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Sample records for 17o vt mas

  1. Understanding the symmetric line shape in the 17O MAS spectra for hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Oki, Shinobu; Deguchi, Kenzo; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state 17O Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 17O-enriched hexagonal ice, [17O]-Ih, between 173 and 253 K were presented. Marked changes in the line shape were clearly observed, indicating water molecular reorientation in the crystal structure. At 173 K, molecular motions were considered to be frozen and analysis of the 1D MAS spectrum yielded the following parameters: quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) = 6.6 ± 0.2 MHz and asymmetry parameter (ηQ) = 0.95 ± 0.05. At 232 K and above, contrary to the conventional explanation, pseudo-symmetric line shapes appeared in the 17O MAS NMR spectra arising from the contribution of second-order quadrupole interactions. As a chemical exchange model to describe these isotropic 17O MAS NMR spectra, a modified Ratcliffe model, which consider the effects of proton disorder, was proposed, and the resulting theoretical spectra could well reproduce the experimental spectra.

  2. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic–Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State 17O MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic–electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution 17O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic 17O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  3. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State (17)O MAS NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halat, David M; Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Kim, Gunwoo; Dunstan, Matthew T; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2016-09-14

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution (17)O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic (17)O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  4. Graphics Software For VT Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline

    1991-01-01

    VTGRAPH graphics software tool for DEC/VT computer terminal or terminals compatible with it, widely used by government and industry. Callable in FORTRAN or C language, library program enabling user to cope with many computer environments in which VT terminals used for window management and graphic systems. Provides PLOT10-like package plus color or shade capability for VT240, VT241, and VT300 terminals. User can easily design more-friendly user-interface programs and design PLOT10 programs on VT terminals with different computer systems. Requires ReGis graphics set terminal and FORTRAN compiler.

  5. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  6. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole.

  7. MAS and MI+ Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grice, Ila M.

    1991-01-01

    Compares the compact disc read-only-memory (CD-ROM) Magazine Article Summaries (MAS) and Magazine Index Plus Backfile (MI+) in terms of system hardware, index coverage, searching capabilities, citation display, printing citations, local holdings, and miscellaneous features and costs. Finds in favor of MAS. (DMM)

  8. VTGRAPH - GRAPHIC SOFTWARE TOOL FOR VT TERMINALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.

    1994-01-01

    VTGRAPH is a graphics software tool for DEC/VT or VT compatible terminals which are widely used by government and industry. It is a FORTRAN or C-language callable library designed to allow the user to deal with many computer environments which use VT terminals for window management and graphic systems. It also provides a PLOT10-like package plus color or shade capability for VT240, VT241, and VT300 terminals. The program is transportable to many different computers which use VT terminals. With this graphics package, the user can easily design more friendly user interface programs and design PLOT10 programs on VT terminals with different computer systems. VTGRAPH was developed using the ReGis Graphics set which provides a full range of graphics capabilities. The basic VTGRAPH capabilities are as follows: window management, PLOT10 compatible drawing, generic program routines for two and three dimensional plotting, and color graphics or shaded graphics capability. The program was developed in VAX FORTRAN in 1988. VTGRAPH requires a ReGis graphics set terminal and a FORTRAN compiler. The program has been run on a DEC MicroVAX 3600 series computer operating under VMS 5.0, and has a virtual memory requirement of 5KB.

  9. Solid-state 17O NMR of pharmaceutical compounds: salicylic acid and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianqi; Shan, Melissa; Terskikh, Victor; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Wu, Gang

    2013-08-22

    We report solid-state NMR characterization of the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors in five site-specifically (17)O-labeled samples of salicylic acid and o-acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin). High-quality (17)O NMR spectra were obtained for these important pharmaceutical compounds under both static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions at two magnetic fields, 14.0 and 21.1 T. A total of 14 (17)O QC and CS tensors were experimentally determined for the seven oxygen sites in salicylic acid and Aspirin. Although both salicylic acid and Aspirin form hydrogen bonded cyclic dimers in the solid state, we found that the potential curves for the concerted double proton transfer in these two compounds are significantly different. In particular, while the double-well potential curve in Aspirin is nearly symmetrical, it is highly asymmetrical in salicylic acid. This difference results in quite different temperature dependencies in (17)O MAS spectra of the two compounds. A careful analysis of variable-temperature (17)O MAS NMR spectra of Aspirin allowed us to obtain the energy asymmetry (ΔE) of the double-well potential, ΔE = 3.0 ± 0.5 kJ/mol. We were also able to determine a lower limit of ΔE for salicylic acid, ΔE > 10 kJ/mol. These asymmetrical features in potential energy curves were confirmed by plane-wave DFT computations, which yielded ΔE = 3.7 and 17.8 kJ/mol for Aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively. To complement the solid-state (17)O NMR data, we also obtained solid-state (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra for salicylic acid and Aspirin. Using experimental NMR parameters obtained for all magnetic nuclei present in salicylic acid and Aspirin, we found that plane-wave DFT computations can produce highly accurate NMR parameters in well-defined crystalline organic compounds.

  10. What is this? VT versus SVT

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Kumar, Anup; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Balachandran, Anil

    2013-01-01

    We present a patient who had a wide QRS tachycardia; it was initially difficult to determine whether it was superventricular tachycardia (SVT) or ventricular tachycardia (VT). By some criteria (sinus capture beats, pseudo-δ waves and wide QRS) the patient's ECG was suggestive of VT of epicardial origin. On the coronary angiogram it was found that this patient had significant coronary artery disease. He was stented with three stents and later had a full electrophysiological study .We present here the ECGs and the differential diagnosis and a brief review of the diagnostic features of epicardial VT. PMID:24064403

  11. 78 FR 48763 - Vermont Disaster #VT-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster VT-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  12. 77 FR 39559 - Vermont Disaster #VT-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster VT-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of...

  13. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  14. On the Δ17O budget of atmospheric O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Edward D.; Yeung, Laurence Y.; Kohl, Issaku E.

    2014-06-01

    We modeled the Δ17O of atmospheric O2 using 27 ordinary differential equations comprising a box model composed of the stratosphere, troposphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Results show that 57% of the deficit in 17O in O2 relative to a reference water fractionation line is the result of kinetic isotope fractionation attending the Dole effect, 33% balances the positive Δ17O of O(1D) in the stratosphere, and 10% is from evapotranspiration. The predicted Δ‧17O O2 relative to waters is -0.410‰ as measured at the δ18O of air. The value for Δ‧17O O2 varies at fixed δ18O with the concentration of atmospheric CO2, gross primary production, and net primary production as well as with reaction rates in the stratosphere. Our model prediction is consistent with our measurements of the oxygen isotopic composition of air O2 compared with rocks if rocks define a fractionation line with an intercept in δ‧17O = 103ln(δ17O/103 + 1) vs. δ‧18O = 103ln(δ18O/103 + 1) space less than SMOW but more positive than some recent measurements imply. The predicted Δ17O is less negative than that obtained from recent measurements of O2 directly against SMOW. Underestimation of Δ‧17O O2 can only be ameliorated if the integrated (bulk) Δ‧17O for stratospheric CO2 is significantly greater than measurements currently allow. Our results underscore the need for high-precision comparisons of the 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios of atmospheric O2, VSMOW, and rocks.

  15. Modernization of experimental air turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimko, Marek; Okresa, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This article briefly describes a modernization of the experimental device - air turbine (VT-400), which is a part of the research activities at the Department of Power System Engineering, University of West Bohemia (KKE-UWB). This device serves for the research of steam turbine blades within the framework of a long-term cooperation between the Department and Doosan Skoda Power (DSPW). Due to the age of the device, some necessary changes had to be performed and some obsolete components had to be replaced or new ones added. A part of this article is also a comparison with the previous state and an evaluation of the contribution after the reconstruction.

  16. Enrichment of H(2)(17)O from tap water, characterization of the enriched water, and properties of several (17)O-labeled compounds.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Brinda; Lewis, Andrew R; Plettner, Erika

    2011-01-01

    A low-abundance form of water, H(2)(17)O, was enriched from 0.04% to ∼90% by slow evaporation and fractional distillation of tap water. The density and refractive index for H(2)(17)O are reported. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of (16)O- and (17)O-1-hexanols and their trimethyl silyl ethers and of (16)O- and (17)O-hexamethyl disiloxanes was used to determine the percentage of (17)O enrichment in the H(2)(17)O. Furthermore, the chemical shifts of labeled and nonlabeled water dissolved in CDCl(3) differed sufficiently that we could verify the enrichment of H(2)(17)O. (17)O hexanol was synthesized by the reaction of iodohexane with Na(17)OH. (17)O-Labeled trimethylsilanol and (17)O-labeled hexamethyldisiloxane were prepared by the reaction of H(2)(17)O with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). To generate standards for (17)O NMR, H(2)(17)O(2), and (17)O camphor were prepared. H(2)(17)O was electrolyzed to form (17)O-labeled hydrogen peroxide which was quantified using two colorimetric assays. (17)O-Labeled camphor was prepared by exchanging the ketone oxygen of camphor using H(2)(17)O. The (17)O-labeled compounds were characterized using (17)O, (1)H, and (13)C NMR and GC-MS. While we were characterizing the labeled camphor, we also detected an unexpected oxygen exchange reaction of primary alcohols, catalyzed by electrophilic ketones such as camphor. The reaction is a displacement of the alcohol OH group by water. This is an example of the usefulness of (17)O NMR in the study of a reaction mechanism that has not been noticed previously. PMID:21128590

  17. Natural-abundance 17O NMR of monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Lauterwein, Jürgen; Sheppard, Norman

    Natural-abundance "high-resolution" 17O NMR spectra of D-glucose, D-mannose, D-galactose, and some methoxy derivatives of D-glucose were recorded in aqueous solution. The sensitivity and spectral resolution was improved by optimizing the accumulation and manipulation of data. The water solvent peak was suppressed through use of 17O-depleted water or displaced by addition of paramagnetic shift reagents. With Dy 3+ the 17O NMR spectrum of D-glucose remained unaltered; however, the water peak was shifted outside the carbohydrate spectral region. The 17O NMR resonances were assigned from earlier data for some specifically 17O-enriched monosaccharide derivatives. The anomeric hydroxyl resonances could also be located because of their exchange with the 17O-depleted water. Although the chemical shifts of the monosacharides generally parallel the sequence of chemical shifts for simple primary and secondary alcohols and substituted ethers, several exceptions were found and discussed in terms of steric and electrostatic repulsive forces between oxygens.

  18. Corrections for 17O interference, effects on Δ47 determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; He, B.; Colman, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The measurements of 13C on CO2 samples are routinely corrected for 17O contribution to the m/z 45 signal (Craig, 1957; Santrock, et al., 1985). The 17O abundance affects the Δ47 calculation, and the amount of 17O present is routinely determined using the relationship between 18O and 17O presented in IAEA TECDOC 825 (Dennis, et al., 2011; Huntington, et al., 2009; Gonfiantini, et al., 1995). In 2010, the IAEA released new recommendations for 17O determinations to be used for 13C corrections (Brand, et al., 2010). We compare the effect of using different ways to determine 17O interference, as well as using the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) value for VPDB (Brand, et al., 2010), on heated gas lines, model data, and on CO2 gases made to have similar δ47 and Δ47, but with highly contrasting δ18O and δ13C values. The 2010 IAEA recommendations give a better fit for heated gas data than the TECDOC 825 recommendations. Comparing differences in the data points relative to their respective fitted lines, we see differences on the order of 5 to 10 ppm in Δ47. That corresponds to a systematic error of 2 °C in the temperature estimate (room temperature range), and one that varies with δ13C and δ18O, but not necessarily with δ47. The preliminary work on equilibrated CO2 gases having similar δ47, but very different δ13C and δ18O, showed large (ca. 70 ppm) differences in Δ47 when using the (standard) TECDOC 825 recommendations. The Δ47 values were much closer when the 2010 IUPAC recommendations were used. This also serves as a test of the updated factors for 17O determination, as well as the overall robustness of the Δ47 measurement.

  19. 27. Photocopy of 1968 repair drawing for 'VT. Route #123 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of 1968 repair drawing for 'VT. Route #123 over Conn. River' by State of Vermont Department of Highways. (Filed with N.H. Department of Transportation, Bridge Design Division plan archives, Concord, N.H.) Sheet: 4 of 8 Abutment Repair Details August, 1968 - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  20. 42. View of Woodstock green, looking northeast along Vt. Route ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. View of Woodstock green, looking northeast along Vt. Route 4 from a vantage point at the tip of the triangular park in front of the town hall. - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  1. 33 CFR 110.136 - Lake Champlain, NY and VT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain, NY and VT. 110.136 Section 110.136 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.136 Lake Champlain, NY and VT. (a) Burlington...

  2. 76 FR 59479 - Vermont Disaster Number VT-00022

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster Number VT-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  3. 76 FR 58329 - Vermont Disaster Number VT-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster Number VT-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  4. 17O and 29Si NMR parameters of MgSiO3 phases from high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Berry, Andrew J; Frost, Daniel J; Gregorovic, Alan; Pickard, Chris J; Readman, Jennifer E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-10-31

    The 29Si and 17O NMR parameters of six polymorphs of MgSiO3 were determined through a combination of high-resolution solid-state NMR and first-principles gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) formalism calculations using periodic boundary conditions. MgSiO3 is an important component of the Earth's mantle that undergoes structural changes as a function of pressure and temperature. For the lower pressure polymorphs (ortho-, clino-, and protoenstatite), all oxygen species in the 17O high-resolution triple-quantum magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were resolved and assigned. These assignments differ from those tentatively suggested in previous work on the basis of empirical experimental correlations. The higher pressure polymorphs of MgSiO3 (majorite, akimotoite, and perovskite) are stabilized at pressures corresponding to the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle, with perovskite being the major constituent at depths >660 km. We present the first 17O NMR data for these materials and confirm previous 29Si work in the literature. The use of high-resolution multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) and satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) experiments allows us to resolve distinct oxygen species, and full assignments are suggested. The six polymorphs exhibit a wide variety of structure types, providing an ideal opportunity to consider the variation of NMR parameters (both shielding and quadrupolar) with local structure, including changes in coordination number, local geometry (bond distances and angles), and bonding. For example, we find that, although there is a general correlation of increasing 17O chemical shift with increasing Si-O bond length, the shift observed also depends upon the exact coordination environment.

  5. The V-T energy transfer in collisions of diatomics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A general approach evaluating the transition probabilities for the V-T exchange, involving highly excited levels and the Delta-v greater than 1 transitions, in diatomic gases is presented. Examples of numerical results are given for a number of transitions in nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the ground electronic states. The approach can be used for the V-T exchange involving diatomic molecular ions.

  6. Hydrogen Burning of {sup 17}O in Classical Novae

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2005-07-15

    We report on the observation of a previously unknown resonance at E{sub R}{sup lab}=194.1{+-}0.6 keV in the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}=1.6{+-}0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}/{omega}{gamma}{sub p{gamma}}=470{+-}50. The corresponding excitation energy in the {sup 18}F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV by {gamma}-ray measurements using the {sup 14}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray astronomy of classical novae.

  7. Announcing the Venus Transit 2004 (VT-2004) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Rare Celestial Event to be Observed by Millions Summary On June 8, 2004, Venus - the Earth's sister planet - will pass in front of the Sun. This event, a 'transit', is extremely rare - the last one occurred in 1882, 122 years ago. Easily observable in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia, it is likely to attract the attention of millions of people on these continents and, indeed, all over the world. On this important occasion, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has joined forces with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), the Institut de Mécanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides (IMCCE) and the Observatoire de Paris in France, as well as the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic to establish the Venus Transit 2004 (VT-2004) public education programme. It is supported by the European Commission in the framework of the European Science and Technology Week and takes advantage of this extraordinary celestial event to expose the public - in a well-considered, interactive and exciting way - to a number of fundamental issues at the crucial interface between society and basic science. VT-2004 has several components, including an instructive and comprehensive website (www.vt-2004.org). It is directed towards the wide public in general and the media, school students and their teachers, as well as amateur astronomers in particular. It invites all interested persons to participate actively in the intercontinental VT-2004 Observing Campaign (that reenacts historical Venus Transit observations) and the VT-2004 Video Contest. During the VT-2004 Final Event in November, the winners of the Video Contest will be chosen by an international jury. This meeting will also serve to discuss the project and its impact. The outcome of this rare celestial event and the overall experience from this unique public education project will clearly be of very wide interest, not just in the field of astronomy.

  8. Pulsed EPR investigations of systems modeling molybdenum enzymes: hyperfine and quadrupole parameters of oxo-17O in [Mo 17O(SPh)4]-.

    PubMed

    Astashkin, Andrei V; Neese, Frank; Raitsimring, Arnold M; Cooney, J Jon A; Bultman, Eric; Enemark, John H

    2005-11-30

    Ka band ESEEM spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine (hfi) and nuclear quadrupole (nqi) interaction parameters for the oxo-17O ligand in [Mo 17O(SPh)4]-, a spectroscopic model of the oxo-Mo(V) centers of enzymes. The isotropic hfi constant of 6.5 MHz found for the oxo-17O is much smaller than the values of approximately 20-40 MHz typical for the 17O nucleus of an equatorial OH(2) ligand in molybdenum enzymes. The 17O nqi parameter (e2qQ/h = 1.45 MHz, eta approximately = 0) is the first to be obtained for an oxo group in a metal complex. The parameters of the oxo-17O ligand, as well as other magnetic resonance parameters of [Mo 17O(SPh)4]- predicted by quasi-relativistic DFT calculations, were in good agreement with those obtained in experiment. From the electronic structure of the complex revealed by DFT, it follows that the SOMO is almost entirely molybdenum d(xy) and sulfur p, while the spin density on the oxo-17O is negative, determined by spin polarization mechanisms. The results of this work will enable direct experimental identification of the oxo ligand in a variety of chemical and biological systems.

  9. 17O-Decoupled 1H Spectroscopy and Imaging with a Surface Coil: STEAM Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, Sridhar R.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Dandora, Rahul; Stolpen, Alan H.; Leigh, J. S.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2000-03-01

    17O-decoupled 1H spin-echo imaging has been reported as a means of indirect 17O detection, with potential application to measurement of blood flow and metabolism. In its current form, 17O decoupling requires large RF amplitudes and a 180° refocusing pulse, complicating its application in volume and surface coils, respectively. To overcome this problem, we have developed an 17O-decoupled proton stimulated echo sequence ("STEAM decoupling") to allow 17O detection with a surface coil. A high B1 amplitude is easily generated, allowing complete decoupling of 17O and 1H. Slice-selective, 17O-decoupled 1H imaging is readily performed and the sequence is easily adapted for localized spectroscopy. Intrinsic correction for variations in B1 and further compensation for B1 inhomogeneity are discussed.

  10. The VT Fuze, from Half a Century Ago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, H. Richard

    1996-01-01

    Explains the physics principles behind the VT (variable time) fuze, also called the proximity fuze, that was used in World War II in a radio device built into the nose of an aircraft shell or bullet that made it explode at the instant of passing an airplane in a near miss. Discusses other uses of the proximity fuze. (JRH)

  11. 76 FR 14799 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Newport, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... the surface, at Newport, VT (75 FR 73015) Docket No. FAA-2010-0938. Interested parties were invited to... rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  12. 78 FR 16400 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Morrisville, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... E airspace at Morrisville, VT (77 FR 75596) Docket No. FAA-2012-0835. Interested parties were... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565,...

  13. 76 FR 59013 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Burlington, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E ] airspace at Burlington, VT (76 FR 38584) Docket No. FAA-2011-0243...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  14. 76 FR 59479 - Vermont Disaster Number VT-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster Number VT-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance....

  15. 76 FR 58558 - Vermont Disaster Number VT-00022

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Vermont Disaster Number VT-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance. BILLING...

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization of 17O: direct polarization.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization of (17)O was studied using four different polarizing agents: the biradical TOTAPOL and the monoradicals trityl and SA-BDPA, as well as a mixture of the latter two. Field profiles, DNP mechanisms, and enhancements were measured to better understand and optimize directly polarizing this low-gamma quadrupolar nucleus using both mono- and biradical polarizing agents. Enhancements were recorded at <88 K and were >100 using the trityl (OX063) radical and <10 with the other polarizing agents. The >10,000-fold savings in acquisition time enabled a series of biologically relevant small molecules to be studied with small sample sizes and the measurement of various quadrupolar parameters. The results are discussed with comparison to room temperature studies and GIPAW quantum chemical calculations. These experimental results illustrate the strength of high field DNP and the importance of radical selection for studying low-gamma nuclei.

  17. MAS: Malware Analysis System Based on Hardware-Assisted Virtualization Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyoung; Kim, Inhyuk; Min, Changwoo; Eom, Young Ik

    There are many analysis techniques in order to analyze malicious codes. However, recently malicious codes often evade detection using stealthy obfuscation techniques, and attack computing systems. We propose an enhanced dynamic binary instrumentation using hardware-assisted virtualization technology. As a machine-level analyzer, our system can be isolated from almost the whole threats of malware, and provides single step analysis environment. Proposed system also supports rapid system call analysis environment. We implement our malware analysis system (referred as MAS) on the KVM hypervisor with Intel VT-x virtualization support. Our experiments with benchmarks show that the proposed system provides efficient analysis environment with low overhead.

  18. Experimental determination of the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2007-03-15

    The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reactions are of major importance to hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis in a number of different stellar sites. In particular, {sup 17}O and {sup 18}F nucleosynthesis in classical novae is strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rates of these two reactions. The previously estimated rate for {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N carries very large uncertainties in the temperature range of classical novae (T=0.01-0.4 GK), whereas a recent measurement has reduced the uncertainty of the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate. We report on the observation of a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub c.m.}=183.3 keV in the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}=(1.6{+-}0.2)x10{sup -3} eV. We studied in the same experiment the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction by an activation method, and the resonance strength was found to amount to {omega}{gamma}{sub p{gamma}}=(2.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6} eV. The excitation energy of the corresponding level in {sup 18}F was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV in a Doppler shift attenuation method measurement, which yielded a value of {tau}<2.6 fs for the level lifetime. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates were calculated using the measured resonance properties and reconsidering some previous analyses of the contributions of other levels or processes. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N rate is now well established below T=1.5 GK, with uncertainties reduced by orders of magnitude in the temperature range T=0.1-0.4 GK. The uncertainty in the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate is somewhat larger because of remaining obscurities in the knowledge of the direct capture process. These new resonance properties have important consequences for {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray emission of classical novae.

  19. 17O solid-state NMR and first-principles calculations of sodium trimetaphosphate (Na3P3O9), tripolyphosphate (Na5P3O10), and pyrophosphate (Na4P2O7).

