assumes a 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry in solution, and by the quantitative measurement of the submicromolar dissociation constant Kd (0.2 μM) of the complex between glutamate and the Escherichia coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP, 32 kDa). The outstanding signal height of the (1)H NMR signal of the Tby tert-butyl group allows Kd measurements using less concentrated protein solutions than usual, providing access to Kd values 1 order of magnitude lower than established NMR methods that employ direct protein detection for Kd measurements. PMID:25789794

  19. Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Excited Conformational States of Nucleic Acids by CEST NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-28

    Nucleic acids undergo structural transitions to access sparsely populated and transiently lived conformational states--or excited conformational states--that play important roles in diverse biological processes. Despite ever-increasing detection of these functionally essential states, 3D structure determination of excited states (ESs) of RNA remains elusive. This is largely due to challenges in obtaining high-resolution structural constraints in these ESs by conventional structural biology approaches. Here, we present nucleic-acid-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), which provide unique long-range angular constraints in ESs of nucleic acids. We demonstrate these approaches on a fluoride riboswitch, where one-bond (13)C-(1)H RDCs from both base and sugar moieties provide direct structural probes into an ES of the ligand-free riboswitch.

  20. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetter, R.; Novotny, E.J.; Boulware, S.D.; Rothman, D.L.; Mason, G.F.; Shulman, G.I.; Shulan, R.G.; Tamborlane, W.V. )

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, the authors used {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-(1-{sup 13}C)glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia in six healthy children. Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 {plus minus} 0.1 {mu}mol/ml at euglycemia and 1.8-2.7 {mu}mol/ml at hyperglycemia. Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels >3 mM.

  1. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties.

  2. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  3. Binding of phenol and differently halogenated phenols to dissolved humic matter as measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smejkalová, Daniela; Spaccini, Riccardo; Fontaine, Barbara; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    1H- and 19F-NMR measurements of spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxationtimes and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) were applied to investigate the association of nonsubstituted (phenol (P)) and halogen-substituted (2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP); 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), and 2,4,6-trifluorophenol (TFP) phenols with a dissolved humic acid (HA). T1 and T2 values for both 1H and 19F in phenols decreased with enhancing HA concentration, indicating reduction in molecular mobility due to formation of noncovalent interactions. Moreover, correlation times (tau c) for different hydrogen and fluorine atoms in phenols showed that anisotropic mobility turned into isotropic motion with HA additions. Changes in relaxation times suggested that DCP and TCP were more extensively bound to HA than P and TFP. This was confirmed by diffusion measurements which showed full association of DCP and TCP to a less amount of HA than that required for entire complexation of P and TFP. Calculated values of binding constants (Ka) reflected the overall NMR behavior, being significantly larger for DCP- and TCP-HA (10.04 +/- 1.32 and 4.47 +/- 0.35 M(-1), respectively) than for P- and TFP-HA complexes (0.57 +/- 0.03 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 M(-1), respectively). Binding increased with decreasing solution pH, thus indicating a dependence on the fraction of protonated form (alpha) of phenols in solution. However, it was found that the hydrophobicity conferred to phenols by chlorine atoms on aromatic rings is a stronger drive than alpha for the phenols repartition within the HA hydrophobic domains.

  4. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup −13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β–alumina system.

  5. Ultrafast NMR T1 Relaxation Measurements: Probing Molecular Properties in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pieter E. S.; Donovan, Kevin J.; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties like size, as well as on dynamic ones such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently a number of single-shot inversion recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. PMID:23878001

  6. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  7. A portable NMR sensor to measure dynamic changes in the amount of water in living stems or fruit and its potential to measure sap flow.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Blümler, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (magnetic resonance imaging) offer the possibility to quantitatively and non-invasively measure the presence and movement of water. Unfortunately, traditional NMR hardware is expensive, poorly suited for plants, and because of its bulk and complexity, not suitable for use in the field. But does it need to be? We here explore how novel, small-scale portable NMR devices can be used as a flow sensor to directly measure xylem sap flow in a poplar tree (Populus nigra L.), or in a dendrometer-like fashion to measure dynamic changes in the absolute water content of fruit or stems. For the latter purpose we monitored the diurnal pattern of growth, expansion and shrinkage in a model fruit (bean pod, Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the stem of an oak tree (Quercus robur L.). We compared changes in absolute stem water content, as measured by the NMR sensor, against stem diameter variations as measured by a set of conventional point dendrometers, to test how well the sensitivities of the two methods compare and to investigate how well diurnal changes in trunk absolute water content correlate with the concomitant diurnal variations in stem diameter. Our results confirm the existence of a strong correlation between the two parameters, but also suggest that dynamic changes in oak stem water content could be larger than is apparent on the basis of the stem diameter variation alone.

  8. A portable NMR sensor to measure dynamic changes in the amount of water in living stems or fruit and its potential to measure sap flow.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Blümler, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (magnetic resonance imaging) offer the possibility to quantitatively and non-invasively measure the presence and movement of water. Unfortunately, traditional NMR hardware is expensive, poorly suited for plants, and because of its bulk and complexity, not suitable for use in the field. But does it need to be? We here explore how novel, small-scale portable NMR devices can be used as a flow sensor to directly measure xylem sap flow in a poplar tree (Populus nigra L.), or in a dendrometer-like fashion to measure dynamic changes in the absolute water content of fruit or stems. For the latter purpose we monitored the diurnal pattern of growth, expansion and shrinkage in a model fruit (bean pod, Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the stem of an oak tree (Quercus robur L.). We compared changes in absolute stem water content, as measured by the NMR sensor, against stem diameter variations as measured by a set of conventional point dendrometers, to test how well the sensitivities of the two methods compare and to investigate how well diurnal changes in trunk absolute water content correlate with the concomitant diurnal variations in stem diameter. Our results confirm the existence of a strong correlation between the two parameters, but also suggest that dynamic changes in oak stem water content could be larger than is apparent on the basis of the stem diameter variation alone. PMID:25595754

  9. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of (15)N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S(2)) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S(2)) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S(2) values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S(2) parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S(2) calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner.

  10. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by AMS and NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line air mass concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component showed features consistent with less oxygenated aerosols and was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated to the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from

  11. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  12. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  13. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow the author to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space or are adsorbed to the solid surfaces. In addition, she proposes to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics. This report summarizes work completed after 20 months of a three-year project. The research involves the study of the NMR and dielectric behavior of sands with three types of solid surfaces: water-wet, where water spontaneously coats and adsorbs to the solid surfaces; hydrophobic, where water is repelled from the solid surfaces by an organosilane coating; and oil-wet, where oil coats the solid surfaces. The oil-wet case is representative of a contaminated soil, in which oil has become adsorbed to the solid surfaces.'

  14. Diffusion anisotropy in excised normal rat spinal cord measured by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inglis, B A; Yang, L; Wirth, E D; Plant, D; Mareci, T H

    1997-01-01

    A conventional spin-echo NMR imaging pulse sequence was used to obtain high-resolution images of excised normal rat spinal cord at 7 and 14 T. It was observed that the large pulsed-field gradients necessary for high-resolution imaging caused a diffusion weighting that dominated the image contrast and that could be used to infer microscopic structural organization beyond that defined by the resolution of the image matrix (i.e., fiber orientation could be assigned based on diffusion anisotropy). Anisotropic diffusion coefficients were therefore measured using apparent diffusion tensor (ADT) imaging to assess more accurately fiber orientations in the spinal cord; structural anisotropy information is portrayed in the six unique images of the complete ADT. To reduce the dimensionality of the data, a trace image was generated using a separate color scale for each of the three diagonal element images of the ADT. This new image retains much of the invariance of the trace to the relative orientations of laboratory and sample axes (inherent to a greyscale trace image) but provides, by the use of color, contrast reflecting diffusion anisotropy. The colored trace image yields a pseudo-three-dimensional view of the rat spinal cord, from which it is possible to deduce fiber orientations.

  15. 17O(n,α)14C cross section from 25 meV to approximately 1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Graff, S. M.

    1991-12-01

    We have measured the 17O(n,α)14C cross section from thermal energy to approximately 1 MeV. A bump in the data near 3 keV could be fitted by a state whose properties are consistent with a known subthreshold J π=1- level at Ex=8.039 MeV. The cause of the 1/v cross section near thermal energy could not be determined although the known 2+ state at 8.213 MeV was found to be too narrow to contribute much to the thermal cross section. Our data are compared to measurements made via the inverse reaction. There are many differences between the two sets of data. The astrophysical reaction rate was calculated from the measured cross section. This reaction plays a role in the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in nonstandard big-bang models. At big-bang temperatures, the experimental rate was found to be in fair agreement with the rate estimated from the previously known properties of states of 18O in this region. Furthermore, using the available information from experiments, it was estimated that the 17O(n,α)14C rate is approximately a factor of 103-104 times larger than the 17O(n,γ)18O rate at big-bang temperatures. As a result, there may be significant cycling between 14C and 17O resulting in a reduction of heavy-element nucleosynthesis.

  16. Diffusion of small solutes in cartilage as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Burstein, D; Gray, M L; Hartman, A L; Gipe, R; Foy, B D

    1993-07-01

    The ability of water and solutes to move through the cartilage matrix is important to the normal function of cartilage and is presumed to be altered in degenerative diseases of cartilage such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to measure a self diffusion coefficient (D) for small solutes in samples of explanted cartilage for diffusion times ranging from 13 ms to 2 s. With a diffusion time of 13 ms, the intratissue diffusivity of several small solutes (water, Na+, Li+, and CF3CO2-) was found consistently to be about 60% of the diffusivity of the same species in free solution. Equilibration of the samples at low pH (which titrates the charge groups so that the net matrix charge of -300 mM at pH 8 becomes approximately -50 mM at pH 2) did not affect the diffusivity of water or Na+. These data, and the similarity between the D in cartilage relative to free solution for water, anions, and cations, are consistent with the view that charge is not an important determinant of the intratissue diffusivity of small solutes in cartilage. With 35% compression, the diffusivity of water and Li+ dropped by 19 and 39%, respectively. In contrast, the diffusivity of water increased by 20% after treatment with trypsin (to remove the proteoglycans and noncollagenous proteins). These data and the lack of an effect of charge on diffusivity are consistent with D being dependent on the composition and density of the solid tissue matrix. A series of diffusion-weighted proton images demonstrated that D could be measured on a localized basis and that changes in D associated with an enzymatically depleted matrix could be clearly observed. Finally, evidence of restriction to diffusion within the tissue was found with studies in which D was measured as a function of diffusion time. The measured D for water in cartilage decreased with diffusion times ranging from 25 ms to 2 s, at which

  17. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  18. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff, that scales like T2,cutoff∝g(-2/3)D(-1/3). For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1/T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1, for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ(2)g(2)DT2(3)>10(2)), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1/T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2. In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids. PMID:27389638

  19. Solute diffusion in ionic liquids, NMR measurements and comparisons to conventional solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients of a variety of dilute solutes in the series of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides ([Prn1][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), trihexyltetracedecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [P14,666][Tf2N], and assorted imidazolium ionic liquids are measured using pulsed field gradient (1)H NMR. These data, combined with available literature data, are used to try to uncover the solute and solvent characteristics most important in determining tracer diffusion rates. Discussion is framed in terms of departures from simple hydrodynamic predictions for translational friction using the ratio ζobs/ζSE, where ζobs is the observed friction, determined from the measured diffusion coefficient D via ζobs = kBT/D, and ζSE = 6πηR is the Stokes friction on a sphere of radius R (determined from the solute van der Waals volume) in a solvent with viscosity η. In the case of neutral solutes, the primary determinant of whether hydrodynamic predictions are accurate is the relative size of solute versus solvent molecules. A single correlation, albeit with considerable scatter, is found between ζobs/ζSE and the ratio of solute-to-solvent van der Waals volumes, ζobs/ζSE = {1 + a(VU/VV)(-p)}, with constants a = 1.93 and p = 1.88. In the case of small solutes, the observed friction is over 100-fold smaller than predictions of hydrodynamic models. The dipole moment of the solute has little effect on the friction, whereas solute charge has a marked effect. For monovalent solutes of size comparable to or smaller than the solvent ions, the observed friction is comparable to or even greater than what is predicted by hydrodynamics. These general trends are shown to be quite similar to what is observed for tracer diffusion in conventional solvents. PMID:23968276

  20. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  1. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V. Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Grant, B.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  2. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Anand, V; Grant, B; Ganesan, K; Tabrizi, P; Torres, R; Catina, D; Ryan, D; Borman, C; Krueckl, C

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  3. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V.; Grant, B.; Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  4. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Saito, A T; Li, J; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Takahashi, M; Maeda, H; Yanagisawa, Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR. PMID:26778351

  5. Pulsed EPR investigations of systems modeling molybdenum enzymes: hyperfine and quadrupole parameters of oxo-17O in [Mo 17O(SPh)4]-.

    PubMed

    Astashkin, Andrei V; Neese, Frank; Raitsimring, Arnold M; Cooney, J Jon A; Bultman, Eric; Enemark, John H

    2005-11-30

    Ka band ESEEM spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine (hfi) and nuclear quadrupole (nqi) interaction parameters for the oxo-17O ligand in [Mo 17O(SPh)4]-, a spectroscopic model of the oxo-Mo(V) centers of enzymes. The isotropic hfi constant of 6.5 MHz found for the oxo-17O is much smaller than the values of approximately 20-40 MHz typical for the 17O nucleus of an equatorial OH(2) ligand in molybdenum enzymes. The 17O nqi parameter (e2qQ/h = 1.45 MHz, eta approximately = 0) is the first to be obtained for an oxo group in a metal complex. The parameters of the oxo-17O ligand, as well as other magnetic resonance parameters of [Mo 17O(SPh)4]- predicted by quasi-relativistic DFT calculations, were in good agreement with those obtained in experiment. From the electronic structure of the complex revealed by DFT, it follows that the SOMO is almost entirely molybdenum d(xy) and sulfur p, while the spin density on the oxo-17O is negative, determined by spin polarization mechanisms. The results of this work will enable direct experimental identification of the oxo ligand in a variety of chemical and biological systems.

  6. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  7. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in cat brain using intracarotid 2H2O and 2H NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Detre, J.A.; Subramanian, V.H.; Mitchell, M.D.; Smith, D.S.; Kobayashi, A.; Zaman, A.; Leigh, J.S. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in cat brain in vivo at 2.7 T using 2H NMR to monitor the washout of deuterated saline injected into both carotid arteries via the lingual arteries. In anesthetized cats, global CBF varied directly with PaCO{sub 2} over a range of 20-50 mm Hg, and the corresponding global CBF values ranged from 25 to 125 ml.100 g-1.min-1. Regional CBF was measured in a 1-cm axial section of cat brain using intracarotid deuterated saline and gradient-echo 2H NMR imaging. Blood flow images with a maximum pixel resolution of 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.0 cm were generated from the deuterium signal washout at each pixel. Image derived values for CBF agreed well with other determinations, and decreased significantly with hypocapnia.

  8. Dynamic NMR microscopy measurement of the dynamics and flow partitioning of colloidal particles in a bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Cokelet, Giles R.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2011-05-01

    The flow and distribution of Newtonian, polymeric and colloid suspension fluids at low Reynolds numbers in bifurcations has importance in a wide range of disciplines, including microvascular physiology and microfluidic devices. A bifurcation consisting of circular capillaries laser etched into a hard polymer with inlet diameter 2.50 ± 0.01 mm, bifurcating to a small diameter outlet of 0.76 ± 0.01 mm and a large diameter outlet of 1.25 ± 0.01 mm is examined. Four distinct fluids (water, 0.25%wt xanthan gum, 8 and 22%vol hard-sphere colloidal suspensions) are flowed at flow rates from 10 to 30 ml/h corresponding to Reynolds numbers based on the entry flow from 0.001 to 8. PGSE NMR techniques are applied to obtain dynamic images of the fluids inside the bifurcation with spatial resolution of 59 × 59 μm/pixel in plane over a 200-μm-thick slice. Velocity in all three spatial directions is examined to determine the impact of secondary flows and characterize the transport in the bifurcation. The velocity data provide direct measurement of the volumetric distribution of the flow between the two channels as a function of flow rate. Water and the 8% colloidal suspension show a constant distribution with increasing flow rate, the xanthan gum shows an increase in fluid going into the larger outlet with higher flow rate, and the 22% colloidal suspension shows a decrease in fluid entering the larger channel with higher flow rate. For the colloidal particle flow, the distribution of colloid particles down the capillary is determined by examining the spectrally resolved propagator for the oil inside the core-shell particles in a direction perpendicular to the axial flow. Using dynamic magnetic resonance microscopy, the potential for using magnetic resonance for "particle counting" in a microscale bifurcation is thus demonstrated.

  9. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-14

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  10. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-01

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  11. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  12. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  13. On the role of experimental imperfections in constructing (1)H spin diffusion NMR plots for domain size measurements.

    PubMed

    Nieuwendaal, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the precision of 1D chemical-shift-based (1)H spin diffusion NMR experiments as well as straightforward experimental protocols for reducing errors. The (1)H spin diffusion NMR experiments described herein are useful for samples that contain components with significant spectral overlap in the (1)H NMR spectrum and also for samples of small mass (<1mg). We show that even in samples that display little spectral contrast, domain sizes can be determined to a relatively high degree of certainty if common experimental variability is accounted for and known. In particular, one should (1) measure flip angles to high precision (≈±1° flip angle), (2) establish a metric for phase transients to ensure their repeatability, (3) establish a reliable spectral deconvolution procedure to ascertain the deconvolved spectra of the neat components in the composite or blend spin diffusion spectrum, and (4) when possible, perform 1D chemical-shift-based (1)H spin diffusion experiments with zero total integral to partially correct for errors and uncertainties if these requirements cannot fully be implemented. We show that minimizing the degree of phase transients is not a requirement for reliable domain size measurement, but their repeatability is essential, as is knowing their contribution to the spectral offset (i.e. the J1 coefficient). When performing experiments with zero total integral in the spin diffusion NMR spectrum with carefully measured flip angles and known phase transient effects, the largest contribution to error arises from an uncertainty in the component lineshapes which can be as high as 7%. This uncertainty can be reduced considerably if the component lineshapes deconvolved from the composite or blend spin diffusion spectra adequately match previously acquired pure component spectra. PMID:27039203

  14. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks

    PubMed Central

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition (17O/16O, 18O/16O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the 18O/16O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3–2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ18O = −43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low 18O/16O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme 18O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6–0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ18O estimates of −21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how 17O/16O measurements provide information beyond traditional 18O/16O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent. PMID:25870269

  15. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks.

    PubMed

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-04-28

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition ((17)O/(16)O, (18)O/(16)O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the (18)O/(16)O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3-2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ(18)O = -43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low (18)O/(16)O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme (18)O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6-0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ(18)O estimates of -21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how (17)O/(16)O measurements provide information beyond traditional (18)O/(16)O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent.

  16. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks.

    PubMed

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-04-28

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition ((17)O/(16)O, (18)O/(16)O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the (18)O/(16)O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3-2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ(18)O = -43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low (18)O/(16)O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme (18)O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6-0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ(18)O estimates of -21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how (17)O/(16)O measurements provide information beyond traditional (18)O/(16)O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent. PMID:25870269

  17. Elastic scattering of 17O+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-05-01

    Within the frame of the commissioning of a new experimental apparatus EXPADES we undertook the measurement of the elastic scattering angular distribution for the system 17O+208Pb at energy around the Coulomb barrier. The reaction dynamics induced by loosely bound Radioactive Ion Beams is currently being extensively studied [4]. In particular the study of the elastic scattering process allows to obtain direct information on the total reaction cross section of the exotic nuclei. In order to understand the effect of the low binding energy on the reaction mechanism it is important to compare radioactive weakly bound nuclei with stable strongly-bound nuclei. In this framework the study of the 17O+208Pb elastic scattering can be considered to be complementary to a previous measurement of the total reaction cross section for the system 17F+208Pb at energies of 86, 90.4 MeV [5, 6]. The data will be compared with those obtained for the neighboring systems 16,18O+208Pb and others available in literature.

  18. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  19. Peptide bond hydrolysis catalyzed by the Wells-Dawson Zr(α2-P2W17O61)2 polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Absillis, Gregory; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2012-09-17

    In this paper we report the first example of peptide hydrolysis catalyzed by a polyoxometalate complex. A series of metal-substituted Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates were synthesized, and their hydrolytic activity toward the peptide bond in glycylglycine (GG) was examined. Among these, the Zr(IV)- and Hf(IV)-substituted ones were the most reactive. Detailed kinetic studies were performed with the Zr(IV)-substituted Wells-Dawson type polyoxometalate K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O which was shown to act as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of the peptide bond in GG. The speciation of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O which is highly dependent on the pD, concentration, and temperature of the solution, was fully determined with the help of (31)P NMR spectroscopy and its influence on the GG hydrolysis rate was examined. The highest reaction rate (k(obs) = 9.2 (±0.2) × 10(-5) min(-1)) was observed at pD 5.0 and 60 °C. A 10-fold excess of GG was hydrolyzed in the presence of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O proving the principles of catalysis. (13)C NMR data suggested the coordination of GG to the Zr(IV) center in K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O via its N-terminal amine group and amide carbonyl oxygen. These findings were confirmed by the inactivity of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O toward the N-blocked analogue acetamidoglycylglycinate and the inhibitory effect of oxalic, malic, and citric acid. Triglycine, tetraglycine, and pentaglycine were also fully hydrolyzed in the presence of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O yielding glycine as the final product of hydrolysis. K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O also exhibited hydrolytic activity toward a series of other dipeptides.

  20. Investigation of the Herzberg (C1Σ+→A1Π) band system in 12C17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, Rafał

    2015-10-01

    The C→A (0,1), (0,2) and (0,3) rovibronic bands of the less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue are studied in high resolution using a high-accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy in the region of 22,800-26,100 cm-1. Calibration with respect to simultaneously recorded thorium atomic lines, obtained from several overlapped orders of the spectrum in the visible range, as well as a stainless steel hollow-cathode molecular lamp with two anodes, yields an absolute accuracy of wavenumbers measurements of about 0.0025 cm-1 for the CO spectra. All 261 spectra lines of the Herzberg band system in 12C17O, up to Jmax=34, were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. As a result, the merged rotational constants and rotational equilibrium constants for the C1Σ+ Rydberg state, as well as the band origins, the isotope shifts, the RKR turning points, Franck-Condon factors, relative intensities, and r-centroids of the C→A system in the 12C17O isotopologue were obtained. An experimental RKR potential energy curve and vibrational levels of the C1Σ+ state in 12C17O together with highly excited k3Π, c3Π, E1Π, B1Σ+ and D‧1Σ+ states lying in the region between the first dissociation limit and the ionization potential of CO were plotted. A detailed investigation of possible perturbations that should occur in the C1Σ+(υ=0) Rydberg state of less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue in the close vicinity of the k3Π(υ=1, 2) and c3Π(υ=0) states in the region 92,000 cm-1 was performed. In the A1Π, υ=3 state of 12C17O, extensive, multi-state rotational perturbations were found and analyzed. Also, a global isotopic analysis of the C1Σ+ Rydberg state was carried out in the 12C16O, 12C17O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O as well as in 14C16O and 14C18O isotopologues. This analysis enabled us to determine, amongst others, the vibrational equilibrium constants in 12C17O for the C1Σ+ state, to improve these constants in the 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O isotopologues and

  1. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  2. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-04

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data.

  3. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data. PMID:26959024

  4. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  5. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  6. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Baltisberger, Jay H.

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  7. Continuous-flow IRMS technique for determining the 17O excess of CO2 using complete oxygen isotope exchange with cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, D. J.; van der Veen, C.; Kliphuis, M.; Kaiser, J.; Wiegel, A. A.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an analytical system for analysis of all single substituted isotopologues (12C16O17O, 12C16O18O, 13C16O16O) in nanomolar quantities of CO2 extracted from stratospheric air samples. CO2 is separated from bulk air by gas chromatography and CO2 isotope ratio measurements (ion masses 45 / 44 and 46 / 44) are performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The 17O excess (Δ17O) is derived from isotope measurements on two different CO2 aliquots: unmodified CO2 and CO2 after complete oxygen isotope exchange with cerium oxide (CeO2) at 700 °C. Thus, a single measurement of Δ17O requires two injections of 1 mL of air with a CO2 mole fraction of 390 μmol mol-1 at 293 K and 1 bar pressure (corresponding to 16 nmol CO2 each). The required sample size (including flushing) is 2.7 mL of air. A single analysis (one pair of injections) takes 15 minutes. The analytical system is fully automated for unattended measurements over several days. The standard deviation of the 17O excess analysis is 1.7‰. Multiple measurements on an air sample reduce the measurement uncertainty, as expected for the statistical standard error. Thus, the uncertainty for a group of 10 measurements is 0.58‰ for Δ 17O in 2.5 h of analysis. 100 repeat analyses of one air sample decrease the standard error to 0.20‰. The instrument performance was demonstrated by measuring CO2 on stratospheric air samples obtained during the EU project RECONCILE with the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The precision for RECONCILE data is 0.03‰ (1σ) for δ13C, 0.07‰ (1σ) for δ18O and 0.55‰ (1σ) for δ17O for a sample of 10 measurements. This is sufficient to examine stratospheric enrichments, which at altitude 33 km go up to 12‰ for δ17O and up to 8‰ for δ18O with respect to tropospheric CO2 : δ17O ~ 21‰ Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW), δ18O ~ 41‰ VSMOW (Lämmerzahl et al., 2002). The samples measured with our analytical technique agree with available data for

  8. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  9. 1- and 2+ discrete states in 90Zr populated via the (17O,'17Oγ ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Lanza, E. G.; Vitturi, A.; Mengoni, D.; Leoni, S.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Kempley, R. S.; Labiche, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    2+ and 1- states in 90Zr were populated via the (17O,'17Oγ ) reaction at 340 MeV. The γ decay was measured with high resolution using the AGATA (advanced γ tracking array demonstrator array). Differential cross sections were obtained at few different angles for the scattered particle. The results of the elastic scattering and inelastic excitation of 2+,3-, and 1- states are compared with distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations, using both the standard collective form factor and a form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities. This allowed to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- state at 6.424 MeV. The comparison of the present (17O,'17Oγ ) data with existing (γ ,γ' ) and (p ,p' ) data in the corresponding region of the γ continuum (6-11 MeV), characterized by a large E 1 component, shows completely different behaviors of the cross section as a function of the nuclear excitation energy. The comparison of the data with DWBA calculations suggests a decrease of the isoscalar strength in the cross section with increasing excitation energy.

  10. Gas-phase NMR measurements, absolute shielding scales, and magnetic dipole moments of 29Si and 73Ge nuclei.

    PubMed

    Makulski, W; Jackowski, K; Antusek, A; Jaszuński, M

    2006-10-12

    New gas-phase NMR measurements of the shielding constants of 29Si, 73Ge, and 1H nuclei in SiH4 and GeH4 are reported. The results, extrapolated to zero density, provide accurate isolated molecule values, best suited for comparison with theoretical calculations. Using the recent ab initio results for these molecules and the measured chemical shifts, we determine the absolute shielding scales for 29Si and 73Ge. This allows us to provide new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments for these two nuclei; in addition, we examine the dipole moments of 13C and 119Sn.

  11. Biogenic phosphorus in oligotrophic mountain lake sediments: differences in composition measured with NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Reitzel, Kasper; Danielsson, Rolf; Gogoll, Adolf; Rydin, Emil

    2006-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) composition in alkaline sediment extracts from three Swedish oligotrophic mountain lakes was investigated using 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Surface sediments from one natural lake and two mature reservoirs, one of which has received nutrient additions over the last 3 years, were compared with respect to biogenic P composition. The results show significant differences in the occurrence of labile and biogenic P species in the sediments of the different systems. The P compound groups that varied most between these three systems were pyrophosphate and polyphosphates, compound groups known to play an important role in sediment P recycling. The content of these compound groups was lowest in the reservoirs and may indicate a coupling between anthropogenic disturbances (i.e., impoundment) to a water system and the availability of labile P species in the sediment. A statistical study was also conducted to determine the accuracy and reliability of using 31P-NMR spectroscopy for quantification of sediment P forms. PMID:17070896

  12. Microsolvation and sp2-stereoinversion of monomeric α-(2,6-di-tert-butylphenyl)vinyllithium as measured by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Knittl, Monika; Rossmann, Eva C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The β-unsubstituted title compound dissolves in THF as a uniformly trisolvated monomer, whereas it forms exclusively disolvated monomers in tert-butyl methyl ether, Et2O, TMEDA, or toluene with TMEDA (1.4 equiv). This was established at low temperatures through the observation of separated NMR signals for free and lithium-coordinated ligands and/or through the patterns and magnitudes of 13C,6Li NMR coupling constants. An aggregated form was observed only with Et2O (2 equiv) in toluene as the solvent. The olefinic geminal interproton coupling constants of the H2C= part can be used as a secondary criterion to differentiate between these differently solvated ground-states (3, 2, or <2 coordinated ligands per Li). Due to a kinetic trisolvation privilege of THF, the cis/trans sp2-stereoinversion rates could be measured through analyses of 1H NMR line broadening and coalescence only in THF as the solvent: The pseudomonomolecular (because THF-catalyzed), ionic mechanism is initialized by a C–Li bond heterolysis with the transient immobilization of one additional THF ligand, followed by stereoinversion of the quasi-sp2-hybridized carbanionic center in cooperation with a “conducted tour” migration of Li+(THF)4 along the α-aryl group within the solvent-separated ion pair. PMID:25383123

  13. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  14. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  15. Influence of N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds on the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2007-06-01

    A computational investigation was carried out to characterize the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen. We found that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds around the acetaminophen molecule in the crystal lattice have different influences on the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding eigenvalues and their orientations in the molecular frame of axes. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-311+G(d) standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated chemical shielding tensors were used to evaluate the (17)O, (15)N, and (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors in crystalline acetaminophen, which are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NMR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen-bonding interactions affect the chemical shielding tensors of each nucleus. The computed (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(1), which is involved in two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, shows remarkable sensitivity toward the choice of the cluster model, whereas the (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(2) involved in one N-H...O hydrogen bond, shows smaller improvement toward the hydrogen-bonding interactions. Also, a reasonably good agreement between the experimentally obtained solid-state (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations is achievable only in molecular cluster model where a complete hydrogen-bonding network is considered. Moreover, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensor orientations are able to reproduce the experimental values to a reasonably good degree of accuracy.

  16. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Sen, P. N.; Schwartz, L. M.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects.

  17. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Hürlimann, M D; Sen, P N; Schwartz, L M; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects. PMID:11445310

  18. Pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Paar, N.; Avigo, R.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocarte, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Milion, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Ziebliński, M.

    2016-04-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 140Ce excited via inelastic scattering of 17O at a bombarding energy of 340 MeV was measured using the high-resolution AGATA-demonstrator array in coincidence with scattered ions detected in two segmented Δ E -E silicon detectors. Angular distributions of scattered ions and emitted γ rays were measured, as well as their differential cross sections. The excitation of 1- states below the neutron separation energy is similar to the one obtained in reactions with the α isoscalar probe. The comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and the corresponding predictions using the distorted-wave Born approximation allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of identified 1- pygmy states. For this analysis the form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities and optical potentials was used.

  19. Measurement of lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via flow cytometry and liquid-state ¹H NMR spectroscopy for development of an NMR-traceable flow cytometry protocol.

    PubMed

    Bono, Michael S; Garcia, Ravi D; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V; Ahner, Beth A; Kirby, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  20. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  1. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  2. Local electromagnetic properties of magnetic pnictides: a comparative study probed by NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Ghoshray, K; Ghoshray, A; Pal, A; Awana, V P S

    2013-05-15

    (75)As and (31)P NMR studies are performed in PrCoAsO and NdCoPO respectively. The Knight shift data in PrCoAsO indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the 4f moments along the c axis in the ferromagnetic state of Co 3d moments. We propose a possible spin structure in this system. The (75)As quadrupolar coupling constant, νQ, increases continuously with decrease of temperature and is found to vary linearly with the intrinsic spin susceptibility, K(iso). This indicates the possibility of the presence of a coupling between charge density and spin density fluctuations. Further, the (31)P NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) in the paramagnetic state of NdCoPO indicate that the differences of LaCoPO and NdCoPO from SmCoPO are due to the decrement of the interlayer separation and not due to the moments of the 4f electrons. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in NdCoPO shows weak anisotropy at 300 K. Using the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory of itinerant ferromagnets, it is shown that in the ab plane, the spin fluctuations are three-dimensional ferromagnetic in nature. From SCR theory the important spin-fluctuation parameters (T0, TA, F¯1) are evaluated. The similarities and dissimilarities of the NMR results in As and P based systems with different rare earths are also discussed. PMID:23604391

  3. Local electromagnetic properties of magnetic pnictides: a comparative study probed by NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Ghoshray, K; Ghoshray, A; Pal, A; Awana, V P S

    2013-05-15

    (75)As and (31)P NMR studies are performed in PrCoAsO and NdCoPO respectively. The Knight shift data in PrCoAsO indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the 4f moments along the c axis in the ferromagnetic state of Co 3d moments. We propose a possible spin structure in this system. The (75)As quadrupolar coupling constant, νQ, increases continuously with decrease of temperature and is found to vary linearly with the intrinsic spin susceptibility, K(iso). This indicates the possibility of the presence of a coupling between charge density and spin density fluctuations. Further, the (31)P NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) in the paramagnetic state of NdCoPO indicate that the differences of LaCoPO and NdCoPO from SmCoPO are due to the decrement of the interlayer separation and not due to the moments of the 4f electrons. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in NdCoPO shows weak anisotropy at 300 K. Using the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory of itinerant ferromagnets, it is shown that in the ab plane, the spin fluctuations are three-dimensional ferromagnetic in nature. From SCR theory the important spin-fluctuation parameters (T0, TA, F¯1) are evaluated. The similarities and dissimilarities of the NMR results in As and P based systems with different rare earths are also discussed.

  4. Cation location in microporous zeolite, SSZ-13, probed with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na Ra; Kim, Su Hyun; Shin, Hye Sun; Jang, Ik Jun; Cho, Sung June

    2013-06-01

    The location of metal ion, Ag2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Y3+ in the SSZ-13 has been investigated with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum. It was referred that the location of the metal ion varies depending on the corresponding charge. The ion-exchanged Ag ion was located in the alpha-cage to interact directly with xenon. Others multivalent cation contributed little with xenon because these were present near the six membered rings where xenon cannot access. PMID:23862500

  5. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. Chronically implanted detection coils, employing a balanced matching configuration of capacitors in the tuned circuit, were used to obtain /sup 31/P NMR spectra from heart, kidney, and liver in situ. Gated spectra of heart obtained at systole and diastole and the effects of fructose on kidney and liver were studied. The ability to observe other nuclei using implanted coils is illustrated with /sup 39/K NMR spectra from kidney and muscle. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate (13 ..mu..mol/min/gm tissue) were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O (0.8 to 1.7) and Na/sup +//ATP (4 to 10) values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g., the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed.

  6. Sediment depth attenuation of biogenic phosphorus compounds measured by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Tranvik, Lars; Gogoll, Adolf; Waldeback, Monica; Markides, Karin; Rydin, Emil

    2005-02-01

    Being a major cause of eutrophication and subsequent loss of water quality, the turnover of phosphorus (P) in lake sediments is in need of deeper understanding. A major part of the flux of P to eutrophic lake sediments is organically bound or of biogenic origin. This P is incorporated in a poorly described mixture of autochthonous and allochthonous sediment and forms the primary storage of P available for recycling to the water column, thus regulating lake trophic status. To identify and quantify biogenic sediment P and assess its lability, we analyzed sediment cores from Lake Erken, Sweden, using traditional P fractionation, and in parallel, NaOH extracts were analyzed using 31P NMR. The surface sediments contain orthophosphates (ortho-P) and pyrophosphates (pyro-P), as well as phosphate mono- and diesters. The first group of compounds to disappear with increased sediment depth is pyrophosphate, followed by a steady decline of the different ester compounds. Estimated half-life times of these compound groups are about 10 yr for pyrophosphate and 2 decades for mono- and diesters. Probably, these compounds will be mineralized to ortho-P and is thus potentially available for recycling to the water column, supporting further growth of phytoplankton. In conclusion, 31P NMR is a useful tool to asses the bioavailability of certain P compound groups, and the combination with traditional fractionation techniques makes quantification possible. PMID:15757351

  7. The 871 keV gamma ray from 17O and the identification of plutonium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peurrung, Anthony; Arthur, Richard; Elovich, Robert; Geelhood, Bruce; Kouzes, Richard; Pratt, Sharon; Scheele, Randy; Sell, Richard

    2001-12-01

    Disarmament agreements and discussions between the United States and the Russian Federation for reducing the number of stockpiled nuclear weapons require verification of the origin of materials as having come from disassembled weapons. This has resulted in the identification of measurable "attributes" that characterize such materials. It has been proposed that the 871 keV gamma ray of 17O can be observed as an indicator of the unexpected presence of plutonium oxide, as opposed to plutonium metal, in such materials. We have shown that the observation of the 871 keV gamma ray is not a specific indicator of the presence of the oxide, but rather indicates the presence of nitrogen.

  8. sup 31 P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S. )

    1990-04-03

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts.

  9. Study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The experimental study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,α{sup 14}C){sup 1}H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J{sup π}=5{sup −}), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  10. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  11. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  12. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  13. Pulsed NMR Measurements in Superfluid 3He in Aerogel of 97.5 % Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Kado, Ryusuke; Obara, Ken; Yano, Hideo; Hata, Tohru; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Yokogawa, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2006-09-07

    Aerogel is made of thin SiO2 strands of a few nanometer diameter. Since the coherence length of superfluid 3He is much longer than the silica strand diameter and is nearly the same as the mean distance between silica strands, aerogel gives us a chance to study the effects of an impurity in superfluid 3He. To investigate what superfluid states are formed in aerogel, we performed a pulsed NMR experiment. Both the A-like and B-like phases show a tipping angle dependent frequency shift in the FID signal after an rf pulse. The dependence in the A-like phase is well explained by an expectation based on the ''robust phase'' introduced by Fomin, while the FID frequencies in the B-like phase behave similarly to those observed in the bulk B phase in a slab geometry with the initial condition of a non-Leggett configuration.

  14. Structure and equilibria of Ca 2+-complexes of glucose and sorbitol from multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR measurements supplemented with molecular modelling calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallagi, A.; Dudás, Cs.; Csendes, Z.; Forgó, P.; Pálinkó, I.; Sipos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Ca 2+-complexation of D-glucose and D-sorbitol have been investigated with the aid of multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR spectroscopy and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Formation constants of the forming 1:1 complexes have been estimated from one-dimensional 13C NMR spectra obtained at constant ionic strength (1 M NaCl). Binding sites were identified from 2D 1H- 43Ca NMR spectra. 2D NMR measurements and ab initio calculations indicated that Ca 2+ ions were bound in a tridentate manner via the glycosidic OH, the ethereal oxygen in the ring and the OH on the terminal carbon for the α- and β-anomers of glucose and for sorbitol simultaneous binding of four hydroxide moieties (C1, C2, C4 and C6) was suggested.

  15. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D2(17)O and HD(17)O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing (17)O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined (17)O spin-rotation constants of D2 (17)O and HD(17)O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H2 (17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  16. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H NMR measurement of ligand concentration in solvent-saturated chromatographic beads.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, Fredrik; Furó, István

    2016-04-01

    A method based on (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR has been developed for measuring concentration accurately in heterogeneous materials like that of ligands in chromatography media. Ligand concentration is obtained by relating the peak integrals for a butyl ligand in the spectrum of a water-saturated chromatography medium to the integral of the added internal reference. The method is fast, with capacity of 10 min total sample preparation and analysis time per sample; precise, with a reproducibility expressed as 1.7% relative standard deviation; and accurate, as indicated by the excellent agreement of derived concentration with that obtained previously by (13) C single-pulse excitation MAS NMR. The effects of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity, spin rate, temperature increase due to spinning, and distribution and re-distribution of medium and reference solvent both inside the rotor during spinning and between bulk solvent and pore space are discussed in detail. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Broad levels in 17O and their relevance for the astrophysical s process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faestermann, T.; Mohr, P.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2015-11-01

    Levels in 17O affect the astrophysical s process in two opposite ways. The neutron production is enhanced by resonances in the 13C(α ,n )16O reaction at excitation energies around 7 MeV in 17O, and the number of available neutrons is reduced by low-lying resonances in the 16O(n ,γ )17O reaction corresponding to levels in 17O with excitation energies of 4 -5 MeV . The present work uses the 19F(d ,α )17O reaction to determine absolute widths of the relevant levels in 17O. The results improve the uncertainties of the previously adopted values and resolve a discrepancy between recent studies for the 1 /2+ level close to the threshold of the 13C(α ,n )16O reaction. In addition, improved excitation energies and widths are provided for several states in 17O up to excitation energies close to 8 MeV.

  18. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  19. Measuring the longitudinal NMR relaxation rates of fast relaxing nuclei using a signal eliminating relaxation filter.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D F; Led, J J

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180 degrees inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180 degrees pulses separated by two variable delays, Delta1 and Delta2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  20. Transport properties of bulk hydrogen and hydrogen-helium slush at 4MHz using NMR measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2004-03-01

    The most promising large-scale advance in rocket propulsion is the use of atomic propellants, stabilized in cryogenic environments. The high energy atomic propellants must be stored in a stabilizing medium to inhibit or delay their combination into molecules. We report studies of a suitable cryogenic matrix for atomic propellants consisting of a slush of small grains of solid hydrogen floating in liquid helium. Using NMR techniques, transport properties for bulk samples of solid hydrogen at 4 MHz have been studied as a function of ortho concentration and temperature. In an earlier experiment we determined the stability, transport and thermal properties of a solid hydrogen-liquid helium stabilizer. The nuclear spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times of the stabilizer were observed to be appreciably shorter than that expected for bulk samples. We anticipate that the solid-liquid surface relaxation could be the critical path for relaxation towards equilibrium. To address this question, data on relaxation processes for hydrogen -helium slush prepared by different methods will be compared.

  1. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  2. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  3. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, F.; Corsaro, C.; Broccio, M.; Branca, C.; González-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Chen, S.-H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift δ, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because δ is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat CP(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of CP(T) in the range 290–370 K. We find that −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P displays a pronounced maximum upon crossing the locus of maximum correlation length at ≈240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water, which predicts that CP(T) displays a maximum on crossing the Widom line. PMID:18753633

  4. Study of the γ decay of high-lying states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Kmiecik, M.; Bracco, A.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemala, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    A measurement of the high-lying states in 208Pb has been made using 17O beams at 20 MeV/u. The gamma decay following inelastic excitation was measured with the detector system AGATA Demonstrator based on segmented HPGe detectors, coupled to an array of large volume LaBr3:Ce scintillators and to an array of Si detectors. Preliminary results in comparison with (γ,γ') data, for states in the 5-8 MeV energy interval, are presented.

  5. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP.

  6. An oxygen-17 dynamic NMR study of the Pr-DOTA complex.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-01-21

    The complex between (17)O-enriched DOTA (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid) and praseodymium(III) (Pr(3+)) was studied in aqueous solution by variable-temperature (17)O NMR at 14.1 T. pH effects as well as the influence of metal ions free in solution were investigated. At low temperature, the so-called TSAP and SAP conformations give rise to distinct signals for the oxygen atoms coordinated to the metal ion (O2); coalescence occurs between 20 and 30 °C. In contrast, a single signal was detected for the noncoordinated oxygen atoms (O1) in the entire investigated temperature range, i.e. between -3 and 135 °C. At high temperature, the spectra exhibit signal broadening that reveals the interchange of the O1 and O2 oxygen atoms of the carboxylate groups. The linewidths measured for O1 were deconvolved into contributions from quadrupole relaxation and chemical exchange, allowing the corresponding activation barriers to be determined. The present (17)O dynamic NMR study provides the first quantitative experimental data characterizing the interchange of the oxygen atoms in a DOTA chelate of a lanthanide metal ion. The activation entropy of this process is negligible and the activation enthalpy is found to range between 66 and 77 kJ mol(-1), depending on the pH and the presence of free Pr(3+) ions in solution. These data support the results of a previous computational study according to which the exchange mechanism involves the internal rotation of the carboxylate groups.