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Filipe; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-Francois; Tricot, Grégory; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Montagne, Lionel; Mauri, Francesco; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-08-18

    The assignment of high-field (18.8 T) (17)O MAS and 3QMAS spectra has been completed by use of first-principles calculations for three crystalline sodium phosphates, Na 3P 3O 9, Na 5P 3O 10, and Na 4P 2O 7. In Na 3P 3O 9, the calculated parameters, quadrupolar constant ( C Q), quadrupolar asymmetry (eta Q), and the isotropic chemical shift (delta cs) correspond to those deduced experimentally, and the calculation is mandatory to achieve a complete assignment. For the sodium tripolyphosphate Na 5P 3O 10, the situation is more complex because of the free rotation of the end-chain phosphate groups. The assignment obtained with ab initio calculations can however be confirmed by the (17)O{ (31)P} MAS-J-HMQC spectrum. Na 4P 2O 7 (17)O MAS and 3QMAS spectra show a complex pattern in agreement with the computed NMR parameters, which indicate that all of the oxygens exhibit very similar values. These results are related to structural data to better understand the influence of the oxygen environment on the NMR parameters. The findings are used to interpret those results observed on a binary sodium phosphate glass. PMID:18642900

  20. Tracing atmospheric nitrate deposition in a complex semiarid ecosystem using delta17O.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Greg; Meixner, Thomas; Fenn, Mark; Hernandez, Larry; Sirulnik, Abby; Allen, Edith; Thiemens, Mark

    2004-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrate collected from aerosols, fog, and precipitation was measured and found to have a large 17O anomaly with delta17O values ranging from 20 percent per thousand to 30% percent per thousand (delta17O = delta17O - 0.52(delta18O)). This 17O anomaly was used to trace atmospheric deposition of nitrate to a semiarid ecosystem in southern California. We demonstrate that the delta17O signal is a conserved tracer of atmospheric nitrate deposition and is a more robust indicator of N deposition relative to standard delta18O techniques. The data indicate that a substantial portion of nitrate found in the local soil, stream, and groundwater is of atmospheric origin and does not undergo biologic processing before being exported from the system.

  1. Experimental Study of 17O(p,{alpha})14N and 17O(p,{gamma})18F for Classical Nova Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2006-04-26

    We investigated the proton-capture reactions on 17O occurring in classical nova explosions. We observed a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub R}{sup lab}=194.1{+-}0.6 keV in the 17O(p,{alpha})14N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}=1.6{+-}0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the 17O(p,{gamma})18F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}/{omega}{gamma}p{gamma}=470{+-}50. The corresponding excitation energy in the 18F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV by {gamma}-ray measurements using the 14N({alpha},{gamma})18F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for 17O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray astronomy of classical novae.

  2. Measurement of δ18O, δ17O, and 17O-excess in water by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berman, Elena S F; Levin, Naomi E; Landais, Amaelle; Li, Shuning; Owano, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Stable isotopes of water have long been used to improve understanding of the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate. Recently, there has been increasing interest in measurement and use of the less-abundant (17)O isotope in addition to (2)H and (18)O. Off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is demonstrated for accurate and precise measurements δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water. OA-ICOS involves no sample conversion and has a small footprint, allowing measurements to be made by researchers collecting the samples. Repeated (514) high-throughput measurements of the international isotopic reference water standard Greenland Ice Sheet Precipitation (GISP) demonstrate the precision and accuracy of OA-ICOS: δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP = -24.74 ± 0.07‰ (1σ) and δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP = -13.12 ± 0.05‰ (1σ). For comparison, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) value for δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP is -24.76 ± 0.09‰ (1σ) and an average of previously reported values for δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP is -13.12 ± 0.06‰ (1σ). Multiple (26) high-precision measurements of GISP provide a (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP of 23 ± 10 per meg (1σ); an average of previously reported values for (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP is 22 ± 11 per meg (1σ). For all these OA-ICOS measurements, precision can be further enhanced by additional averaging. OA-ICOS measurements were compared with two independent isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) laboratories and shown to have comparable accuracy and precision as the current fluorination-IRMS techniques in δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess. The ability to measure accurately δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water inexpensively and without sample conversion is expected to increase vastly the application of δ(17)O and (17)O-excess measurements for scientific understanding of the water cycle, atmospheric convection, and climate modeling among others. PMID:24032448

  3. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Garvey, Edward P.; Hoekstra, William J.; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. PMID:26369977

  4. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Fothergill, Annette W; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Patterson, Thomas F; Filler, Scott G; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. PMID:26369977

  5. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. PMID:26073599

  6. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  7. Continental scale variation in 17O-excess of meteoric waters in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuning; Levin, Naomi E.; Chesson, Lesley A.

    2015-09-01

    High-precision triple oxygen isotope analysis of waters is an emerging tool in hydrological and paleoclimate research. The existing research on 17O-excess in waters includes surveys of meteoric waters and region-specific studies of high-latitude snow and tropical storms. However, a better understanding of the variation in 17O-excess of waters across large geographic regions is needed to expand the utility of triple oxygen isotope measurements. Here we present 17O-excess data from tap waters across the continental U.S., which we used as a proxy for precipitation. The 17O-excess values of tap waters ranged from -6 to +43 per meg and averaged 17 ± 11 per meg which is lower than the average 17O-excess reported for global meteoric waters, but overlaps with reported 17O-excess values of rainfall from the tropics. We observed relatively high 17O-excess values (>25 per meg) of tap waters in the northwestern U.S. and some of the lowest 17O-excess values (<5 per meg) in the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The latitudinal variation of 17O-excess among tap waters likely reflects the different controls on 17O-excess in precipitation. For example, re-evaporation of precipitation and convective processes influence the isotopic composition of tap waters from the southern portions of the U.S., resulting in relatively low 17O-excess values. In contrast, these effects are reduced in tap waters from the northern portions of the U.S. where snow and cold-season rainfall are primarily responsible for the majority of annual precipitation. Exceptions to the latitudinal trend are prevalent in the central portions of the U.S., where mixing and convection are likely responsible for 17O-excess values that are lower than would be expected at their latitudes. The results of this study provide both a first look at the variation of 17O-excess in meteoric waters on a continental scale and a predictive map for 17O-excess of meteoric waters in the U.S.

  8. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D2(17)O and HD(17)O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing (17)O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined (17)O spin-rotation constants of D2 (17)O and HD(17)O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H2 (17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  9. {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne for the weak s process

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Gueray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Oezkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2012-11-20

    The ratio of the reaction rates of the competing channels {sup 17}O({alpha}{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne determines the efficiency of {sup 16}O as a neutron poison in the s process in low metallicity rotating stars. It has a large impact on the element production, either producing elements to the mass range of A=90 in case of a significant poisoning effect or extending the mass range up to the region of A=150 if the {gamma} channel is of negligible strength. We present an improved study of the reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, including an independent measurement of the {sup 17}O({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 20}Ne channel. A simultaneous R-Matrix fit to both the n{sub 0} and the n{sub 1} channels has been performed. New reaction rates, including recent data on the {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne reaction, have been calculated and used as input for stellar network calculations and their impact on the s process in rotating massive stars is discussed.

  10. Summing Up the Unique Venus Transit 2004 (VT-2004) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    On June 8, 2004, Venus - the Earth's sister planet - passed in front of the Sun. This rare event - the last one occurred in 1882 - attracted the attention of millions of people all over the world. In a few days' time, on November 5-7, 2004, about 150 educators, media representatives, as well as amateur and professional astronomers will gather in Paris (France) at the international conference "The Venus Transit Experience" to discuss the outcome of the related Venus Transit 2004 (VT-2004) public education programme. This unique project was set up by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), together with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), the Institut de Mécanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides (IMCCE) and the Observatoire de Paris in France, as well as the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. It was also supported by the European Commission in the framework of the European Science and Technology Week, cf. ESO PR 03/04. The VT-2004 programme successfully exposed the broad public to a number of fundamental issues at the crucial interface between society and basic science. It ensured the most comprehensive real-time coverage of the event via an extremely dynamic Central Display that was updated a short intervals. Thanks to the prior establishment of hundreds of mirror sites, the VT-2004 website was easily accessible all through the transit, even though it experienced about 55 million webhits during a period of 8 hours. The VT-2004 programme established a wide international network of individuals (including school teachers and their students, amateur astronomers, interested laypeople, etc.) and educational institutions (astronomical observatories, planetaria, science centres, etc.), as well as 25 National Nodes with their own websites about the Venus Transit in as many local languages. It collected a large number of photos and drawings. It also included an international Video Contest, inviting all

  11. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore » of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  12. Broad levels in 17O and their relevance for the astrophysical s process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faestermann, T.; Mohr, P.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2015-11-01

    Levels in 17O affect the astrophysical s process in two opposite ways. The neutron production is enhanced by resonances in the 13C(α ,n )16O reaction at excitation energies around 7 MeV in 17O, and the number of available neutrons is reduced by low-lying resonances in the 16O(n ,γ )17O reaction corresponding to levels in 17O with excitation energies of 4 -5 MeV . The present work uses the 19F(d ,α )17O reaction to determine absolute widths of the relevant levels in 17O. The results improve the uncertainties of the previously adopted values and resolve a discrepancy between recent studies for the 1 /2+ level close to the threshold of the 13C(α ,n )16O reaction. In addition, improved excitation energies and widths are provided for several states in 17O up to excitation energies close to 8 MeV.

  13. 17O NMR and Raman spectra of water with different calcium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ying; Ou, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Hui-ping

    2014-09-01

    17O NMR and Raman spectra of water with different calcium salts have been measured. Different water samples were prepared by adding nano-materials, calcium gluconate, calcium citrate and calcium chloride into distilled water. Both 17O NMR and Raman spectra of different water samples were recorded. The effects of temperature and time on 17O NMR line-width of different water samples were analyzed as well. The experimental results showed that Raman spectra of water with these four calcium salts were almost the same as those for distilled water when the temperature increased to 40 °C. The 17O NMR line-width of distilled water decreased from 76.8 Hz to 46.9 Hz and 65.8 Hz after nano-materials and calcium chloride were added, respectively. Besides, the 17O NMR line-width of distilled water increased from 76.8 Hz to 131.6 Hz after calcium citrate was added, while the 17O NMR line-width of distilled water increased from 76.8 Hz to 77.2 Hz after calcium gluconate was added. The 17O NMR line-width of water with calcium chloride increased while the other three water samples were nearly stable as the temperature increased from 30 °C to 85 °C. The 17O NMR line-width of water with nano-materials kept steady while the 17O NMR line-width of the other three water samples all increased in 42 days.

  14. δ17O and Δ47—The Heavens can Wait.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Most terrestrial systems fall on or close to the Global Meteoric Water Line, GMWL, for 17O and 18O isotopes. Luz and Barken (2010) recently discussed variations from the GMWL, and typically the differences were in the 50 per meg, or 0.05‰, 17O excess. Landais et al. also looked at water from a Vostok ice core, covering the past 150,000 years, and see differences from GMWL on the order of 45 per meg 17O excess. Carbonate samples are analyze for their 13C and 18O to help understand paleo-climate, water sources, and by looking at clumped isotopes, Δ47, the excess of 13C-18O bonds measured by mass spectroscopy on m/z 47. Those samples will also carry thru the 17O-excess in their waters of formation. We modeled the effect of 17O excess on Δ47 and basically there is little effect in the 50 per meg 17O excess range. We also looked at what would happen with 18O spiked samples, presuming the spike does not add 17O. In that case, a 100 ‰ shift in 18O would give rise to -49‰ 17O excess anomaly. That shows a significant effect, a 1.8 ‰ shift in Δ47 and even a 3.5 ‰ shift in the δ13C reading. So spiked samples are not good candidates for clumped isotope analysis, terrestrial samples probably will not have enough of a 17O excess to affect Δ47 measurements, and extra-terrestrial samples will have to be checked.

  15. Multitude of 2+ discrete states in 124Sn observed via the (17O 17O'γ) reaction: Evidence for pygmy quadrupole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Tsoneva, N.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Lenske, H.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Isocrate, R.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Lunardi, S.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    A multitude of discrete 2+ states in 124Sn with energy up to 5 MeV were populated and identified with the (17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV. Cross sections were compared with distorted wave Born approximation predictions and in general a good agreement was found. The measured energy and intensity distributions of the 2+ states are very similar to the predictions based on self-consistent density functional theory and extended QRPA approach accounting for multiphonon degrees of freedom. This provides evidence of the excitation of the pygmy quadrupole resonance in skin nuclei.

  16. (17)O NMR and Raman Spectroscopies of Green Tea Infusion with Nanomaterial to Investigate Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changyan; Zhang, Huiping; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Xinya

    2016-09-01

    (17)O NMR and Raman spectrograms of green tea infusions with nanomaterial were investigated. Different green tea infusions were prepared by steeping tea powder with different concentrations of nanomaterial aqueous solution. The tea infusions were tested with (17)O NMR and Raman spectroscopies. The (17)O NMR results showed that line width increased to 90 in the tea infusions after nanomaterial was added as a result of the effects of the self-association of Ca(2+) and tea polyphenol. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that, in tea infusions, the enhancement of C─C and C─O stretching vibrations suggest an increase in the number of effective components in water.

  17. Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    MAS is a remote sensing instrument for passive sounding (limb sounding) of the earth's atmosphere from the Space Shuttle. The main objective of the MAS is to study the composition and dynamic structure of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere in the height range 20 to 100 km, the region known as the middle atmosphere. The MAS will be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission scheduled for late 1990. The Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder will provide, for the first time, information obtained simultaneously on the temperature and on ozone concentrations in the 20 to 90 km altitude region. The information will cover a large area of the globe, will have high accuracy and high vertical resolution, and will cover both day and night times. Additionally, data on the two important molecules, H2O and ClO, will also be provided.

  18. Consideration of VT5 etch-based OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, ChinTeong; Temchenko, Vlad; Kaiser, Dieter; Meusel, Ingo; Schmidt, Sebastian; Schneider, Jens; Niehoff, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Including etch-based empirical data during OPC model calibration is a desired yet controversial decision for OPC modeling, especially for process with a large litho to etch biasing. While many OPC software tools are capable of providing this functionality nowadays; yet few were implemented in manufacturing due to various risks considerations such as compromises in resist and optical effects prediction, etch model accuracy or even runtime concern. Conventional method of applying rule-based alongside resist model is popular but requires a lot of lengthy code generation to provide a leaner OPC input. This work discusses risk factors and their considerations, together with introduction of techniques used within Mentor Calibre VT5 etch-based modeling at sub 90nm technology node. Various strategies are discussed with the aim of better handling of large etch bias offset without adding complexity into final OPC package. Finally, results were presented to assess the advantages and limitations of the final method chosen.

  19. Duration Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2013-06-01

    This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines. Five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of round one of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. Test results will provide manufacturers with reports that can be used to fulfill part of the requirements for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment included a grid-connected Ventera Energy Corporation VT10 wind turbine mounted on an 18.3-m (60-ft) self-supporting lattice tower manufactured by Rohn.

  20. {sup 17}O NMR investigation of oxidative degradation in polymers under gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; ASSINK,ROGER A.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    2000-03-08

    The {gamma}-irradiated-oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}) and the polymer polyisoprene was investigated as a function of oxidation level using {sup 17}O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas during the {gamma}-irradiation process, details about the oxidative degradation mechanisms can be directly obtained from the analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra. Production of carboxylic acids is the primary oxygen-containing functionality during the oxidation of pentacontane, while ethers and alcohols are the dominant oxidation product observed for polyisoprene. The formation of ester species during the oxidation process is very minor for both materials, with water also being produced in significant amounts during the radiolytic oxidation of polyisoprene. The ability to focus on the oxidative component of the degradation process using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy demonstrates the selectivity of this technique over more conventional approaches.

  1. Natural abundant (17) O NMR in a 1.5-T Halbach magnet.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Morten K; Bakharev, Oleg N; Jensen, Ole; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-06-01

    We present mobile, low-field (17) O NMR as a means for monitoring oxygen in liquids. Whereas oxygen is one of the most important elements, oxygen NMR is limited by a poor sensitivity related to low natural abundance and gyro-magnetic ratio of the NMR active (17) O isotope. Here, we demonstrate (17) O NMR detection at a Larmor frequency of 8.74 MHz in a 1.5-T Halbach neodymium magnet with a home-built digital NMR instrument suitable for large-scale production and in-line monitoring applications. The proposed (17) O NMR sensor may be applied for direct, noninvasive measurements of water content in, for example, oil, manure, or food in automated quality or process control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25641664

  2. 17O(p, α) 14N study at the LUNA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. A.; Bruno, C.; Caciolli, A.; LUNA Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen burning of 17O sensitively influences nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, the ratio between reaction rates of 17O(p, α) 14N (Q=1.2 MeV) and 17O(p, γ) 18F (Q=5.6 MeV) channels on 17O is one of the most important parameters for the galactic synthesis of 17O, the stellar production of radioactive 18F, and for predicted O isotopic ratios in premolar grains. Now the LUNA collaboration is preparing a new effort to study the (p, α) channel on 17O at astrophysical energies. To reach this goal a new chamber has been constructed which allows to place 8 silicons detectors in backward directions. The setup improves the efficiency which is a crucial parameter in measuring nuclear reaction at such low energies. Aluminum foils are placed on the silicon in order to stop the elastic backscattered protons which otherwise produce non-negligible background on the silicons.

  3. Improvement of the high-accuracy 17O(p ,α )14N reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-06-01

    The 17O(p ,α )14N and 17O(p ,γ )18F reactions are of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RGs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, they govern the destruction of 17O and the formation of the short-lived radioisotope 18F, which is of special interest for γ -ray astronomy. At temperatures typical of the above-mentioned astrophysical scenario, T =0.01 -0.1 GK for RG, AGB, and massive stars and T =0.1 -0.4 GK for a classical nova explosion, the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction cross section is dominated by two resonances: one at about ERc m=65 keV above the 18F proton threshold energy, corresponding to the EX=5.673 MeV level in 18F, and another one at ERc m=183 keV (EX=5.786 MeV). We report on the indirect study of the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction via the Trojan Horse method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the strength of narrow resonance at ultralow energies. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature. This value was used as input parameter for reaction-rate determination and its comparison with the result of the direct measurement is also discussed in the light of the electron screening effect.

  4. Spatial Distribution of 17O-excess of Tap Waters in the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Levin, N. E.; Chesson, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    17O-excess is the deviation from the average relationship between δ18O and δ17O values in meteoric waters. This parameter is similar to d-excess in that it is sensitive to relative humidity during evaporation, but unlike d-excess it is largely insensitive to temperature. Therefore, 17O-excess may be used to provide independent information on relative humidity during evaporative processes in hydrological and climatic models. Here we report the first national-level survey of 17O-excess of tap waters collected from 92 localities across the conterminous United States (US). Since tap water primarily originates from rivers, reservoirs and groundwater, our results should approximate the seasonally integrated 17O-excess of precipitation at any given locality. The average of these 17O-excess values for measured US tap waters is 0.028±0.005%, which is consistent with the global average (0.033±0.005%). The spatial distributions of the measured 17O-excess values are likely controlled by the effects of evaporation in two different types of settings: (1) evaporation in oceanic regions that vary in relative humidity, which results in air masses carrying moisture with distinct 17O-excess values, and (2) evaporation of water either during or after precipitation events. To first order, we observed high 17O-excess values (0.036±0.005 to 0.065±0.005%) in tap waters from the Appalachian Mountains, the Rocky Mountains, west of the Great Plains and the Mississippi Delta region; whereas low 17O-excess values (-0.015±0.005 to 0.010±0.005%) are observed in the majority of the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. These data suggest that the high 17O-excess values may be the results of moisture from relatively dry oceanic sources, while the low 17O-excess values may be due to moisture from a relatively humid source such as the Gulf of Mexico. We also found some second-order features in the 17O-excess distribution of the tap waters, which could be attributed to the local evaporation

  5. Analyzing drivers of variability in the Δ17O of nitrate in the northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Chung, S. H.; Welker, J. M.; Harlow, B.; Evans, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Δ17O of nitrate (NO3-) has beens used to track atmospheric inputs to ecosystems with biological sources near 0‰ and atmospheric sources from 20 to 40‰. The elevated Δ17O of atmospheric NO3- is due to oxidation with ozone. We analyzed the isotope composition of NO3- in weekly precipitation samples from 8 NADP/USNIP sites in the northwestern US between 1997-2004. Each site exhibits annual variation with lowest Δ17O during summer and highest Δ17O during winter. WA24 and WA19 exhibited the greatest (14.0‰) and least (8.9‰) annual variation, respectively. This significant and variable amount of seasonal change motivated analyzing drivers of this variability. Potential factors that influence Δ17O were evaluated with linear regression. Meteorological variables were tested which may account for inter-week variation. Measures of fire activity were included for effects on atmospheric oxidation. Lastly, NADP ion concentrations were used as potential indicators of marine influence which could introduce halogen chemistry and alter oxidation. Temperature was the only variable to significantly correlate with Δ17O at all sites (P<0.0001 at ID11 to P=0.05 at WA98). Fire activity (number of fires, area burned) significantly correlated with Δ17O at 4 of 8 sites (p<0.05) and suggested potential influence at 3 additional sites (0.1> P >0.05). No potential indicators of marine influence showed a relationship with Δ17O at coastal sites (WA19 and WA98), but there was a significant relationship between concentrations of Na and Cl with Δ17O at UT01 site which is influenced by the Great Salt Lake. Overall, temperature and fire activity best explain variability in the Δ17O of NO3- in the northwestern US. Understanding this variability is crucial to correctly attribute NO3- sources in ecological studies between biological and atmospheric inputs in mixing models. Incorrect accounting of variability leads to unnecessary error and incorrect identification of NO3- sources in

  6. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  7. Characterizing Oxygen Local Environments in Paramagnetic Battery Materials via (17)O NMR and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ieuan D; Middlemiss, Derek S; Halat, David M; Trease, Nicole M; Pell, Andrew J; Grey, Clare P

    2016-08-01

    Experimental techniques that probe the local environment around O in paramagnetic Li-ion cathode materials are essential in order to understand the complex phase transformations and O redox processes that can occur during electrochemical delithiation. While Li NMR is a well-established technique for studying the local environment of Li ions in paramagnetic battery materials, the use of (17)O NMR in the same materials has not yet been reported. In this work, we present a combined (17)O NMR and hybrid density functional theory study of the local O environments in Li2MnO3, a model compound for layered Li-ion batteries. After a simple (17)O enrichment procedure, we observed five resonances with large (17)O shifts ascribed to the Fermi contact interaction with directly bonded Mn(4+) ions. The five peaks were separated into two groups with shifts at 1600 to 1950 ppm and 2100 to 2450 ppm, which, with the aid of first-principles calculations, were assigned to the (17)O shifts of environments similar to the 4i and 8j sites in pristine Li2MnO3, respectively. The multiple O environments in each region were ascribed to the presence of stacking faults within the Li2MnO3 structure. From the ratio of the intensities of the different (17)O environments, the percentage of stacking faults was found to be ca. 10%. The methodology for studying (17)O shifts in paramagnetic solids described in this work will be useful for studying the local environments of O in a range of technologically interesting transition metal oxides. PMID:27404908

  8. 33 CFR 110.8 - Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.8 Lake Champlain, N.Y. and Vt. (a) Ticonderoga, N.Y. An area shoreward of a line bearing 312° from Ticonderoga Light to the southeast corner of...