  7. An oxygen-17 dynamic NMR study of the Pr-DOTA complex.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-01-21

    The complex between (17)O-enriched DOTA (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid) and praseodymium(III) (Pr(3+)) was studied in aqueous solution by variable-temperature (17)O NMR at 14.1 T. pH effects as well as the influence of metal ions free in solution were investigated. At low temperature, the so-called TSAP and SAP conformations give rise to distinct signals for the oxygen atoms coordinated to the metal ion (O2); coalescence occurs between 20 and 30 °C. In contrast, a single signal was detected for the noncoordinated oxygen atoms (O1) in the entire investigated temperature range, i.e. between -3 and 135 °C. At high temperature, the spectra exhibit signal broadening that reveals the interchange of the O1 and O2 oxygen atoms of the carboxylate groups. The linewidths measured for O1 were deconvolved into contributions from quadrupole relaxation and chemical exchange, allowing the corresponding activation barriers to be determined. The present (17)O dynamic NMR study provides the first quantitative experimental data characterizing the interchange of the oxygen atoms in a DOTA chelate of a lanthanide metal ion. The activation entropy of this process is negligible and the activation enthalpy is found to range between 66 and 77 kJ mol(-1), depending on the pH and the presence of free Pr(3+) ions in solution. These data support the results of a previous computational study according to which the exchange mechanism involves the internal rotation of the carboxylate groups. PMID:24158053

  8. Observation of the Second-Order Quadrupolar Interaction as a Dominating NMR Relaxation Mechanism in Liquids: The Ultraslow Regime of Motion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiahui; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2016-09-01

    We report variable-temperature (VT) (17)O NMR spectra of [5-(17)O]-d-glucose in an aqueous solution and in glycerol at 14.1 and 21.1 T. The VT (17)O NMR data cover a wide range of motion for which the molecular rotational correlation time (τc) of glucose changes more than 5 orders of magnitude. The observed line width of the (17)O NMR signal for [5-(17)O]-d-glucose displays a maximum at ω0τc ≈ 1 and a minimum at ω0τc ≈ 150, where ω0 is the angular Larmor frequency of (17)O. Under the ultraslow motion condition (i.e., ω0τc > 150), the line width of the observed (17)O NMR signal increases drastically with τc, suggesting that the second-order quadrupolar interaction becomes the predominant relaxation mechanism. While this relaxation mechanism has long been predicted by theory, the current study reports the first experimental observation of such a phenomenon. The implications of this new relaxation mechanism on the spectral resolution limit in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy for half-integer spins are discussed. PMID:27525537

  9. Reduction of magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets for NMR using inductive measurements and sampled-data feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Samra, Jenna E; Shetty, Kiran K; Brey, William W

    2011-10-01

    Resistive and hybrid (resistive/superconducting) magnets provide substantially higher magnetic fields than those available in low-temperature superconducting magnets, but their relatively low spatial homogeneity and temporal field fluctuations are unacceptable for high resolution NMR. While several techniques for reducing temporal fluctuations have demonstrated varying degrees of success, this paper restricts attention to methods that utilize inductive measurements and feedback control to actively cancel the temporal fluctuations. In comparison to earlier studies using analog proportional control, this paper shows that shaping the controller frequency response results in significantly higher reductions in temporal fluctuations. Measurements of temporal fluctuation spectra and the frequency response of the instrumentation that cancels the temporal fluctuations guide the controller design. In particular, we describe a sampled-data phase-lead-lag controller that utilizes the internal model principle to selectively attenuate magnetic field fluctuations caused by the power supply ripple. We present a quantitative comparison of the attenuation in temporal fluctuations afforded by the new design and a proportional control design. Metrics for comparison include measurements of the temporal fluctuations using Faraday induction and observations of the effect that the fluctuations have on nuclear resonance measurements.

  10. Reversible unfolding of cytochrome c upon interaction with cardiolipin bilayers. 2. Evidence from phosphorus-31 NMR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, P.J.R.; Watts, A. )

    1991-04-23

    {sup 31}P NMR measurements were conducted to determine the structural and chemical environment of beef heart cardiolipin when bound to cytochrome c. {sup 31}P NMR line shapes infer that the majority of lipid remains in the bilayer state and that the average conformation of the lipid phosphate is not greatly affected by binding to the protein. An analysis of the spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) relaxation times of hydrated cardiolipin as a function of temperature describes a T{sub 1} minimum at around 25{degree}C which leads to a correlation time for the phosphates in the lipid headgroup of 0.71 ns. The relaxation behavior of the protein-lipid complex was markedly different, showing a pronounced enhancement in the phosphorus spin-lattice relaxation rate. This effect of the protein increased progressively with increasing temperature, giving no indication of a minimum in T{sub 1} up to 75{degree}C. The enhancement in lipid phosphorus T{sub 1} relaxation was observed with protein in both oxidation states, being somewhat less marked for the reduced form. The characteristics of the T{sub 1} effects and the influence of the protein on other relaxation processes determined for the lipid phosphorus (spin-spin relaxation and longitudinal relaxation in the rotating frame) point to a strong paramagnetic interaction from the protein. A comparison with the relaxation behavior of samples spinning at the magic angle was also consistent with this mechanism. The results suggest that cytochrome c reversibly denatures on complexation with cardiolipin bilayers, such that the electronic ground state prevailing in the native structure of both oxidized and reduced protein can convert to high-spin states with greater magnetic susceptibility.

  11. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  12. Spatial distribution of 17O-excess in surface snow along a traverse from Zhongshan station to Dome A, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongxi; Hou, Shugui; Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Prie, Frederic; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Risi, Camille; Li, Yuansheng; Jouzel, Jean; Wang, Yetang; He, Jing; Minster, Bénédicte; Falourd, Sonia

    2015-03-01

    The influence of temperature on the triple isotopic composition of oxygen in water is still an open question and limits the interpretation of water isotopic profiles in Antarctic ice cores. The main limitation arises from the lack of 17O-excess measurements in surface snow and especially for remote regions characterized by low temperature and accumulation rate. In this study, we present new 17O-excess measurements of surface snow along an East Antarctic traverse, from the coastal Zhongshan station to the highest point of the Antarctic ice sheet at Dome A. The 17O-excess data significantly decrease inland, with a latitudinal gradient of - 1.33 ± 0.41 per meg/degree, an altitudinal gradient of - 0.48 ± 0.17 permeg / 100 m, and a temperature gradient of 0.35 ± 0.11 permeg /°C. Theoretical calculations performed using a Rayleigh model attribute this inland decrease to kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring during condensation from vapor to ice under supersaturation conditions at low temperatures. However, large heterogeneity of 17O-excess in Antarctic precipitation cannot only be explained by temperature at condensation and/or influences of relative humidity in the moisture source region.

  13. Measurement of the intracrystalline self-diffusion of xenon in zeolites by the NMR pulsed field gradient technique

    SciTech Connect

    Heink, W.; Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H.; Stallmach, F. )

    1990-03-14

    With use of {sup 129}Xe NMR, the NMR pulsed field gradient technique is applied to study the self-diffusion of xenon adsorbed on zeolites NaX, NaCaA, and ZSM-5. In their dependence on both the type of adsorbent and the sorbate concentration, the self-diffusion coefficients are found to follow the same patterns as previously determined for methane by {sup 1}H NMR. For NaCaA, the comparison of the present results with literature data reveals large discrepancies, while recent computer simulations of xenon self-diffusion in ZSM-5 are found to be in reasonable agreement.

  14. Sizing of reverse micelles in microemulsions using NMR measurements of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Law, Susan J; Britton, Melanie M

    2012-08-14

    This paper reports the size of reverse micelles (RMs) in AOT/octane/H(2)O and CTAB/hexanol/H(2)O microemulsions using magnetic resonance (MR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) measurements of diffusion. Diffusion data were measured using the pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment for surfactant molecules residing in the RM interface. Inverse Laplace transformation of these data generated diffusion coefficients for the RMs, which were converted into hydrodynamic radii using the Stokes-Einstein relation. This technique is complementary to those previously used to size RMs, such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), but also offers several advantages, which are discussed. RM sizes, determined using the PGSTE method, in the AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) microemulsions were compared with previous DLS and SAXS data, showing good agreement. Methods for determining number distributions from the PGSTE data, through the use of scaling factors, were investigated. PMID:22794150

  15. Sizing of reverse micelles in microemulsions using NMR measurements of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Law, Susan J; Britton, Melanie M

    2012-08-14

    This paper reports the size of reverse micelles (RMs) in AOT/octane/H(2)O and CTAB/hexanol/H(2)O microemulsions using magnetic resonance (MR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) measurements of diffusion. Diffusion data were measured using the pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment for surfactant molecules residing in the RM interface. Inverse Laplace transformation of these data generated diffusion coefficients for the RMs, which were converted into hydrodynamic radii using the Stokes-Einstein relation. This technique is complementary to those previously used to size RMs, such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), but also offers several advantages, which are discussed. RM sizes, determined using the PGSTE method, in the AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) microemulsions were compared with previous DLS and SAXS data, showing good agreement. Methods for determining number distributions from the PGSTE data, through the use of scaling factors, were investigated.

  16. NMR Studies of the original magnetic properties of the cuprates: influence of impurities and defects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloul, Henri

    1998-03-01

    The cuprates display original magnetic properties, both in their insulating and metallic phases. In underdoped metallic systems, a pseudo gap in the density of magnetic q=3D0 excitations is observed from local susceptibility measurements, as well as from specific heat and transport properties. A pseudo spin-gap in the AF excitations at the AF wave vector is detected both by NMR and inelastic neutron scattering. From the NMR measurements it can be concluded that these magnetic anomalies are quite similar in single layer(J. Bobroff, H.. Alloul, P. Mendels, V. Viallet, J. F. Marucco and D. Colson, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).), bilayer and trilayer underdoped cuprates. The modifications of magnetic properties induced by substitutions or defects in the planes, which do not modify appreciably the charge transfer have been studied. The spatial dependence of the spin susceptibility \\chi ' (r) of the pure material can be directly probed through the study of the modifications of the NMR spectra of various nuclei (^89Y, ^17O, ^63Cu) induced by such localised magnetic impurities. Large qualitative differences between the underdoped and slightly overdoped YBCO are evidenced from ^17O NMR line broadening in Ni substituted YBCO. This allows us to propose a quite powerful method for studying the q and T dependence of the static magnetic susceptibility (J. Bobroff et al, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).). The impurity magnetic state also directly reflects the occurence of electronic correlations in the metallic state. The case of Zn will be examined in some detail. ^89Y NMR has revealed that the substitution of this 3d^10 non magnetic atom on a Cu site induces a Curie like contribution to the local susceptibility on the near neighbour coppers ( A. V. Mahajan, H. Alloul, G. Collin and J. F. Marucco, Physical Review Letters 72, 3100 (1994).). The effective induced moment decreases with hole doping and becomes rather weak, but is still present for optimal doping

  17. Protonated hydronium dication, H/sub 4/O/sup 2 +/. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of D/sub 2/H/sup 17/O/sup +/ in HF:SbF/sub 5/ and DH/sub 2//sup 17/O/sup +/ in DF:SbF/sub 5/ and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Prakash, G.K.S.; Barzaghi, M.; Lammertsma, K.; von R. Schleyer, P.; Pople, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Isotopic hydronium ions D/sub 2/H/sup 17/O/sup +/ and DH/sub 2//sup 17/O/sup +/ in 1:1 (molar) HF:SbF/sub 5//SO/sub 2/ and DF:SbF/sub 2/SO/sub 2/ solutions, respectively, at -15/sup 0/C undergo slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange as monitored by /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy. The rate of such exchange increases with the increase in the acidity of the fluoroantimonic acid medium (1:2 molar composition). The previously observed lack of exchange of isotopic hydronium ions in the somewhat weaker Magic Acid, FSO/sub 3/H:SbF/sub 5/, medium (H/sub 0/ approx. -21.5) suggests that in the stronger HF:SbF/sub 5/ medium (H/sub 0/ approx. -25 to -28), the exchange occurs through the intermediacy of protonated hydronium dication. Consequently, the structure and stability of protonated hydronium dication has been probed by ab initio theory. The T/sub d/ symmetry structure was found to be the minimum energy structure at the HF/6.31G* level. At the HF/6.31G* level this structure is thermodynamically unstable (dissociation preferred by 59.2 kcal/mol), it seems to have significant kinetic stability (deprotonation barrier 39.4 kcal/mol). 20 references, 1 table.

  18. The Inversion of NMR Log Data Sets with Different Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Keh-Jim; LaTorraca, Gerald A.

    1999-09-01

    We present a composite-data processing method which simultaneously processes two or more data sets with different measurement errors. We examine the role of the noise level of the data in the singular value decomposition inversion process, the criteria for a proper cutoff, and its effect on the uncertainty of the solution. Examples of processed logs using the composite-data processing method are presented and discussed. The possible usefulness of the apparent T1/T2 ratio extracted from the logs is illustrated.

  19. The inversion of NMR log data sets with different measurement errors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A

    1999-09-01

    We present a composite-data processing method which simultaneously processes two or more data sets with different measurement errors. We examine the role of the noise level of the data in the singular value decomposition inversion process, the criteria for a proper cutoff, and its effect on the uncertainty of the solution. Examples of processed logs using the composite-data processing method are presented and discussed. The possible usefulness of the apparent T(1)/T(2) ratio extracted from the logs is illustrated. PMID:10479558

  20. Isotope separation of {sup 17}O by photodissociation of ozone with near-infrared laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Shigeru; Kambe, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Takehiro; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen-17 is a stable oxygen isotope useful for various diagnostics in both engineering and medical applications. Enrichment of {sup 17}O, however, has been very costly due to the lack of appropriate methods that enable efficient production of {sup 17}O on an industrial level. In this paper, we report the first {sup 17}O-selective photodissociation of ozone at a relatively high pressure, which has been achieved by irradiating a gas mixture of 10 vol% O{sub 3}-90 vol% CF{sub 4} with narrowband laser. The experiment was conducted on a pilot-plant scale. A total laser power of 1.6 W was generated by external-cavity diode lasers with all the laser wavelengths fixed at the peak of an absorption line of {sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 17}O around 1 {mu}m. The beams were introduced into a 25 -m long photoreaction cell under the sealed-off condition with a total pressure of 20 kPa. Lower cell temperature reduced the background decomposition of ozone, and at the temperature of 158 K, an {sup 17}O enrichment factor of 2.2 was attained.

  1. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amninder; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Willis, Scott; Torres, Allan; Price, William

    2015-02-01

    Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction). Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine) up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  2. Autocorrelation spectra of an air-fluidized granular system measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasic, S.; Stepisnik, J.; Mohoric, A.; Sersa, I.; Planinsic, G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel insight into the dynamics of a fluidized granular system is given by a nuclear magnetic resonance method that yields the spin-echo attenuation proportional to the spectrum of the grain positional fluctuation. Measurements of the air-fluidized oil-filled spheres and mustard seeds at different degrees of fluidization and grain volume fractions provide the velocity autocorrelation that differs from the commonly anticipated exponential Enskog decay. An empiric formula, which corresponds to the model of grain caging at collisions with adjacent beads, fits well to the experimental data. Its parameters are the characteristic collision time, the free path between collisions and the cage-breaking rate or the diffusion-like constant, which decreases with increasing grain volume fraction. Mean-squared displacements calculated from the correlation spectrum clearly show transitions from ballistic, through sub-diffusion and into diffusion regimes of grain motion.

  3. Rapid measurement of pseudocontact shifts in metalloproteins by proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Bertini, Ivano; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-09-12

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arise in paramagnetic systems in which the susceptibility tensor is anisotropic. PCSs depend upon the distance from the paramagnetic center and the position relative to the susceptibility tensor, and they can be used as structural restraints in protein structure determination. We show that the use of (1)H-detected solid-state correlations provides facile and rapid detection and assignment of site-specific PCSs, including resolved (1)H PCSs, in a large metalloprotein, Co(2+)-substituted superoxide dismutase (Co(2+)-SOD). With only 3 mg of sample and a small set of experiments, several hundred PCSs were measured and assigned, and these PCSs were subsequently used in combination with (1)H-(1)H distance and dihedral angle restraints to determine the protein backbone geometry with a precision paralleling those of state-of-the-art liquid-state determinations of diamagnetic proteins, including a well-defined active site.

  4. Measurement of Heteronuclear Dipolar Coupling by Transferred-Echo Double-Resonance NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, A. W.; Vega, S.; Schaefer, J.

    A magic-angle spinning experiment called transferred-echo double resonance (TEDOR) has been introduced recently to measure the I-S dipolar coupling of heteronuclear I-S pairs of spin- {1}/{2} nuclei while eliminating unwanted background signals from uncoupled I and S spins via a coherence-transfer process. In this paper, a quantitative description of the TEDOR experiment is given in terms of the evolution of the density matrix for a pair of heteronuclear spins. The resulting equations provide a theoretical basis for evaluating the selectivity and sensitivity of TEDOR and suggest strategies for determining dipolar coupling constants directly from TEDOR data. Experimental examples illustrating these aspects of TEDOR are provided by studies performed on a range of 13C- 15N dipolar couplings found in double-labeled asparagine, alanine, glycine, and the linear peptide antibiotic, gramicidin.

  5. Investigation into the structural composition of hydroalcoholic solutions as basis for the development of multiple suppression pulse sequences for NMR measurement of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2014-12-01

    An eight-fold suppression pulse sequence was recently developed to improve sensitivity in (1) H NMR measurements of alcoholic beverages [Magn. Res. Chem. 2011 (49): 734-739]. To ensure that only one combined hydroxyl peak from water and ethanol appears in the spectrum, adjustment to a certain range of ethanol concentrations was required. To explain this observation, the structure of water-ethanol solutions was studied. Hydroalcoholic solutions showed extreme behavior at 25% vol, 46% vol, and 83% vol ethanol according to (1) H NMR experiments. Near-infrared spectroscopy confirmed the occurrence of four significant compounds ('individual' ethanol and water structures as well as two water-ethanol complexes of defined composition - 1 : 1 and 1 : 3). The successful multiple suppression can be achieved for every kind of alcoholic beverage with different alcoholic strengths, when the final ethanol concentration is adjusted to a range between 25% vol and 46% vol (e.g. using dilution or pure ethanol addition). In this optimum region, an individual ethanol peak was not detected, because the 'individual' water structure and the 1 : 1 ethanol-water complex predominate. The nature of molecular association in ethanol-water solutions is essential to elucidate NMR method development for measurement of alcoholic beverages. The presented approach can be used to optimize other NMR suppression protocols for binary water-organic solvent mixtures, where hydrogen bonding plays a dominant role.

  6. Development of an eight-channel NMR system using RF detection coils for measuring spatial distributions of current density and water content in the PEM of a PEFC.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Yokouchi, Yasuo; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Ito, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    The water generation and water transport occurring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be estimated from the current density generated in the PEFC, and the water content in the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). In order to measure the spatial distributions and time-dependent changes of current density generated in a PEFC and the water content in a PEM, we have developed an eight-channel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. To detect a NMR signal from water in a PEM at eight positions, eight small planar RF detection coils of 0.6 mm inside diameter were inserted between the PEM and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEFC. The local current density generated at the position of the RF detection coil in a PEFC can be calculated from the frequency shift of the obtained NMR signal due to an additional magnetic field induced by the local current density. In addition, the water content in a PEM at the position of the RF detection coil can be calculated by the amplitude of the obtained NMR signal. The time-dependent changes in the spatial distributions were measured at 4 s intervals when the PEFC was operated with supply gas under conditions of fuel gas utilization of 0.67 and relative humidity of the fuel gas of 70%RH. The experimental result showed that the spatial distributions of the local current density and the water content in the PEM within the PEFC both fluctuated with time.

  7. Strategies for diagnosing and alleviating artifactual attenuation associated with large gradient pulses in PGSE NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Price, W S; Hayamizu, K; Ide, H; Arata, Y

    1999-08-01

    The generation of phase-based artifacts resulting from mismatch in the effective areas (i.e., the time integrals) of sequential gradient pulses is discussed in the context of large gradient pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements. Such effects result in artifactual attenuation and distortion in the spectra which, in the first instance, are similar to (and commonly mistaken for) the effects of eddy currents. Small degrees of mismatch cause "unphysical" concave downward curvature in PGSE attenuation plots of freely diffusing species. However, larger mismatches can result in artifactual diffraction peaks in the plots which could easily be confused for true restricted diffusion effects. Although "rectangular" gradient pulses are preferable from a theoretical viewpoint, we found that shaped gradient (e.g., half-sine) pulses, which due to their slower rise and fall times were more tractable for the current amplifier, were more sequentially reproducible. As well as generating fewer phase-based artifacts such shaped pulses also decrease the likelihood of vibration problems.

  8. A Method for Helical RNA Global Structure Determination in Solution Using Small Angle X-ray Scattering and NMR Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbu; Zuo, Xiaobing; Yu, Ping; Xu, Huan; Starich, Mary R.; Tiede, David M.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2009-01-01

    We report a “top-down” method that uses mainly duplexes' global orientations and overall molecular dimension and shape restraints, which were extracted from experimental NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data respectively, to determine global architectures of RNA molecules consisting of mostly A-form like duplexes. The method is implemented in the G2G (from Global measurement to Global Structure) toolkit of programs. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method by determining the global structure of a 71-nucleotide RNA using experimental data. The backbone root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of the ensemble of the calculated global structures relative to the X-ray crystal structure using the experimental data is 3.0 ± 0.3 Å, and the RMSD is only 2.5 ± 0.2 Å for the three duplexes that were orientation-restrained during the calculation. The global structure simplifies interpretation of multi-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectra for high resolution structure determination. The potential general application of the method for RNA structure determination is discussed. PMID:19666030

  9. Structure and dynamics of water in tendon from NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, S; Gillis, P; Henri, V P

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation times were measured in collagen tissue when varying the orientation of the fiber with respect to the static field. T1 was found to be only slightly dependent on theta, the fiber-to-field angle, but T2 was very sensitive to the orientation, with a maximum value at the magic angle. The transverse decay curves were multiexponential. Their deconvolution displayed four components; the ones that decayed most slowly were almost independent of theta, but the two fastest ones showed a strong angular dependence that was interpreted with a cross-relaxation model. Quadrupolar dips were visible in the 1/T1 dispersion curves. These dips were independent of theta, so that the magnetization transfer could also be assumed to be independent of the fiber orientation. Finally, each component was assigned to a fraction of protons localized in the macromolecular structure and characterized by particular dynamics. The model of Woessner was applied to the water molecules tightly bound into the macromolecules, which resulted in a dynamical description of this water fraction. This description is compatible with the two-sites model of Ramachandran based on x-ray diffraction and with the extensive studies of Berendsen. However, the important indications obtained from the deconvolution lead to a less static representation of the tissue. PMID:2297563

  10. Approximation and noise errors of measured T/sub 1/ in NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Persyk, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of various types from four manufacturers were measured to determine their gain drift characteristics. This was in turn related to retuning frequency in Anger cameras. A well stabilized light source illuminated sets of thirty-seven PMTs, simulating ideal steady-state conditions in an Anger camera. Anode outputs were sampled at six minute intervals for periods of up to three weeks using a multichannel data logger. Data were analyzed off line. It was found that PMT gains diverged form their initial values at a rate which decreased with time. The standard deviation of the gain changes, called drift, was plotted versus time. Drift was found to generally obey a power law function: D(%) = 0.16 x t/sup 0.6/ where t is the elapsed time in hours. In testing thousands of PMTs the authors occasionally found ''flyers'' with drift rates considerably larger than the average. The authors conclude that with sets of carefully selected PMTs the frequency of tuning would generally decrease as the tubes age. They also conclude that the presence of an occasional ''flyer'' PMT in a camera would undoubtedly necessitate more frequent tuning, in some cases on a weekly basis. These findings support the observed wide variation in tuning frequency among Anger cameras without active PMT gain compensation.

  11. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies. PMID:25098933

  12. Measurement of State-Specific Association Constants in Allosteric Sensors through Molecular Stapling and NMR.

    PubMed

    Moleschi, Kody J; Akimoto, Madoka; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-08-26

    Allostery is a ubiquitous mechanism to control biological function and arises from the coupling of inhibitory and binding equilibria. The extent of coupling reflects the inactive vs active state selectivity of the allosteric effector. Hence, dissecting allosteric determinants requires quantification of state-specific association constants. However, observed association constants are typically population-averages, reporting on overall affinities but not on allosteric coupling. Here we propose a general method to measure state-specific association constants in allosteric sensors based on three key elements, i.e., state-selective molecular stapling through disulfide bridges, competition binding saturation transfer experiments and chemical shift correlation analyses to gauge state populations. The proposed approach was applied to the prototypical cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA-RIα), for which the structures of the inactive and active states are available, as needed to design the state-selective disulfide bridges. Surprisingly, the PKA-RIα state-specific association constants are comparable to those of a structurally homologous domain with ∼10(3)-fold lower cAMP-affinity, suggesting that the affinity difference arises primarily from changes in the position of the dynamic apo inhibitory equilibrium.

  13. CRDS of 17O enriched water between 5850 and 6671 cm-1: More than 1000 energy levels of H217O and HD17O newly determined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Leshchishina, O.; Karlovets, E. V.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2016-07-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 5850 and 6671 cm-1. Two series of recordings were performed with pressure values of 1.0 and 12.0 Torr. The investigated spectral region corresponds to the important 1.55 μm transparency window of the atmosphere where water absorption is very weak. The high sensitivity of the recordings (αmin ~ 5×10-11 cm-1) allows detecting lines with intensity spanning six orders of magnitude (1.4×10-30-3.6×10-24 cm/molecule at room temperature). The experimental list includes more than 10,300 lines. The assignments of water lines were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. More than 8500 lines were assigned to 9619 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). All but four transitions of the 16O and 18O isotopologues were assigned using known experimental energy levels. More than half of the assigned H217O and HD17O transitions correspond to new (or corrected) upper energy levels. About 1000 new H217O transitions associated with upper states of the second triad and of the first hexad were identified. Most of the newly assigned HD17O transitions belong to the ν1+ν3 and 2ν2+ν3 bands. The assigned transitions allowed to newly determine or correct 20 highly excited rotational levels of the vibrational ground state of this isotopologue. Overall 791 and 266 energy levels are newly determined for H217O and HD17O, respectively. A few additional levels were corrected compared to literature values. The obtained experimental results are compared to the spectroscopic parameters provided by the HITRAN database and to the empirical energy levels recommended by an IUPAC task group.

  14. CRDS of 17O enriched water between 5850 and 6671 cm-1: More than 1000 energy levels of H217O and HD17O newly determined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Leshchishina, O.; Karlovets, E. V.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2016-07-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 5850 and 6671 cm-1. Two series of recordings were performed with pressure values of 1.0 and 12.0 Torr. The investigated spectral region corresponds to the important 1.55 μm transparency window of the atmosphere where water absorption is very weak. The high sensitivity of the recordings (αmin ~ 5×10-11 cm-1) allows detecting lines with intensity spanning six orders of magnitude (1.4×10-30-3.6×10-24 cm/molecule at room temperature). The experimental list includes more than 10,300 lines. The assignments of water lines were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. More than 8500 lines were assigned to 9619 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). All but four transitions of the 16O and 18O isotopologues were assigned using known experimental energy levels. More than half of the assigned H217O and HD17O transitions correspond to new (or corrected) upper energy levels. About 1000 new H217O transitions associated with upper states of the second triad and of the first hexad were identified. Most of the newly assigned HD17O transitions belong to the ν1+ν3 and 2ν2+ν3 bands. The assigned transitions allowed to newly determine or correct 20 highly excited rotational levels of the vibrational ground state of this isotopologue. Overall 791 and 266 energy levels are newly determined for H217O and HD17O, respectively. A few additional levels were corrected compared to literature values. The obtained experimental results are compared to the spectroscopic parameters provided by the HITRAN database and to the empirical energy levels recommended by an IUPAC task group.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel Wells-Dawson-type mono vanadium(V)-substituted tungsto-polyoxometalate isomers: 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-).

    PubMed

    Ueda, Tadaharu; Ohnishi, Miho; Shiro, Motoo; Nambu, Jun-ichi; Yonemura, Toshiaki; Boas, John F; Bond, Alan M

    2014-05-19

    Two vanadium(V)-substituted tungsto-polyoxometalate isomers, 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-), were prepared as their tetra-alkyl ammonium salts from a W(VI)-H2SO4-V(V) reaction mixture in aqueous CH3CN solution. X-ray crystallographic structural analysis revealed that both isomers have a Wells-Dawson-type structure with a higher occupancy of vanadium at polar sites and belt sites for 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-), respectively. The isomers were also characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, Raman, UV-vis, and (51)V NMR spectroscopies as well as voltammetry, and the data obtained were compared with that derived from [S2W18O62](4-). Significantly, the reversible potentials for the vanadium(V/IV) couple for both 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-) in CH3CN (0.1 M n-Bu4NPF6) are considerably more positive than the tungstate reduction process exhibited by the [S2W18O62](4-) framework, implying that the presence of vanadium should be useful in catalytic reactions. The one-electron-reduced [S2V(IV)W17O62](6-) forms of both isomers were prepared in solution by controlled potential bulk electrolysis and characterized by voltammetry and EPR spectroscopy.

  16. Rotational analysis of the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) in the rare 13C17O isotopologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, Rafał; Zachwieja, Mirosław

    2012-02-01

    Although yet unobserved in the very rare 13C17O isotopologue, the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) was obtained under high resolution as an emission spectrum using a conventional spectroscopic technique. The emission from the discharge was observed with a plane grating spectrograph and recorded by a photomultiplier tube. In total, 192 transition wave numbers belonging to two bands (0-1 and 0-2) were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. This method allowed us to determine the merged rotational constants B0 = 1.8131941(58) cm-1 and D0 = 5.5620(46) × 10-6 cm-1 and the individual molecular constant B1 = 1.471059(47) cm-1, D1 = 5.315(64) × 10-6 cm-1, B2 = 1.451762(13) cm-1, D2 = 7.812(16) × 10-6 cm-1 for the as yet unanalyzed 13C17O molecule B1Σ+ and A1Π states, respectively. The band origins σ of the Ångström system in the 13C17O molecule were also calculated. Numerous rotational perturbations observed in the A1Π state in 13C17O molecule have been identified and analyzed in detail. The suspected candidates responsible for these irregularities were indicated by means of a graph of the rovibronic levels of the neighboring states based on the estimated term value in the 13C17O molecule. The values of these perturbations have also been defined for both the e- and f-parity of the A1Π(v = 1 and 2) state. Simultaneously, the B1Σ+ state was observed to be quite regular up to the observed Jmax level.

  17. “CLASSIC NMR”: An In-Situ NMR Strategy for Mapping the Time-Evolution of Crystallization Processes by Combined Liquid-State and Solid-State Measurements**

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Colan E; Williams, P Andrew; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2014-01-01

    A new in-situ NMR strategy (termed CLASSIC NMR) for mapping the evolution of crystallization processes is reported, involving simultaneous measurement of both liquid-state and solid-state NMR spectra as a function of time. This combined strategy allows complementary information to be obtained on the evolution of both the solid and liquid phases during the crystallization process. In particular, as crystallization proceeds (monitored by solid-state NMR), the solution state becomes more dilute, leading to changes in solution-state speciation and the modes of molecular aggregation in solution, which are monitored by liquid-state NMR. The CLASSIC NMR experiment is applied here to yield new insights into the crystallization of m-aminobenzoic acid. PMID:25044662

  18. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in gamma-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2004-11-29

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. NMR parameters such as transverse ( T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and MRI results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  19. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in (gamma)-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2005-02-03

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters such as transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  20. High resolution δ17O-δ18O as a single mineral thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Sengupta, S.; Pack, A.

    2014-12-01

    The equilibrium relationship α17O/16Oa-b = (α18O/16Oa-b)θ makes the analysis of δ17O redundant for most terrestrial applications. However the θ term varies with temperature, so that ultra-high precision δ17O data provide additional information not available from δ18O alone. If the δ18O and δ17O values of formation water covary in a known way (e.g., meteoric water, ocean water), then a unique solution for both temperature and the δ18O of the formation fluids can be obtained from the combined δ18O-δ17O mineral values. The paired δ18O-δ17O values are in essence a single mineral thermometer. Unlike clumped isotopes or combined δ18O-δD data, the δ18O and δ17O values of a mineral have identical 'diagenetic potential', and will only be altered with a high F/R ratio. We have made an empirical determination of the temperature dependence on θ = -710/T2 + 0.5305 using Pleistocene diatom data from ODP Leg 177, Site 1093 (δ18O = 39.610, δ17O = 20.536‰), which is almost identical to Pack and Herwartz (EPSL, 2014). Application to ancient cherts gives the following results: The δ18O-δ17O values of cherts vary systematically with age, from Archean to Proterozoic to Phanerozoic. The Archean cherts are incompatible with modern seawater under any temperature conditions. Instead they have equilibrated with water of δ18O= -10±3 (‰ vs SMOW) at 50 to 70°C. These data support a lighter ocean in the Archean by ~5‰. Proterozoic cherts equilibrated at 35-50°C with meteoric water of -8±3‰ and Phanerozoic cherts equilibrated with mixed meteoric water/ocean water at similar temperatures and higher δ18O values (-3±3‰). The δ18O values of lacustrine diatoms from the Valles Caldera, NM, vary by over 20‰ between glacial and interglacial times. The combined δ18O-δ17O values of interglacial diatoms give T= ~12°C, δ18Ometeoric water = -9‰. A glacial age diatom sample gives T=<10°C, δ18Ometeoric water = -20‰. These data could not be obtained from the

  1. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  2. Measuring small compartment dimensions by probing diffusion dynamics via Non-uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin-Echo (NOGSE) NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive measurements of microstructure in materials, cells, and in biological tissues, constitute a unique capability of gradient-assisted NMR. Diffusion-diffraction MR approaches pioneered by Callaghan demonstrated this ability; Oscillating-Gradient Spin-Echo (OGSE) methodologies tackle the demanding gradient amplitudes required for observing diffraction patterns by utilizing constant-frequency oscillating gradient pairs that probe the diffusion spectrum, D(ω). Here we present a new class of diffusion MR experiments, termed Non-uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin-Echo (NOGSE), which dynamically probe multiple frequencies of the diffusion spectral density at once, thus affording direct microstructural information on the compartment's dimension. The NOGSE methodology applies N constant-amplitude gradient oscillations; N - 1 of these oscillations are spaced by a characteristic time x, followed by a single gradient oscillation characterized by a time y, such that the diffusion dynamics is probed while keeping (N - 1)x + y ≡ TNOGSE constant. These constant-time, fixed-gradient-amplitude, multi-frequency attributes render NOGSE particularly useful for probing small compartment dimensions with relatively weak gradients - alleviating difficulties associated with probing D(ω) frequency-by-frequency or with varying relaxation weightings, as in other diffusion-monitoring experiments. Analytical descriptions of the NOGSE signal are given, and the sequence's ability to extract small compartment sizes with a sensitivity towards length to the sixth power, is demonstrated using a microstructural phantom. Excellent agreement between theory and experiments was evidenced even upon applying weak gradient amplitudes. An MR imaging version of NOGSE was also implemented in ex vivo pig spinal cords and mouse brains, affording maps based on compartment sizes. The effects of size distributions on NOGSE are also briefly analyzed.

  3. Solar 18O/17O and the Setting for Solar Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    2004-03-01

    The burst of star formation during the gaeous merger of the Milky Way with a low-metallicity dwarf galaxy created not only the Si-isotope correlation in mainstream SiC grains but also the anomalously large ^18O/^17O ratio in the sun.

  4. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, P.; Werban, U.; Schrön, M.; Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.; Pohle, M.; Kathage, S.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  5. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, Ulrike; Schrön, Martin; Dietrich, Peter; Walsh, David; Grunewald, Elliot; Pohle, Marco; Kathage, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  6. Characterization of Atmospheric Nitrate Dynamics in a Sub-Alpine Watershed Using Δ17O and δ15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, I.; Savarino, J. P.; Clement, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote subalpine ecosystems are usually characterized by nutrient-poor soils (Körner, 2004; Seastedt et al., 2004), making them particularly susceptible to undergo changes due to increased atmospheric N deposition (Vitousek et al., 1997; Preunkert et al., 2003). Using Δ17O, a conserved tracer of atmospheric nitrate (NO3 atm) (Michalski et al., 2004; Tsunogai et al., 2010), and δ15N, indicator of NO3 biological sources (Kendall, 1998; Casciotti et al., 2009), we measured the seasonal variations of NO3 atm stable isotopic composition and concentration in several streams and soils originating from two sub-alpine watersheds in the French Alps. Our objective was to investigate whether or not NO3 atm impacts the soil N biogeochemical cycle by increasing nutrients availability for plants and bacteria. We coupled streams and soils measurements with snow-pits sampling and aerosols collection at the Lautaret Pass, to better emphasize the correlation between atmospheric deposition, soil retention and watersheds effluents response. Our results reveal that different temporal dynamics govern our study site: stream measurements show that in spring, snowmelt results in a NO3 atm impulse, accounting for ca. 31 % of the total stream NO3 budget; on the opposite in autumn, NO3 atm accounts only for ca. 3 % of the total stream NO3 budget, highlighting the presence of a NO3 bacterial pool (nitrification). We also inferred from the observed Δ17O variations two distinct phenomena in the spring/summer season: a fast snow run-off and a slower snow-water percolation. The later is believed to affect most the soil N cycle as it directly increases available NO3. Measured soil leachates and extracts confirm this hypothesis and point out the potential importance of anthropogenic N deposition as on average 7 to 10 % of the soil solutions NO3 derives directly from the atmosphere.

  7. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  8. In vivo measurement of the size of oil bodies in plant seeds using a simple and robust pulsed field gradient NMR method.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Marina; Guillermo, Armel; Bayle, Pierre-Alain; Bardet, Michel

    2015-04-01

    An easy to implement and convenient method to measure the mean size of oil bodies (OBs) in plant seeds is proposed using a pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFGNMR) approach. PFGNMR is a well-known technique used to study either free or restricted diffusion of molecules. As triacylglycerols (TAG) are confined in OBs, analysis of their diffusion properties is a well-suited experimental approach to determine OB sizes. In fact, at long diffusion time, TAG mean squared displacement is limited by the size of the domain where these molecules are confined. In order to access the OB size distribution, strong intensities of magnetic field gradients are generally required. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that a standard liquid-phase NMR probe equipped with a weak-intensity gradient coil can be used to determine the mean size of OBs. Average sizes were measured for several seeds, and OB diameters obtained by PFGNMR were fully consistent with previously published values obtained by microscopy techniques. Moreover, this approach provided evidence of TAG transfer through the network of interconnected OBs, which is dependent on the ability of adjacent membranes to open diffusion routes between OBs. The main advantage of the NMR method is that it does not require any sample preparation and experiments are performed with whole seeds directly introduced in a standard NMR tube.

  9. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  10. The structure investigations of dehydroacetic acid and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene condensation product by NMR, MS, and X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Morawiak, M.; Kamieński, B.; Schilf, W.

    2016-05-01

    A new unexpected product of condensation reaction of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and carbonyl compound (here: dehydroacetic acid (dha)) was synthesized. Discussion about the molecular structure of possible products of this reaction was done on the base of NMR studies. The structure of the titled product in both DMSO solution and in the solid state was resolved by analysis of its spectral data (X-ray structure analysis, multinuclear NMR in solution and solid state spectra) and MS measurements. The presented studies provided clear evidence that the titled product exists in diluted DMSO solution as the mixture of two kinetic free ionic species whereas in concentrated DMSO solution as well as in the solid state this system forms associated ionic pairs bonded together by hydrogen bonds.

  11. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  12. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  13. Transport properties investigation of aqueous protic ionic liquid solutions through conductivity, viscosity, and NMR self-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Anouti, Mérièm; Jacquemin, Johan; Porion, Patrice

    2012-04-12

    We present a study on the transport properties through conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and self-diffusion coefficient (D) measurements of two pure protic ionic liquids--pyrrolidinium hydrogen sulfate, [Pyrr][HSO(4)], and pyrrolidinium trifluoroacetate, [Pyrr][CF(3)COO]--and their mixtures with water over the whole composition range at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Based on these experimental results, transport mobilities of ions have been then investigated in each case through the Stokes-Einstein equation. From this, the proton conduction in these PILs follows a combination of Grotthuss and vehicle-type mechanisms, which depends also on the water composition in solution. In each case, the displacement of the NMR peak attributed to the labile proton on the pyrrolidinium cation with the PILs concentration in aqueous solution indicates that this proton is located between the cation and the anion for a water weight fraction lower than 8%. In other words, for such compositions, it appears that this labile proton is not solvated by water molecules. However, for higher water content, the labile protons are in solution as H(3)O(+). This water weight fraction appears to be the solvation limit of the H(+) ions by water molecules in these two PILs solutions. However, [Pyrr][HSO(4)] and [Pyrr][CF(3)COO] PILs present opposed comportment in aqueous solution. In the case of [Pyrr][CF(3)COO], η, σ, D, and the attractive potential, E(pot), between ions indicate clearly that the diffusion of each ion is similar. In other words, these ions are tightly bound together as ion pairs, reflecting in fact the importance of the hydrophobicity of the trifluoroacetate anion, whereas, in the case of the [Pyrr][HSO(4)], the strong H-bond between the HSO(4)(-) anion and water promotes a drastic change in the viscosity of the aqueous solution, as well as on the conductivity which is up to 187 mS·cm(-1) for water weight fraction close to 60% at 298 K.

  14. {sup 17}O Knight shift study of the superconducting state of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Mukuda, H.; Ishida, K.; Kitaoka, Y.; Mao, Z.; Mori, Y.; Maeno, Y.

    1999-12-01

    {sup 17}O Knight shift measurements in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} were performed over the wide range of magnetic field 3.2--11.4kOe parallel to the basal RuO{sub 2} planes. The spin susceptibility is totally unchanged through its T{prime}{sub c}, evidencing that the spin-triplet superconducting state is realized in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. The results indicates that the Cooper pairs consist of the parallel spin pairs {vert{underscore}bar}{up{underscore}arrow}{up{underscore}arrow}> and {vert{underscore}bar}{down{underscore}arrow}{down{underscore}arrow}> with their quantization axis perpendicular to the c-axis direction. The in-plane 2D nearly ferromagnetic spin fluctuations may play a role for the stabilization of this state among various representations of spin-triplet order parameter.

  15. If you are interested in submitting a paper to this journal visit: Isotopic fractionation and the quantification of ^1^7O anomalies in the oxygen three-isotope system - an appraisal and geochemical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Martin F.

    2002-06-01

    The oxygen three-isotope plot provides valuable insights to geochemical and cosmochemical processes in which the relationship of 17O/ 16O relative to 18O/ 16O is of interest. It is generally recognised, however, that the usual format of this diagram, illustrating the variation of δ 17O with δ 18O, is based on the approximation of a power law function to linear format. In contrast, the relationship between δ 17O and δ 18O for entity a measured with respect to reference b is accurately represented by the linear function: 1000 ln1+ δ 17O/1000=λ1000 ln1+ δ 18O/1000+1000 ln[1+k a,b] where k a,b is a measure of the offset (if any) of a from the mass-dependent fractionation line, of slope λ, on which b lies. The respective ordinate and abscissa scales are essentially unchanged from those of the corresponding δ 17O versus δ 18O plot yet, unlike the latter, the slope of the fractionation line is invariant to both the magnitude of the δ values and to the isotopic composition of the reference. Application to high precision measurements which encompass a wide range of δ values reveals that slope differences (or indeed similarities) between comparable data sets may be disguised by the limitations of the δ 17O versus δ 18O diagram, with adverse consequences for the accurate quantification of Δ 17O values. This may be addressed by re-defining Δ 17O, the offset from a reference fractionation line, as 1000 k a,b. In turn, this is very closely approximated by 1000ln[1+ k a,b], the intercept on the ordinate axis of a 1000ln[1+(δ 17O/1000)] versus 1000ln[1+(δ 18O/1000)] plot, for values of 1000 k a,b not exceeding ˜5. The same analysis shows that the fractionation factor α 17/16 for a given system is related to the corresponding α 18/16 value by: α 17/16=[1+k a,b](α 18/16) λ These findings are equally applicable to the reporting of data from other three-isotope systems, such as magnesium.

  16. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  17. 17O+58Ni scattering and reaction dynamics around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Keeley, N.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Molini, P.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Rusek, K.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-08-01

    This work aims at investigating the projectile binding energy influence on the reaction dynamics, introducing new results and new data analysis methods in order to overcome some typically encountered problems, such as the identification of reaction products differing by few mass units and the discrimination of direct reaction processes. The 17O+58Ni collision was studied at five near-barrier energies employing a compact experimental setup consisting of four double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSDs). Different reaction processes, namely the elastic and inelastic scattering and the 1 n stripping, were discriminated by means of a detailed analysis of the experimental energy spectra based on Monte Carlo simulations. The elastic scattering angular distributions were investigated within the framework of the optical model using Woods-Saxon and double-folding potentials. The total reaction cross sections were extracted and the reduced cross sections compared with those obtained for 17F (Sp=0.600 MeV), the mirror nucleus of 17O (Sn=4.143 MeV), and for the tightly bound 16O projectile. The 17O+58Ni total reaction cross sections were larger than those for 16O on the same target at the lowest energies studied, becoming identical, within errors, as the incident energy increased above the Coulomb barrier. This behavior was related to a strong contribution from the 1 n -stripping channel at the lowest energies.