  9. Measurments and Modeling of Δ 17O Vatiations in Atmospheric Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, G. M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2002-12-01

    The estimated doubling of HNO3 production in the atmosphere in the next 50 years is important from both an ecological and an atmospheric chemistry perspective. The removal of NO-{3 atm} (HNO3 + aerosol nitrate) by dry and wet deposition can initiate serious environmental consequences including soil acidification, forest decline, the alteration of native plant diversity, and the promotion of eutrophication and toxic algae blooms in coastal waters. A reliable, quantitative, tracer of NO-{3 atm} deposition, particularly in regions with multiple nitrate sources and heavy nitrogen cycling is still lacking. In the atmosphere, HNO3 production is the primary sink for NOx, which via direct and catalytic production of ozone regulates the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The impact heterogeneous versus homogenous HNO3 production exert on global O3 and OH steady state concentrations has also been demonstrated in Global 3-D chemical models. Yet, the extent that anthroprogenic activities have impacted heterogeneous and homogenous production, and how these pathways varied on ancient time scales is also unknown. Nitrate aerosols were collected in La Jolla, Ca. for a one-year period and their oxygen isotopic composition were analyzed (δ 18O and δ 17O). A large Δ 17O17O = δ 17O - 0.515 δ 18O ) was observed and this isotopic signature exhibited a strong seasonal amplitude. The variability in Δ 17O is attributed to variability in HOx and O3 oxidation rates and the seasonal variation of homogeneous versus heterogeneous nitric acid formation reactions. An isotopic model coupled to a photochemical box model reproduced the observed Δ 17O with good precision. Implications for the use of Δ 17O in nitrate as an investigative tool for NOx related chemistry in both present day atmosphere and in ancient atmospheres is discussed. The magnitude of the Δ 17O signature also has implications as a tracer of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Both the increased detection sensitivity

  10. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  11. Isotope separation of {sup 17}O by photodissociation of ozone with near-infrared laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Shigeru; Kambe, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Takehiro; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen-17 is a stable oxygen isotope useful for various diagnostics in both engineering and medical applications. Enrichment of {sup 17}O, however, has been very costly due to the lack of appropriate methods that enable efficient production of {sup 17}O on an industrial level. In this paper, we report the first {sup 17}O-selective photodissociation of ozone at a relatively high pressure, which has been achieved by irradiating a gas mixture of 10 vol% O{sub 3}-90 vol% CF{sub 4} with narrowband laser. The experiment was conducted on a pilot-plant scale. A total laser power of 1.6 W was generated by external-cavity diode lasers with all the laser wavelengths fixed at the peak of an absorption line of {sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 17}O around 1 {mu}m. The beams were introduced into a 25 -m long photoreaction cell under the sealed-off condition with a total pressure of 20 kPa. Lower cell temperature reduced the background decomposition of ozone, and at the temperature of 158 K, an {sup 17}O enrichment factor of 2.2 was attained.

  12. CRDS of 17O enriched water between 5850 and 6671 cm-1: More than 1000 energy levels of H217O and HD17O newly determined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Leshchishina, O.; Karlovets, E. V.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2016-07-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 5850 and 6671 cm-1. Two series of recordings were performed with pressure values of 1.0 and 12.0 Torr. The investigated spectral region corresponds to the important 1.55 μm transparency window of the atmosphere where water absorption is very weak. The high sensitivity of the recordings (αmin ~ 5×10-11 cm-1) allows detecting lines with intensity spanning six orders of magnitude (1.4×10-30-3.6×10-24 cm/molecule at room temperature). The experimental list includes more than 10,300 lines. The assignments of water lines were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. More than 8500 lines were assigned to 9619 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). All but four transitions of the 16O and 18O isotopologues were assigned using known experimental energy levels. More than half of the assigned H217O and HD17O transitions correspond to new (or corrected) upper energy levels. About 1000 new H217O transitions associated with upper states of the second triad and of the first hexad were identified. Most of the newly assigned HD17O transitions belong to the ν1+ν3 and 2ν2+ν3 bands. The assigned transitions allowed to newly determine or correct 20 highly excited rotational levels of the vibrational ground state of this isotopologue. Overall 791 and 266 energy levels are newly determined for H217O and HD17O, respectively. A few additional levels were corrected compared to literature values. The obtained experimental results are compared to the spectroscopic parameters provided by the HITRAN database and to the empirical energy levels recommended by an IUPAC task group.

  13. CRDS of 17O enriched water between 5850 and 6671 cm-1: More than 1000 energy levels of H217O and HD17O newly determined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Leshchishina, O.; Karlovets, E. V.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2016-07-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 5850 and 6671 cm-1. Two series of recordings were performed with pressure values of 1.0 and 12.0 Torr. The investigated spectral region corresponds to the important 1.55 μm transparency window of the atmosphere where water absorption is very weak. The high sensitivity of the recordings (αmin ~ 5×10-11 cm-1) allows detecting lines with intensity spanning six orders of magnitude (1.4×10-30-3.6×10-24 cm/molecule at room temperature). The experimental list includes more than 10,300 lines. The assignments of water lines were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. More than 8500 lines were assigned to 9619 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). All but four transitions of the 16O and 18O isotopologues were assigned using known experimental energy levels. More than half of the assigned H217O and HD17O transitions correspond to new (or corrected) upper energy levels. About 1000 new H217O transitions associated with upper states of the second triad and of the first hexad were identified. Most of the newly assigned HD17O transitions belong to the ν1+ν3 and 2ν2+ν3 bands. The assigned transitions allowed to newly determine or correct 20 highly excited rotational levels of the vibrational ground state of this isotopologue. Overall 791 and 266 energy levels are newly determined for H217O and HD17O, respectively. A few additional levels were corrected compared to literature values. The obtained experimental results are compared to the spectroscopic parameters provided by the HITRAN database and to the empirical energy levels recommended by an IUPAC task group.

  14. (17)O NMR and Raman Spectroscopies of Green Tea Infusion with Nanomaterial to Investigate Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changyan; Zhang, Huiping; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Xinya

    2016-09-01

    (17)O NMR and Raman spectrograms of green tea infusions with nanomaterial were investigated. Different green tea infusions were prepared by steeping tea powder with different concentrations of nanomaterial aqueous solution. The tea infusions were tested with (17)O NMR and Raman spectroscopies. The (17)O NMR results showed that line width increased to 90 in the tea infusions after nanomaterial was added as a result of the effects of the self-association of Ca(2+) and tea polyphenol. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that, in tea infusions, the enhancement of C─C and C─O stretching vibrations suggest an increase in the number of effective components in water. PMID:27461881

  15. Evaluation of VT-1161 for Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis in Murine Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Hien T.; Galgiani, John N.; Lewis, Maria L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Lewis, Eric R. G.; Doyle, Adina L.; Hoekstra, William J.; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Garvey, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, is a growing health concern endemic to the southwestern United States. Safer, more effective, and more easily administered drugs are needed especially for severe, chronic, or unresponsive infections. The novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor VT-1161 demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively, against 52 Coccidioides clinical isolates. In the initial animal study, oral doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced fungal burdens and increased survival time in a lethal respiratory model in comparison with treatment with a placebo (P < 0.001). Oral doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 were similarly efficacious in the murine central nervous system (CNS) model compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). All comparisons with the positive-control drug, fluconazole at 50 mg/kg per day, demonstrated either statistical equivalence or superiority of VT-1161. VT-1161 treatment also prevented dissemination of infection from the original inoculation site to a greater extent than fluconazole. Many of these in vivo results can be explained by the long half-life of VT-1161 leading to sustained high plasma levels. Thus, the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of VT-1161 are attractive characteristics for long-term treatment of this serious fungal infection. PMID:26369964

  16. Evaluation of VT-1161 for Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis in Murine Infection Models.

    PubMed

    Shubitz, Lisa F; Trinh, Hien T; Galgiani, John N; Lewis, Maria L; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Bridget M; Lewis, Eric R G; Doyle, Adina L; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Garvey, Edward P

    2015-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, is a growing health concern endemic to the southwestern United States. Safer, more effective, and more easily administered drugs are needed especially for severe, chronic, or unresponsive infections. The novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor VT-1161 demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively, against 52 Coccidioides clinical isolates. In the initial animal study, oral doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced fungal burdens and increased survival time in a lethal respiratory model in comparison with treatment with a placebo (P < 0.001). Oral doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 were similarly efficacious in the murine central nervous system (CNS) model compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). All comparisons with the positive-control drug, fluconazole at 50 mg/kg per day, demonstrated either statistical equivalence or superiority of VT-1161. VT-1161 treatment also prevented dissemination of infection from the original inoculation site to a greater extent than fluconazole. Many of these in vivo results can be explained by the long half-life of VT-1161 leading to sustained high plasma levels. Thus, the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of VT-1161 are attractive characteristics for long-term treatment of this serious fungal infection. PMID:26369964

  17. High resolution δ17O-δ18O as a single mineral thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Sengupta, S.; Pack, A.

    2014-12-01

    The equilibrium relationship α17O/16Oa-b = (α18O/16Oa-b)θ makes the analysis of δ17O redundant for most terrestrial applications. However the θ term varies with temperature, so that ultra-high precision δ17O data provide additional information not available from δ18O alone. If the δ18O and δ17O values of formation water covary in a known way (e.g., meteoric water, ocean water), then a unique solution for both temperature and the δ18O of the formation fluids can be obtained from the combined δ18O-δ17O mineral values. The paired δ18O-δ17O values are in essence a single mineral thermometer. Unlike clumped isotopes or combined δ18O-δD data, the δ18O and δ17O values of a mineral have identical 'diagenetic potential', and will only be altered with a high F/R ratio. We have made an empirical determination of the temperature dependence on θ = -710/T2 + 0.5305 using Pleistocene diatom data from ODP Leg 177, Site 1093 (δ18O = 39.610, δ17O = 20.536‰), which is almost identical to Pack and Herwartz (EPSL, 2014). Application to ancient cherts gives the following results: The δ18O-δ17O values of cherts vary systematically with age, from Archean to Proterozoic to Phanerozoic. The Archean cherts are incompatible with modern seawater under any temperature conditions. Instead they have equilibrated with water of δ18O= -10±3 (‰ vs SMOW) at 50 to 70°C. These data support a lighter ocean in the Archean by ~5‰. Proterozoic cherts equilibrated at 35-50°C with meteoric water of -8±3‰ and Phanerozoic cherts equilibrated with mixed meteoric water/ocean water at similar temperatures and higher δ18O values (-3±3‰). The δ18O values of lacustrine diatoms from the Valles Caldera, NM, vary by over 20‰ between glacial and interglacial times. The combined δ18O-δ17O values of interglacial diatoms give T= ~12°C, δ18Ometeoric water = -9‰. A glacial age diatom sample gives T=<10°C, δ18Ometeoric water = -20‰. These data could not be obtained from the

  18. Localization of potential binding sites for the edema disease verotoxin (VT2e) in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, T E; Coomber, B L; Gyles, C L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify organs and cells to which the edema disease verotoxin (VT2e) could bind in pigs. Frozen 4-5 microns thick sections of organs usually affected in edema disease (colon, spinal cord, cerebellum and eyelid) and organs not usually affected (liver, ileum) from two 5- to 6-week-old weaned pigs were permeabilized with acetone, then exposed to VT2e. Unbound VT2e was removed by washing and bound VT2e was detected by immunohistochemistry. In the eyelid, double-label immunofluorescence was used to identify the cells to which VT2e bound. VT2e was shown to bind to all six organs that were examined. The toxin bound to arteries in all organs, to veins in all organs except the liver, and to enterocytes in the ileal crypts. Double labelling of eyelid with monoclonal antibodies specific for von Willebrand factor or alpha-smooth actin and VT2e showed that the toxin bound to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. The binding of VT2e to endothelium is consistent with findings for other verotoxins but binding to vascular smooth muscle has not been reported for other verotoxins. It is concluded that i) factors other than the presence of receptors for VT2e influence the development of lesions in edema disease, and ii) smooth muscle necrosis, which is characteristic of the vascular lesions in edema disease, may be due to a direct action of toxin on smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9553705

  19. Width of the 3841-keV level in 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pietralla, N.; Zilges, A.

    1994-10-01

    The width of 3841-keV level in 17O was precisely measured in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility. The result of Γ(3841 keV)=(92+/-6) meV is compared with upper limits quoted in the literature. Possible particle-hole configurations of the 3841-keV level are discussed.

  20. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  1. Probing surface hydrogen bonding and dynamics by natural abundance, multidimensional, 17O DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Chaudhary, Umesh; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek

    2016-05-06

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly being used as a tool for the atomic-level characterization of surface sites. DNP surface-enhanced SSNMR spectroscopy of materials has, however, been limited to studying relatively receptive nuclei, and the particularly rare 17O nuclide, which is of great interest for materials science, has not been utilized. We demonstrate that advanced 17O SSNMR experiments can be performed on surface species at natural isotopic abundance using DNP. We use 17O DNP surface-enhanced 2D SSNMR to measure 17O{1H} HETCOR spectra as well as dipolar oscillations on a series of thermally treatedmore » mesoporous silica nanoparticle samples having different pore diameters. These experiments allow for a nonintrusive and unambiguous characterization of hydrogen bonding and dynamics at the surface of the material; no other single experiment can give such details about the interactions at the surface. Lastly, our data show that, upon drying, strongly hydrogen-bonded surface silanols, whose motions are greatly restricted by the interaction when compared to lone silanols, are selectively dehydroxylated.« less

  2. Solar 18O/17O and the Setting for Solar Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    2004-03-01

    The burst of star formation during the gaeous merger of the Milky Way with a low-metallicity dwarf galaxy created not only the Si-isotope correlation in mainstream SiC grains but also the anomalously large ^18O/^17O ratio in the sun.

  3. ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O IN THE GALACTIC CENTRAL REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. S.; Sun, L. L.; Riquelme, D.; Henkel, C.; Lu, D. R.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Li, J.; Wang, M.

    2015-08-15

    The {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O isotopic ratio of oxygen is a crucial measure of the secular enrichment of the interstellar medium by ejecta from high-mass versus intermediate-mass stars. So far, however, there is a lack of data, particularly from the Galactic center (GC) region. Therefore, we have mapped typical molecular clouds in this region in the J = 1–0 lines of C{sup 18}O and C{sup 17}O with the Delingha 13.7 m telescope (DLH). Complementary pointed observations toward selected positions throughout the GC region were obtained with the IRAM 30 m and Mopra 22 m telescopes. C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios reflecting the {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O isotope ratios were obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C{sup 18}O and C{sup 17}O. For the first time, C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios are determined for Sgr C (V ∼ −58 km s{sup −1}), Sgr D (V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}), and the 1.°3 complex (V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}). Through our mapping observations, abundance ratios are also obtained for Sgr A (∼0 and ∼50 km s{sup −1} component) and Sgr B2 (∼60 km s{sup −1}), which are consistent with the results from previous single-point observations. Our frequency-corrected abundance ratios of the GC clouds range from 2.58 ± 0.07 (Sgr D, V ∼ 80 km s{sup −1}, DLH) to 3.54 ± 0.12 (Sgr A, ∼50 km s{sup −1}). In addition, strong narrow components (line width less than 5 km s{sup −1}) from the foreground clouds are detected toward Sgr D (−18 km s{sup −1}), the 1.°3 complex (−18 km s{sup −1}), and M+5.3−0.3 (22 km s{sup −1}), with a larger abundance ratio around 4.0. Our results show a clear trend of lower C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratios toward the GC region relative to molecular clouds in the Galactic disk. Furthermore, even inside the GC region, ratios appear not to be uniform. The low GC values are consistent with an inside-out formation scenario for our Galaxy.

  4. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  5. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  6. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    PubMed

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Dumas, Guillaume; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  7. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities. PMID:26569608

  8. Detection and frequency of VT1, VT2 and eaeA genes in Escherichia coli O157 and O157:H7 strains isolated from cattle, cattle carcasses and abattoir environment in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aysun; Gun, Huseyin; Ugur, Muammer; Turan, Nuri; Yilmaz, Huseyin

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to detect VT1, VT2 and eaeA genes and to determine the frequency of these genes in Escherichia coli O157 and O157:H7 strains isolated from cattle, cattle carcasses and environmental samples of the 5 abattoirs located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this, the presence of VT1, VT2 and eaeA genes in 26 strains of E. coli O157:H7 and 6 strains of O157 was investigated by multiplex-PCR. The results have shown that eaeA gene was detected in all O157 and O157:H7 strains tested. Both VT2 and eaeA genes were detected in 4 (80%) of 5 strains of E. coli O157 and eaeA alone in 1 strain of O157. In 27 strains of O157:H7, 5 (18.5%) strains were found to be positive for VT1, VT2 and eaeA genes, 19 (70.3%) strains for both VT2 and eaeA and, 3 (11.1%) strains for only eaeA gene. Either VT1 alone or VT2 alone was not detected in any strains tested. eaeA gene alone in 2 strains, VT2-eaeA genes in 9 strains and VT1-VT2-eaeA genes in 2 strains were detected in 13 of E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from cattle. eaeA alone in 1 strain, VT2-eaeA genes in 5 strains and VT1-VT2-eaeA genes in 2 strains were detected in 8 of E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from carcasses. VT2-eaeA genes in 5 strains (isolated from hands, apron, knife and floor) and VT1-VT2-eaeA genes in 1 strain (isolated from knife) were also detected in 6 of E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from environmental samples. This study reveals that most of the strains are found to be toxigenic and it is most likely that strains isolated from carcasses and abattoir environment originated from cattle feces. Therefore, HACCP systems are necessary from farm to table especially in the abattoirs to prevent contamination of meat and abattoir environment with intestinal content.

  9. Practice and applications of 17-O-excess measurements of water using novel laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, K. J.; Steig, E. J.; Vasileios, G.; Schauer, A. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2014-12-01

    17O-excess, defined as the deviation from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) in a plot of ln(δ18O+1) vs. ln(δ17O+1), is an evolving tool for understanding the modern water cycle and reconstructing past climate regimes. Because of competing effects between equilibrium and kinetic fractionation small variations in 17O-excess can be used, for example, to (i) infer changes in temperature and sea ice across glacial-interglacial cycles in Antarctica (Schoenemann et al., 2014), (ii) study the role of rain re-evaporation during convective events thereby improving the incorporation of isotopes into GCMs (Landais et al., 2010), and (iii) assess the role of stratospheric water vapor intrusions at high altitudes or in polar regions (Winkler et al., 2013). In natural waters, variability in 17O-excess is very small (on the order of tens of per meg, where 1 per meg is 0.001‰). Until recently, only measurements made via Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) could achieve the required precision, following time-consuming front-end chemistry that converted H2O into O2 for analysis of m/z+ 32, 33 and 34. Recent improvements in laser-based spectroscopy, e.g., Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), are enabling quicker and easier measurement of 17O-excess in water (Steig et al., 2013; 2014). The Picarro L2140-i is certified with a precision of ≤ 0.015‰; however implementation of best practices can result in an achievable precision of ≤ 0.008‰, thereby demonstrating comparable performance to IRMS. We will review our recommendations for achieving high-precision measurements of 17O-excess on the Picarro L2140-i, including how to calibrate the system, the frequency of standards analysis, the number of replicate injections and vials required, and approaches to dealing with sample-to-sample memory. We will also compare the external accuracy achieved by three distinct Picarro L2140-i analyzers for multiple waters with distinct isotopic composition.

  10. Simulating the budget and distribution of Δ17O in CO2 with a global atmosphere-biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Wouter; Schneider, Linda; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; van der Velde, Ivar; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The isotope ratios of 16O, 17O and 18O in CO2 are referred to as the triple-oxygen isotope composition of CO2, and have long held promise to better understand terrestrial carbon cycling. However, measurement precision as well as an incomplete understanding of fractionation during equilibrium exchange and diffusion of CO2 have been a challenge, especially for the estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and respiration from measured δ17O and δ18O isotope ratios in CO2. The excess-17O in CO2 (Δ17O), defined as the deviation of the δ17O and δ18O ratios from an expected mass-dependent fractionation line, is in principle easier to interpret as many processes that simultaneously affect δ17O and δ18O are not reflected in Δ17O. Two global box model simulations suggest that atmospheric Δ17O is therefore mostly determined by transport of relatively δ17O enriched CO2 from the stratosphere, and its equilibration in leaf-water back to an excess of close to zero, following diffusion as part of photosynthetic CO2 uptake by vegetation. This makes Δ17O an interesting tracer for photosynthesis at the global scale, and the first decadal time series have recently been published that indeed suggest strong GPP-driven variations in atmospheric Δ17O. In this study, we expand the modeling of Δ17O beyond the current two global box model results published by explicitly simulating the global atmospheric Δ17O distribution over a five year period. We specifically are interested whether regional gradients in Δ17O in areas with large GPP such as Amazonia leave an imprint on Δ17O that can be measured with the rapidly improving measurement precision (10-40 permeg currently). Therefore, we used the SIBCASA biosphere model at 1x1 degrees globally to simulate hourly fluxes of Δ17O into and out of C3 and C4 vegetation as well as soils. These fluxes were then fed into the TM5 atmospheric transport model at 6x4 degrees horizontal resolution to simulate the hourly spatial gradients in

  11. Predicting (17)O NMR chemical shifts of polyoxometalates using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rupali; Zhang, Jie; Ohlin, C André

    2016-03-21

    We have investigated the computation of (17)O NMR chemical shifts of a wide range of polyoxometalates using density functional theory. The effects of basis sets and exchange-correlation functionals are explored, and whereas pure DFT functionals generally predict the chemical shifts of terminal oxygen sites quite well, hybrid functionals are required for the prediction of accurate chemical shifts in conjunction with linear regression. By using PBE0/def2-tzvp//PBE0/cc-pvtz(H-Ar), lanl2dz(K-) we have computed the chemical shifts of 37 polyoxometalates, corresponding to 209 (17)O NMR signals. We also show that at this level of theory the protonation-induced pH dependence of the chemical shift of the triprotic hexaniobate Lindqvist anion, [HxNb6O19]((8-x)), can be reproduced, which suggests that hypotheses regarding loci of protonation can be confidently tested. PMID:26925832

  12. Pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn populated by inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Camera, F.; Lanza, E. G.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; De Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Krzysiek, M.; Litvinova, E.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Zieblinski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 124Sn was measured using the inelastic scattering of 17O at 340 MeV. The emitted γ rays were detected with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array and the scattered ions were detected in two segmented ΔE- E silicon telescopes. The angular distribution was measured both for the γ rays and the scattered 17O ions. An accumulation of E1 strength below the particle threshold was found and compared with previous data obtained with (γ ,γ‧) and (α ,α‧ γ) reactions. The present results of elastic scattering, and excitation of E2 and E1 states were analysed using the DWBA approach. From this comprehensive description the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states was extracted. The obtained values are based on the comparison of the data with DWBA calculations including a form factor deduced using a microscopic transition density.

  13. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  14. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  15. 17O+58Ni scattering and reaction dynamics around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Keeley, N.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Molini, P.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Rusek, K.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-08-01

    This work aims at investigating the projectile binding energy influence on the reaction dynamics, introducing new results and new data analysis methods in order to overcome some typically encountered problems, such as the identification of reaction products differing by few mass units and the discrimination of direct reaction processes. The 17O+58Ni collision was studied at five near-barrier energies employing a compact experimental setup consisting of four double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSDs). Different reaction processes, namely the elastic and inelastic scattering and the 1 n stripping, were discriminated by means of a detailed analysis of the experimental energy spectra based on Monte Carlo simulations. The elastic scattering angular distributions were investigated within the framework of the optical model using Woods-Saxon and double-folding potentials. The total reaction cross sections were extracted and the reduced cross sections compared with those obtained for 17F (Sp=0.600 MeV), the mirror nucleus of 17O (Sn=4.143 MeV), and for the tightly bound 16O projectile. The 17O+58Ni total reaction cross sections were larger than those for 16O on the same target at the lowest energies studied, becoming identical, within errors, as the incident energy increased above the Coulomb barrier. This behavior was related to a strong contribution from the 1 n -stripping channel at the lowest energies.