  18. Non-mass-dependent (17) O anomalies generated by a superimposed thermal gradient on a rarefied O(2) gas in a closed system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Bao, Huiming

    2011-01-15

    Cryogenic or heating methods have been widely used in experiments involving gas purification or isolation and in studying phase changes among solids, liquids, or gases for more than a century. Thermal gradients are often present in these routine processes. While stable isotopes of an element are known to fractionate under a thermal gradient, the largely diffusion-driven fractionation is assumed to be entirely mass-dependent. We report here, however, that distinct non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope fractionation can be generated when subjecting rarefied O(2) gas in a closed system to a simple thermal gradient. The Δ(17) O value, a measure of the (17) O anomaly, can be up to -0.51‰ (standard deviation (s.d.) 1σ = 0.03) in one of the temperature compartments. The magnitude of the (17) O anomalies decreased with increasing initial gas pressures. The authenticity of this phenomenon is substantiated by a series of blank tests and isotope mass-balance calculations. The observed anomalies are not the result of H(2) O contamination in samples or in isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Our finding calls attention to the importance of thermal gradient-induced isotope fractionation and to its implications in laboratory procedures, stable isotope geochemistry, and the physical chemistry of rarefied gases. PMID:21154650

  19. Development of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coating on ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, N.; Abbasi, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Choi, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and to improve area specific resistance (ASR), Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 is thermally grown on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS) and 4-probe ASR tests. The results show that the coating not only decreases the ASR considerably, but also acts as a barrier to mitigate the sub-scale growth and to prevent chromium migration through the coating and the cathode. The EDS analysis reveals that a mixed spinel region is formed between the coating and oxide scale after 500 h oxidation at 750 °C causing a noticeable decrease in oxygen diffusivity through this layer and subsequent decline in sub-scale growth rate. The ASR of uncoated sample is measured to be 63.5 mΩ cm2 after 500 h oxidation, while the Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coated sample shows a value of 19.3 mΩ cm2 representing ∼70% reduction compared to the uncoated sample. It is proposed that the high electrical conductivity of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 (140 S cm-1), reduction of oxide scale growth, and good bonding between the coating and substrate contribute to the substantial ASR reduction for the coated sample.

  20. Tracer diffusion measurements in solid lithium: a test case for the comparison between NMR in static and pulsed magnetic field gradients after upgrading a standard solid state NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Marion Fischer, D; Duwe, Peter; Indris, Sylvio; Heitjans, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This paper reports on the upgrading of a standard solid state NMR spectrometer, which has been used in combination with a field variable 7 T cryomagnet, to a low-cost combined SFG and PFG NMR spectrometer. Both methods are applied to solid lithium as a simple test case. The results show that under the given conditions SFG NMR and PFG NMR can provide tracer diffusion coefficients for 7 Li diffusion down to about 10(-14) and 10(-13) m2/s, respectively. SFG and PFG NMR are complementary methods. The paper demonstrates advantages and disadvantages of each method with a concrete example and why it is desirable to be able to apply both methods to the same sample.

  1. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  2. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  3. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  4. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  5. Triple isotope (δD, δ17O, δ18O) study on precipitation, drip water and speleothem fluid inclusions for a Western Central European cave (NW Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Häuselmann, Anamaria D.; Fleitmann, Dominik; Häuselmann, Philipp; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Deuterium (δD) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes are powerful tracers of the hydrological cycle and have been extensively used for paleoclimate reconstructions as they can provide information on past precipitation, temperature and atmospheric circulation. More recently, the use of 17Oexcess derived from precise measurement of δ17O and δ18O gives new and additional insights in tracing the hydrological cycle whereas uncertainties surround this proxy. However, 17Oexcess could provide additional information on the atmospheric conditions at the moisture source as well as about fractionations associated with transport and site processes. In this paper we trace water stable isotopes (δD, δ17O and δ18O) along their path from precipitation to cave drip water and finally to speleothem fluid inclusions for Milandre cave in northwestern Switzerland. A two year-long daily resolved precipitation isotope record close to the cave site is compared to collected cave drip water (3 months average resolution) and fluid inclusions of modern and Holocene stalagmites. Amount weighted mean δD, δ18O and δ17O are -71.0‰, -9.9‰, -5.2‰ for precipitation, -60.3‰, -8.7‰, -4.6‰ for cave drip water and -61.3‰, -8.3‰, -4.7‰ for recent fluid inclusions respectively. Second order parameters have also been derived in precipitation and drip water and present similar values with 18 per meg for 17Oexcess whereas d-excess is 1.5‰ more negative in drip water. Furthermore, the atmospheric signal is shifted towards enriched values in the drip water and fluid inclusions (Δ of ˜ + 10‰ for δD). The isotopic composition of cave drip water exhibits a weak seasonal signal which is shifted by around 8-10 months (groundwater residence time) when compared to the precipitation. Moreover, we carried out the first δ17O measurement in speleothem fluid inclusions, as well as the first comparison of the δ17O behaviour from the meteoric water to the fluid inclusions entrapment in speleothems

  6. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON external standard method, before and after precipitation of serum proteins and those obtained using CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or applying post-processing filtering algorithms to remove, from the (1)H q-NMR spectra, the proteins signal contribution. For each of these approaches, the percent error in the absolute value of every measurement for all the nutrients is also plotted as accuracy assessment. PMID:27331118

  7. The effects of cholera enterotoxin on intestinal tissue water as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Udall, J N; Alvarez, L A; Nichols, B L; Hazlewood, C F

    1975-01-01

    Cholera enterotoxin has been postulated to change the configuration of the intracellular protein-water system, altering the permeability of the cell to water. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, this protein-water relationship can be examined. Small intestinal loops in the rat were injected with 0.5 ml of either Schwarz/Mann cholera enterotoxin (40 mug/cc saline solution) or normal saline. Full thickness segments of intestine from each loop were taken and percentage water (using a gravimetric procedure which includes a correction for fat) and NMR relaxation times were determined. The mean value +/- S.D. for tissue water was 79.49 +/- 2.65% in the controls and 84.52 +/- 2.01% in the cholera specimens (p less than .001). T1 (spin-lattice) relaxation times were 521.22 +/- 69.5 msec in the controls and 667.96 +/- 119.25 msec in cholera tissue (p less than .001). T2 (spin-spin) relaxation times were 62.34 +/- 9.59 msec in controls and 80.35 +/- 21.46 msec in cholera tissue (p less than .02). These findings are consistent with the theory that cholera enterotoxin acts to alter intracellular protein-water relationship.

  8. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  9. FTS Studies of the 17O Enriched Isotopologues of CO_2 Toward Creating a Complete and Highly Accurate Reference Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Ben; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Miller, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The proliferation and increased abilities of remote sensing missions for the monitoring of planetary atmospheric gas species has spurred the need for complete and accurate spectroscopic reference standards. As a part of our ongoing effort toward creating a global carbon dioxide (CO2) frequency reference standard, we report new FTS measurements of the 17O enriched isotopologues of CO2. The first measurements were taken in the ν3 region (2200 - 2450 cm-1, 65 - 75 THz), have absolute calibration accuracies of 100 kHz (3E-6 cm-1), comparable to the uncertainties for typical sub-millimeter/THz spectroscopy. Such high absolute calibration accuracy has become regular procedure for the cases of linear molecules such as CO2 and CO for FTS measurements at JPL, and enables us to produce measured transition frequencies for entire bands with accuracies that rival those of early heterodyne measurements for individual beat notes. Additionally, by acquiring spectra of multiple carbon dioxide isotopologues simultaneously, we have begun to construct a self-consistent frequency grid based on CO2 that extends from 20 - 200 THz. These new spectroscopic reference standards are a significant step towards minimizing CO2 retrieval errors from remote sensing applications, especially those involving targets with predominantly CO2 atmospheres such as Mars, Venus and candidate terrestrial exoplanets where minor isotopologues will make significant contributions to the radiance signals.

  10. Changes in Precipitation Sources over Glacial/Interglacial MIS 11 and 12 Examined by Δ17O of SiO2 Obtained from Diatoms along the Valles Caldera Lake Core, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, J.; Sharp, Z. D.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of the isotopic composition of paleo-lake water have been made using 18O/16O (ẟ18O) in diatom silica (Dodd and Sharp, GCA, 2010). Post-mortem diatom silica equilibrates with ambient lake water within six months, chronicling the bulk oxygen isotope composition of the lake and resulting in silica that is near the quartz-water fractionation line (Dodd et al, GGG, 2012). The δ18O values of lacustrine diatoms from the Valles Caldera, NM, vary by ~25‰ between glacial and interglacial periods and suggest a collapse of the summer monsoon that currently provides 50% of the modern precipitation in NM. Triple oxygen isotope measurements of diatom silica may serve as a proxy for the isotopic composition of the lake water and as an estimate of paleo-humidity over the precipitation source. The deuterium excess parameter (d= ẟD - 8 ẟ18O) has been used along ice cores as a source relative humidity index, but is difficult to make in lake sediments. Instead, high precision 17O-excess (∆17O) measurements (=ẟ17O - 0.528 ẟ18O) may provide paleo-humidity information. Landais et al. (GRL, 2008) found a ∆17O difference of 0.02‰ in the Vostok ice core between glacial and interglacial times, interpreted as a function of changing relative humidity of the precipitation source. A 0.03‰ change was observed in glacial (∆17O=-0.22‰) and interglacial (∆17O=-0.19‰) diatom silica along the Valles Caldera lake core. Further information regarding the δ18O value of meteoric water can be calculated from paired δ18O-δ17O measurements. The combined δ18O-δ17O values of interglacial diatoms suggest a δ18Ometeoric water value of -9‰. Modern δ18O value of monsoonal precipitation in NM is ~-10‰. The δ18O of glacial diatoms suggest a δ18Ometeoric water = -20‰. Modern δ18O value of winter precipitation in NM is ~-20‰. These results suggest that the seasonality of precipitation in New Mexico can be inferred based on changes in the relative

  11. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  12. Fully-Automated High-Throughput NMR System for Screening of Haploid Kernels of Maize (Corn) by Measurement of Oil Content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Liu, Jin; Xu, Xiaoping; Huang, Qingming; Chen, Shanshan; Yang, Peiqiang; Chen, Shaojiang; Song, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    One of the modern crop breeding techniques uses doubled haploid plants that contain an identical pair of chromosomes in order to accelerate the breeding process. Rapid haploid identification method is critical for large-scale selections of double haploids. The conventional methods based on the color of the endosperm and embryo seeds are slow, manual and prone to error. On the other hand, there exists a significant difference between diploid and haploid seeds generated by high oil inducer, which makes it possible to use oil content to identify the haploid. This paper describes a fully-automated high-throughput NMR screening system for maize haploid kernel identification. The system is comprised of a sampler unit to select a single kernel to feed for measurement of NMR and weight, and a kernel sorter to distribute the kernel according to the measurement result. Tests of the system show a consistent accuracy of 94% with an average screening time of 4 seconds per kernel. Field test result is described and the directions for future improvement are discussed. PMID:27454427

  13. Quantitative measurement of major secoiridoid derivatives in olive oil using qNMR. Proof of the artificial formation of aldehydic oleuropein and ligstroside aglycon isomers.

    PubMed

    Karkoula, Evangelia; Skantzari, Angeliki; Melliou, Eleni; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2014-01-22

    A previously developed method for measurement of oleocanthal and oleacein in olive oil by quantitative (1)H NMR was expanded to include the measurement of the monoaldehydic forms of oleuropein and ligstroside aglycons. The method was validated and applied to the study of 340 monovarietal Greek and Californian olive oils from 23 varieties and for a 3-year period. A wide variation concerning the concentrations of all four secoiridoids was recorded. The concentration of each one ranged from nondetectable to 711 mg/kg and the sum of the four major secoiridoids (named as D3) ranged from nondetectable to 1534 mg/kg. Examination of the NMR profile of the olive oil extract before and after contact with normal or reversed stationary chromatography phase proved the artificial formation of the 5S,8S,9S aldehydic forms of oleuropein and ligstroside aglycon isomers during chromatography. Finally, methyl elenolate was identified for the first time as a minor constituent of olive oil. PMID:24384036

  14. Fully-Automated High-Throughput NMR System for Screening of Haploid Kernels of Maize (Corn) by Measurement of Oil Content

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoping; Huang, Qingming; Chen, Shanshan; Yang, Peiqiang; Chen, Shaojiang; Song, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    One of the modern crop breeding techniques uses doubled haploid plants that contain an identical pair of chromosomes in order to accelerate the breeding process. Rapid haploid identification method is critical for large-scale selections of double haploids. The conventional methods based on the color of the endosperm and embryo seeds are slow, manual and prone to error. On the other hand, there exists a significant difference between diploid and haploid seeds generated by high oil inducer, which makes it possible to use oil content to identify the haploid. This paper describes a fully-automated high-throughput NMR screening system for maize haploid kernel identification. The system is comprised of a sampler unit to select a single kernel to feed for measurement of NMR and weight, and a kernel sorter to distribute the kernel according to the measurement result. Tests of the system show a consistent accuracy of 94% with an average screening time of 4 seconds per kernel. Field test result is described and the directions for future improvement are discussed. PMID:27454427

  15. Formation of κ-carrageenan-gelatin polyelectrolyte complexes studied by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy and kinematic viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Vovk, Mikhail A; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2016-10-20

    The intermolecular interactions between an anionic polysaccharide from the red algae κ-carrageenan and a gelatin polypeptide, forming stoichiometric polysaccharide-polypeptide (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes in the aqueous phase, were examined. The major method of investigation was high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Additional data were obtained by UV absorption spectroscopy, light scattering dispersion and capillary viscometry. Experimental data were interpreted in terms of the changing roles of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds when κ-carrageenan-gelatin complexes are formed. At high temperatures, when biopolymer macromolecules in solution are in the state of random coil, hydrophobic interactions make a major contribution to complex stabilization. At the temperature of gelatin's coil→helix conformational transition and at lower temperatures, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds play a defining role in complex formation. A proposed model of the κ-carrageenan-gelatin complex is discussed. PMID:27474666

  16. Measurement of Internal Acyl Migration Reaction Kinetics Using Directly Coupled HPLC-NMR:  Application for the Positional Isomers of Synthetic (2-Fluorobenzoyl)-d-glucopyranuronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Sidelmann, U G; Hansen, S H; Gavaghan, C; Carless, H A; Lindon, J C; Farrant, R D; Wilson, I D; Nicholson, J K

    1996-08-01

    Ester glucuronides (1-O-acyl-β-d-glucopyranuronates) of many drugs may undergo internal acyl migration reactions, resulting in the formation of new positional isomers with both α- and β-anomers. We illustrate here a novel approach for the direct investigation of the acyl migration kinetics of ester glucuronides and show the application with respect to the isomers of synthetic (2-fluorobenzoyl)-d-glucopyranuronic acid. Individual isomers were separated from an equilibrium mixture containing the β-1-O-acyl, α- and β-2-O-acyl, α- and β-3-O-acyl, and α- and β-4-O-acyl isomers at pH 7.4 in 20 mM phosphate buffer. The interconverting isomers were separated using reversed-phase HPLC and pumped directly into a dedicated on-line NMR flow probe in a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer. The flow was stopped with each isomer in the NMR flow probe, and sequential NMR spectra were collected at 25 °C, allowing direct measurement of the production of positional isomers from each selectively isolated glucuronide isomer. All of the positional isomers and anomers were characterized, and relative quantities determined, and a kinetic model describing the rearrangement reactions was constructed. The acyl migration reaction kinetics were simulated using a theoretical approach using nine first-order rate constants determined for the acyl migration reactions and six first-order rate constants describing the mutarotation each of the 2-, 3-, and 4-positional isomers. The rate constants (in h(-)(1)) for the rearrangement reactions of the 2-fluorobenzoyl glucuronide isomers were as follows:  β-1-O-acyl, 0.29 ± 0.01; α-2-O-acyl, 0.11 ± 0.01; β-2-O-acyl, 0.07 ± 0.01; α-3-O-acyl, 0.10 ± 0.01; β-3-O-acyl, 0.09 ± 0.01; α-4-O-acyl, 0.09 ± 0.01; and β-4-O-acyl, 0.06 ± 0.01. The α- and β-anomerization rates were estimated on the basis of the kinetics model; the anomerization rates of the 4-O-acyl isomers were additionally determined experimentally using directly coupled HPLC-NMR. The

  17. Direct NMR detection of the unstable "red product" from the reaction between nitroprusside and 2-mercaptosuccinic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yin; Mossing, Brendan; Wu, Gang

    2015-12-21

    The reaction between nitroprusside (NP, [Fe(II)(CN)5NO](2-)) and organic thiolates (RS(-)) in aqueous solution has long been known to produce an unstable red intermediate thus often being referred to as the "red product" (RP) in the literature. While RP has always been formulated as [Fe(II)(CN)5N(O)SR](3-), it is rather difficult to study it in aqueous solution because it is not only unstable but also exhibits rapid ligand exchange. All previous studies of RP have relied on UV-vis, IR, kinetics measurements, and analysis of decomposed products. Herein we report the first comprehensive multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O) NMR characterization of the RP produced from the reaction between NP and 2-mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA). The NMR chemical shifts obtained for the RP are compared with those from the free ligand (S-nitrosothiol, RS-N=O) prepared in situ by the reaction of MSA with NaNO2. We also showed that useful thermodynamic and kinetic properties of RP formation can be readily obtained from (1)H NMR studies.

  18. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  19. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  20. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  2. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  3. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  4. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

  5. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore » Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  6. Dynamic High-Resolution H-1 and P-31 NMR Spectroscopy and H-1 T-2 Measurements in Postmortem Rabbit Muscles Using Slow Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Andersen, Henrik J.

    2004-05-05

    Postmortem changes in rabbit muscle tissue with different glycogen status (normal vs low) were followed continuously from 13 min postmortem until 8 h postmortem and again 20 h postmortem using simultaneous magic angle spinning 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy together with measurement of the transverse relaxation time, T2, of the muscle water. The 1H metabolite spectra were measured using the phase-altered spinning sidebands (PASS) technique at a spinning rate of 40 Hz. pH values calculated from the 31P NMR spectra using the chemical shifts of the C-6 line of histidine in the 1H spectra and the chemical shifts of inorganic phosphate in the 31P spectra confirmed the different muscle glycogen status in the tissues. High-resolution 1H spectra obtained from the PASS technique revealed the presence of a new resonance line at 6.8 ppm during the postmortem period, which were absent in muscles with low muscle glycogen content. This new resonance line may originate from the aminoprotons in creatine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH effect on the exchange rate between the amino and the water protons and thereby the NMR visibility. Alternatively, the new resonance line may originate from the aromatic protons in tyrosine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH-induced protein unfolding exposing hydrophobic amino acid residues to the aqueous environment. Further studies are needed to evaluate these hypotheses. Finally, distributed analysis of the water T2 relaxation data revealed three relaxation populations and an increase in the population believed to reflect extramyofibrillar water through the postmortem period. This increase was significantly reduced (p < 0.0001) in samples from animals with low muscle glycogen content, indicating that the pH is controlling the extent of postmortem expulsion of water from myofibrillar structures. The significance of the postmortem increase in the amount extramyofibrillar water on the water-holding capacity was verified by

  7. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, Cristina Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E.; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing {sup 17}O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined {sup 17}O spin-rotation constants of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  8. The impact of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric sulfate production pathways, oxidants, and ice core Δ17O(SO42-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Kunasek, S. A.

    2011-04-01

    We use a global three-dimensional chemical transport model to quantify the influence of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric sulfate production mechanisms and oxidant concentrations constrained by observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O = &delta17O-0.52 × &delta18O) of sulfate in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores and aerosols. The oxygen isotopic composition of non-sea salt sulfate (Δ17O(SO42-)) is a function of the relative importance of each oxidant (e.g. O3, OH, H2O2, and O2) during sulfate formation, and can be used to quantify sulfate production pathways. Due to its dependence on oxidant concentrations, Δ17O(SO42-) has been suggested as a proxy for paleo-oxidant levels. However, the oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate from both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores shows a trend opposite to that expected from the known increase in the concentration of tropospheric O3 since the preindustrial period. The model simulates a significant increase in the fraction of sulfate formed via oxidation by O2 catalyzed by transition metals in the present-day Northern Hemisphere troposphere (from 11% to 22%), offset by decreases in the fractions of sulfate formed by O3 and H2O2. There is little change, globally, in the fraction of tropospheric sulfate produced by gas-phase oxidation (from 23% to 27%). The model-calculated change in Δ17O(SO42-) since preindustrial times (1850 CE) is consistent with Arctic and Antarctic observations. The model simulates a 42% increase in the concentration of global mean tropospheric O3, a 10% decrease in OH, and a 58% increase in H2O2 between the preindustrial period and present. Model results indicate that the observed decrease in the Arctic Δ17O(SO42-) - in spite of increasing tropospheric O3 concentrations - can be explained by the combined effects of increased sulfate formation by O2 catalyzed by anthropogenic transition metals and increased cloud water acidity, rendering Δ17O(SO42-) insensitive to changing oxidant

  9. Investigation of trap properties of Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 high-k gate stack p-type MOSFETs by low-frequency (1/f) noise and random telegraph noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shih-Chang; Wu, San-Lein; Huang, Po-Chin; Wang, Bo-Chin; Tsai, Kai-Shiang; Kao, Tsung-Hsien; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Guo; Cheng, Osbert; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Chen, Jone-Fang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the trap properties of composite Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 high-k gate stack p-type MOSFETs (pMOSFETs) were investigated by simultaneous low-frequency (1/f) noise and random telegraph noise measurements. Compared with pure ZrO2 pMOSFETs, the interface property and drive current of Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 pMOSFETs were both improved, and the depth of the effective centroid of the fixed charges was close to the insulator/semiconductor interface. This result indicated that the trapping behavior of hole capture from a ZrO2 film can be suppressed by mixing the film with a HfO2 film. Consequently, comparable oxide trap densities and trapping depths between Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 and HfO2 pMOSFETs can be seen. In addition, it was found that the unified model can appropriately interpret the 1/f noise mechanism in Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 pMOSFETs.

  10. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool to investigate low-energy resonances: the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cases

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-08-12

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O, {alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O, {alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  11. 17O excess traces atmospheric nitrate in paleo-groundwater of the Saharan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, M.; Leis, A.; Abdalla, R.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Böttcher, M. E.; Köhler, S.

    2014-06-01

    Saharan paleo-groundwater from the Hasouna area of Libya contains up to 1.8 mM of nitrate, which exceeds the World Health Organization limit for drinking water, but the origin is still disputed. Herein we show that a positive 17O excess in NO3- (Δ17ONO3 = Δ17ONO3 - 0.52 δ18ONO3) is preserved in the paleo-groundwater. The 17O excess provides an excellent tracer of atmospheric NO3-, which is caused by the interaction of ozone with NOx via photochemical reactions, coupled with a non-mass-dependent isotope fractionation. Our Δ17ONO3 data from 0.4 to 5.0 ‰ (n = 28) indicate that up to 20 mol % of total dissolved NO3- originated from the Earth's atmosphere (x[NO3-]atm), where the remaining NO3- refers to microbially induced nitrification in soils. High Δ17ONO3 values correspond to soils that are barren in dry periods, while low Δ17ONO3 values correspond to more fertile soils. Coupled high Δ17ONO3 and high x[NO3-]atm values are caused by a sudden wash-out of accumulated disposition of atmospheric NO3- on plants, soil surfaces and in vadose zones within humid-wet cycles. The individual isotope and chemical composition of the Hasouna groundwater can be followed by a binary mixing approach using the lowest and highest mineralised groundwater as end members without considering evaporation. Using the δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4 isotope signature of dissolved SO42-, no indication is found for a superimposition by denitrification, e.g. involving pyrite minerals within the aquifers. It is suggested that dissolved SO42- originates from the dissolution of CaSO4 minerals during groundwater evolution.

  12. 17O-excess traces atmospheric nitrate in paleo groundwater of the Saharan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, M.; Leis, A.; Abdalla, R.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Böttcher, M. E.; Köhler, S.

    2013-12-01

    Saharan paleo groundwater from the Hasouna area of Libya contains up to 1.8 mM of nitrate, the origin of which is still disputed. Herein we show that a positive 17O-excess in NO3- (Δ17ONO3 = δ17ONO3 - 0.52 δ18ONO3) is preserved in the paleo groundwater. The 17O-excess provides an excellent tracer of atmospheric NO3-, which is caused by the interaction of ozone with NOx via photochemical reactions, coupled with a non-mass dependent isotope fractionation. Our Δ17ONO3 data from 0.4 to 5.0‰ (n = 28) indicate that up to x [NO3-]atm = 20 mol % of total dissolved NO3- originated from the Earth's atmosphere. High Δ17ONO3 values correspond to soils that are barren in dry periods, while low Δ17ONO3 values correspond to more fertile soils. Coupled high Δ17ONO3 and high x [NO3-]atm values are caused by a sudden wash out of dry deposition of atmospheric NO3- on plant or soil surfaces within humid-wet cycles. The individual isotope and chemical composition of the Hasouna groundwater can be followed by a binary mixing approach using the lowest and highest mineralized groundwater as end-members without considering evaporation. Using the δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4 isotope signature of dissolved sulfate, no indication is found for a superimposition by denitrification, e.g. involving pyrite minerals within the aquifers. It is suggested that dissolved sulfate originates from the dissolution of calcium sulfate minerals during groundwater evolution.

  13. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  14. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M.

    2016-06-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20–60 nm and lengths of 4–6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications.

  15. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M.

    2016-01-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20–60 nm and lengths of 4–6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications. PMID:27271194

  16. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M

    2016-01-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20-60 nm and lengths of 4-6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications. PMID:27271194

  17. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  18. Water dissolution in albite melts: - Constraints from ab initio NMR calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Nekvasil, Hanna; Long, Hongbo

    2002-12-01

    Hartree-Fock and B3LYP NMR calculations were performed at the 6-311+G(2df,p) level on cluster models representing albite glasses using B3LYP/6 to 31G* optimized geometries. Calculation results on several well-known crystalline materials, such as low albite and KHSi 2O 5, were used to check the accuracy of the calculation methods. Calculated 29Si-NMR results on clusters that model protonation of Al-O-Si linkages and the replacement of Na + by H + indicate a major increase in Si-O(H) bond length and a 5 ppm difference in δ iso for 29Si compared to that for anhydrous albite glass. The calculated δ iso of 27Al in such linkages agrees with the experimental data, but shows an increase in C q that cannot be fully diminished by H-bonding to additional water molecules. This protonation model is consistent with both experimental 17O NMR data and the major peak of 1H-NMR spectra. It cannot readily explain the existence of the small peak in the experimental 1H spectra around 1.5 ppm. Production of the depolymerized units Al [Q 3]-O-H upon the dissolution of water is not consistent with 27Al, 1H, or 17O NMR experimental results. Production of Si [Q 3]-O-H is consistent with all of the experimental 17O and 1H-NMR data; such units can produce both the major peak at 3.5 ppm and the small peak at 1.5 ppm in 1H spectra, either with or without hydrogen bonding. This species, however, cannot produce the main features of 29Si spectra. It is concluded that although neither protonation nor the production of Si [Q 3]-O-H alone is consistent with the available experimental data, the combination of these two processes is consistent with available experimental NMR data.

  19. Structural Studies of the Molybdenum Center of the Pathogenic R160Q Mutant of Human Sulfite Oxidase by Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy and 17O and 33S Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Astashkin, Andrei V.; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Klein, Eric L.; Feng, Changjian; Wilson, Heather L.; Rajagopalan, K. V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of the Mo(V) center of the pathogenic R160Q mutant of human sulfite oxidase (hSO) confirms the presence of three distinct species whose relative abundances depend upon pH. Species 1 is exclusively present at pH ≤ 6, and remains in significant amounts even at pH 8. Variable-frequency electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) studies of this species prepared with 33S-labeled sulfite clearly show the presence of coordinated sulfate, as has previously been found for the “blocked” form of Arabidopsis thaliana at low pH (Astashkin, A. V.; Johnson-Winters, K.; Klein, E. L.; Byrne, R. S.; Hille, R.; Raitsimring, A. M.; Enemark, J. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 14800). The ESEEM spectra of Species 1 prepared in 17O-enriched water show both strongly and weakly magnetically coupled 17O atoms that can be assigned to an equatorial sulfate ligand and the axial oxo ligand, respectively. The nuclear quadrupole interaction (nqi) of the axial oxo ligand is substantially stronger than those found for other oxo-Mo(V) centers studied previously. Additionally, pulsed electron–nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements reveal a nearby weakly coupled exchangeable proton. The structure for Species 1 proposed from the pulsed EPR results using isotopic labeling is a six-coordinate Mo(V) center with an equatorial sulfate ligand that is hydrogen bonded to an exchangeable proton. Six-coordination is supported by the 17O nqi parameters for the axial oxo group of the model compound, (dttd)Mo17O(17Otms), where H2dttd = 2,3:8,9-dibenzo-1,4,7,10-tetrathiadecane; tms = trimethylsilyl. Reduction of R160Q to Mo(V) with Ti(III) gives primarily Species 2, another low pH form, whereas reduction with sulfite at higher pH values gives a mixture of Species 1 and 2, as well as the “primary” high pH form of wild-type SO. The occurrence of significant amounts of the “sulfate-blocked” form of R160Q (Species 1) at physiological p

  20. The RGB and AGB Star Nucleosynthesis in Light of the Recent 17O(p, α)14N and 18O(p, α)15N Reaction-rate Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on A = 17 and A = 18 oxygen isotopes, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. In particular, the strengths of the 20 keV and 65 keV resonances in the 18O(p, α)15N and 17O(p, α)14N reactions, respectively, have been extracted, as well as the contribution of the tail of the broad 656 keV resonance in the 18O(p, α)15N reaction inside the Gamow window. The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p, α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. As a result, more accurate reaction rates for the 18O(p, α)15N, 17O(p, α)14N, and 17O(p, γ)18F processes have been deduced, devoid of systematic errors due to extrapolation or the electron screening effect. Such rates have been introduced into state-of-the-art red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis coupled with extra-mixing episodes. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The low 14N/15N found in SiC grains cannot be explained by the revised nuclear reaction rates and remains a serious problem that has not been satisfactorily addressed.

  1. Measurement of the Isotopic Ratio of [to the tenth power]B/[to the eleventh power]B in NaBH[subscript 4] by [to the first power]H NMR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Murray; Moyna, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    A study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in a novel way to determine the isotopic ration between [to the tenth power]B and [to the eleventh power]B in sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The experiment provides an unusual and relatively simple means for undergraduate chemistry students to accurately measure the distribution of the two…

  2. Stable isotope (2H, 17O, 18O) and hydro chemical patterns of precipitation collected in weekly resolution at Hannover, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeniger, Paul; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations of stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in precipitation were initiated in May 2008 at the Federal Institute of Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover, Germany. In 2014 all precipitation samples were re-analyzed because a purchase of a new laser spectrometer (Picarro L2140-i) now allowed measurements of δ17O and a calculation of the 17O-excess parameter. Starting in October 2015 a routine analysis of hydro chemical parameters was added whenever enough sample aliquot was available (major ions, trace elements). A discussion of the stable isotope data of the seven year series of weekly precipitation samples (n = 370) will be presented. Beneath general patterns (seasonality and trends) we also focus on importance of amount weighing procedures, corrections for minor rain amounts, aspects of sample storage and re-analyzes, as well as impacts through changes in analytical equipment (IRMS, CRD spectroscopy) which is visible from the data. For stable isotopes a Thermo Fisher delta plus IRMS (Gasbench and H-Device) was used until 2011 and from 2012 on a Picarro L2120-i water vapor analyzer with long-term accuracies for quality check samples better than 0.2‰ and 0.8‰ for δ18O and δ2H, respectively.

  3. Extended analysis of the Ångström band system (B1Σ+ - A1Π) in the rare 12C17O isotopologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, R.; Szajna, W.; Zachwieja, M.

    2012-11-01

    The Ångström band system (B1Σ+ - A1Π), so far unobserved in the rare 12C17O isotopologue, was obtained under high resolution as an emission spectrum using high accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy. In total, 200 transition wave numbers belonging to the 0-1 and 0-2 bands were precisely measured and rotationally analysed. The obtained result was the merged rotational constants B0 = 1.898 8823(41) cm-1 and D0 = 6.4283(26) × 10-6 cm-1 for the B1Σ+ Rydberg state as well as the individual rotational constants B1 = 1.540 88(12) cm-1, D1 = 6.950(87) × 10-6 cm-1, B2 = 1.519 292(69) cm-1, D2 = 8.22(16) × 10-6 cm-1 for the A1Π state in the 12C17O isotopologue. The \\sigma _{0 - v^{\\prime \\prime }} band origins were also calculated. Numerous rotational perturbations observed in the A1Π state in this molecule have been identified. The observed perturbations were confronted with those predicted from theoretical calculations.

  4. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  5. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  6. Uncertainty minimization in NMR measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization of a proton target for nuclear physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin M.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation into the measurement uncertainty in polarization produced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization is outlined. The polarization data taken during Jefferson Lab experiment E08-007 is used to obtain error estimates and to develop an algorithm to minimize uncertainty of the measurement of polarization in irradiated View the ^14NH_3 targets, which is readily applied to other materials. The target polarization and corresponding uncertainties for E08-007 are reported. The resulting relative uncertainty found in the target polarization is determined to be less than or equal to 3.9%.

  7. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  8. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid-DMSO-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Donaldson, Stephen H; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-08-25

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO-lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO-water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems.

  9. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  10. Review of advances in coupling electrochemistry and liquid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Boujtita, Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    The coupling of electrochemistry and NMR spectroscopy (EC-NMR) may present an interesting approach in the environmental oxidative degradation or metabolism studies. This review presents experimental advances in the field of EC-NMR and highlights the main advantages and drawbacks of in situ and on line of NMR spectroelectrochemistry. The analysis of NMR spectra recorded in situ or on line EC-NMR permits to elucidate the reaction pathway of the electrochemical oxidation reactions and could constitute a fast way for monitoring unstable species as for instance quinone and quinone imine structures without using any coupling agents. The use of 1D and 2D NMR coupled with electrochemistry may leads to the elucidation of the major species produced from the electrochemical oxidation process. The present review gives an overview about the development of the electrochemical cells which can operate on line or in situ with NMR measurements. Future developments and potential applications of EC-NMR are also discussed.

  11. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  12. Studies on Effects of Impurity Doping and NMR Measurements of La 1111 and/or Nd 1111 Fe-Pnictide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Lee, Sang Chul; Takahashi, Hidefumi; Satomi, Erika; Miura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistivity ρ, Hall coefficient RH, thermoelectric power S, and the electronic specific heat coefficient γ have been carried out for samples of LnFe1-yMyAsO1-xFx (Ln=La, Nd; M=Co, Mn; x=0.11) obtained by doping M atoms into the superconducting LnFeAsO1-xFx (Ln 1111) system. The NMR longitudinal relaxation rate 1/T1 has also been measured for samples of LaFe1-yCoyAsO1-xFx with various x values. Co atoms doped into the superconducting LnFeAsO1-xFx are nonmagnetic, and the rate of Tc-suppression |dTc/dx| by Co atoms has been found to be too small to be explained by the pair-breaking effect expected for the S± superconducting symmetry proposed as the most probable symmetry for the system. This result throws a serious doubt on whether the symmetry is realized in the system. Instead of the pair breaking, two mechanisms of Tc suppression by the doped impurities have been found: One is the electron localization, which appears when the sheet resistance R\\square exceeds h/4e2=6.45 kΩ, and the other is the disappearance (or reduction in the area) of the hole Fermi surfaces around the Γ point in the reciprocal space. The latter mechanism has been observed when the number of electrons increases with increasing Co doping level and the system changes from an “anomalous metal” to an ordinary one. Regarding the two distinct T dependences of the NMR longitudinal relaxation rate 1/T1 of LaFeAsO1-xFx, (1/T1\\propto T6 reported by our group in the T region from Tc to ˜0.4 Tc for samples with the highest Tc values with varying x, and 1/T1\\propto T2.5--3.0 observed by many groups in almost the entire T region studied below Tc), we discuss the origin of such a difference, and show that, at least, the T2.5--3.0-like dependence of 1/T1 cannot be considered as the experimental evidence for the S± symmetry of Δ.

  13. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  14. Synthesis of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide histaminyl conjugate for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Vinš, Petr; Černý, Ivan; Mikšátková, Petra; Drašar, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Simple method of preparation of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide N-histaminyl amide was developed for the construction of immunoanalytical kit. Improved method of glucuronide derivative synthesis was used, followed by hydroxybenzotriazole-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling with histamine. PMID:26898541

  15. Using 15N, 17O, and 18O to determine nitrate sources in the Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Wang, Fan; Michalski, Greg; Xia, Xinghui; Liu, Shaoda

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies have used δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate (δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3) to determine the nitrate sources in rivers but were subject to substantial uncertainties and limitations, especially associated with evaluating the atmospheric contribution. The Δ(17)O of nitrate (Δ(17)ONO3) has been suggested as an unambiguous tracer of atmospheric NO3(-) and may serve as an additional nitrate source constraint. In the present study, triple nitrate isotopes (δ(15)NNO3, Δ(17)ONO3, and δ(18)ONO3) were used for the first time to assess the sources and sinks of nitrate in the Yellow River (YR) basin, which is the second longest river in China. Results showed that the Δ(17)ONO3 of the water from the YR ranged from 0‰ to 1.6‰ during two normal-water seasons. This suggested that unprocessed atmospheric nitrate accounted for 0-7% of the total nitrate in the YR. The corrected δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 values with atmospheric imprints being removed indicated that the main terrestrial sources of nitrate were sewage/manure effluents in the upstream of the YR and manure/sewage effluents and ammonium/urea-containing fertilizer in the middle and lower reaches which made comparable contributions to the nitrate. In addition, there was a significant positive relationship between δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 values of river water (p < 0.01) which may signal the presence of denitrification. This study indicates that the triple nitrate isotope method is useful for assessing the nitrate sources in rivers, especially for the measurements of atmospheric nitrate contribution.

  16. The Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites: A new grouplet with high. Delta. sup 17 O and evidence for nebular oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, M.K. Brooklyn Coll., NY ); Prinz, M. ); Kojima, Hideyasu; Yanai, Keizo ); Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Carlisle Lakes, ALH85151, and Y75302 are similar ungrouped chondrites which have petrologic and bulk compositional similarities to the ordinary chondrites, but are more oxidized; and their oxygen isotopic compositions differ. They represent a new grouplet which the authors call the Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites. They have the highest {Delta}{sup 17}O values (up to 2.91) measured to date. The whole chondrites and most of their chondrules plot on the same mass fractionation line on an oxygen 3-isotope diagram. They are olivine rich (>70 vol%), essentially metal free, and most olivine is FeO rich, equilibrated at Fa{sub 38}. Rare olivine and pyroxene grains in chondrules and fragments are zoned, and these are important in discerning the history of these chondrites. The zoning does not appear to have formed during crystallization from a melt droplet chondrule, but post-dated chondrule formation. Two hypotheses are postulated to explain the zoning: (1) parent-body thermal metamorphism and (2) nebular gas-solid exchange reactions accompanied by condensation of new FeO-rich olivine, utilizing existing olivine surfaces as nucleation sites. The occurrence of steep Fe-Mg compositional gradients of core-to-rim profiles, oscillatory zoning in olivine, fayalitic rims of Fa{sub 45} that exceed instead of approach the equilibrium composition of the matrix (Fa{sub 38}), and olivine-filled veins in zoned pyroxenes are more compatible with the nebular hypothesis. The Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites may have originally been derived from an ordinary chondrite-like precursor which was later oxidized, prior to its final lithification. However, the oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole chondrites and most of their chondrules suggest that the precursor probably formed in an oxygen isotopically distinct environment.

  17. Direct measurement of oleocanthal and oleacein levels in olive oil by quantitative (1)H NMR. Establishment of a new index for the characterization of extra virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Karkoula, Evangelia; Skantzari, Angeliki; Melliou, Eleni; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2012-11-28

    A new method for direct measurement of the oleocanthal and oleacein levels in olive oil by quantitative (1)H NMR was developed. The method was applied to the study of 175 monovarietal commercial Greek and California olive oil samples. The main findings were as follows: (1) There was a significant variation concerning the concentrations of oleocanthal and oleacein among the studied samples. Their concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 355 mg/kg and their sum (index D1) from 0 to 501 mg/kg. (2) There are olive varieties that independent of geographic origin and harvest time produce oil that contains both compounds in low levels. (3) There is a positive correlation of a high level of oleocanthal and oleacein in olive oils with the early time of harvest. Although there is a need for more extensive study, a new index for the characterization of extra virgin olive oils, which is a combination of D1 = oleocanthal + oleacein level and D2 = oleocanthal/oleacein ratio, seems to be very useful. PMID:23116297

  18. Direct measurement of oleocanthal and oleacein levels in olive oil by quantitative (1)H NMR. Establishment of a new index for the characterization of extra virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Karkoula, Evangelia; Skantzari, Angeliki; Melliou, Eleni; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2012-11-28

    A new method for direct measurement of the oleocanthal and oleacein levels in olive oil by quantitative (1)H NMR was developed. The method was applied to the study of 175 monovarietal commercial Greek and California olive oil samples. The main findings were as follows: (1) There was a significant variation concerning the concentrations of oleocanthal and oleacein among the studied samples. Their concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 355 mg/kg and their sum (index D1) from 0 to 501 mg/kg. (2) There are olive varieties that independent of geographic origin and harvest time produce oil that contains both compounds in low levels. (3) There is a positive correlation of a high level of oleocanthal and oleacein in olive oils with the early time of harvest. Although there is a need for more extensive study, a new index for the characterization of extra virgin olive oils, which is a combination of D1 = oleocanthal + oleacein level and D2 = oleocanthal/oleacein ratio, seems to be very useful.

  19. Measuring dynamic and kinetic information in the previously inaccessible supra-τ(c) window of nanoseconds to microseconds by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2013-09-26

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool that has enabled experimentalists to characterize molecular dynamics and kinetics spanning a wide range of time-scales from picoseconds to days. This review focuses on addressing the previously inaccessible supra-tc window (defined as τ(c) < supra-τ(c) < 40 μs; in which tc is the overall tumbling time of a molecule) from the perspective of local inter-nuclear vector dynamics extracted from residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and from the perspective of conformational exchange captured by relaxation dispersion measurements (RD). The goal of the first section is to present a detailed analysis of how to extract protein dynamics encoded in RDCs and how to relate this information to protein functionality within the previously inaccessible supra-τ(c) window. In the second section, the current state of the art for RD is analyzed, as well as the considerable progress toward pushing the sensitivity of RD further into the supra-τ(c) scale by up to a factor of two (motion up to 25 μs). From the data obtained with these techniques and methodology, the importance of the supra-τ(c) scale for protein function and molecular recognition is becoming increasingly clearer as the connection between motion on the supra-τ(c) scale and protein functionality from the experimental side is further strengthened with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Symmetry of the gradient profile as second experimental dimension in the short-time expansion of the apparent diffusion coefficient as measured with NMR diffusometry.

    PubMed

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Zong, Fangrong; Hertel, Stefan; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent apparent diffusion coefficient as measured by pulsed gradient NMR can be used to estimate parameters of porous structures including the surface-to-volume ratio and the mean curvature of pores. In this work, the short-time diffusion limit and in particular the influence of the temporal profile of diffusion gradients on the expansion as proposed by Mitra et al. (1993) is investigated. It is shown that flow-compensated waveforms, i.e. those whose first moment is zero, are blind to the term linear in observation time, which is the term that is proportional to mean curvature and surface permeability. A gradient waveform that smoothly interpolates between flow-compensated and bipolar waveform is proposed and the degree of flow-compensation is used as a second experimental dimension. This two-dimensional ansatz is shown to yield an improved precision when characterizing the confining domain. This technique is demonstrated with simulations and in experiments performed with cylindrical capillaries of 100 μm radius.