  16. Effects of the degree of polymerization on the structure of sodium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts: An 17O NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2009-02-01

    Revealing the atomic structure and disorder in oxide glasses, including sodium silicates and aluminosilicates, with varying degrees of polymerization, is a challenging problem in high-temperature geochemistry as well as glass science. Here, we report 17O MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra for binary sodium silicate and ternary sodium aluminosilicate glasses with varying degrees of polymerization (Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio and Na 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio), revealing in detail the extent of disorder (network connectivity and topological disorder) and variations of NMR parameters with the glass composition. In binary sodium silicate glasses [Na 2O- k(SiO 2)], the fraction of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs, Na-O-Si) increases with the Na 2O/SiO 2 ratio ( k), as predicted from the composition. The 17O isotropic chemical shifts ( 17O δiso) for both bridging oxygen (BO) and NBO increase by about 10-15 ppm with the SiO 2 content (for k = 1-3). The quadrupolar coupling products of BOs and NBOs also increase with the SiO 2 content. These trends suggest that both NBOs and BOs strongly interact with Na; therefore, the Na distributions around BOs and NBOs are likely to be relatively homogenous for the glass compositions studied here, placing some qualitative limits on the extent of segregation of alkali channels from silica-enriched regions as suggested by modified random-network models. The peak width (in the isotropic dimension) and thus bond angle and length distributions of Si-O-Si and Na-O-Si increase with the SiO 2 content, indicating an increase in the topological disorder with the degree of polymerization. In the ternary aluminosilicate glasses [Na 2O] x[Al 2O 3] 1-xSiO 2, the NBO fraction decreases while the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al fractions apparently increase with increasing Al 2O 3 content. The variation of oxygen cluster populations suggests that deviation from "Al avoidance" is more apparent near the charge-balanced join (Na/Al = 1). The Si-O-Si fraction, which is closely related to the activity

  17. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  18. Onset of Superconductivity in YBCO in Very High Fields from ^17O and ^63Cu NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, William

    2000-03-01

    We have used NMR to study the onset of superconductivity in near optimally doped YBCO in fields from 1 to 27 T. We have compared Knight shift(^17O), spin-spin relaxation measurements(^17O), and spin lattice relaxation measurements (^63Cu and ^17O). The measurements have been performed as a function of temperature above and below the transition region. The Knight shift can be measured with considerable precision directly giving the Pauli spin susceptibility. We show that the onset of superconductivity in a magnetic field is really a crossover region from normal state behavior to a vortex liquid for which we determine a H-T phase diagram up to high field. The relaxation measurements show clear evidence for the opening of a pseudo gap near 100 K in the transition region. The different NMR experiments are sensitive to the susceptibility dependence on wave vector from different regions of the Brillouin zone indicating possible origins of such a gap including superconducting fluctuations or a gap in the spin excitation spectrum. Magnetic field dependence of the data allows discrimination. Intercomparison between samples near optimal doping as well as the work from other laboratories will be made. This work was performed in collaboration with V. F. Mitović, H. N. Bachman, E. E. Sigmund, M. Eschrig, J. A. Sauls, A. P. Reyes, P. Kuhns, and W. G. Moulton. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  19. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  1. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  2. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidimonas taiwanensis Strain VT154-175.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, Federica; Biagini, Tommaso; Giampaoli, Saverio; Crognale, Silvia; Santoni, Daniele; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The slightly thermophilic bacterium Tepidimonas taiwanensis strain VT154-175 has been isolated from a hot spring in the area of Viterbo, Italy. The whole draft genome of 2.9 Mb obtained by paired-end next-generation sequencing and divided into 60 scaffolds is presented. PMID:27609919

  4. 75 FR 34179 - Tivoly, Inc., Derby Line, VT; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Register on December 8, 2009 (74 FR 64,711). The initial investigation resulted in a negative determination... Employment and Training Administration Tivoly, Inc., Derby Line, VT; Notice of Negative Determination on... After reconsideration, I affirm the original notice of negative determination of eligibility to...

  5. Structural and hydraulic characteristics of porous materials made of VT6 titanium alloy fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kostornov, A.G.; Akhmedov, M.Kh

    1995-11-01

    The structural and hydraulic characteristics (maximum, average, and hydraulic pore diameters, permeability, and sinuosity of the pore channels) have been studied in materials made of discrete VT6 alloy fibers obtained by rapid solidification of a melt. The materials have structural parameters that are similar to those in materials made from smooth cylindrical fibers or powders and are superior in regard to permeability.

  6. Electro-Explosive Doping of VT6 Titanium Alloy Surface by Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzareva, T. Yu; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Budovskkh, E. A.; Konovalov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The studies carried out in this work target detection of changes in the surface layer of titanium alloy VT6 after electro-explosive alloying (EEA) by boron carbide. EEA of VT6 titanium alloy surface is the plasma alloying formed during the electric explosion of foil with the sample powder of boron carbide. Carbon fibers with weight 140 mg were used as an explosive conductor. Sample powder of boron carbide B4C was placed in the area of explosion on the carbon fibers. It was revealed that EEA of the surface layers of titanium alloy samples VT6 leads to the modification of the layer, thickness of which changes from 10 pm to 50 pm. Heterogeneous distribution of alloying elements was found in the treatment zone by the methods of X-ray microanalysis. A significant difference in their concentration in the identified layers leads to difference in their structural and tribological behaviour. It was revealed that after electro-explosive alloying the microhardness of titanium alloy VT6 significantly increases. Electro-explosive alloying leads to the formation of a structure of submicro- and nano-scale level. It allows strength and tribological properties of the treated surface to be increased.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidimonas taiwanensis Strain VT154-175

    PubMed Central

    Valeriani, Federica; Biagini, Tommaso; Giampaoli, Saverio; Crognale, Silvia; Santoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The slightly thermophilic bacterium Tepidimonas taiwanensis strain VT154-175 has been isolated from a hot spring in the area of Viterbo, Italy. The whole draft genome of 2.9 Mb obtained by paired-end next-generation sequencing and divided into 60 scaffolds is presented. PMID:27609919

  8. 75 FR 73015 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Newport, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Newport, VT, as the Newport Non-Directional Beacon (NDB)...

  9. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks

    PubMed Central

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition (17O/16O, 18O/16O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the 18O/16O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3–2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ18O = −43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low 18O/16O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme 18O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6–0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ18O estimates of −21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how 17O/16O measurements provide information beyond traditional 18O/16O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent. PMID:25870269

  10. 1- and 2+ discrete states in 90Zr populated via the (17O,'17Oγ ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Lanza, E. G.; Vitturi, A.; Mengoni, D.; Leoni, S.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Kempley, R. S.; Labiche, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    2+ and 1- states in 90Zr were populated via the (17O,'17Oγ ) reaction at 340 MeV. The γ decay was measured with high resolution using the AGATA (advanced γ tracking array demonstrator array). Differential cross sections were obtained at few different angles for the scattered particle. The results of the elastic scattering and inelastic excitation of 2+,3-, and 1- states are compared with distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations, using both the standard collective form factor and a form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities. This allowed to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- state at 6.424 MeV. The comparison of the present (17O,'17Oγ ) data with existing (γ ,γ' ) and (p ,p' ) data in the corresponding region of the γ continuum (6-11 MeV), characterized by a large E 1 component, shows completely different behaviors of the cross section as a function of the nuclear excitation energy. The comparison of the data with DWBA calculations suggests a decrease of the isoscalar strength in the cross section with increasing excitation energy.

  11. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks.

    PubMed

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-04-28

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition ((17)O/(16)O, (18)O/(16)O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the (18)O/(16)O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3-2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ(18)O = -43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low (18)O/(16)O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme (18)O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6-0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ(18)O estimates of -21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how (17)O/(16)O measurements provide information beyond traditional (18)O/(16)O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent.

  12. Revealing the climate of snowball Earth from Δ17O systematics of hydrothermal rocks.

    PubMed

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Krylov, Dmitri; Xiao, Yilin; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Sengupta, Sukanya; Di Rocco, Tommaso

    2015-04-28

    The oxygen isotopic composition of hydrothermally altered rocks partly originates from the interacting fluid. We use the triple oxygen isotope composition ((17)O/(16)O, (18)O/(16)O) of Proterozoic rocks to reconstruct the (18)O/(16)O ratio of ancient meteoric waters. Some of these waters have originated from snowball Earth glaciers and thus give insight into the climate and hydrology of these critical intervals in Earth history. For a Paleoproterozoic [∼2.3-2.4 gigayears ago (Ga)] snowball Earth, δ(18)O = -43 ± 3‰ is estimated for pristine meteoric waters that precipitated at low paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Today, such low (18)O/(16)O values are only observed in central Antarctica, where long distillation trajectories in combination with low condensation temperatures promote extreme (18)O depletion. For a Neoproterozoic (∼0.6-0.7 Ga) snowball Earth, higher meltwater δ(18)O estimates of -21 ± 3‰ imply less extreme climate conditions at similar paleo-latitudes (≤35°N). Both estimates are single snapshots of ancient water samples and may not represent peak snowball Earth conditions. We demonstrate how (17)O/(16)O measurements provide information beyond traditional (18)O/(16)O measurements, even though all fractionation processes are purely mass dependent. PMID:25870269

  13. Elastic scattering of 17O+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-05-01

    Within the frame of the commissioning of a new experimental apparatus EXPADES we undertook the measurement of the elastic scattering angular distribution for the system 17O+208Pb at energy around the Coulomb barrier. The reaction dynamics induced by loosely bound Radioactive Ion Beams is currently being extensively studied [4]. In particular the study of the elastic scattering process allows to obtain direct information on the total reaction cross section of the exotic nuclei. In order to understand the effect of the low binding energy on the reaction mechanism it is important to compare radioactive weakly bound nuclei with stable strongly-bound nuclei. In this framework the study of the 17O+208Pb elastic scattering can be considered to be complementary to a previous measurement of the total reaction cross section for the system 17F+208Pb at energies of 86, 90.4 MeV [5, 6]. The data will be compared with those obtained for the neighboring systems 16,18O+208Pb and others available in literature.

  14. An electromagnetic PIC code on the MasPar

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeice, P.

    1993-12-31

    A 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code has been rewritten to run on the MasPar. The original code; known as TRISTAN which was written by Oscar Buneman was rewritten in MPL and its data structure altered to suit the MasPar architecture and exploit the fully local property of the algorithm. We discuss the significant issues associated with porting the code and present a comparative analysis of the code run times on the MasPar and on the CRAY YMP and C90. Results of a simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the earth`s magnetosphere are shown.

  15. Estimated times to exhaustion at the PWC V O2, PWC HRT, and VT.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Michelle; Housh, Terry J; Malek, Moh H; Beck, Travis W; Hendrix, C Russell; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Physical Working Capacity at the Heart Rate Threshold (PWC HRT) and Physical Working Capacity at the Oxygen Consumption Threshold (PWC V O2) tests by 1) using individual power vs. duration relationships to estimate the times to exhaustion (ETTE) at the PWC HRT and PWC V O2, and 2) comparing the power outputs and ETTE values of the PWC HRT and PWC V O2 with those of the ventilatory threshold (VT). Ten adults (mean age +/- SD = 23 +/- 1 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer for the determination of V O2 peak and VT. The subjects also performed four randomly ordered workbouts to exhaustion at different power outputs (ranging from 98 to 246 W) to determine the PWC V O2, PWC HRT, and power vs. duration relationship. Power curve analyses (y = ax b) were used to define the hyperbolic power vs. duration relationship for each subject and to determine the ETTE at the PWC V O2, PWC HRT, and VT. Two separate one-way repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that there were significant differences among the fatigue thresholds (PWC V O2 > PWC HRT) and ETTE values (PWC HRT > PWC V O2): PWC V O2 (mean +/- SD = 147 +/- 43 W; ETTE = 21 +/- 3 minutes), PWCHRT (136 +/- 37 W; ETTE = 29 +/- 6 minutes), and VT (143 +/- 44 W; ETTE = 27 +/- 11 minutes). These findings were consistent with previous studies that indicated that the PWC HRT occurred at a lower power output than the PWC V O2. Furthermore, the PWC HRT was maintained for a mean of 29 minutes, whereas the PWC V O2 and VT were maintained for 21 and 27 minutes, respectively. These findings indicate that the ETTE values for the PWC V O2 and PWC HRT were substantially less than those suggested in previous studies. PMID:18978609

  16. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, Cristina Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E.; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing {sup 17}O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined {sup 17}O spin-rotation constants of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of 17O- and 18O-enriched carbon dioxide: Line positions and intensities in the 4681-5337 cm-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkov, Yu. G.; Jacquemart, D.; Lyulin, O. M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    The line positions and intensities of carbon dioxide isotopologues have been retrieved in the 4681-5337 cm-1 spectral range from Fourier transform spectra of carbon dioxide recorded in LADIR (Paris, France) with the Bruker IFS 125-HR [Jacquemart D, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2012;113:961-975]. In total 6386 line positions and intensities of 89 bands of 12 isotopologues 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C18O, 16O12C17O, 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O, 18O12C18O, 17O12C18O, 17O12C17O, 18O13C18O, 17O13C18O, and 17O13C17O have been retrieved. 23 bands were newly assigned. All studied bands belong to the ΔP=7 series of transitions, where P = 2V1 +V2 + 3V3 is the polyad number (Vi are vibrational quantum numbers). The accuracy of the line position measurement is about 0.3×10-3 cm-1 for the unblended and not very weak lines. The accuracy of the line intensities varies from 4% to 15% depending on the isotopologue, on the intensity of the line and on the extent of the line overlapping. The observed intensities were used to fit the effective dipole moment parameters for the ΔP=7 series of transitions in 16O12C18O, 16O12C17O, 12C17O2, 17O12C18O, 16O13C17O, 13C17O2 and 17O13C18O isotopologues of carbon dioxide.

  18. Pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Paar, N.; Avigo, R.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocarte, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Milion, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Ziebliński, M.

    2016-04-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 140Ce excited via inelastic scattering of 17O at a bombarding energy of 340 MeV was measured using the high-resolution AGATA-demonstrator array in coincidence with scattered ions detected in two segmented Δ E -E silicon detectors. Angular distributions of scattered ions and emitted γ rays were measured, as well as their differential cross sections. The excitation of 1- states below the neutron separation energy is similar to the one obtained in reactions with the α isoscalar probe. The comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and the corresponding predictions using the distorted-wave Born approximation allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of identified 1- pygmy states. For this analysis the form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities and optical potentials was used.

  19. /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy: torsion angle relationships in aryl carboxylic esters, acids, and amides

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, A.L.; Balakrishnan, P.; Dotrong, M.; McCloskey, C.J.; Oakley, M.G.; Boykin, D.W.

    1987-02-18

    /sup 1/ /sup 7/O NMR spectroscopic data (natural abundance in acetonitrile at 75/sup 0/C) were obtained for the following series of electronically similar, sterically hindered compounds: aromatic methyl esters, aromatic carboxylic acids, and aromatic amides. Torsional angles were calculated by the molecular mechanics (MM2) method. Linear regression analysis of the estimated torsion angles and the /sup 17/O chemical shift data for each series yielded the following results (series, slope delta/degree, correlation coefficient): esters (C=O), 0.70, 0.997; esters (-0-), 0.43, 0.992; acids (-CO/sub 2/H), 0.56, 0.994; amides (C=O), 0.84, 0.942; N,N-dimethylamides (C=O), 0.6, 0.991. The results are discussed in terms of minimization of repulsive van der Waals interactions by rotation of the functional group out of the plane of the aromatic ring.

  20. The 871 keV gamma ray from 17O and the identification of plutonium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peurrung, Anthony; Arthur, Richard; Elovich, Robert; Geelhood, Bruce; Kouzes, Richard; Pratt, Sharon; Scheele, Randy; Sell, Richard

    2001-12-01

    Disarmament agreements and discussions between the United States and the Russian Federation for reducing the number of stockpiled nuclear weapons require verification of the origin of materials as having come from disassembled weapons. This has resulted in the identification of measurable "attributes" that characterize such materials. It has been proposed that the 871 keV gamma ray of 17O can be observed as an indicator of the unexpected presence of plutonium oxide, as opposed to plutonium metal, in such materials. We have shown that the observation of the 871 keV gamma ray is not a specific indicator of the presence of the oxide, but rather indicates the presence of nitrogen.

  1. The impact of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric sulfate production pathways, oxidants, and ice core Δ17O(SO42-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Kunasek, S. A.

    2011-04-01

    We use a global three-dimensional chemical transport model to quantify the influence of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric sulfate production mechanisms and oxidant concentrations constrained by observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O = &delta17O-0.52 × &delta18O) of sulfate in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores and aerosols. The oxygen isotopic composition of non-sea salt sulfate (Δ17O(SO42-)) is a function of the relative importance of each oxidant (e.g. O3, OH, H2O2, and O2) during sulfate formation, and can be used to quantify sulfate production pathways. Due to its dependence on oxidant concentrations, Δ17O(SO42-) has been suggested as a proxy for paleo-oxidant levels. However, the oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate from both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores shows a trend opposite to that expected from the known increase in the concentration of tropospheric O3 since the preindustrial period. The model simulates a significant increase in the fraction of sulfate formed via oxidation by O2 catalyzed by transition metals in the present-day Northern Hemisphere troposphere (from 11% to 22%), offset by decreases in the fractions of sulfate formed by O3 and H2O2. There is little change, globally, in the fraction of tropospheric sulfate produced by gas-phase oxidation (from 23% to 27%). The model-calculated change in Δ17O(SO42-) since preindustrial times (1850 CE) is consistent with Arctic and Antarctic observations. The model simulates a 42% increase in the concentration of global mean tropospheric O3, a 10% decrease in OH, and a 58% increase in H2O2 between the preindustrial period and present. Model results indicate that the observed decrease in the Arctic Δ17O(SO42-) - in spite of increasing tropospheric O3 concentrations - can be explained by the combined effects of increased sulfate formation by O2 catalyzed by anthropogenic transition metals and increased cloud water acidity, rendering Δ17O(SO42-) insensitive to changing oxidant

  2. 17O excess traces atmospheric nitrate in paleo-groundwater of the Saharan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, M.; Leis, A.; Abdalla, R.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Böttcher, M. E.; Köhler, S.

    2014-06-01

    Saharan paleo-groundwater from the Hasouna area of Libya contains up to 1.8 mM of nitrate, which exceeds the World Health Organization limit for drinking water, but the origin is still disputed. Herein we show that a positive 17O excess in NO3- (Δ17ONO3 = Δ17ONO3 - 0.52 δ18ONO3) is preserved in the paleo-groundwater. The 17O excess provides an excellent tracer of atmospheric NO3-, which is caused by the interaction of ozone with NOx via photochemical reactions, coupled with a non-mass-dependent isotope fractionation. Our Δ17ONO3 data from 0.4 to 5.0 ‰ (n = 28) indicate that up to 20 mol % of total dissolved NO3- originated from the Earth's atmosphere (x[NO3-]atm), where the remaining NO3- refers to microbially induced nitrification in soils. High Δ17ONO3 values correspond to soils that are barren in dry periods, while low Δ17ONO3 values correspond to more fertile soils. Coupled high Δ17ONO3 and high x[NO3-]atm values are caused by a sudden wash-out of accumulated disposition of atmospheric NO3- on plants, soil surfaces and in vadose zones within humid-wet cycles. The individual isotope and chemical composition of the Hasouna groundwater can be followed by a binary mixing approach using the lowest and highest mineralised groundwater as end members without considering evaporation. Using the δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4 isotope signature of dissolved SO42-, no indication is found for a superimposition by denitrification, e.g. involving pyrite minerals within the aquifers. It is suggested that dissolved SO42- originates from the dissolution of CaSO4 minerals during groundwater evolution.

  3. 17O-excess traces atmospheric nitrate in paleo groundwater of the Saharan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, M.; Leis, A.; Abdalla, R.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Böttcher, M. E.; Köhler, S.

    2013-12-01

    Saharan paleo groundwater from the Hasouna area of Libya contains up to 1.8 mM of nitrate, the origin of which is still disputed. Herein we show that a positive 17O-excess in NO3- (Δ17ONO3 = δ17ONO3 - 0.52 δ18ONO3) is preserved in the paleo groundwater. The 17O-excess provides an excellent tracer of atmospheric NO3-, which is caused by the interaction of ozone with NOx via photochemical reactions, coupled with a non-mass dependent isotope fractionation. Our Δ17ONO3 data from 0.4 to 5.0‰ (n = 28) indicate that up to x [NO3-]atm = 20 mol % of total dissolved NO3- originated from the Earth's atmosphere. High Δ17ONO3 values correspond to soils that are barren in dry periods, while low Δ17ONO3 values correspond to more fertile soils. Coupled high Δ17ONO3 and high x [NO3-]atm values are caused by a sudden wash out of dry deposition of atmospheric NO3- on plant or soil surfaces within humid-wet cycles. The individual isotope and chemical composition of the Hasouna groundwater can be followed by a binary mixing approach using the lowest and highest mineralized groundwater as end-members without considering evaporation. Using the δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4 isotope signature of dissolved sulfate, no indication is found for a superimposition by denitrification, e.g. involving pyrite minerals within the aquifers. It is suggested that dissolved sulfate originates from the dissolution of calcium sulfate minerals during groundwater evolution.

  4. Water permeability of polyunsaturated lipid membranes measured by 17O NMR.

    PubMed

    Huster, D; Jin, A J; Arnold, K; Gawrisch, K

    1997-08-01

    Diffusion-controlled water permeation across bilayers of polyunsaturated phospholipids was measured by 17O nuclear magnetic resonance. In 100-nm extruded liposomes containing 50 mM MnCl2, water exchange between internal and external solutions was monitored via changes in the linewidth of the 17O water resonance of external water. Liposome size and shape were characterized by light scattering methods and determination of liposome trapped volume. At 25 degrees C, the following water permeability coefficients were determined: 18:0-18:1n-9 PC, 155 +/- 24 microns/s; 18:0-18:3n-3 PC, 330 +/- 88 microns/s; and 18:0-22:6n-3 PC, 412 +/- 91 microns/s. The addition of 1 M ethanol reduced permeability coefficients to 66 +/- 15 microns/s for 18:0-18:1n-9 PC and to 239 +/- 67 microns/s for 18:0-22:6n-3 PC. Furthermore, the addition of 50 mol% 18:1n-9-18:1n-9 PE reduced the water permeability from 122 +/- 21 microns/s for pure 18:1n-9-18:1n-9 PC to 74 +/- 15 microns/s for the mixture. The significant increase in water permeation for membranes with polyunsaturated hydrocarbon chains correlates with looser packing of polyunsaturated lipids at the lipid-water interface and the suggested deeper penetration of water into these bilayers. Ethanol may block water diffusion pathways by occupying points of water entry into bilayers at the interface. The addition of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine increases lipid packing density and, consequently, reduces permeation rates.

  5. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M.

    2016-06-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20–60 nm and lengths of 4–6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications.

  6. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M.