  1. A method for helical RNA global structure determination in solution using small-angle x-ray scattering and NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbu; Zuo, Xiaobing; Yu, Ping; Xu, Huan; Starich, Mary R; Tiede, David M; Shapiro, Bruce A; Schwieters, Charles D; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2009-10-30

    We report a "top-down" method that uses mainly duplexes' global orientations and overall molecular dimension and shape restraints, which were extracted from experimental NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering data, respectively, to determine global architectures of RNA molecules consisting of mostly A-form-like duplexes. The method is implemented in the G2G (from global measurement to global structure) toolkit of programs. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method by determining the global structure of a 71-nt RNA using experimental data. The backbone root-mean-square deviation of the ensemble of the calculated global structures relative to the X-ray crystal structure is 3.0+/-0.3 A using the experimental data and is only 2.5+/-0.2 A for the three duplexes that were orientation restrained during the calculation. The global structure simplifies interpretation of multidimensional nuclear Overhauser spectra for high-resolution structure determination. The potential general application of the method for RNA structure determination is discussed. PMID:19666030

  2. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Guangjin E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Vega, Alexander J. E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Polenova, Tatyana E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear {sup 1}H-X (X = {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 31}P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the {sup 1}H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the {sup 1}H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from {sup 1}H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the {sup 1}H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [{sup 15}N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  3. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-01

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear 1H-X (X = 13C, 15N, 31P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the 1H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the 1H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from 1H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the 1H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-13C,15N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate 1H-15N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-13C,15N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  4. Northwest Africa 6693: A new type of FeO-rich, low-Δ17O, poikilitic cumulate achondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Rubin, Alan E.; Isa, Junko; Brittenham, Steve; Ahn, Insu; Choi, Byeon-Gak

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Africa 6693 is a new type of achondrite, with a unique combination of oxygen-isotopic composition (low Δ17O: -1.08‰; also δ17O = 1.19‰) and FeO-rich, low mg bulk composition. A mode (in vol%) shows 70% pyroxene, 16% olivine and 13% feldspar, along with 0.6% Cr-spinel, and 0.4% NiFe metal (awaruite). Its coarse-poikilitic texture, with pigeonite oikocrysts up to 14 mm, as well as the subchondritic MgO/SiO2 of the rock's bulk composition, indicate origin as an igneous cumulate. The cumulus phases included pigeonite and olivine, and the parent magma was probably also saturated with feldspar, which occurs mainly as anhedral, yet optically continuous, grains intergrown with the pyroxene. The mafic silicates are uniformly ferroan: pigeonite near En57Wo3.2 and olivine near Fo49. The feldspar is uniformly albitic, near Ab92, except for a single tiny grain of Ab57Or43. However, the albite features diverse K/Ca (Or/An) ratios: ranging from consistently ˜0.46 in one end of the oblong NWA 6693 stone, to 5.2 in an olivine-rich enclave that consists mostly of micrographic olivine-feldspar intergrowth. Also, siderophile and incompatible element data show heterogeneity among samples from different regions of this large cumulate. The rock was probably neither an orthocumulate nor an adcumulate, and the proportion of "trapped liquid" probably varied from place to place. After initial crystallization, a shock event caused very minor brecciation, and pervasively mobilized linear-arcuate trails of microinclusions (minute oxides, mostly) and bubbles. A minor proportion of additional melt was formed within, and/or infiltrated into, the rock and formed discrete overgrowth mantles, recognizable based on unusual scarcity of microinclusions, on some pyroxenes. Final cooling, based on mineral-equilibration temperatures, occurred at a moderate rate by intrusive-igneous standards. Olivine, metal, and sulfide phases are all very Ni-rich (e.g., olivine NiO averages 0.77 wt

  5. Glutamatergic and GABAergic energy metabolism measured in the rat brain by (13) C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Gruetter, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Energy metabolism supports both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission processes. This study investigated the specific contribution of astrocytic metabolism to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission that remained to be ilucidated in vivo. Therefore, we measured (13)C incorporation into brain metabolites by dynamic (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 14.1 T in rats under α-chloralose anaesthesia during infusion of [1,6-(13)C]glucose. The enhanced sensitivity at 14.1 T allowed to quantify incorporation of (13) C into the three aliphatic carbons of GABA non-invasively. Metabolic fluxes were determined with a mathematical model of brain metabolism comprising glial, glutamatergic and GABAergic compartments. GABA synthesis rate was 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. GABA-glutamine cycle was 0.053 ± 0.003 μmol/g/min and accounted for 22 ± 1% of total neurotransmitter cycling between neurons and glia. Cerebral glucose oxidation was 0.47 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min, of which 35 ± 1% and 7 ± 1% was diverted to the glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid cycles, respectively. The remaining fraction of glucose oxidation was in glia, where 12 ± 1% of the TCA cycle flux was dedicated to oxidation of GABA. 16 ± 2% of glutamine synthesis was provided to GABAergic neurons. We conclude that substantial metabolic activity occurs in GABAergic neurons and that glial metabolism supports both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the living rat brain. PMID:23745684

  6. Using NMR to study full intact wine bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekley, A. J.; Bruins, P.; Sisto, M.; Augustine, M. P.

    2003-03-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe and spectrometer capable of investigating full intact wine bottles is described and used to study a series of Cabernet Sauvignons with high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. Selected examples of full bottle 13C NMR spectra are also provided. The application of this full bottle NMR method to the measurement of acetic acid content, the detection of complex sugars, phenols, and trace elements in wine is discussed.

  7. Theory of 14N and 17O Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in the Single Amino Acids Occurring in the Protein Chain of Cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, R. H.; Cammarere, D.; Sahoo, N.; Nagamine, K.; Das, T. P.

    2002-07-01

    The understanding of electron transport in proteins based on a novel technique involving muon spin rotation (μSR)measurements is a topic of great current interest. The technique, which involves study of spin relaxation of a positive muon (μ+) trapped in amino acids in protein chains due to the fluctuating magnetic field that the moving electron produces, is based on the premise that the electron is generated by ionization of a muonium (Mu) which was trapped at the same site as the μ+ left behind. In attempting to test this premise from first-principles for the Cytochrome c (Cyt c) system in which recent μSR measurements have been made, we have carried out Hartree- Fock investigations of the electronic structures of the bare amino acids and amino acids with + and Mu trapped at the oxygen of the C=O group common to all amino acids. With the aim that the comparison of theoretically predicted experimental nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters will provide a useful test of the electron distribution in the amino acids of Cyt c, we present results for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (e2qQ) and asymmetry parameters (η) for the bare amino acids and the amino acids with trapped μ+ and Mu. The trends in 2 and for 14N and 17O between the various amino acids, as well as the changes in these parameters in the presence of μ+ and Mu are being analyzed. It would be helpful to have experimental data for e2qQ and to η compare with our predictions for the amino acids as they occur in vitro in polycrystalline Cyt c in which the SR measurements have been carried out. It is also hoped that the μSR technique will be able to provide experimental data on e2qQ and for the 14N and 17O nuclei to compare with our predictions

  8. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  9. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  10. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  11. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  12. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  13. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties.

  14. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  15. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  16. Site-resolved multiple-quantum filtered correlations and distance measurements by magic-angle spinning NMR: Theory and applications to spins with weak to vanishing quadrupolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Eliav, U; Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2016-01-14

    We discuss and analyze four magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR methods that can be used to measure internuclear distances and to obtain correlation spectra between a spin I = 1/2 and a half-integer spin S > 1/2 having a small quadrupolar coupling constant. Three of the methods are based on the heteronuclear multiple-quantum and single-quantum correlation experiments, that is, high rank tensors that involve the half spin and the quadrupolar spin are generated. Here, both zero and single-quantum coherence of the half spins are allowed and various coherence orders of the quadrupolar spin are generated, and filtered, via active recoupling of the dipolar interaction. As a result of generating coherence orders larger than one, the spectral resolution for the quadrupolar nucleus increases linearly with the coherence order. Since the formation of high rank tensors is independent of the existence of a finite quadrupolar interaction, these experiments are also suitable to materials in which there is high symmetry around the quadrupolar spin. A fourth experiment is based on the initial quadrupolar-driven excitation of symmetric high order coherences (up to p = 2S, where S is the spin number) and subsequently generating by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction higher rank (l + 1 or higher) tensors that involve also the half spins. Due to the nature of this technique, it also provides information on the relative orientations of the quadrupolar and dipolar interaction tensors. For the ideal case in which the pulses are sufficiently strong with respect to other interactions, we derive analytical expressions for all experiments as well as for the transferred echo double resonance experiment involving a quadrupolar spin. We show by comparison of the fitting of simulations and the analytical expressions to experimental data that the analytical expressions are sufficiently accurate to provide experimental (7)Li-(13)C distances in a complex of lithium, glycine, and water. Discussion

  17. Relationship between the crystallization rates of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione, and their molecular mobility as measured by their enthalpy relaxation and (1)H NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Aso, Y; Yoshioka, S; Kojima, S

    2000-03-01

    Isothermal crystallization of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione was studied at temperatures above and below their glass transition temperatures (T(g)). A sharp decrease in the crystallization rate with decreasing temperature was observed for phenobarbital and flopropione, such that no crystallization was observed at temperatures 20-30 degrees C lower than their T(g) within ordinary experimental time periods. In contrast, the crystallization rate of nifedipine decreased moderately with decreasing temperature, and considerable crystallization was observed at 40 degrees C below its T(g) within 4 months. The molecular mobility of these amorphous drugs was assessed by enthalpy relaxation and (1)H-NMR relaxation measurements. The enthalpy relaxation time of nifedipine was smaller than that of phenobarbital or flopropinone at the same T - T(g) values, suggesting higher molecular mobility of nifedipine. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) decreased markedly at temperature above T(g). The slope of the Arrhenius type plot of the T(1rho) for nifedipine protons changed at about 10 degrees C below the T(g), whereas the slope for phenobarbital protons became discontinuous at about 10 degrees C above the T(g). Even at temperatures below its T(g), the spin-spin relaxation process of nifedipine could be described by the sum of its Gaussian relaxation, which is characteristic of solid protons, and its Lorentzian relaxation, which is characteristic of protons with higher mobility. In contrast, no Lorentzian relaxation was observed for phenobarbital or flopropione at temperatures below their T(g). These results also suggest that nifedipine has higher molecular mobility than phenobarbital and flopropione at temperatures below T(g). The faster crystallization of nifedipine than that of phenobarbital or flopropione observed at temperatures below its T(g) may be partly ascribed to its higher molecular mobility at these temperatures.

  18. On the introduction of {sup 17}O+p reaction rates evaluated through the THM in AGB nucleosynthesis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-05-09

    The rates for the {sup 17}O(p,αα{sup 14}N, {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 18}F and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions deduced trough the Trojan Horse Method (THM) have been introduced into a state-of-the-art asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis and cool bottom process. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis.

  19. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  20. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  1. The interstellar C18O/C17O ratio in the solar neighbourhood: The ρ Ophiuchus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Brand, J.; Henkel, C.

    2005-02-01

    Observations of up to ten carbon monoxide (CO and isotopomers) transitions are presented to study the interstellar C18O/C17O ratio towards 21 positions in the nearby (d˜140 pc) low-mass star forming cloud ρ Oph. A map of the C18O J=1-0 distribution of parts of the cloud is also shown. An average 12C18O/12C17O isotopomeric ratio of 4.11 ± 0.14, reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratio, is derived from Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) calculations. From LTE column densities we derive a ratio of 4.17±0.26. These calculations also show that the kinetic temperature decreases from about 30 K in the cloud envelope to about 10 K in the cloud cores. This decrease is accompanied by an increase of the average molecular hydrogen density from 104 cm-3 to ⪆105 cm-3. Towards some lines of sight C18O optical depths reach values of order unity. Based on observations collected with the Swedish/ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO 62.I-0752). All spectra (some of which are shown in Fig. \\ref{spectra}) are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/430/549

  2. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reaction rate determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-24

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of 'presolar' grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  3. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  4. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  5. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  6. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  7. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. Single crystal to single crystal topochemical photoreactions: measuring the degree of disorder in the [2+2] photodimerization of trans-cinnamic acid using single-crystal 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nieuwendaal, Ryan C; Mattler, Sarah J; Bertmer, Marko; Hayes, Sophia E

    2011-05-19

    A single crystal of α-trans-cinnamic acid was synthesized with a (13)C-label at the β-carbon position and photoreacted to yield the [2+2] cycloaddition product, α-truxillic acid. (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization (CP) single-crystal NMR experiments were performed on the unreacted and sequentially photoreacted samples for different goniometer orientations, and the spectra were simulated using the SIMMOL and SIMPSON software packages. Atomic coordinates from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data were used as inputs in the simulations, which allowed the chemical shift tensor to be precisely measured and related to the unit cell (or molecular) reference frame of cinnamic acid. The line widths of the (13)C resonances observed at different goniometer rotations were utilized to estimate the orientational dispersion of the cinnamic acid species, which ultimately provides a measure of disorder in the single crystal. The photoreacted sample, a solid solution of cinnamic and truxillic acids, maintained its single-crystal nature, even up to 44% conversion to truxillic acid, keeping its P2(1)/n symmetry. Upon photoirradiation, however, a slight loss of order was observed in the cinnamic acid species as evidenced by an increase in the (13)C NMR line widths, demonstrating that NMR can be used to monitor subtle orientational imperfections in single crystal to single crystal photoreactions.

  11. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations and GIPAW NMR Calculations of a Lithium Borate Glass Melt.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Eiji; Takahashi, Takafumi; Iwadate, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-14

    The atomic structure of a molten 0.3Li2O-0.7B2O3 glass at 1250 K was investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) method was then employed for computing the chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant of (11)B, (17)O, and (7)Li from 764 AIMD derived structures. The chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant distributions were directly estimated from the dynamical structure of the molten glass. (11)B NMR parameters of well-known structural units such as the three-coordinated ring, nonring, and four-coordinated tetrahedron were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study, more detailed classification of B units was presented based on the number of O species bonded to the B atoms. This highlights the limitations of (11)B NMR sensitivity for resolving (11)B local environment using the experimentally obtained spectra only. The (17)O NMR parameter distributions can theoretically resolve the bridging and nonbridging O atoms with different structural units such as nonring, single boroxol ring, and double boroxol ring. Slight but clear differences in the number of bridging O atoms surrounding Li that have not been reported experimentally were observed in the theoretically obtained (7)Li NMR parameters. PMID:27010637

  12. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  13. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  14. Solid-State ¹⁷O NMR studies of organic and biological molecules: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    This Trends article highlights the recent advances published between 2012 and 2015 in solid-state (17)O NMR for organic and biological molecules. New developments in the following areas are described: (1) new oxygen-containing functional groups, (2) metal organic frameworks, (3) pharmaceuticals, (4) probing molecular motion in organic solids, (5) dynamic nuclear polarization, and (6) paramagnetic coordination compounds. For each of these areas, the author offers his personal views on important problems to be solved and possible future directions.

  15. On the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.; Dudkin, V. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Myazin, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    A new procedure for determining the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers is considered. The procedure is based on mathematical processing of experimental data that are related to measuring the gradient of a nutation-line slope at the point at which an inverted NMR signal crosses zero. The procedure allows one to determine the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers for resonance frequencies of magnetic-field measurements within a range of 0.5 Hz to 840 MHz.

  16. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  18. An NMR study and ab initio molecular orbital calculation of substituted benzofuroxans and the salt of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmoch, P.; Wiench, J. W.; Stefaniak, L.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-09-01

    13C, 15N and 17O NMR data are reported for a series of substituted benzofuroxans in aprotic and acidic solutions and for a potassium salt of a substituted benzofuroxan. Some of the title compounds can exhibit fast furoxan valence equilibrium at room temperature regardless of a solvent used, whereas for the others no evidence of above-mentioned process exists. The NMR parameters most sensitive to salt formation are the chemical shifts of the C7, N1, N3 and all of the oxygen nuclei. Hence these are reported as the most satisfactory chemical shifts to be used in distinguishing between the salt and non-ionic forms of the substituted benzofuroxans studied. Calculated energies at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory for both tautomeric forms (N1- and N3-oxide) of some compounds studied are used for predicting the tautomeric equilibrium constants. Absolute 17O shieldings are employed in the reversal of the assignments of 17O NMR signals existing in the literature.

  19. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  20. Dicobalt-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound, [(α(2)-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-): a potent species for water oxidation, C-H bond activation, and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Barats-Damatov, Delina; Shimon, Linda J W; Weiner, Lev; Schreiber, Roy E; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Poblet, Josep M; de Graaf, Coen; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-02-01

    High-valent oxo compounds of transition metals are often implicated as active species in oxygenation of hydrocarbons through carbon-hydrogen bond activation or oxygen transfer and also in water oxidation. Recently, several examples of cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation have been reported, and cobalt(IV) species have been suggested as active intermediates. A reactive species, formally a dicobalt(IV)-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound [(α2-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-), [(POMCo)2O], has now been isolated and characterized by the oxidation of a monomeric [α2-P2W17O61Co(II)(H2O)](8-), [POMCo(II)H2O], with ozone in water. The crystal structure shows a nearly linear Co-O-Co moiety with a Co-O bond length of ∼1.77 Å. In aqueous solution [(POMCo)2O] was identified by (31)P NMR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Reactivity studies showed that [(POMCo)2O]2O] is an active compound for the oxidation of H2O to O2, direct oxygen transfer to water-soluble sulfoxides and phosphines, indirect epoxidation of alkenes via a Mn porphyrin, and the selective oxidation of alcohols by carbon-hydrogen bond activation. The latter appears to occur via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Density functional and CASSCF calculations strongly indicate that the electronic structure of [(POMCo)2O]2O] is best defined as a compound having two cobalt(III) atoms with two oxidized oxygen atoms.

  1. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  2. Gadolinium heteropoly complex K 17[Gd(P 2W 17O 61) 2] as a potential MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guoying; Feng, Jianghua; Wu, Huifeng; Pei, Fengkui; Fang, Ke; Lei, Hao

    2004-10-01

    Gadolinium heteropoly complex K17[Gd(P2W17O61)2] has been evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments as a potential contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The thermal analysis and conductivity study indicate that this complex has good thermal stability and wide pH stability range. The T1 relaxivity is 7.59 mM-1 s-1 in aqueous solution and 7.97 mM-1 s-1 in 0.725 mmol l-1 bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution at 25 °C and 9.39 T, respectively. MR imaging of three male Sprague-Dawley rats showed remarkable enhancement in rat liver after intravenous injection, which persisted longer than with Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity increased by 57.1±16.9% during the whole imaging period at 0.082 mmol kg-1dose. Our preliminary in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that K17[Gd(P2W17O61)2] is a potential liver-specific MRI contrast agent.

  3. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  4. An Experimental Study on What Controls the Ratios of 18O/16O and 17O/16O of O2 During Microbial Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Ward, B. B.; Fischer, W. W.; Bender, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios of atmospheric and dissolved oceanic O2 are key biogeochemical tracers of total photosynthesis and respiration on global to local length scales and glacial/interglacial time scales (Luz et al., 1999). Critical to the use of these ratios as biogeochemical tracers is knowledge of how they are affected by production, consumption, and transport of O2. We present new measurements of O2 respiration by E. coli and N. oceanus, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, to test three assumptions of isotopically enabled models of the O2 cycle: (i) laboratory-measured respiratory 18O/16O isotope effects (18α) of microorganisms are constant under all experimental and natural conditions (e.g., temperature and growth rate); (ii) the respiratory 'mass law' relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O [17α = (18α)β] is universal; and (iii) 18α and β for aerobic ammonia and organic carbon oxidation are identical. For E. coli, we find that both 18α and β are variable. From 37°C to 15°C, 18α varies linearly with temperature from 17 to 14‰, and β varies linearly from 0.513 to 0.508. 18α and β do not appear to vary with growth rate (as tested using different carbon sources). Both 18α and β are lower than previous observations for bacteria: 18α = 17-20‰ (Kiddon et al., 1993) and β = 0.515 (Luz and Barkan, 2005). We were able to simulate the observed temperature dependence of 18α and β using a model of respiration with two isotopically discriminating steps: O2 binding to cytochrome bo oxidase (the respiratory enzyme) and reduction of O2 to H2O. Finally, initial results on N. oceanus suggest it has similar values for 18α and β as previously studied aerobic bacteria that consume organic carbon, providing the first support for assumption (iii). Based on these results, isotopically constrained biogeochemical models of O2 cycling may need to consider a temperature dependence for 18α and β for microbial respiration. For example, these results may

  5. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  6. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  7. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  9. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  10. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  11. Magnetic isotope effects in the photolysis of dibenzyl ketone on porous silica. /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O enrichments

    SciTech Connect

    Turro, N.J.; Cheng, C.C.; Wan, P.; Chung, C.; Mahler, W.

    1985-04-25

    The photolysis of dibenzyl ketone (DBK) on porous silica has been investigated. Both /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O isotopic enrichment in the ketone remaining after partial photolysis is demonstrated. The efficiency of /sup 13/C enrichment was found to be relatively insensitive to the average pore diameter of the silica host, to the percent coverage by DBK, and to the application of an external magnetic field. A significant dependence of /sup 13/C enrichment with temperature, with a maximum in the enrichment-temperature profile, was observed. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between pathways available to the triplet C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 2/COCH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ radical pair produced by photolysis of DBK.

  12. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  13. Combined NMR-observation of cold denaturation in supercooled water and heat denaturation enables accurate measurement of deltaC(p) of protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Szyperski, Thomas; Mills, Jeffrey L; Perl, Dieter; Balbach, Jochen

    2006-04-01

    Cold and heat denaturation of the double mutant Arg 3-->Glu/Leu 66-->Glu of cold shock protein Csp of Bacillus caldolyticus was monitored using 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy in the temperature range from -12 degrees C in supercooled water up to +70 degrees C. The fraction of unfolded protein, f (u), was determined as a function of the temperature. The data characterizing the unfolding transitions could be consistently interpreted in the framework of two-state models: cold and heat denaturation temperatures were determined to be -11 degrees C and 39 degrees C, respectively. A joint fit to both cold and heat transition data enabled the accurate spectroscopic determination of the heat capacity difference between native and denatured state, DeltaC(p) of unfolding. The approach described in this letter, or a variant thereof, is generally applicable and promises to be of value for routine studies of protein folding.

  14. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  15. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  16. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  17. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  18. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  19. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  20. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  1. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  2. Isotopic enhancements of 17O and 18O from solar wind particles in the lunar regolith.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Trevor R; Holden, Peter; Norman, Marc D; Clarke, Jodi

    2006-04-01

    Differences in isotopic abundances between meteorites and rocks on Earth leave unclear the true composition of the gas out of which the Solar System formed. The Sun should have preserved in its outer layers the original composition, and recent work has indicated that the solar wind is enriched in 16O, relative to Earth, Mars and bulk meteorites. This suggests that self-shielding of CO due to photo-dissociation, which is a well understood process in molecular clouds, also led to evolution in the isotopic abundances in the early Solar System. Here we report measurements of oxygen isotopic abundances in lunar grains that were recently exposed to the solar wind. We find that 16O is underabundant, opposite to an earlier finding based on studies of ancient metal grains. Our result, however, is more difficult to understand within the context of current models, because there is no clear way to make 16O more abundant in Solar System rocks than in the Sun.