    2016-01-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20–60 nm and lengths of 4–6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications. PMID:27271194

  7. Rapid Synthesis of Thin and Long Mo17O47 Nanowire-Arrays in an Oxygen Deficient Flame.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Cai, Lili; Zhou, Lite; Zhao, Chenqi; Rao, Pratap M

    2016-01-01

    Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays are promising active materials and electrically-conductive supports for batteries and other devices. While high surface area resulting from long, thin, densely packed nanowires generally leads to improved performance in a wide variety of applications, the Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays synthesized previously by electrically-heated chemical vapor deposition under vacuum conditions were relatively thick and short. Here, we demonstrate a method to grow significantly thinner and longer, densely packed, high-purity Mo17O47 nanowire-arrays with diameters of 20-60 nm and lengths of 4-6 μm on metal foil substrates using rapid atmospheric flame vapor deposition without any chamber or walls. The atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C evaporation temperature resulted in smaller diameters, longer lengths and order-of-magnitude faster growth rate than previously demonstrated. As explained by kinetic and thermodynamic calculations, the selective synthesis of high-purity Mo17O47 nanowires is achieved due to low oxygen partial pressure in the flame products as a result of the high ratio of fuel to oxidizer supplied to the flame, which enables the correct ratio of MoO2 and MoO3 vapor concentrations for the growth of Mo17O47. This flame synthesis method is therefore a promising route for the growth of composition-controlled one-dimensional metal oxide nanomaterials for many applications. PMID:27271194

  8. Purification and antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase from endophytic Enterobacter aerogenes VT66.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses biofilm lifestyle to resist antibiotic treatment. In our study, endophytic bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 quenched the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. The quorum quenching activity was attributed to the presence of AHL-lactonase. The AHL-lactonase was purified using column chromatography and purified AHL-lactonase was applied for the control of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. The results showed that purified AHL-lactonase obtained with a molecular weight about 30kDa was able to inhibit more than 70% of biofilm in P. aeruginosa PAO1 (P<0.001). Antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated well with results from staining technique used to determine inhibition of biomass and viable cell activity. Therefore, results unambiguously confirm that the AHL-lactonase from E. aerogenes VT66 could be used as antibiofilm therapeutics in P. aeruginosa associated biomedical applications.

  9. Isotopic Water Analyzer for Highly Precise Measurements of δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Fortson, S.; Snaith, S.; Gupta, M.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ18O and δ17O) of both liquid water and water vapor are widely used in hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and biogeochemistry to determine the migration of water through an ecosystem. Previously, discrete samples were collected (or condensed) and transported to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer for characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies were generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the continued development of a field-portable Isotopic Water Analyzer that exploits cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g. Off-Axis ICOS) to accurately and rapidly quantify δ2H, δ18O and δ17O of both liquid water and water vapor. The instrument is thermally-controlled to better than ±8 mK and is capable of measuring over 90 liquid samples/day with δ2H, δ18O and δ17O precisions exceeding ±0.2 ‰, ±0.05 ‰, and ±0.06 ‰ respectively. Subsequent averaging yields δ2H, δ18O and δ17O precisions exceeding ±0.077 ‰, ±0.023 ‰, and ±0.03 ‰ respectively with over 22 samples/day. The accuracy of the liquid analyzer was confirmed over a very wide dynamic range (δ2H = -455 to +671 ‰ with comparable δ18O and δ17O values) by direct comparison to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Moreover, the ability to directly measure 17O-excess, vapor samples, and unnatural waters (e.g. plant water, soil water, urine, blood, saliva…) will also be presented.

  10. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  11. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  12. Structure and disorder in iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses and melts: High-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding of the effect of iron content on the structure (Si coordination environment and the degree of polymerization) of iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses is essential for studying their macroscopic properties and diverse geological processes in Earth's interior. Although the recent advances in high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques provide detailed structural information of a diverse iron-free oxide glasses with varying composition (e.g., Lee, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 2011, 108, 6847; Lee and Sung, Chem. Geol., 2008, 256, 326; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Lee et al., Phys. Rev., 103, 095501, 2009), their application to iron-bearing silicate glasses has a limited usefulness in resolving atomic configurations due to the effect of paramagnetic cation (i.e., Fe) on the NMR spectra. Here, we report the first ^{29}Si and ^{17}O NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses with varying iron content (Na_{2}O-Fe_{2}O_{3}-SiO_{2} glasses, up to 34.60 wt% Fe_{2}O_{3}), revealing previously unknown details of iron-induced changes in structure and disorder. While signal intensity decreases and peak width increases exponentially with increasing iron content [=Fe_{2}O_{3}/(Na_{2}O+Fe_{2}O_{3})], ^{29}Si MAS NMR spectra for sodium-iron silicate glasses present the slight peak shift and an asymmetrical peak broadening toward higher Q^{n} species with increasing iron content. This result implies an increase in the degree of polymerization with increasing iron content. Additionally, ^{29}Si spin-relaxation time (T_{1}) for the glasses decreases with increasing of iron content by several orders of magnitude. ^{17}O 3QMAS NMR spectra for the glasses show well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) even at relatively high iron content, providing the first direct experimental estimation of the degree of polymerization. In sodium-iron silicate glasses, the fraction of NBO decreases with increasing iron

  13. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  14. Preparation and Tungsten-183 NMR Characterization of [alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)](10)(-), [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-), and [alpha-2-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-).

    PubMed

    Bartis, Judit; Kunina, Yuliya; Blumenstein, Michael; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    1996-03-13

    The preparation of the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers of the Wells-Dawson 17 tungsto derivatives by standard methods is accompanied by a significant proportion of the other isomer present as an impurity. In this study, the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers of [Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) have been prepared in >98% purity by reacting isomerically pure K(9)Li[alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)] and K(10)[alpha-2-P(2)W(17)O(61)], respectively, with ZnCl(2), while rigorously controlling the pH at 4.7. The molecules were isolated as potassium salts. For (183)W NMR and (31)P NMR characterization, both molecules were ion exchanged by cation-exchange chromatography, maintaining the pH at 4.7, to obtain the lithium salts. Removal of water and isolation of a solid sample of [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) was achieved by lyophilization at -40 degrees C. The chemical shift data from (31)P and (183)W NMR spectroscopy of the isolated [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) and [alpha-2-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) isomers are consistent with a mixture of the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isomers reported previously;(1) the molecules have the expected C(1) and C(s)() symmetry, respectively. The [alpha-1-Zn(H(2)O)P(2)W(17)O(61)](8)(-) isomer is stable in the pH range of 4.6-6 at temperatures <35 degrees C. Using the same ion exchange and lyophilization techniques, the lacunary [alpha-1-P(2)W(17)O(61)](10)(-) isomer was isolated as the lithium salt; characterization by (183)W NMR spectroscopy confirms the C(1) symmetry.

  15. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  16. 23 Na and 17O NMR studies of hyperkagome Na4Ir3O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, Abigail; Bert, Fabrice; Orain, Jean-Christophe; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Mendels, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Na4Ir3O8 is a unique case of a 3D corner sharing triangular lattice which can be decorated with quantum spins. It has spurred a lot of theoretical interest as a spin liquid candidate of a new kind where the Hamiltonian might not be thought in terms of a simple Heisenberg case because of spin orbit coupling on the Ir 5d element. We present a comprehensive set of NMR data taken on both the 23Na and 17O sites. We have found that magnetic freezing of all Ir sites sets in below Tf ~ 7.5K ~ 0 . 019 J with a clear hyperfine field transferred from Ir moments and a drastic decrease of 1 /T1 . Above Tf, physical properties are expected to be a landmark of frustration in this exotic geometry. We will discuss our shift and relaxation data in the temperature range of 300K to 7.5 K in the light of published thermodynamic measurements (Y. Okamotoa et al, PRL 99 137207, 2007 and Y. Singh et al, PRB 88 220413(R), 2013) and comment on their implications for the already existing large body of theoretical work.

  17. 17O(n,α)14C cross section from 25 meV to approximately 1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Graff, S. M.

    1991-12-01

    We have measured the 17O(n,α)14C cross section from thermal energy to approximately 1 MeV. A bump in the data near 3 keV could be fitted by a state whose properties are consistent with a known subthreshold J π=1- level at Ex=8.039 MeV. The cause of the 1/v cross section near thermal energy could not be determined although the known 2+ state at 8.213 MeV was found to be too narrow to contribute much to the thermal cross section. Our data are compared to measurements made via the inverse reaction. There are many differences between the two sets of data. The astrophysical reaction rate was calculated from the measured cross section. This reaction plays a role in the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in nonstandard big-bang models. At big-bang temperatures, the experimental rate was found to be in fair agreement with the rate estimated from the previously known properties of states of 18O in this region. Furthermore, using the available information from experiments, it was estimated that the 17O(n,α)14C rate is approximately a factor of 103-104 times larger than the 17O(n,γ)18O rate at big-bang temperatures. As a result, there may be significant cycling between 14C and 17O resulting in a reduction of heavy-element nucleosynthesis.

  18. Synthesis of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide histaminyl conjugate for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Vinš, Petr; Černý, Ivan; Mikšátková, Petra; Drašar, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Simple method of preparation of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide N-histaminyl amide was developed for the construction of immunoanalytical kit. Improved method of glucuronide derivative synthesis was used, followed by hydroxybenzotriazole-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling with histamine. PMID:26898541

  19. Investigation of the Herzberg (C1Σ+→A1Π) band system in 12C17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, Rafał

    2015-10-01

    The C→A (0,1), (0,2) and (0,3) rovibronic bands of the less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue are studied in high resolution using a high-accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy in the region of 22,800-26,100 cm-1. Calibration with respect to simultaneously recorded thorium atomic lines, obtained from several overlapped orders of the spectrum in the visible range, as well as a stainless steel hollow-cathode molecular lamp with two anodes, yields an absolute accuracy of wavenumbers measurements of about 0.0025 cm-1 for the CO spectra. All 261 spectra lines of the Herzberg band system in 12C17O, up to Jmax=34, were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. As a result, the merged rotational constants and rotational equilibrium constants for the C1Σ+ Rydberg state, as well as the band origins, the isotope shifts, the RKR turning points, Franck-Condon factors, relative intensities, and r-centroids of the C→A system in the 12C17O isotopologue were obtained. An experimental RKR potential energy curve and vibrational levels of the C1Σ+ state in 12C17O together with highly excited k3Π, c3Π, E1Π, B1Σ+ and D‧1Σ+ states lying in the region between the first dissociation limit and the ionization potential of CO were plotted. A detailed investigation of possible perturbations that should occur in the C1Σ+(υ=0) Rydberg state of less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue in the close vicinity of the k3Π(υ=1, 2) and c3Π(υ=0) states in the region 92,000 cm-1 was performed. In the A1Π, υ=3 state of 12C17O, extensive, multi-state rotational perturbations were found and analyzed. Also, a global isotopic analysis of the C1Σ+ Rydberg state was carried out in the 12C16O, 12C17O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O as well as in 14C16O and 14C18O isotopologues. This analysis enabled us to determine, amongst others, the vibrational equilibrium constants in 12C17O for the C1Σ+ state, to improve these constants in the 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O isotopologues and

  20. Correction for the 17O interference in δ(13C) measurements when analyzing CO2 with stable isotope mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Assonov, Sergey S.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of δ(13C) determined on CO2 with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) must be corrected for the amount of 17O in the CO2. For data consistency, this must be done using identical methods by different laboratories. This report aims at unifying data treatment for CO2 IRMS by proposing (i) a unified set of numerical values, and (ii) a unified correction algorithm, based on a simple, linear approximation formula. Because the oxygen of natural CO2 is derived mostly from the global water pool, it is recommended that a value of 0.528 be employed for the factor λ, which relates differences in 17O and 18O abundances. With the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) of 0.011 180(28) in VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) reevaluation of data yields a value of 0.000 393(1) for the oxygen isotope ratio N(17O)/N(16O) of the evolved CO2. The ratio of these quantities, a ratio of isotope ratios, is essential for the 17O abundance correction: [N(17O)/N(16O)]/[N(13C)/N(12C)] = 0.035 16(8). The equation [δ(13C) ≈ 45δVPDB-CO2 + 2 17R/13R (45δVPDB-CO2 – λ46δVPDB-CO2)] closely approximates δ(13C) values with less than 0.010 ‰ deviation for normal oxygen-bearing materials and no more than 0.026 ‰ in extreme cases. Other materials containing oxygen of non-mass-dependent isotope composition require a more specific data treatment. A similar linear approximation is also suggested for δ(18O). The linear approximations are easy to implement in a data spreadsheet, and also help in generating a simplified uncertainty budget.

  1. High-temperature MAS-NMR at high spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Kirchhain, Holger; Holzinger, Julian; Mainka, Adrian; Spörhase, Andreas; Venkatachalam, Sabarinathan; Wixforth, Achim; van Wüllen, Leo

    2016-09-01

    A low cost version to enable high temperature MAS NMR experiments at temperatures of up to 700°C and spinning speeds of up to 10kHz is presented. The method relies on inductive heating using a metal coated rotor insert. The metal coating is accomplished via a two step process involving physical vapor deposition and galvanization.

  2. Surface hardening alloy VT6 of electric explosion and by electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Kobzareva, T. Yu. Gromov, V. E. E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Soskova, N. A. E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Budovskikh, E. A. E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru; Raikov, S. V.

    2014-11-14

    The aim is to study the phase composition, structure and properties of the surface layer of the VT6 titanium alloy, subjected to combined treatment, consisting of alloying by the plasma of an electric explosion of a graphite fiber with a charge of the SiC powder and subsequent exposure by a high-intense electron beam. As a result of such treatment, a multiphase surface layer with a submicron and nanosize structure forms with the microhardness manifold exceeding its value in the sample volume are presented.

  3. Structural homogeneity of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. Low-temperature micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, A. V.; Lubenets, S. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The microhardness of samples of VT1-0 titanium with grain sizes ranging from 35 nm to 10 μm is measured at temperatures of 77-300 K. Nanocrystalline samples produced by rolling at low temperatures are found to be quite homogeneous, and their structure is stable with respect to thermal and mechanical interactions. The interrelationship between microhardness and grain size is well described by the Hall-Petch relationship, the parameters of which depend on temperature. Data on the temperature dependence of the microhardness and the Hall-Petch coefficient indicate that the microplastic deformation is of a thermally activated, dislocation character, regardless of grain size.

  4. Phase composition and structure of femtosecond laser-produced oxide layer on VT6 alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Yu R.; Zhidkov, M. V.; Golosov, E. V.; Vershinina, T. N.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ligachev, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of femtosecond laser irradiation on the formation of an oxide layer on the surface of VT6 titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) is studied. The structure, chemical and phase composition have been studied by x-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The formation features of an oxide layer, which contains TiO2-rutile, TiO2-anatase Al2TiO5-aluminum titanate, Ti3O5-titanium oxide and TiO-titanium monoxide on the femtosecond laser-irradiation modified surface have been analyzed.

  5. Solid-state (17)O NMR as a sensitive probe of keto and gem-diol forms of alpha-keto acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Geris, Amanda J; Wu, Gang

    2009-08-28

    We have used solid-state (17)O NMR experiments to measure the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors for two alpha-keto acids: sodium [2-(17)O]pyruvate and lithium [2,2'-(17)O(2)]pyruvate. In the solid state, sodium [2-(17)O]pyruvate is in the keto form (-C(double bond (17)O)-) whereas lithium [2,2'-(17)O(2)]pyruvate takes the gem-diol form (-C((17)OH)(2)-). This study represents the first time that a full set of (17)O NMR tensors are experimentally determined for alpha-keto acids in these two different tautomeric forms. We have found that the two forms exhibit drastically different (17)O QC and CS tensors: for the keto form, delta(iso) = 543 +/- 1 ppm, C(Q) = 10.8 +/- 0.2 MHz, eta(Q) = 0.48 +/- 0.05, delta(11) = 1020 +/- 10, delta(22) = 640 +/- 10, delta(33) = -40 +/- 10 ppm, alpha = 80 +/- 5 degrees, beta = 90 +/- 2 degrees, and gamma = 83 +/- 2 degrees; for the gem-diol form, delta(iso) = 62 +/- 1 ppm, C(Q) = 8.5 +/- 0.5 MHz, eta(Q) = 1.0 +/- 0.05, delta(11) = 140 +/- 5, delta(22) = 45 +/- 5, delta(33) = 0 +/- 5 ppm, alpha = 55 +/- 5 degrees, beta = 90 +/- 5 degrees, and gamma = 80 +/- 2 degrees. The (17)O chemical shift tensor observed for the gem-diol functional group also represents the first such measurement for any -ol functional group (e.g., alcohols, phenols, carbohydrates, etc.) Using these accurate experimental (17)O NMR tensors, we were able to evaluate the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations. Our results showed that quantum chemical calculations using the crystal lattice approach are in much better agreement with the experimental solid-state (17)O NMR data than those calculated using the molecular cluster approach. Quantum chemical calculations have also provided information about the sign of the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constants and about the (17)O NMR tensor orientations in the molecular frame of reference. Our findings suggest that solid-state (17)O NMR may be useful in probing the tautomeric form of the alpha

  6. Purification and antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase from endophytic Enterobacter aerogenes VT66.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses biofilm lifestyle to resist antibiotic treatment. In our study, endophytic bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 quenched the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. The quorum quenching activity was attributed to the presence of AHL-lactonase. The AHL-lactonase was purified using column chromatography and purified AHL-lactonase was applied for the control of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. The results showed that purified AHL-lactonase obtained with a molecular weight about 30kDa was able to inhibit more than 70% of biofilm in P. aeruginosa PAO1 (P<0.001). Antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated well with results from staining technique used to determine inhibition of biomass and viable cell activity. Therefore, results unambiguously confirm that the AHL-lactonase from E. aerogenes VT66 could be used as antibiofilm therapeutics in P. aeruginosa associated biomedical applications. PMID:26432367

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Tensile Properties of a VT6 Alloy Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, T. I.; Imayev, V. M.; Imayev, R. M.; Pavlinich, S. P.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of a material manufactured from the VT6 titanium alloy by the method of selective laser melting (SLM) are investigated. In the initial state, the microstructure of the SLMmaterial consists of columnar β-grains elongated in the direction of heat sink, which were transformed during cooling into the acicular martensite α'-phase. A heat treatment, including two-stage annealing at 900 and 700°C, transfers the microstructure into equilibrium, two-phase state, with the elongation of β-grains being retained. Mechanical tensile tests were performed in the direction normal to the layer packing formed during SLM. It is found that strength properties of the workpiece manufactured by the SLM process are similar to those of the VT6 alloy manufactured by conventional casting, while its room-temperature ductility is noticeably higher. Deformation-relief studies of the specimen surface demonstrated that the layers formed during SLM affect neither the development of deformation nor fracture of the material.

  8. Aquaporin-1 gene deletion reduces breast tumor growth and lung metastasis in tumor-producing MMTV-PyVT mice

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) is a plasma membrane water-transporting protein expressed strongly in tumor microvascular endothelia. We previously reported impaired angiogenesis in implanted tumors in AQP1-deficient mice and reduced migration of AQP1-deficient endothelial cells in vitro. Here, we investigated the consequences of AQP1 deficiency in mice that spontaneously develop well-differentiated, luminal-type breast adenomas with lung metastases [mouse mammary tumor virus-driven polyoma virus middle T oncogene (MMTV-PyVT)]. AQP1+/+ MMTV-PyVT mice developed large breast tumors with total tumor mass 3.5 ± 0.5 g and volume 265 ± 36 mm3 (se, 11 mice) at age 98 d. Tumor mass (1.6±0.2 g) and volume (131±15 mm3, 12 mice) were greatly reduced in AQP1−/− MMTV-PyVT mice (P<0.005). CD31 immunofluorescence showed abnormal microvascular anatomy in tumors of AQP1−/− MMTV-PyVT mice, with reduced vessel density. HIF-1α expression was increased in tumors in AQP1−/− MMTV-PyVT mice. The number of lung metastases (5±1/mouse) was much lower than in AQP1+/+ MMTV-PyVT mice (31±8/mouse, P<0.005). These results implicate AQP1 as an important determinant of tumor angiogenesis and, hence, as a potential drug target for adjuvant therapy of solid tumors.—Esteva-Font, C., Jin, B.-J., Verkman, A. S. Aquaporin-1 gene deletion reduces breast tumor growth and lung metastasis in tumor-producing MMTV-PyVT mice. PMID:24334548

  9. [Threshold value of f/Vt index for predicting successful weaning from mechanical ventilation in active smokers].

    PubMed

    Rivas-Salazar, Rommel Jesús; Baltazar-Torres, José Ángel; Arvizu-Tachiquín, Perla Cristina; Moreno-López, Israel; Zamora-Varela, Sergio; Cano-Oviedo, Abraham Antonio; Esquivel-Chávez, Alejandro; Sánchez-Hurtado, Luis Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la ventilación mecánica (VM) se utiliza en el 60-70 % de los ingresos a la unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI). Un valor umbral del índice f/Vt de 105 es un predictor de éxito en el retiro de la ventilación mecánica (RVM) en pacientes con asma, cirugía cardiaca, neumonía, sepsis, neurocríticos, etc. Sin embargo, no existen reportes de la utilidad del índice f/Vt para predecir RVM exitoso en pacientes con tabaquismo activo (TA). El objetivo de este trabajo es identificar un valor umbral del índice f/Vt para predecir RVM exitoso en pacientes con TA. Métodos: se incluyeron prospectivamente 85 pacientes con TA y VM >24 horas, ingresados a la UCI. Se registraron variables demográficas y clínicas. Se midió el índice f/Vt con un espirómetro de Wright y se calculó su sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo (VPP) y valor predictivo negativo (VPN) para predecir RVM exitoso. Una p <0.05 se consideró estadísticamente significativa. Resultados: el promedio del índice f/Vt fue de 68.69. El RVM exitoso fue del 75.3 %. Un valor umbral del índice f/Vt de 79.5 tuvo sensibilidad de 76 %, especificidad de 61 %, VPP de 85 % y VPN de 46 % para predecir RVM exitoso en este grupo de enfermos. Conclusiones: el valor umbral del índice f/Vt de 79.5 es útil para predecir éxito en el RVM en pacientes con TA.

  10. Magnetic Field-Independent ^17O and ^63, 65Cu Normal State Spin Lattice Relaxation as Inferred by ^17O T2 NMR up to 28 T in YBa_2Cu_3O_7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, V. F.; Bachman, H. N.; Halperin, W. P.