  3. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  4. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  5. NMR in a Diamond Anvil Pressure Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Matthew; Dioguardi, Adam; Weir, Samuel; Bush, Blaine; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Deemyad, Shanti; Curro, Nichlas

    We present recent advances in the use of diamond anvil pressure cells in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. This technique allows access to new regions of the phase diagrams of iron pnictide and heavy fermion materials, and promises to allow NMR experiments under pressures not previously accessible.

  6. NMR phase noise in bitter magnets.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, E E; Calder, E S; Thomas, G W; Mitrović, V F; Bachman, H N; Halperin, W P; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the temporal instability of a high field resistive Bitter magnet through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This instability leads to transverse spin decoherence in repeated and accumulated NMR experiments as is normally performed during signal averaging. We demonstrate this effect via Hahn echo and Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation experiments in a 23-T resistive magnet. Quantitative analysis was found to be consistent with separate measurements of the magnetic field frequency fluctuation spectrum, as well as with independent NMR experiments performed in a magnetic field with a controlled instability. Finally, the CPMG sequence with short pulse delays is shown to be successful in recovering the intrinsic spin--spin relaxation even in the presence of magnetic field temporal instability.

  7. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  8. Indirect study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction via the {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegriti, M. G.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Vilmay, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Stanoiu, M.

    2008-04-15

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is considered the main neutron source for the s process in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In the Gamow peak, the cross section sensitively depends on the 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O (E{sub x}=6.356 MeV). In this work, we determined the astrophysical S factor through an evaluation of the {alpha} spectroscopic factor and the corresponding asymptotic normalization factor (ANC) of the 6.356 MeV state using the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O at two different incident energies. Our result confirms that the contribution of the 1/2{sup +} state is dominant at astrophysical energies. Our reaction rate at T=0.09 GK is slightly lower than the value adopted in the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates (NACRE), but two times larger than the one obtained in a recent ANC measurement.

  9. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  10. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  11. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint.

  12. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  13. Enzyme Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond–nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond–millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  14. Picoliter 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-02-01

    In this study, a 267-μm-diameter solenoid transceiver is used to acquire localized 1H NMR spectra and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 500 MHz is shown to be within 20-30% of theoretical limits formulated by considering only its resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-μm-diameter globule of triacylglycerols (∼900 mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus laevis frogs and a water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live mammalian cells (∼33 mM). In chemical shift imaging (CSI) experiments performed using a few thousand total scans, the choline methyl line is shown to have an acceptable SNR in resolved volume elements containing only 50 pL of sample, and localized spectra are resolved from just 5 pL in the Xenopus globule. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of performing 1H NMR on picoliter-scale sample volumes in biological cells and tissues and illustrate how the achieved SNR in spectroscopic images can be predicted with reasonable accuracy at microscopic spatial resolutions.

  15. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  16. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  17. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  18. NMR Investigation of Filler Effects of (Gamma) Irradiation in Polyurethane Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Gjersing, E L; Maxwell, R S; Cohenour, R

    2007-06-11

    Polyurethane and polyester elastomers have been used for decades in a wide variety of applications, from seat cushion foams to prosthetic materials to high performance adhesives. Adiprene LW-520 is a polyurethane-based adhesive used in a number of U. S. Department of Energy applications. Several investigations have been performed to determine aging properties of polyurethanes. For example, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times have been shown to be sensitive to thermal degradation in polyurethanes. Detailed information about the exact nature of the oxidative thermal degradation in related materials has also been obtained via {sup 17}O and {sup 13}C NMR, with additional insight into morphological changes being obtained using {sup 1}H spin diffusion experiments. Radiation has also been shown to change the physical and mechanical properties of the polymers; in fact many polyurethanes are cured using radiation to affect the isocyanate and free radical reactive groups, thus controlling the properties such as thermal or solvent resistance.

  19. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  20. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  1. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  2. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed.

  3. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  4. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  5. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  6. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  7. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of

  8. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials. PMID:26730889

  9. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of coumarin-stained beads: quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle with solid-state 19F-NMR and measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Huber, Alexandra; Behnke, Thomas; Würth, Christian; Jaeger, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2012-04-17

    The rational design of nano- and micrometer-sized particles with tailor-made optical properties for biological, diagnostic, and photonic applications requires tools to characterize the signal-relevant properties of these typically scattering bead suspensions. This includes methods for the preferably nondestructive quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle and the measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields and absorption coefficients of suspensions of fluorescent beads for material performance optimization and comparison. Here, as a first proof-of-concept, we present the first time determination of the number of dye molecules per bead using nondestructive quantitative ((19)F) NMR spectroscopy and 1000 nm-sized carboxylated polystyrene particles loaded with varying concentrations of the laser dye coumarin 153 containing a CF(3) group. Additionally, the signal-relevant optical properties of these dye-loaded particles were determined in aqueous suspension in comparison to the free dye in solvents of different polarity with a custom-built integrating sphere setup that enables spectrally resolved measurements of emission, transmission, and reflectance as well absolute fluorescence quantum yields. These measurements present an important step toward absolute brightness values and quantitative fluorescence analysis with particle systems that can be exploited, for example, for optical imaging techniques and different fluorescence assays as well as for the metrological traceability of fluorescence methods. PMID:22404690

  11. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies of photoexcited /sup 17/O-benzophenone. Orbital rotation in the lowest triplet state

    SciTech Connect

    Waeckerle, G.; Baer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Dinse, K.H.; Yamauchi, S.; Kashmar, R.J.; Pratt, D.W.

    1982-03-01

    The magnetically active isotope of oxygen /sup 17/O has been used to probe the changes in the electron charge and spin density distributions in oxygen valence orbitals which occur when benzophenone is excited to its lowest triplet state. The data obtained include the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) and electron-nuclear double resonance spectra at both zero and high magnetic fields. New methods of analysis of zero-field ODMR spectra, appropriate when the second-order hyperfine splitting exceeds the quadrupole coupling, are described. This analysis yields the principal values of the electron fine-structure (D), oxygen hyperfine (A), and oxygen quadrupole (Q) tensors, and the orientation of their principal axes with respect to the molecular frame. It is found, consistent with expectations for an n..pi..( state, that the direction of the largest component of Q is different from that of the ground state. It is also found, by two independent methods, that the principal transverse axes of A and Q do not conform to the local C/sub 2v/ symmetry axes of the carbonyl group. This result is interpreted to mean that the axis of the n-type oxygen 2p orbital is rotated out of the carbonyl plane, a rotation which appears to be direct consequence of n..pi..(/..pi pi..( configurational mixing. In agreement with this, the principal values of D, A, and Q are different from those expected for a ''pure'' n..pi..( state. Other consequences of n..pi..(/..pi pi..( mixing, not only in benzophenone but also in the lowest triplet states of other aromatic carbonyls, are discussed briefly.

  12. Preliminary Paleointensity Results Obtained Along Two Adjacent Ridge Segments of the East Pacific Rise (15o-17oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Carlut, J.; Kent, D. V.; Kent, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    The 16oN segment north of the Orozco transform fault is the shallowest and broadest along more than 5000 km of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 23oS to 23oN. Paleointensity experiments using the Thellier paleointensity method have been conducted on more than 35 lava samples along this magmatically inflated segment and along the more `typical' adjacent 17oN segment. Our goal is to constrain the timing and thus the emplacement mechanism of lava flows along the crest of the EPR. On-going detailed geochemical analysis on the same samples independently constrain the major lava flow sequences [Donnelly et al., Eos Trans, 79, p. F832, 1998]. Reliable preliminary results are obtained on multiple glassy basaltic samples from 25 dredges and wax cores samples. These are distributed over ~100 km along-axis, mainly within a few hundred meters (~2000 years) of the morphological axis. Our paleointensity dating technique relies on calibrated portions of the geomagnetic reference curve to constrain the timing of the lava fields. The inflated 16oN segment is characterized by very recent activities (probably less than 50 years old) along with much older flows (several hundreds years old). Samples collected off-axis and near the end of the 16oN segment have low paleointensities and are thus thought to be significantly older. There is also a weak tendency for older samples to occur along tectonized sections of the ridge axis, consistent with waning magmatism in those areas. With the help of geochemical data, flows are classified according to eruptive cycles along the neovolcanic zone.

  13. Distance measurements in disodium ATP hydrates by means of 31P double quantum two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potrzebowski, M. J.; Gajda, J.; Ciesielski, W.; Montesinos, I. M.

    2006-04-01

    POST-C7 measurements provide constraints allowing distinguishing crystal lattice organization and establishing intra and/or intermolecular distances between phosphorus atoms of triphosphate chains for different hydrates of disodium ATP salts. Double-quantum efficiency in function of excitation time obtained from series of two-dimensional spectra for POST-C7 experiments was used to set up of buildup curves and semi-quantitative measure of 31P- 31P length.

  14. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-04-26

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data.

  15. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  17. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions. PMID:26857803

  18. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  19. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  20. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  1. Measurement of carbon flux through the MEP pathway for isoprenoid synthesis by (31)P-NMR spectroscopy after specific inhibition of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate reductase. Effect of light and temperature.

    PubMed

    Mongélard, Gaëlle; Seemann, Myriam; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Rohmer, Michel; Bligny, Richard; Rivasseau, Corinne

    2011-08-01

    The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and the mevalonate pathways are the unique synthesis routes for the precursors of all isoprenoids. An original mean to measure the carbon flux through the MEP pathway in plants is proposed by using cadmium as a total short-term inhibitor of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MEcDP) reductase (GcpE) and measuring the accumulation rate of its substrate MEcDP by (31) P-NMR spectroscopy. The MEP pathway metabolic flux was determined in spinach (Spinacia oleracea), pea (Pisum sativum), Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium) and boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) leaves. In spinach, flux values were compared with the synthesis rate of major isoprenoids. The flux increases with light intensity (fourfold in the 200-1200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) PPFR range) and temperature (sevenfold in the 25-37 °C range). The relationship with the light and the temperature dependency of isoprenoid production downstream of the MEP pathway is discussed.

  2. A study of hydrogen-bond dynamics in carboxylic acids by NMR T1 measurements: isotope effects and hydrogen-bond length dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaki, T.; Imashiro, F.; Terao, T.; Hirota, N.; Hayashi, S.

    1987-08-01

    Proton (deuteron) transfer of hydrogen bonds in benzoic, glutaric and p-formylbenzoic acids was studied by proton (deuteron) T1 measurements. Deuteration of carboxylic protons was found to increase the barriers to classical proton jumping as well as quantum-mechanical tunneling. The former barriers increase as the hydrogen-bond distance increases.

  3. LIMS for Lasers 2015 for achieving long-term accuracy and precision of δ2H, δ17O, and δ18O of waters using laser absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2015-01-01

    Although laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) instrumentation is easy to use, its incorporation into laboratory operations is not easy, owing to extensive offline manipulation of comma-separated-values files for outlier detection, between-sample memory correction, nonlinearity (δ-variation with water amount) correction, drift correction, normalization to VSMOW-SLAP scales, and difficulty in performing long-term QA/QC audits. METHODS: A Microsoft Access relational-database application, LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) for Lasers 2015, was developed. It automates LAS data corrections and manages clients, projects, samples, instrument-sample lists, and triple-isotope (δ(17) O, δ(18) O, and δ(2) H values) instrumental data for liquid-water samples. It enables users to (1) graphically evaluate sample injections for variable water yields and high isotope-delta variance; (2) correct for between-sample carryover, instrumental drift, and δ nonlinearity; and (3) normalize final results to VSMOW-SLAP scales. RESULTS: Cost-free LIMS for Lasers 2015 enables users to obtain improved δ(17) O, δ(18) O, and δ(2) H values with liquid-water LAS instruments, even those with under-performing syringes. For example, LAS δ(2) HVSMOW measurements of USGS50 Lake Kyoga (Uganda) water using an under-performing syringe having ±10 % variation in water concentration gave +31.7 ± 1.6 ‰ (2-σ standard deviation), compared with the reference value of +32.8 ± 0.4 ‰, after correction for variation in δ value with water concentration, between-sample memory, and normalization to the VSMOW-SLAP scale. CONCLUSIONS: LIMS for Lasers 2015 enables users to create systematic, well-founded instrument templates, import δ(2) H, δ(17) O, and δ(18) O results, evaluate performance with automatic graphical plots, correct for δ nonlinearity due to variable water concentration, correct for between-sample memory, adjust for drift, perform VSMOW-SLAP normalization, and

  4. Pulsed NMRON relaxation measurements and thermometric NMR in the quasi-2 dimensional femomagnet: Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gros, M.; Kotlicld, A.; Turrell, B. G.

    1990-08-01

    The measurement of the field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 54Mn in the two manganese sites in the quasi-2 dimensional ferromagnet Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 20 obtained by the pulsed NMRON technique is reported. This technique allows the observation in low fields of the higher frequency resonance which previously could not be measured by CW methods. The anomaly in the 54Mn relaxation time observed in the 55Mn level crossing regime is discussed, and the thermometric observation of the field dependence and lice width of the resonance lines from the abundant 55Mn spin systems is reported and related to the 54Mn spin-lattice relaxation behavior.

  5. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  6. Water absorption in mortar determined by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Hazrati, K; Kopinga, K; Marchand, J

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers the possibility to determine moisture profiles in porous building materials. Moreover, the relaxation of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal can provide additional information on the water distribution in the microstructure. For mortar, it is shown that the transverse relaxation yields information on the distribution of water in the gel pores and capillary pores. Moisture profiles and relaxation were measured during water absorption. The effect of the drying treatment on the microstructure and the water absorption was investigated.

  7. Self-diffusion measurements of methanol and 1-decanol in supercritical CO{sub 2} by {sup 13}C pulsed field gradient NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, S.; Mayne, C.L.; Grant, D.M.; Taylor, C.M.V.

    1997-10-01

    A small amount of a highly polar compound, such as methanol, is frequently added to supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide to enhance its ability to dissolve polar molecules in SCF separation technology. Few diffusion coefficients in SCF mixtures have been reported in the literature. The pulsed field gradient spin-echo technique (PGSE) has been used extensively to measure self-diffusion in neat monohydric alcohols under pressure. Hurle et al. and Luedemann et al. showed that the experimental diffusion coefficients of methanol may be explained by a rough hard-sphere model (RHS) with a roughness parameter, A. In this paper, diffusion measurements are reported for CO{sub 2}-methanol and CO{sub 2}-decanol mixtures in supercritical fluids. Since methanol in CO{sub 2} is primarily monomeric at low concentration, the RHS model, that is accurate for most simple, non-associated liquids, should apply. Previous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation studies in SCF CO{sub 2} suggest a large local solvent density enhancement, or solvent clustering, near a alcohol solute molecule under SCF conditions. If solvent clustering occurs in the vicinity of alcohol solute molecules, it should affect the diffusion coefficients. The authors have made the requisite measurements and found that they corroborate their previous spin-relaxation data.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance crystallography of 17O-enriched oxycobaltomyoglobin: Stereoelectronic structure of the cobalt dioxygen system

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, L. Charles; Chien, James C. W.

    1980-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance crystallographic study was made on oxycobaltomyoglobin with the dioxygen ligand enriched to 19.1% in 17O. There are two spectroscopically distinct cobalt dioxygen species. The less abundant species, II (40%), has nonequivalent oxygen atoms with superhyperfine tensors OAα = (5, -67.5, 22.4)G and OAβ = (5.4, -83.3, 30.3)G. Together with the previously reported 59Co hyperfine tensor [Chien, J. C. W. & Dickinson, L. C. (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 2783-2787], the orbital spin densities are found to be Oα(pη) = 0.48, Oα(pζ) = -0.11, Oβ(pη) = 0.74, Oβ(pζ) = -0.16, Co(dxz) = -0.01, Co(dyz) = 0.06 for a total electron density of 1.01. The O—O axis is directed toward His-E7, suggesting a possible hydrogen bonding interaction which may contribute to the nonequivalency of the oxygen atoms; its projection approximately bisects N1—Fe—N2. The z axis of the CoA tensor is tilted at an angle of 28° from the heme normal, resulting in a Co—O—O angle of 120°. The more abundant species, I (60%), has equivalent oxygen atoms with OAγ = (12, -72.5, 20)G and orbital spin densities of Oγ(pη) = 0.54, Oγ(pζ) = -0.05, Co(dxz) = -0.02, Co(dyz) = 0.09 for a total spin density of 1.10. Although the direction cosines for this molecule cannot be precisely determined, the projection of its O—O axis approximately bisects N2—Fe—N3 and is parallel to the imidazole ring of His-F8. Increase of temperature changes g, CoA, and OA values, with the largest effect seen with OA. This temperature dependence indicates averaging of the two bond structures which are stabilized at 77 K. PMID:6246485

  9. Measurement of homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in multiple 1/2-spin systems using constant-time DQ-DRENAR NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinjun; Eckert, Hellmut

    2015-11-01

    A new pulse sequence entitled DQ-DRENAR (Double-Quantum based Dipolar Recoupling Effects Nuclear Alignment Reduction) was recently described for the quantitative measurement of magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in homonuclear spin-1/2 systems involving multiple nuclei. As described in the present manuscript, the efficiency and performance of this sequence can be significantly improved, if the measurement is done in the constant-time mode. We describe both the theoretical analysis of this method and its experimental validation of a number of crystalline model compounds, considering both symmetry-based and back-to-back (BABA) DQ-coherence excitation schemes. Based on the combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results we discuss the effect of experimental parameters such as the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), the spinning rate, and the radio frequency field inhomogeneity upon its performance. Our results indicate that constant-time (CT-) DRENAR is a method of high efficiency and accuracy for compounds with multiple homonuclear spin systems with particular promise for the analysis of stronger-coupled and short T2 spin systems.

  10. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  11. Δ17O Isotopic Investigation of Nitrate Salts Found in Co-Occurrence with Naturally Formed Perchlorate in the Mojave Desert, California, USA and the Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Parker, D.; Rech, J.; Prellwitz, J.; Michalski, G.

    2009-12-01

    Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and manmade contaminant that has been identified in soil, groundwater and surface water. Perchlorate directly affects human health by interfering with iodide uptake in the thyroid gland, which may in turn lower the production of key hormones that are needed for proper growth and development. Until recently, the Atacama Desert, Chile was thought to be the only location where perchlorate salts formed naturally. Recent work has documented the occurrence of these salts in several semi-arid regions of the United States. This study identified putatively natural sources of perchlorate in the Mojave Desert of California. Soil samples were collected from six field sites varying in geologic age. The co-occurrence of perchlorate and nitrate in caliches from the Atacama Desert and soils from the Mojave Desert was also investigated. Although the former are richer in NO3-, near-ore-grade (~5%) deposits occur in the vicinity of Death Valley National Park. Weak but significant correlations exist between ClO4- and NO3- at both locations, but the perchlorate levels are much higher (up to 800 mg/kg) in the Chilean samples than in California (<25 mg/kg). Oxygen isotopes in the nitrate were examined to identify variation within the Mojave Desert field sites, and to compare with those in samples collected from the Atacama Desert. The Mojave Desert Δ17O values ranged from 7-13‰ and those from the Atacama were between 17-21‰. This isotopic analysis revealed a dominantly atmospheric origin for the Atacama nitrate salts, and a mixture between biological nitrate and atmospherically-derived nitrate for the Mojave samples. When corrected for the percentage of atmospheric nitrate measured in the Atacama samples, the Mojave samples still contain much lower perchlorate concentrations than would be expected if the occurrence of perchlorate correlated strictly with atmospherically derived nitrate. These results indicate that the variation in the

  12. Electrostatic interplay: The interaction triangle of polyamines, silicic acid, and phosphate studied through turbidity measurements, silicomolybdic acid test, and 29Si NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jantschke, Anne; Spinde, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The discovery of long-chain polyamines as biomolecules that are tightly associated to biosilica in diatom cell walls has inspired numerous in vitro studies aiming to characterize polyamine–silica interactions. The determination of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental interest on one hand for the understanding of cell wall biogenesis in diatoms and on the other hand for designing bioinspired materials synthesis approaches. The present contribution deals with the influence of amines and polyamines upon the initial self-assembly processes taking place during polyamine-mediated silica formation in solution. The influence of phosphate upon these processes is studied. For this purpose, sodium metasilicate solutions containing additives such as polyallylamine, allylamine and others in the presence/absence of phosphate were investigated. The analyses are based mainly on turbidity measurements yielding information about the early aggregation steps which finally give rise to the formation and precipitation of silica. PMID:25551030

  13. Electrostatic interplay: The interaction triangle of polyamines, silicic acid, and phosphate studied through turbidity measurements, silicomolybdic acid test, and (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jantschke, Anne; Spinde, Katrin; Brunner, Eike

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of long-chain polyamines as biomolecules that are tightly associated to biosilica in diatom cell walls has inspired numerous in vitro studies aiming to characterize polyamine-silica interactions. The determination of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental interest on one hand for the understanding of cell wall biogenesis in diatoms and on the other hand for designing bioinspired materials synthesis approaches. The present contribution deals with the influence of amines and polyamines upon the initial self-assembly processes taking place during polyamine-mediated silica formation in solution. The influence of phosphate upon these processes is studied. For this purpose, sodium metasilicate solutions containing additives such as polyallylamine, allylamine and others in the presence/absence of phosphate were investigated. The analyses are based mainly on turbidity measurements yielding information about the early aggregation steps which finally give rise to the formation and precipitation of silica.

  14. Measurement of the lateral diffusion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine adsorbed on silica beads in the absence and presence of melittin: a 31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Paquet, M J; Dufourc, E J; Auger, M

    1998-01-01

    31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the lateral diffusion, D(L), in the fluid phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the presence and absence of melittin. The use of a spherical solid support with a radius of 320 +/- 20 nm, on which lipids and peptides are adsorbed together, and a novel way of analyzing the two-dimensional exchange patterns afforded a narrow distribution of D(L) centered at a value of (8.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(-8) cm2/s for the pure lipid system and a large distribution of D(L) spanning 1 x 10(-8) to 10 x 10(-8) cm2/s for the lipids in the presence of melittin. In addition, the determination of D(L) for nonsupported DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) suggests that the support does not slow down the lipid diffusion and that the radii of the bilayers vary from 300 to 800 nm. Finally, the DPPC-melittin complex is stabilized at the surface of the silica beads in the gel phase, opening the way to further study of the interaction between melittin and DPPC. PMID:9533697

  15. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  16. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  17. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  18. High Resolution non-Markovianity in NMR