    1998-03-01

    ^17O spin-spin relaxation NMR (T_2) is a powerful probe of vortex fluctuations in high Tc cuprates.(H. N. Bachman et al)., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 41, 467 (1996). It is important to understand the normal state T2 relaxation in order to extract the vortex field fluctuations.^1,(C. H. Recchia et al)., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3543 (1997). The study of T2 in YBCO has shown that, in the normal state, copper and oxygen spin fluctuations (T1 processes) dominate the time scales for T_2, the spin-echo height decay. Thus, measurements of T2 as a function of magnetic field are an indicator of ^17O and ^63, 65Cu T1 behavior. We report new T2 measurements taken in the normal state from 3.2 T up to 28.2 T in which the spin-spin relaxation rate is observed to be completely field independent. By comparison with the predicted spin echo height decay given by the Gaussian Phase Approximation model we show that T1 of ^63, 65Cu and ^17O must not deviate from their published low-field values, within experimental error, over the entire magnetic field range. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  11. Use of 17O/16O to trace atmospherically-deposited sulfate in surface waters: A case study in alpine watersheds in the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Mast, M.A.; Kester, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Building on the discovery of excess 17O in atmospheric sulfate by Lee et al. (2001), we have carried out a case study to determine whether 17O might provide a new tool for quantifying the impact of atmospheric deposition on surface-water sulfate loads. In Rocky Mountain alpine regions, excess 17O was found to be characteristics of atmospheric sulfate deposited in snow. Excess 17O was also evident in stream sulfate in one of two high-elevation watersheds where analyses were made. Isotope mass balance calculations gave surprizingly low atmospheric contributions to stream sulfate suggesting that (1) despite abundant outcrop and sparse soil in these areas, significant sulfate may be taken up and released by soil microbes before being exported in streams, and (2) surface waters can carry multiple non-atmospheric sulfate types, some possibly anthropogenic. Measurements of 17O may prove very useful in studies of sulfate behavior in a variety of surficial environments.

  12. Cross ambiguity functions on the MasPar MP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.A.; Pryor, D.V.; Frock, C.K.

    1995-12-01

    In a signal processing environment, cross ambiguity functions are often used to detect when one signal is a time and/or frequency shift of another. They consist of multiple cross-correlations, which can be computed efficiently using complex valued FFTs. This paper discusses the implementation of cross ambiguity functions on the MasPar MP-2, a SIMD processor array. Two different implementations are developed. The first computes each cross ambiguity function serially, using FFT code that parallelizes across the complete set of processors. The second uses the MasPar IORAM to realign the data so that the cross ambiguity functions can be computed in parallel. In this case, multiple FFTs are executed in parallel on subsets of the processors, which lowers the overall amount of communication required.

  13. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  14. On the introduction of {sup 17}O+p reaction rates evaluated through the THM in AGB nucleosynthesis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-05-09

    The rates for the {sup 17}O(p,αα{sup 14}N, {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 18}F and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions deduced trough the Trojan Horse Method (THM) have been introduced into a state-of-the-art asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis and cool bottom process. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis.

  15. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  16. Direct measurement of the Mn(II) hydration state in metal complexes and metalloproteins through 17O NMR line widths.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Zhu, Jiang; Caravan, Peter

    2013-12-11

    Here we describe a simple method to estimate the inner-sphere hydration state of the Mn(II) ion in coordination complexes and metalloproteins. The line width of bulk H2(17)O is measured in the presence and absence of Mn(II) as a function of temperature, and transverse (17)O relaxivities are calculated. It is demonstrated that the maximum (17)O relaxivity is directly proportional to the number of inner-sphere water ligands (q). Using a combination of literature data and experimental data for 12 Mn(II) complexes, we show that this method provides accurate estimates of q with an uncertainty of ±0.2 water molecules. The method can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers working at fields of 7 T and higher. The hydration number can be obtained for micromolar Mn(II) concentrations. We show that the technique can be extended to metalloproteins or complex:protein interactions. For example, Mn(II) binds to the multimetal binding site A on human serum albumin with two inner-sphere water ligands that undergo rapid exchange (1.06 × 10(8) s(-1) at 37 °C). The possibility of extending this technique to other metal ions such as Gd(III) is discussed.

  17. Dynamic NMR of low-sensitivity fast-relaxing nuclei: (17)O NMR and DFT study of acetoxysilanes.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Mameli, Giulia; Mocci, Francesca; Luhmer, Michel; Cerioni, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    (17)O NMR is not routinely used for structure characterization, and kinetic studies of fluxional organic compounds are seldom undertaken because poor sensitivity and fast quadrupole relaxation are frequently regarded as intractable issues. This work shows how, nowadays, quantitative (17)O dynamic NMR studies on small organic molecules are feasible without enrichment being needed. It reports on acetoxysilanes, a class of fluxional compounds whose structure and dynamics were to be clarified. Natural abundance (17)O NMR spectra were recorded over a wide range of temperatures using standard instrumentation. The analysis relies on simple linewidth measurements and directly provides the activation parameters. The activation enthalpy is found to decrease with increasing number of acetoxy groups bound to silicon. Density functional theory calculations properly predict this trend and show that a single oxygen atom of the acetoxy group is bound to silicon, excluding chelation as binding mode, and that the dynamic process involves the shift of the silicon atom between the two oxygen atoms of the acetoxy group.

  18. The interstellar C18O/C17O ratio in the solar neighbourhood: The ρ Ophiuchus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Brand, J.; Henkel, C.

    2005-02-01

    Observations of up to ten carbon monoxide (CO and isotopomers) transitions are presented to study the interstellar C18O/C17O ratio towards 21 positions in the nearby (d˜140 pc) low-mass star forming cloud ρ Oph. A map of the C18O J=1-0 distribution of parts of the cloud is also shown. An average 12C18O/12C17O isotopomeric ratio of 4.11 ± 0.14, reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratio, is derived from Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) calculations. From LTE column densities we derive a ratio of 4.17±0.26. These calculations also show that the kinetic temperature decreases from about 30 K in the cloud envelope to about 10 K in the cloud cores. This decrease is accompanied by an increase of the average molecular hydrogen density from 104 cm-3 to ⪆105 cm-3. Towards some lines of sight C18O optical depths reach values of order unity. Based on observations collected with the Swedish/ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO 62.I-0752). All spectra (some of which are shown in Fig. \\ref{spectra}) are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/430/549

  19. High precision delta(17)O isotope measurements of oxygen from silicates and other oxides: method and applications.

    PubMed

    Miller; Franchi; Sexton; Pillinger

    1999-07-01

    The use of infrared laser-assisted fluorination to release oxygen from milligram quantities of silicates or other oxide mineral grains is a well-established technique. However, relatively few studies have reported the optimisation of this procedure for oxygen-17 isotope measurements. We describe here details of an analytical system using infrared (10 µm) laser-assisted fluorination, in conjunction with a dual inlet mass spectrometer of high resolving power ( approximately 250) to provide (17)O and (18)O oxygen isotope measurements from 0.5-2 mg of silicates or other oxide mineral grains. Respective precisions (1) of typically 0.08 and 0.04 per thousand are obtained for the complete analytical procedure. Departures from the mass-dependent oxygen isotope fractionation line are quantified by Delta(17)O; our precision (1) of such measurements on individual samples is shown to be +/-0.024 per thousand. In turn, this permits the offset between parallel, mass-dependent fractionation lines to be characterised to substantially greater precision than has been possible hitherto. Application of this system to investigate the (17)O versus (18)O relationship for numerous terrestrial whole-rock and mineral samples, of diverse geological origins and age, indicates that the complete data set may be described by a single, mass-dependent fractionation line of slope 0.5244+/- 0.00038 (standard error). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  1. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  2. Hipparcos red stars in the HpVT2 and VIC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platais, I.; Pourbaix, D.; Jorissen, A.; Makarov, V. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Samus, N. N.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Lebzelter, T.; Sperauskas, J.

    2003-01-01

    For Hipparcos M, S, and C spectral type stars, we provide calibrated instantaneous (epoch) Cousins V - I color indices using newly derived HpVT2 photometry. Three new sets of ground-based Cousins VI data have been obtained for more than 170 carbon and red M giants. These datasets in combination with the published sources of V I photometry served to obtain the calibration curves linking Hipparcos/Tycho Hp-VT2 with the Cousins V - I index. In total, 321 carbon stars and 4464 M- and S-type stars have new V - I indices. The standard error of the mean V - I is about 0.1 mag or better down to Hp~9 although it deteriorates rapidly at fainter magnitudes. These V - I indices can be used to verify the published Hipparcos V - I color indices. Thus, we have identified a handful of new cases where, instead of the real target, a random field star has been observed. A considerable fraction of the DMSA/C and DMSA/V solutions for red stars appear not to be warranted. Most likely such spurious solutions may originate from usage of a heavily biased color in the astrometric processing. Based on observations from the Hipparcos astrometric satellite operated by the European Space Agency (ESA 1997).}\\fnmsep\\thanks{Table 7 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/397/997

  3. Effect of electron beam treatment on structural change in titanium alloy VT-0 at high-cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, S. V.; Komissarova, I. A.; Kosinov, D. A.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Ivanova, O. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the surface of the fractured structure of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 under treatment by low-energy high-current electron beams and the subsequent cycle fatigue to the failure were analyzed by transmission scanning and transmission electron diffraction microscopy. The increase in the fatigue life of samples in 2.2 times after treatment by electron beams was established. An assumption was made that the increase in the fatigue life of titanium, grade VT1-0, was due to the formation of a lamellar substructure conditioned by high-velocity crystallization of the titanium surface layer.

  4. A general protocol for temperature calibration of MAS NMR probes at arbitrary spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using (207)Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and FastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  5. A General Protocol for Temperature Calibration of MAS NMR Probes at Arbitrary Spinning Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using 207Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and fastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  6. Multinuclear MAS NMR investigation of zeolites reacted with chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Kónya, Z.; Lentz, P.; Nagy, J. B.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    Multinuclear ( 23Na, 27Al, 29Si, 13C) MAS NMR techniques were used for investigation of surface reaction of Y-type zeolites with CFCs (CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2, CClF 3, CF 4) and HCFC (CHClF 2). The hydrogen containing derivative reacts slowly. Those possessing more than 2 F atoms can be regarded as stable unreactive materials. CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2 react strongly with the zeolites. The reaction of HCFC with zeolites has a different mechanism to the other CFCs tested. On the basis of multinuclear NMR results a mechanism is given for the decomposition of HCFC.

  7. 17O NMR study of the doped electrons in lightly oxygen-deficient cubic SrMnO3 -x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trokiner, A.; Verkhovskii, S.; Volkova, Z.; Gerashenko, A.; Mikhalev, K.; Germov, A.; Yakubovskii, A.; Korolev, A.; Dabrowski, B.; Tyutyunnik, A.

    2016-05-01

    The spin susceptibility of the localized Mn (t2 g) electrons, χs, and the spatially distributed spin density of the doped electrons were investigated by 17O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the paramagnetic (PM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases of electron-doped SrMnO3 -x ceramics with the cubic structure. Three lightly doped samples (2 x <0.015 ) were studied with TN=220 K-240 K. In the PM state χs increases gradually from TN and reaches a broad maximum above ˜1.5 TN . The gapped behavior of χs indicates a low-dimensional short-range spin order persisting above TN. These short-range one-dimensional correlations are consistent with 17O NMR results obtained at room temperature, which show that Mn magnetic moments are aligned along the edges of the cubic unit cell. Above 350 K all doped electrons are fast-moving eg electrons. They provide the uniform polarization of the localized spins which increases χs and the increasing doping shifts the oxygen-deficient SrMnO3 -x oxide towards a ferromagnetic (FM) metallic state. At lower T the doped electrons are heterogeneously distributed in the oxide: The fraction of the fast-moving electrons diminishes and vanishes below 100 K, while the remaining doped electrons slow down their hopping and each of them creates a FM domain. These FM domains which are detected below 10 K by 55Mn NMR can be considered as small-size magnetic polarons. Their T -activated hopping in the G-type AF lattice was probed by 17O spin-echo experiments. The energy barrier of hopping shows a trend to grow with increasing doping, indicating that the de Gennes metallic ground state cannot be achieved in oxygen-deficient SrMnO3 -x oxides, probably due to detrimental oxygen vacancy defects.

  8. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  9. Milli-Arcsecond (MAS) Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; O'Neill, John; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2016-05-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets should be visible in coronal EUV emission lines. However, this spatial scale is far below the resolution of existing imaging instruments, so these dissipation sites have never been observed individually. Conventional optics cannot be manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required spatial resolution in the extreme-ultraviolet where these hot plasmas radiate. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (MAS) resolution, with much more readily achievable tolerances than with conventional imaging technology. Prototype photon sieve elements have been fabricated and tested in the laboratory. A full-scale ultra-high resolution instrument will require formation flying and computational image deconvolution. Significant progress has been made in overcoming these challenges, and some recent results in these areas are discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket concept demonstration payload is presented that obtains 80 MAS (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335. These images will show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, and they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region.

  10. Study of the γ decay of high-lying states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Kmiecik, M.; Bracco, A.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemala, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    A measurement of the high-lying states in 208Pb has been made using 17O beams at 20 MeV/u. The gamma decay following inelastic excitation was measured with the detector system AGATA Demonstrator based on segmented HPGe detectors, coupled to an array of large volume LaBr3:Ce scintillators and to an array of Si detectors. Preliminary results in comparison with (γ,γ') data, for states in the 5-8 MeV energy interval, are presented.

  11. Influence of aging temperature on the structure and mechanical properties of titanium alloy VT22 subjected to helical rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, I. P.; Naydenkin, E. V.; Ratochka, I. V.; Lykova, O. N.; Balushkina, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of titanium alloy VT22 after helical rolling and subsequent aging was investigated. It is shown that the treatment leads to the formation of ultra-fine grain/subgrain structure in the alloy. The subsequent aging increases the ultimate strength and yield strength to 1640 and 1590 MPa respectively, while saving satisfactory plasticity (δ > 5%).

  12. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  13. SpoVT: From Fine-Tuning Regulator in Bacillus subtilis to Essential Sporulation Protein in Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Eijlander, Robyn T.; Holsappel, Siger; de Jong, Anne; Ghosh, Abhinaba; Christie, Graham; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation is a highly sophisticated developmental process adopted by most Bacilli as a survival strategy to withstand extreme conditions that normally do not support microbial growth. A complicated regulatory cascade, divided into various stages and taking place in two different compartments of the cell, involves a number of primary and secondary regulator proteins that drive gene expression directed toward the formation and maturation of an endospore. Such regulator proteins are highly conserved among various spore formers. Despite this conservation, both regulatory and phenotypic differences are observed between different species of spore forming bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the regulatory sporulation protein SpoVT results in a severe sporulation defect in Bacillus cereus, whereas this is not observed in Bacillus subtilis. Although spores are initially formed, the process is stalled at a later stage in development, followed by lysis of the forespore and the mother cell. A transcriptomic investigation of B. cereus ΔspoVT shows upregulation of genes involved in germination, potentially leading to premature lysis of prespores formed. Additionally, extreme variation in the expression of species-specific genes of unknown function was observed. Introduction of the B. subtilis SpoVT protein could partly restore the sporulation defect in the B. cereus spoVT mutant strain. The difference in phenotype is thus more than likely explained by differences in promoter targets rather than differences in mode of action of the conserved SpoVT regulator protein. This study stresses that evolutionary variances in regulon members of sporulation regulators can have profound effects on the spore developmental process and that mere protein homology is not a foolproof predictor of similar phenotypes. PMID:27790204

  14. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  15. Structural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of a VT22 Titanium Alloy Under High-Temperature Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratochka, I. V.; Mishin, I. P.; Lykova, O. N.; Naydenkin, E. V.; Varlamova, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    The special features inherent in the development of high-temperature deformation and structural evolution in materials are investigated, using a VT22 titanium alloy of the transition class (Ti - 4.74 mass% Al - 5.57 mass% Mo - 5.04 mass% V) subjected to helical rolling + aging as an example. This treatment is found to give rise to an intragrain fine acicular martensite structure with fine inclusions of α-phase particles of size ~1 μm. It is shown that in the alloy undergoing plastic deformation at temperatures approaching the polymorphic transformation temperature, the elongation to failure is in excess of 300%. The high plasticity of the alloy in the conditions considered is likely to be due to vigorous development of phase transformations and intensification of diffusion-controlled processes, including the effects of the evolution of the dislocation structure, growth of subgrains, and formation of new grains in the bulk of the pre-existing ones during plastic deformation.

  16. Gadolinium heteropoly complex K 17[Gd(P 2W 17O 61) 2] as a potential MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guoying; Feng, Jianghua; Wu, Huifeng; Pei, Fengkui; Fang, Ke; Lei, Hao

    2004-10-01

    Gadolinium heteropoly complex K17[Gd(P2W17O61)2] has been evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments as a potential contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The thermal analysis and conductivity study indicate that this complex has good thermal stability and wide pH stability range. The T1 relaxivity is 7.59 mM-1 s-1 in aqueous solution and 7.97 mM-1 s-1 in 0.725 mmol l-1 bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution at 25 °C and 9.39 T, respectively. MR imaging of three male Sprague-Dawley rats showed remarkable enhancement in rat liver after intravenous injection, which persisted longer than with Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity increased by 57.1±16.9% during the whole imaging period at 0.082 mmol kg-1dose. Our preliminary in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that K17[Gd(P2W17O61)2] is a potential liver-specific MRI contrast agent.

  17. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for it’s 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 µm). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  18. Anode consumption on a subsea X-mas tree

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Anode consumption and coating breakdown on a X-mas tree installed at the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea was investigated after 5 years. A comparison with a spare tree and one tree being exposed for only 3--4 months was done. The epoxy coating has several blisters, in particular on stainless steel surfaces. Water inside the blisters has a pH of 13-14 indicating that the cathodic reaction occurs inside them. The anode dimensions indicate an overall anode consumption of approximately 20%, while the design allows 27% after 5 years. This indicates that the original design is quite conservative. If the design had been done according to present day design rules, the conservatism would be reduced; an overall anode consumption of 23% is then likely (still less than allowed 27%).

  19. Multinuclear MAS NMR studies of sodalitic framework materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.M.; Mead, P.J.; Dann, S.E.; Weller, M.T.

    2000-02-24

    A wide range of sodalite framework materials, M{sub 8}[TT{prime}O{sub 4}]{sub 6}X{sub 2} where T = Al, Ga, Si, T{prime} = Be, Al, Si, Ge, have been characterized using {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 71}Ga magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. Structural parameters, such as functions of the framework T{single{underscore}bond}O{single{underscore}bond}T{prime} angle, correlate linearly with the determined chemical shift values and provide relationships, as a function of T{prime}, which will facilitate characterization of more complex zeolitic compounds containing such species. The effects of changing a particular neighboring framework cation on the resonance position is controlled by variations in both framework bond angles/distances and electrostatic effects; these contributions are resolved.

  20. Food Waste Composting Study from Makanan Ringan Mas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, A. A.; Ismail, S. N. M.; Jamaludin, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The poor management of municipal solid waste in Malaysia has worsened over the years especially on food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% of the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Composting is one of low cost alternative method to dispose the food waste. This study is conducted to compost the food waste generation in Makanan Ringan Mas, which is a medium scale industry in Parit Kuari Darat due to the lack knowledge and exposure of food waste recycling practice. The aim of this study is to identify the physical and chemical parameters of composting food waste from Makanan Ringan Mas. The physical parameters were tested for temperature and pH value and the chemical parameter are Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium. In this study, backyard composting was conducted with 6 reactors. Tapioca peel was used as fermentation liquid and soil and coconut grated were used as the fermentation bed. Backyard composting was conducted with six reactors. The overall results from the study showed that the temperature of the reactors were within the range which are from 30° to 50°C. The result of this study revealed that all the reactors which contain processed food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 5 to 6 which can be categorized as slightly acidic. Meanwhile, the reactors which contained raw food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 7 to 8 which can be categorized as neutral. The highest NPK obtained is from Reactor B that process only raw food waste. The average value of Nitrogen is 48540 mg/L, Phosphorus is 410 mg/L and Potassium is 1550 mg/L. From the comparison with common chemical fertilizer, it shows that NPK value from the composting are much lower than NPK of the common chemical fertilizer. However, comparison with NPK of organic fertilizer shown only slightly difference value in NPK.

  1. Efficacy of the clinical agent VT-1161 against fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant Candida albicans in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Sobel, J D; Lilly, E A; Fidel, P L

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC) remain major health problems for women. VT-1161, a novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor which has potent antifungal activity against fluconazole-sensitive Candida albicans, retained its in vitro potency (MIC50 of ≤0.015 and MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml) against 10 clinical isolates from VVC or RVVC patients resistant to fluconazole (MIC50 of 8 and MIC90 of 64 μg/ml). VT-1161 pharmacokinetics in mice displayed a high volume of distribution (1.4 liters/kg), high oral absorption (73%), and a long half-life (>48 h) and showed rapid penetration into vaginal tissue. In a murine model of vaginal candidiasis using fluconazole-sensitive yeast, oral doses as low as 4 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced the fungal burden 1 and 4 days posttreatment (P < 0.0001). Similar VT-1161 efficacy was measured when an isolate highly resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 64 μg/ml) but fully sensitive in vitro to VT-1161 was used. When an isolate partially sensitive to VT-1161 (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml) and moderately resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 8 μg/ml) was used, VT-1161 remained efficacious, whereas fluconazole was efficacious on day 1 but did not sustain efficacy 4 days posttreatment. Both agents were inactive in treating an infection with an isolate that demonstrated weaker potency (MICs of 2 and 64 μg/ml for VT-1161 and fluconazole, respectively). Finally, the plasma concentrations of free VT-1161 were predictive of efficacy when in excess of the in vitro MIC values. These data support the clinical development of VT-1161 as a potentially more efficacious treatment for VVC and RVVC.

  2. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis modulates fear memory and extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lazaroni, Thiago Luiz do Nascimento; Bastos, Cristiane Perácio; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Santos, Robson Souza; Pereira, Grace Schenatto

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate defense-alerting reaction to fear is a common feature of neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, impairments in brain circuits, as well as in molecular pathways underlying the neurovegetative adjustments to fear may play an essential role on developing neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we tested the hypothesis that interfering with angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis homeostasis, which appears to be essential to arterial pressure control, would affect fear memory and extinction. Mas knockout (MasKO) mice, in FVB/N background, showed normal cued fear memory and extinction, but increased freezing in response to context. Next, as FVB/N has poor performance in contextual fear memory, we tested MasKO in mixed 129xC57BL/6 background. MasKO mice behaved similarly to wild-type (WT), but memory extinction was slower in contextual fear conditioning to a weak protocol (1CS/US). In addition, delayed extinction in MasKO mice was even more pronounced after a stronger protocol (3CS/US). We showed previously that Angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist, losantan, rescued object recognition memory deficit in MasKO mice. Here, losartan was also effective. Memory extinction was accelerated in MasKO mice after treatment with losartan. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may modulate fear memory extinction. Furthermore, we suggest MasKO mice as an animal model to study post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  3. {sup 17}O Knight shift study of the superconducting state of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Mukuda, H.; Ishida, K.; Kitaoka, Y.; Mao, Z.; Mori, Y.; Maeno, Y.

    1999-12-01

    {sup 17}O Knight shift measurements in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} were performed over the wide range of magnetic field 3.2--11.4kOe parallel to the basal RuO{sub 2} planes. The spin susceptibility is totally unchanged through its T{prime}{sub c}, evidencing that the spin-triplet superconducting state is realized in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. The results indicates that the Cooper pairs consist of the parallel spin pairs {vert{underscore}bar}{up{underscore}arrow}{up{underscore}arrow}> and {vert{underscore}bar}{down{underscore}arrow}{down{underscore}arrow}> with their quantization axis perpendicular to the c-axis direction. The in-plane 2D nearly ferromagnetic spin fluctuations may play a role for the stabilization of this state among various representations of spin-triplet order parameter.

  4. Magnetic isotope effects in the photolysis of dibenzyl ketone on porous silica. /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O enrichments

    SciTech Connect

    Turro, N.J.; Cheng, C.C.; Wan, P.; Chung, C.; Mahler, W.

    1985-04-25

    The photolysis of dibenzyl ketone (DBK) on porous silica has been investigated. Both /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O isotopic enrichment in the ketone remaining after partial photolysis is demonstrated. The efficiency of /sup 13/C enrichment was found to be relatively insensitive to the average pore diameter of the silica host, to the percent coverage by DBK, and to the application of an external magnetic field. A significant dependence of /sup 13/C enrichment with temperature, with a maximum in the enrichment-temperature profile, was observed. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between pathways available to the triplet C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 2/COCH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ radical pair produced by photolysis of DBK.

  5. Continuous-flow IRMS technique for determining the 17O excess of CO2 using complete oxygen isotope exchange with cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, D. J.; van der Veen, C.; Kliphuis, M.; Kaiser, J.; Wiegel, A. A.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an analytical system for analysis of all single substituted isotopologues (12C16O17O, 12C16O18O, 13C16O16O) in nanomolar quantities of CO2 extracted from stratospheric air samples. CO2 is separated from bulk air by gas chromatography and CO2 isotope ratio measurements (ion masses 45 / 44 and 46 / 44) are performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The 17O excess (Δ17O) is derived from isotope measurements on two different CO2 aliquots: unmodified CO2 and CO2 after complete oxygen isotope exchange with cerium oxide (CeO2) at 700 °C. Thus, a single measurement of Δ17O requires two injections of 1 mL of air with a CO2 mole fraction of 390 μmol mol-1 at 293 K and 1 bar pressure (corresponding to 16 nmol CO2 each). The required sample size (including flushing) is 2.7 mL of air. A single analysis (one pair of injections) takes 15 minutes. The analytical system is fully automated for unattended measurements over several days. The standard deviation of the 17O excess analysis is 1.7‰. Multiple measurements on an air sample reduce the measurement uncertainty, as expected for the statistical standard error. Thus, the uncertainty for a group of 10 measurements is 0.58‰ for Δ 17O in 2.5 h of analysis. 100 repeat analyses of one air sample decrease the standard error to 0.20‰. The instrument performance was demonstrated by measuring CO2 on stratospheric air samples obtained during the EU project RECONCILE with the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The precision for RECONCILE data is 0.03‰ (1σ) for δ13C, 0.07‰ (1σ) for δ18O and 0.55‰ (1σ) for δ17O for a sample of 10 measurements. This is sufficient to examine stratospheric enrichments, which at altitude 33 km go up to 12‰ for δ17O and up to 8‰ for δ18O with respect to tropospheric CO2 : δ17O ~ 21‰ Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW), δ18O ~ 41‰ VSMOW (Lämmerzahl et al., 2002). The samples measured with our analytical technique agree with available data for

  6. Mas Oncogene Signaling and Transformation Require the Small GTP-Binding Protein Rac

    PubMed Central

    Zohn, Irene E.; Symons, Marc; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Westwick, John K.; Der, Channing J.

    1998-01-01

    The Mas oncogene encodes a novel G-protein-coupled receptor that was identified originally as a transforming protein when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. The mechanism and signaling pathways that mediate Mas transformation have not been determined. We observed that the foci of transformed NIH 3T3 cells caused by Mas were similar to those caused by activated Rho and Rac proteins. Therefore, we determined if Mas signaling and transformation are mediated through activation of a specific Rho family protein. First, we observed that, like activated Rac1, Mas cooperated with activated Raf and caused synergistic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Second, both Mas- and Rac1-transformed NIH 3T3 cells retained actin stress fibers and showed enhanced membrane ruffling. Third, like Rac, Mas induced lamellipodium formation in porcine aortic endothelial cells. Fourth, Mas and Rac1 strongly activated the JNK and p38, but not ERK, mitogen-activated protein kinases. Fifth, Mas and Rac1 stimulated transcription from common DNA promoter elements: NF-κB, serum response factor (SRF), Jun/ATF-2, and the cyclin D1 promoter. Finally, Mas transformation and some of Mas signaling (SRF and cyclin D1 but not NF-κB activation) were blocked by dominant negative Rac1. Taken together, these observations suggest that Mas transformation is mediated in part by activation of Rac-dependent signaling pathways. Thus, Rho family proteins are common mediators of transformation by a diverse variety of oncogene proteins that include Ras, Dbl family, and G-protein-coupled oncogene proteins. PMID:9488437

  7. Characterization of Atmospheric Nitrate Dynamics in a Sub-Alpine Watershed Using Δ17O and δ15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, I.; Savarino, J. P.; Clement, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote subalpine ecosystems are usually characterized by nutrient-poor soils (Körner, 2004; Seastedt et al., 2004), making them particularly susceptible to undergo changes due to increased atmospheric N deposition (Vitousek et al., 1997; Preunkert et al., 2003). Using Δ17O, a conserved tracer of atmospheric nitrate (NO3 atm) (Michalski et al., 2004; Tsunogai et al., 2010), and δ15N, indicator of NO3 biological sources (Kendall, 1998; Casciotti et al., 2009), we measured the seasonal variations of NO3 atm stable isotopic composition and concentration in several streams and soils originating from two sub-alpine watersheds in the French Alps. Our objective was to investigate whether or not NO3 atm impacts the soil N biogeochemical cycle by increasing nutrients availability for plants and bacteria. We coupled streams and soils measurements with snow-pits sampling and aerosols collection at the Lautaret Pass, to better emphasize the correlation between atmospheric deposition, soil retention and watersheds effluents response. Our results reveal that different temporal dynamics govern our study site: stream measurements show that in spring, snowmelt results in a NO3 atm impulse, accounting for ca. 31 % of the total stream NO3 budget; on the opposite in autumn, NO3 atm accounts only for ca. 3 % of the total stream NO3 budget, highlighting the presence of a NO3 bacterial pool (nitrification). We also inferred from the observed Δ17O variations two distinct phenomena in the spring/summer season: a fast snow run-off and a slower snow-water percolation. The later is believed to affect most the soil N cycle as it directly increases available NO3. Measured soil leachates and extracts confirm this hypothesis and point out the potential importance of anthropogenic N deposition as on average 7 to 10 % of the soil solutions NO3 derives directly from the atmosphere.

  8. [Biologically active substances of cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.)].

    PubMed

    Perova, I B; Zhogova, A A; Poliakova, A V; Éller, K I; Ramenskaia, G V; Samylina, I A

    2014-01-01

    10 samples of fresh-frozen cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.), collected in the Tambov and the Caucasus regions, were investigated for the total amount and composition of the main biologically active substances (BAS): anthocyanins (AC), proanthocyanidins (OPC), dihydroxycinnamic acids (DHCA), iridoids, organic acids, mono- and disaccharides and antiradical activity in the DPPH-test in vitro. Total phenolics content determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, was 150-400 mg/100 g fresh fruit weight. The OPC content, estimated by Bate-Smith method, varied from 20-25 mg/100 g of unripe cornelian cherries to 80-430 mg/100 g of mature cornelian cherries. Total AC amount evaluated by pH-differential spectrophotometry was minimal in unripe fruits (11,2 mg/100 g), and maximal in mature fruits (92,2 mg/100 g). Profile of individual AC was determined by HPLC with UV/Vis and ESI-TOF-MS detections. 3-galactosides of cyanidin (19,0-80,3%) and pelargonidin (15,1-75,6%) were found as main anthocyanins. An original methodology for iridoid determination based on HPLC with UV and ESI-TOF-MS detection was developed. The main iridoids were identified as loganic acid, loganin, sweroside and cornuside. Total iridoids content was 130-400 mg/100 g, and loganic acid was predominant in all samples (87,6-94,8%). Only minor amount of the DHCA derivatives (<10 mg/100 g) were found. The malic acid was predominant among organic acids, the total content of which varied from 0,4 to 2,8%. Relatively high amount of ascorbic acid (35-60 mg/100 g) was found. The carbohydrates profile of cornielian cherries was represented by fructose (2,2-3,8%) and glucose (2,5-7,0%). 70% water-ethanol extracts of Cornus mas fruits have showed pronounced antiradical activity in DPPH-test (470,5-932,0 mg TE/100 g). The data on specific minor BAS can be used in the standardization and evaluation of potential biological activity of extracts and dietary supplements based on the cornelian cherry fruits. PMID:25816631

  9. [Biologically active substances of cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.)].

    PubMed

    Perova, I B; Zhogova, A A; Poliakova, A V; Éller, K I; Ramenskaia, G V; Samylina, I A

    2014-01-01

    10 samples of fresh-frozen cornelian cherry fruits (Cornus mas L.), collected in the Tambov and the Caucasus regions, were investigated for the total amount and composition of the main biologically active substances (BAS): anthocyanins (AC), proanthocyanidins (OPC), dihydroxycinnamic acids (DHCA), iridoids, organic acids, mono- and disaccharides and antiradical activity in the DPPH-test in vitro. Total phenolics content determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, was 150-400 mg/100 g fresh fruit weight. The OPC content, estimated by Bate-Smith method, varied from 20-25 mg/100 g of unripe cornelian cherries to 80-430 mg/100 g of mature cornelian cherries. Total AC amount evaluated by pH-differential spectrophotometry was minimal in unripe fruits (11,2 mg/100 g), and maximal in mature fruits (92,2 mg/100 g). Profile of individual AC was determined by HPLC with UV/Vis and ESI-TOF-MS detections. 3-galactosides of cyanidin (19,0-80,3%) and pelargonidin (15,1-75,6%) were found as main anthocyanins. An original methodology for iridoid determination based on HPLC with UV and ESI-TOF-MS detection was developed. The main iridoids were identified as loganic acid, loganin, sweroside and cornuside. Total iridoids content was 130-400 mg/100 g, and loganic acid was predominant in all samples (87,6-94,8%). Only minor amount of the DHCA derivatives (<10 mg/100 g) were found. The malic acid was predominant among organic acids, the total content of which varied from 0,4 to 2,8%. Relatively high amount of ascorbic acid (35-60 mg/100 g) was found. The carbohydrates profile of cornielian cherries was represented by fructose (2,2-3,8%) and glucose (2,5-7,0%). 70% water-ethanol extracts of Cornus mas fruits have showed pronounced antiradical activity in DPPH-test (470,5-932,0 mg TE/100 g). The data on specific minor BAS can be used in the standardization and evaluation of potential biological activity of extracts and dietary supplements based on the cornelian cherry fruits.

  10. Distributed Cooperation Solution Method of Complex System Based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijin, Jiang; Yuhui, Xu

    To adapt the model in reconfiguring fault diagnosing to dynamic environment and the needs of solving the tasks of complex system fully, the paper introduced multi-Agent and related technology to the complicated fault diagnosis, an integrated intelligent control system is studied in this paper. Based on the thought of the structure of diagnostic decision and hierarchy in modeling, based on multi-layer decomposition strategy of diagnosis task, a multi-agent synchronous diagnosis federation integrated different knowledge expression modes and inference mechanisms are presented, the functions of management agent, diagnosis agent and decision agent are analyzed, the organization and evolution of agents in the system are proposed, and the corresponding conflict resolution algorithm in given, Layered structure of abstract agent with public attributes is build. System architecture is realized based on MAS distributed layered blackboard. The real world application shows that the proposed control structure successfully solves the fault diagnose problem of the complex plant, and the special advantage in the distributed domain.

  11. Searching for Thermal Anomalies on Icy Satellites: Step 1- Validation of the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Gary G.; Howett, Carly J. A.; Young, Leslie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, thermal data from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft have detected various anomalies on Jovian and Saturnian satellites, including the thermally anomalous “PacMan” regions on Mimas and Tethys and the Pwyll anomaly on Europa (Howett et al. 2011, Howett et al. 2012, Spencer et al. 1999). Yet, the peculiarities of some of these anomalies, like the weak detection of the “PacMan” anomalies on Rhea and Dione and the low thermal inertia values of the widespread anomalies on equatorial Europa, are subjects for on-going research (Howett et al. 2014, Rathbun et al. 2010). Further, analysis and review of all the data both Galileo and Cassini took of these worlds will provide information of the thermal inertia and albedos of their surfaces, perhaps highlighting potential targets of interest for future Jovian and Saturnian system missions. Many previous works have used a thermophysical model for airless planets developed by Spencer (1990). However, the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D) model proposed by Young (2012) is able to predict surface temperatures in significantly faster computation time, incorporating seasonal and diurnal insolation variations. This work is the first step in an ongoing investigation, which will use VT3D’s capabilities to reanalyze Galileo and Cassini data. VT3D, which has already been used to analyze volatile transport on Pluto, is validated by comparing its results to that of the Spencer thermal model. We will also present our initial results using VT3D to reanalyze the thermophysical properties of the PacMan anomaly previous discovered on Mimas by Howett et al. (2011), using temperature constraints of diurnal data from Cassini/CIRS. VT3D is expected to be an efficient tool in identifying new thermal anomalies in future Saturnian and Jovian missions.Bibliography:C.J.A. Howett et al. (2011), Icarus 216, 221.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2012), Icarus 221, 1084.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2014), Icarus 241, 239.J

  12. Economic valuation of flood mitigation services: A case study from the Otter Creek, VT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galford, G. L.; Ricketts, T.; Bryan, K. L.; ONeil-Dunne, J.; Polasky, S.

    2014-12-01

    The ecosystem services provided by wetlands are widely recognized but difficult to quantify. In particular, estimating the effect of landcover and land use on downstream flood outcomes remains challenging, but is increasingly important in light of climate change predictions of increased precipitation in many areas. Economic valuation can help incorporate ecosystem services into decisions and enable communities to plan for climate and flood resiliency. Here we estimate the economic value of Otter Creek wetlands for Middlebury, VT in mitigating the flood that followed Tropical Storm Irene, as well as for ten historic floods. Observationally, hydrographs above and below the wetlands in the case of each storm indicated the wetlands functioned as a temporary reservoir, slowing the delivery of water to Middlebury. We compare observed floods, based on Middlebury's hydrograph, with simulated floods for scenarios without wetlands. To simulate these "without wetlands" scenarios, we assume the same volume of water was delivered to Middlebury, but in a shorter time pulse similar to a hydrograph upstream of the wetlands. For scenarios with and without wetlands, we map the spatial extent of flooding using LiDAR digital elevation data. We then estimate flood depth at each affected building, and calculate monetary losses as a function of the flood depth and house value using established depth damage relationships. For example, we expect damages equal to 20% of the houses value for a flood depth of two feet in a two-story home with a basement. We define the value of flood mitigation services as the difference in damages between the with and without wetlands scenario, and find that the Otter Creek wetlands reduced flood damage in Middlebury by 88% following Hurricane Irene. Using the 10 additional historic floods, we estimate an ongoing mean value of $400,000 in avoided damages per year. Economic impacts of this magnitude stress the importance of wetland conservation and warrant the

  13. High-Precision Measurement of The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Tropospheric O2: Implications for Δ17O of air as a Biosignature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Ziegler, K.

    2006-05-01

    Here we present high-precision measurements of 18O/16O and 17O/16O in samples of tropospheric O2 using a standard calibrated with measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rock samples. These new data provide a measure of Δ17O on an absolute scale that aids in the interpretation of the cause of the disparity in Δ17O between O2 in the troposphere and terrestrial rocks. We measured the isotopic composition of four separate aliquotes of ground-level air O2. Oxygen was isolated from air cryogenically using molecular sieve substrates. Correction was made for the influence of Ar scattered across the Faraday collectors (~0.06 per mil in δ17O) of the gas- source mass spectrometer. The reference gas used as an internal standard was calibrated against terrestrial rock samples and meteorites analyzed using infrared laser heating fluorination. All results are reported as linearized delta values (signified with a prime superscript symbol). With a mean terrestrial rock Δ17O'of 0.00 ‰ ± 0.02 we obtain Δ17O values of -0.25 ‰ ± 0.04 1σ, -0.22 ‰ ± 0.03, and -0.23 ‰ ± 0.05 for 5 mesosiderite meteorites, 7 pallasites, and 12 HED meteorites, respectively. The latter meteorite data are consistent with results from three other laboratories and serve to establish the absolute scale for the air O2 measurements. Our results for the O2 samples give a mean linearized δ18O' of 23.237 ‰ ± 0.008 1 std err (corresponding to a normal, non-linearized δ18O SMOW value of 23.509 ‰), a mean δ17O' of 11.922 ‰ ± 0.018, and a mean linearized Δ17O' of -0.347 ‰ ± 0.018 based on a rock-water terrestrial fractionation reference line with a slope (β) of 0.528. The latter is the exponent in a normal fractionation law described by the relation α17=(α18)β. This result can be reconciled with the suggestion by Young et al (2002) that the whole of the departure in Δ17O' of tropospheric O2 relative to terrestrial rocks can be attributed to respiration (a Δ17O Dole effect

  14. Study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The experimental study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,α{sup 14}C){sup 1}H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J{sup π}=5{sup −}), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  15. Constraining 17O and 27Al NMR spectra of high-pressure crystals and glasses: New data for jadeite, pyrope, grossular, and mullite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, K.E.; Stebbins, J.F.; Du, L.-S.; Hankins, B.

    2007-01-01

    The 17O NMR spectra of glasses quenched from melts at high pressure are often difficult to interpret due to overlapping peaks and lack of crystalline model compounds. High-pressure aluminosilicate glasses often contain significant amounts of [5]Al and [6]Al, thus these high-pressure glasses must contain oxygen bonded to high-coordinated aluminum. The 17O NMR parameters for the minerals jadeite, pyrope, grossular, and mullite are presented to assist interpretation of glass spectra and to help test quantum chemical calculations. The 17O NMR parameters for jadeite and grossular support previous peak assignments of oxygen bonded to Si and high-coordinated Al in high-pressure glasses as well as quantum chemical calculations. The oxygen tricluster in mullite is very similar to the previously observed tricluster in grossite (CaAl4 O7) and suspected triclusters in glasses. We also present 27Al NMR spectra for pyrope, grossular, and mullite.

  16. Receptor MAS protects mice against hypothermia and mortality induced by endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Souza, Laura L; Duchene, Johan; Todiras, Mihail; Azevedo, Luciano C P; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Alenina, Natalia; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin (Ang) system is involved in maintaining cardiovascular function by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. More recently, alternative pathways within the renin-angiotensin system have been described, such as the ACE-2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis, with opposite effects to the ones of the ACE/Ang-II/AT1 axis. Correspondingly, our previous work reported that Ang-(1-7) via its receptor Mas inhibits the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α increased by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse peritoneal macrophages. These data led us to investigate the functional role of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in an in vivo LPS model. In this work, we present evidence that Ang-(1-7) via Mas significantly reduced the LPS-increased production of circulating cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-12, and CXCL-1. This inhibitory effect was mediated by Mas because it was not detectable in Mas-deficient (Mas) mice. Accordingly, IL-6, CXCL-1, and CXCL-2 levels were higher after LPS treatment in the absence of Mas. Mas mice were less resistant to LPS-induced endotoxemia, their survival rate being 50% compared with 95% in wild-type mice. Telemetric analyses showed that Mas mice presented more pronounced LPS-induced hypothermia with a 3°C lower body temperature compared with wild-type mice. Altogether, our findings suggest that Ang-(1-7) and Mas inhibit LPS-induced cytokine production and hypothermia and thereby protect mice from the fatal consequences of endotoxemia. PMID:24430551

  17. Mas receptor deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced cerebral and systemic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Lima, Onésia C; Pinto, Mauro C X; Duchene, Johan; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Souza, Laura L; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-12-01

    Beyond the classical actions of the renin-angiotensin system on the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis, several studies have shown its involvement in acute and chronic inflammation. The G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional binding site for the angiotensin-(1-7); however, its role in the immune system has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genetic deletion of Mas receptor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic and cerebral inflammation in mice. Inflammatory response was triggered in Mas deficient (Mas(-/-)) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (8-12 weeks-old) by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg). Mas(-/-) mice presented more intense hypothermia compared to WT mice 24 h after LPS injection. Systemically, the bone marrow of Mas(-/-) mice contained a lower number of neutrophils and monocytes 3 h and 24 h after LPS injection, respectively. The plasma levels of inflammatory mediators KC, MCP-1 and IL-10 were higher in Mas(-/-) mice 24 h after LPS injection in comparison to WT. In the brain, Mas(-/-) animals had a significant increase in the number of adherent leukocytes to the brain microvasculature compared to WT mice, as well as, increased number of monocytes and neutrophils recruited to the pia-mater. The elevated number of adherent leukocytes on brain microvasculature in Mas(-/-) mice was associated with increased expression of CD11b - the alpha-subunit of the Mac-1 integrin - in bone marrow neutrophils 3h after LPS injection, and with increased brain levels of chemoattractants KC, MIP-2 and MCP-1, 24 h later. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Mas receptor deficiency results in exacerbated inflammation in LPS-challenged mice, which suggest a potential role for the Mas receptor as a regulator of systemic and brain inflammatory response induced by LPS.

  18. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L. La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  19. 48 CFR 538.270 - Evaluation of multiple award schedule (MAS) offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation of multiple award schedule (MAS) offers. 538.270 Section 538.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL... and Administering Federal Supply Schedules 538.270 Evaluation of multiple award schedule (MAS)...

  20. Psychometric Comparison of the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, S.; Iacono, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF) are frequently used to assess the learned function of challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability (ID). The aim was to explore and compare the psychometric properties of the MAS and the QABF. Method: Seventy adults with ID and…

  1. A generic, computerized nuclear materials accountability system (NucMAS) and its layered products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jr, J M

    1989-01-01

    NucMAS provides a material balance area with a computerized data management system for nuclear materials accountability. NucMAS is a generic application. It handles the data management and reporting functions for different processing facilities by storing all process-specific information as data rather than procedure. A NucMAS application is configured for each facility it supports. NucMAS and its layered products are compatible with three types of data clients. Core NucMAS has a screen-oriented user interface to support the accountability clerk as a client. Accountability clerks enter data from operating logs and laboratory analyses one to three days after actual processing. Layered products support process operators and automated systems as near-real-time and real-time data clients. The core and layered products use a data-driven approach which results in software that is configurable and maintainable. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Modeling Temporal and Spatial Flows of Ecosystem Services in Chittenden County, VT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, B. G.; Bagstad, K.; Johnson, G.; Villa, F.

    2010-12-01

    This paper documents the integration of ARIES (ARtificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services) with the land use change model UrbanSim to explore the impacts of current and future land use patterns on flood protection and water provision services in Chittenden County, VT. ARIES, an open source modeling platform, is particularly well-suited for measuring, mapping, and modeling the temporal and spatial flows of ecosystem services across the landscape, linking the areas of provision (sources) with human beneficiaries (users) through a spatially explicit agent-based modeling approach. UrbanSim is an open source agent-based land use model designed to facilitate a wide-range of scenarios based on user-specified behavioral assumptions, zoning regulations, and demographic, economic, and infrastructure (e.g. transportation, water, sewer, etc.) parameters. Ecosystem services travel through time and space and are susceptible to disruption and destruction from both natural and anthropogenic perturbations. The conversion of forested or agricultural land to urbanizing uses is replete with a long history of hydrologic impairment, habitat fragmentation, and the degradation of sensitive landscapes. Development decisions are predicated on the presence of landscape characteristics that meet the needs of developers and satisfy the desires of consumers, with minimal consideration of access to or effect on the provision of ecosystem services. The County houses nearly 25% of the state’s population and several employment centers that draw labor from throughout the region. Additionally, the County is expected to maintain modest residential and employment growth over the next 30 years, and will continue to serve as the state’s population and employment center. Expected future growth is likely to adversely affect the remaining farm and forest land in the County in the absence of policies to support sustainable development. We demonstrate how ARIES can be used to quantify changes in

  3. Targeting of CYP17A1 Lyase by VT-464 Inhibits Adrenal and Intratumoral Androgen Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sankar N.; Titus, Mark A.; Gyftaki, Revekka; Wu, Guanglin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Ramachandran, S.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Araujo, John C.; Efstathiou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) is a validated treatment target for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) inhibits both 17α-hydroxylase (hydroxylase) and 17,20-lyase (lyase) reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1 and thus depletes androgen biosynthesis. However, coadministration of prednisone is required to suppress the mineralocorticoid excess and cortisol depletion that result from hydroxylase inhibition. VT-464, a nonsteroidal small molecule, selectively inhibits CYP17A1 lyase and therefore does not require prednisone supplementation. Administration of VT-464 in a metastatic CRPC patient presenting with high tumoral expression of both androgen receptor (AR) and CYP17A1, showed significant reduction in the level of both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and serum PSA. Treatment of a CRPC patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-133 expressing H874Y AR mutant with VT-464, reduced the increase in tumor volume in castrate male mice more than twice as much as the vehicle (P < 0.05). Mass spectrometry analysis of post-treatment xenograft tumor tissues showed that VT-464 significantly decreased intratumoral androgens but not cortisol. VT-464 also reduced AR signaling more effectively than abiraterone in cultured PCa cells expressing T877A AR mutant. Collectively, this study suggests that VT-464 therapy can effectively treat CRPC and be used in precision medicine based on androgen receptor mutation status. PMID:27748439

  4. Vortex Lattice Formation in High Magnetic Fields in an Underdoped Single Crystal of Hg1201 from 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongseop; Xin, Yizhou; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    The vortex lattice in HgBa2CuO4+δ forms at a vortex melting temperature, Tv, typically ~40K for underdoped crystals with a hole doping ~ 0.11. We present our results from 17O NMR for investigation of the vortex lattice as a function of external magnetic field up to 30 T and temperature as low as 5 K. The vortex contribution to the NMR linewidth can be separated from inhomogeneous broadening by deconvolution of the normal state spectra which was measured separately above, Tv. The vortex melting temperature was measured for two underdoped samples marked by the onset of extra linewidth broadening due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution from the solid vortex lattice consistent with transverse relaxation measurements. We have found evidence for a change in the vortex lattice symmetry as a function of external fields. This work was supported by the DOE BES under Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46248 and the NHMFL through the NSF and State of Florida.

  5. Measurements and Modeling of 16O12C17O Spectroscopic Parameters at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, David; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Coleman, Max; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    Nearly 1000 line intensities of 16O12C17O between 4604 and 5126 wn were measured using an isotopically-enriched mixture sample having 40 % (determined by mass spectrometry). Spectra were recorded at 0.0056 wn resolution with a Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL) configured to a Herriott cell with a 20.946 m absorption path. Since collisional narrowing effects were observed, the Rautian profile was systematically applied (instead of the Voigt profile) using a multispectrum retrieval procedure. Transition dipole moments and Herman-Wallis factors were derived for 15 bands, and a global comparison with theoretical calculations and predictions was obtained. Accuracies for the line intensities ranged between 2 - 3 % for strong bands and 6 - 30 % for weak bands. Retrieved line positions were calibrated using CO, HCl and some well-known 16O12C16O transitions. For both measured and calculated line positions, the accuracies fell between 0.1 - 1×10-3 wn. Self-broadening was also obtained for a few bands. Complete line lists were generated to support atmospheric remote sensing of the Earth (e.g., OCO-2 mission), Mars and Venus. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. FTS Studies of the 17O Enriched Isotopologues of CO_2 Toward Creating a Complete and Highly Accurate Reference Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Ben; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Miller, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The proliferation and increased abilities of remote sensing missions for the monitoring of planetary atmospheric gas species has spurred the need for complete and accurate spectroscopic reference standards. As a part of our ongoing effort toward creating a global carbon dioxide (CO2) frequency reference standard, we report new FTS measurements of the 17O enriched isotopologues of CO2. The first measurements were taken in the ν3 region (2200 - 2450 cm-1, 65 - 75 THz), have absolute calibration accuracies of 100 kHz (3E-6 cm-1), comparable to the uncertainties for typical sub-millimeter/THz spectroscopy. Such high absolute calibration accuracy has become regular procedure for the cases of linear molecules such as CO2 and CO for FTS measurements at JPL, and enables us to produce measured transition frequencies for entire bands with accuracies that rival those of early heterodyne measurements for individual beat notes. Additionally, by acquiring spectra of multiple carbon dioxide isotopologues simultaneously, we have begun to construct a self-consistent frequency grid based on CO2 that extends from 20 - 200 THz. These new spectroscopic reference standards are a significant step towards minimizing CO2 retrieval errors from remote sensing applications, especially those involving targets with predominantly CO2 atmospheres such as Mars, Venus and candidate terrestrial exoplanets where minor isotopologues will make significant contributions to the radiance signals.

  7. Spatial distribution of 17O-excess in surface snow along a traverse from Zhongshan station to Dome A, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongxi; Hou, Shugui; Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Prie, Frederic; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Risi, Camille; Li, Yuansheng; Jouzel, Jean; Wang, Yetang; He, Jing; Minster, Bénédicte; Falourd, Sonia

    2015-03-01

    The influence of temperature on the triple isotopic composition of oxygen in water is still an open question and limits the interpretation of water isotopic profiles in Antarctic ice cores. The main limitation arises from the lack of 17O-excess measurements in surface snow and especially for remote regions characterized by low temperature and accumulation rate. In this study, we present new 17O-excess measurements of surface snow along an East Antarctic traverse, from the coastal Zhongshan station to the highest point of the Antarctic ice sheet at Dome A. The 17O-excess data significantly decrease inland, with a latitudinal gradient of - 1.33 ± 0.41 per meg/degree, an altitudinal gradient of - 0.48 ± 0.17 permeg / 100 m, and a temperature gradient of 0.35 ± 0.11 permeg /°C. Theoretical calculations performed using a Rayleigh model attribute this inland decrease to kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring during condensation from vapor to ice under supersaturation conditions at low temperatures. However, large heterogeneity of 17O-excess in Antarctic precipitation cannot only be explained by temperature at condensation and/or influences of relative humidity in the moisture source region.

  8. Improved Direct Measurement of the 64.5 keV Resonance Strength in the 17O (p ,α )14N Reaction at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, C. G.; Scott, D. A.; Aliotta, M.; Formicola, A.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Cavanna, F.; Ciani, G. F.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; Di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Piatti, D.; Prati, P.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The 17O (p ,α ) 14N reaction plays a key role in various astrophysical scenarios, from asymptotic giant branch stars to classical novae. It affects the synthesis of rare isotopes such as 17O and 18F, which can provide constraints on astrophysical models. A new direct determination of the ER=64.5 keV resonance strength performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) accelerator has led to the most accurate value to date ω γ =10.0 ±1. 4stat±0. 7syst neV , thanks to a significant background reduction underground and generally improved experimental conditions. The (bare) proton partial width of the corresponding state at Ex=5672 keV in 18F is Γp=35 ±5stat±3syst neV . This width is about a factor of 2 higher than previously estimated, thus leading to a factor of 2 increase in the 17O (p , α ) 14N reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures relevant to shell hydrogen burning in red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. The new rate implies lower 17O/16O ratios, with important implications on the interpretation of astrophysical observables from these stars.

  9. Reformulated 17O correction of mass spectrometric stable isotope measurements in carbon dioxide and a critical appraisal of historic 'absolute' carbon and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Mass-spectrometric stable isotope measurements of CO 2 use molecular ion currents at mass-to-charge ratios m/ z 44, 45 and 46 to derive the elemental isotope ratios n( 13C)/ n( 12C) and n( 18O)/ n( 16O), abbreviated 13C/ 12C and 18O/ 16O, relative to a reference. The ion currents have to be corrected for the contribution of 17O-bearing isotopologues, the so-called ' 17O correction'. The magnitude of this correction depends on the calibrated isotope ratios of the reference. Isotope ratio calibrations are difficult and are therefore a matter of debate. Here, I provide a comprehensive evaluation of the existing 13C/ 12C ( 13R), 17O/ 16O ( 17R) and 18O/ 16O ( 18R) calibrations of the reference material Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) and CO 2 generated from the reference material Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) by reaction with 100% H 3PO 4 at 25 °C (VPDB-CO 2). I find 17R/10-6=382.7-2.1+1.7, 18RVSMOW/10 -6 = 2005.20 ± 0.45, 13R/10-6= 11124 ± 45, 17R/10-6=391.1-2.1+1.7 and 18R/10-6=2088.37±0.90. I also rephrase the calculation scheme for the 17O correction completely in terms of relative isotope ratio differences ( δ values). This reveals that only ratios of isotope ratios (namely, 17R/ 13R and 13R17R/ 18R) are required for the 17O correction. These can be, and have been, measured on conventional stable isotope mass spectrometers. I then show that the remaining error for these ratios of isotope ratios can lead to significant uncertainty in the derived relative 13C/ 12C difference, but not for 18O/ 16O. Even though inter-laboratory differences can be corrected for by a common 'ratio assumption set' and/or normalisation, the ultimate accuracy of the 17O correction is hereby limited. Errors of similar magnitude can be introduced by the assumed mass-dependent relationship between 17O/ 16O and 18O/ 16O isotope ratios. For highest accuracy in the 13C/ 12C ratio, independent triple oxygen isotope measurements are required. Finally, I propose an experiment that

  10. Peptide bond hydrolysis catalyzed by the Wells-Dawson Zr(α2-P2W17O61)2 polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Absillis, Gregory; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2012-09-17

    In this paper we report the first example of peptide hydrolysis catalyzed by a polyoxometalate complex. A series of metal-substituted Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates were synthesized, and their hydrolytic activity toward the peptide bond in glycylglycine (GG) was examined. Among these, the Zr(IV)- and Hf(IV)-substituted ones were the most reactive. Detailed kinetic studies were performed with the Zr(IV)-substituted Wells-Dawson type polyoxometalate K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O which was shown to act as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of the peptide bond in GG. The speciation of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O which is highly dependent on the pD, concentration, and temperature of the solution, was fully determined with the help of (31)P NMR spectroscopy and its influence on the GG hydrolysis rate was examined. The highest reaction rate (k(obs) = 9.2 (±0.2) × 10(-5) min(-1)) was observed at pD 5.0 and 60 °C. A 10-fold excess of GG was hydrolyzed in the presence of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O proving the principles of catalysis. (13)C NMR data suggested the coordination of GG to the Zr(IV) center in K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O via its N-terminal amine group and amide carbonyl oxygen. These findings were confirmed by the inactivity of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O toward the N-blocked analogue acetamidoglycylglycinate and the inhibitory effect of oxalic, malic, and citric acid. Triglycine, tetraglycine, and pentaglycine were also fully hydrolyzed in the presence of K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O yielding glycine as the final product of hydrolysis. K(15)H[Zr(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)]·25H(2)O also exhibited hydrolytic activity toward a series of other dipeptides.

  11. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State 17O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A.; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules and experimental solid-state 17O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state 17O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases and in particular each of the prior computational work is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing systems. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method and basis sets for metal and non-metal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups, X= H, C, N, P, and metal. The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported 17O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors towards relatively general and accurate predictions of 17O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied various kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9880 and mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and R2 of 0.9926 for all shift tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of 17O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate bound proteins. PMID:26274812

  12. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  13. Rotational analysis of the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) in the rare 13C17O isotopologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, Rafał; Zachwieja, Mirosław

    2012-02-01

    Although yet unobserved in the very rare 13C17O isotopologue, the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) was obtained under high resolution as an emission spectrum using a conventional spectroscopic technique. The emission from the discharge was observed with a plane grating spectrograph and recorded by a photomultiplier tube. In total, 192 transition wave numbers belonging to two bands (0-1 and 0-2) were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. This method allowed us to determine the merged rotational constants B0 = 1.8131941(58) cm-1 and D0 = 5.5620(46) × 10-6 cm-1 and the individual molecular constant B1 = 1.471059(47) cm-1, D1 = 5.315(64) × 10-6 cm-1, B2 = 1.451762(13) cm-1, D2 = 7.812(16) × 10-6 cm-1 for the as yet unanalyzed 13C17O molecule B1Σ+ and A1Π states, respectively. The band origins σ of the Ångström system in the 13C17O molecule were also calculated. Numerous rotational perturbations observed in the A1Π state in 13C17O molecule have been identified and analyzed in detail. The suspected candidates responsible for these irregularities were indicated by means of a graph of the rovibronic levels of the neighboring states based on the estimated term value in the 13C17O molecule. The values of these perturbations have also been defined for both the e- and f-parity of the A1Π(v = 1 and 2) state. Simultaneously, the B1Σ+ state was observed to be quite regular up to the observed Jmax level.

  14. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization,more » a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.« less

  15. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  16. MasABK Proteins Interact with Proteins of the Type IV Pilin System to Affect Social Motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Fremgen, Sarah; Williams, Amanda; Furusawa, Gou; Dziewanowska, Katarzyna; Settles, Matthew; Hartzell, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP) components essential for social (S) gliding, several cryptic pil genes, and a LuxR family protein were reduced significantly in the Δmas mutant while expression of the myxalamide operon was increased significantly. Localization and two-hybrid analysis suggest that the three Mas proteins form a membrane complex. MasA-PhoA fusions confirmed that MasA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with a ≈100 amino acid periplasmic domain. Results from yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MasA interacts with the lipoprotein MasB and MasK, a protein kinase and that MasB and MasK interact with one another. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a physical interaction between two gene products of the mas operon, MasA and MasB, and PilA. Deletion of mas may be accompanied by compensatory mutations since complementation of the Δmas social gliding and developmental defects required addition of both pilA and masABK. PMID:23342171

  17. Northwest Africa 6693: A new type of FeO-rich, low-Δ17O, poikilitic cumulate achondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Rubin, Alan E.; Isa, Junko; Brittenham, Steve; Ahn, Insu; Choi, Byeon-Gak

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Africa 6693 is a new type of achondrite, with a unique combination of oxygen-isotopic composition (low Δ17O: -1.08‰; also δ17O = 1.19‰) and FeO-rich, low mg bulk composition. A mode (in vol%) shows 70% pyroxene, 16% olivine and 13% feldspar, along with 0.6% Cr-spinel, and 0.4% NiFe metal (awaruite). Its coarse-poikilitic texture, with pigeonite oikocrysts up to 14 mm, as well as the subchondritic MgO/SiO2 of the rock's bulk composition, indicate origin as an igneous cumulate. The cumulus phases included pigeonite and olivine, and the parent magma was probably also saturated with feldspar, which occurs mainly as anhedral, yet optically continuous, grains intergrown with the pyroxene. The mafic silicates are uniformly ferroan: pigeonite near En57Wo3.2 and olivine near Fo49. The feldspar is uniformly albitic, near Ab92, except for a single tiny grain of Ab57Or43. However, the albite features diverse K/Ca (Or/An) ratios: ranging from consistently ˜0.46 in one end of the oblong NWA 6693 stone, to 5.2 in an olivine-rich enclave that consists mostly of micrographic olivine-feldspar intergrowth. Also, siderophile and incompatible element data show heterogeneity among samples from different regions of this large cumulate. The rock was probably neither an orthocumulate nor an adcumulate, and the proportion of "trapped liquid" probably varied from place to place. After initial crystallization, a shock event caused very minor brecciation, and pervasively mobilized linear-arcuate trails of microinclusions (minute oxides, mostly) and bubbles. A minor proportion of additional melt was formed within, and/or infiltrated into, the rock and formed discrete overgrowth mantles, recognizable based on unusual scarcity of microinclusions, on some pyroxenes. Final cooling, based on mineral-equilibration temperatures, occurred at a moderate rate by intrusive-igneous standards. Olivine, metal, and sulfide phases are all very Ni-rich (e.g., olivine NiO averages 0.77 wt

  18. Using 15N, 17O, and 18O to determine nitrate sources in the Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Wang, Fan; Michalski, Greg; Xia, Xinghui; Liu, Shaoda

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies have used δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate (δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3) to determine the nitrate sources in rivers but were subject to substantial uncertainties and limitations, especially associated with evaluating the atmospheric contribution. The Δ(17)O of nitrate (Δ(17)ONO3) has been suggested as an unambiguous tracer of atmospheric NO3(-) and may serve as an additional nitrate source constraint. In the present study, triple nitrate isotopes (δ(15)NNO3, Δ(17)ONO3, and δ(18)ONO3) were used for the first time to assess the sources and sinks of nitrate in the Yellow River (YR) basin, which is the second longest river in China. Results showed that the Δ(17)ONO3 of the water from the YR ranged from 0‰ to 1.6‰ during two normal-water seasons. This suggested that unprocessed atmospheric nitrate accounted for 0-7% of the total nitrate in the YR. The corrected δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 values with atmospheric imprints being removed indicated that the main terrestrial sources of nitrate were sewage/manure effluents in the upstream of the YR and manure/sewage effluents and ammonium/urea-containing fertilizer in the middle and lower reaches which made comparable contributions to the nitrate. In addition, there was a significant positive relationship between δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 values of river water (p < 0.01) which may signal the presence of denitrification. This study indicates that the triple nitrate isotope method is useful for assessing the nitrate sources in rivers, especially for the measurements of atmospheric nitrate contribution.

  19. The Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites: A new grouplet with high. Delta. sup 17 O and evidence for nebular oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, M.K. Brooklyn Coll., NY ); Prinz, M. ); Kojima, Hideyasu; Yanai, Keizo ); Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Carlisle Lakes, ALH85151, and Y75302 are similar ungrouped chondrites which have petrologic and bulk compositional similarities to the ordinary chondrites, but are more oxidized; and their oxygen isotopic compositions differ. They represent a new grouplet which the authors call the Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites. They have the highest {Delta}{sup 17}O values (up to 2.91) measured to date. The whole chondrites and most of their chondrules plot on the same mass fractionation line on an oxygen 3-isotope diagram. They are olivine rich (>70 vol%), essentially metal free, and most olivine is FeO rich, equilibrated at Fa{sub 38}. Rare olivine and pyroxene grains in chondrules and fragments are zoned, and these are important in discerning the history of these chondrites. The zoning does not appear to have formed during crystallization from a melt droplet chondrule, but post-dated chondrule formation. Two hypotheses are postulated to explain the zoning: (1) parent-body thermal metamorphism and (2) nebular gas-solid exchange reactions accompanied by condensation of new FeO-rich olivine, utilizing existing olivine surfaces as nucleation sites. The occurrence of steep Fe-Mg compositional gradients of core-to-rim profiles, oscillatory zoning in olivine, fayalitic rims of Fa{sub 45} that exceed instead of approach the equilibrium composition of the matrix (Fa{sub 38}), and olivine-filled veins in zoned pyroxenes are more compatible with the nebular hypothesis. The Carlisle Lakes-type chondrites may have originally been derived from an ordinary chondrite-like precursor which was later oxidized, prior to its final lithification. However, the oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole chondrites and most of their chondrules suggest that the precursor probably formed in an oxygen isotopically distinct environment.

  20. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies of photoexcited /sup 17/O-benzophenone. Orbital rotation in the lowest triplet state

    SciTech Connect

    Waeckerle, G.; Baer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Dinse, K.H.; Yamauchi, S.; Kashmar, R.J.; Pratt, D.W.

    1982-03-01

    The magnetically active isotope of oxygen /sup 17/O has been used to probe the changes in the electron charge and spin density distributions in oxygen valence orbitals which occur when benzophenone is excited to its lowest triplet state. The data obtained include the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) and electron-nuclear double resonance spectra at both zero and high magnetic fields. New methods of analysis of zero-field ODMR spectra, appropriate when the second-order hyperfine splitting exceeds the quadrupole coupling, are described. This analysis yields the principal values of the electron fine-structure (D), oxygen hyperfine (A), and oxygen quadrupole (Q) tensors, and the orientation of their principal axes with respect to the molecular frame. It is found, consistent with expectations for an n..pi..( state, that the direction of the largest component of Q is different from that of the ground state. It is also found, by two independent methods, that the principal transverse axes of A and Q do not conform to the local C/sub 2v/ symmetry axes of the carbonyl group. This result is interpreted to mean that the axis of the n-type oxygen 2p orbital is rotated out of the carbonyl plane, a rotation which appears to be direct consequence of n..pi..(/..pi pi..( configurational mixing. In agreement with this, the principal values of D, A, and Q are different from those expected for a ''pure'' n..pi..( state. Other consequences of n..pi..(/..pi pi..( mixing, not only in benzophenone but also in the lowest triplet states of other aromatic carbonyls, are discussed briefly.

  1. Preliminary Paleointensity Results Obtained Along Two Adjacent Ridge Segments of the East Pacific Rise (15o-17oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Carlut, J.; Kent, D. V.; Kent, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    The 16oN segment north of the Orozco transform fault is the shallowest and broadest along more than 5000 km of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 23oS to 23oN. Paleointensity experiments using the Thellier paleointensity method have been conducted on more than 35 lava samples along this magmatically inflated segment and along the more `typical' adjacent 17oN segment. Our goal is to constrain the timing and thus the emplacement mechanism of lava flows along the crest of the EPR. On-going detailed geochemical analysis on the same samples independently constrain the major lava flow sequences [Donnelly et al., Eos Trans, 79, p. F832, 1998]. Reliable preliminary results are obtained on multiple glassy basaltic samples from 25 dredges and wax cores samples. These are distributed over ~100 km along-axis, mainly within a few hundred meters (~2000 years) of the morphological axis. Our paleointensity dating technique relies on calibrated portions of the geomagnetic reference curve to constrain the timing of the lava fields. The inflated 16oN segment is characterized by very recent activities (probably less than 50 years old) along with much older flows (several hundreds years old). Samples collected off-axis and near the end of the 16oN segment have low paleointensities and are thus thought to be significantly older. There is also a weak tendency for older samples to occur along tectonized sections of the ridge axis, consistent with waning magmatism in those areas. With the help of geochemical data, flows are classified according to eruptive cycles along the neovolcanic zone.

  2. Citron and lemon under the lens of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Adele; Parenti, Francesca; Righi, Valeria; Schenetti, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) is an NMR technique that can be applied to semi-solid samples. Flavedo, albedo, pulp, seeds, and oil gland content of lemon and citron were studied through HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy, which was used directly on intact tissue specimens without any physicochemical manipulation. HR-MAS NMR proved to be a very suitable technique for detecting terpenes, sugars, organic acids, aminoacids and osmolites. It is valuable in observing changes in sugars, principal organic acids (mainly citric and malic) and ethanol contents of pulp specimens and this strongly point to its use to follow fruit ripening, or commercial assessment of fruit maturity. HR-MAS NMR was also used to derive the molar percentage of fatty acid components of lipids in seeds, which can change depending on the Citrus species and varieties. Finally, this technique was employed to elucidate the metabolic profile of mold flavedo. PMID:23871074

  3. Cassini's Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) Process: How to Successfully Command 200 Navigation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Genevie Velarde; Mohr, David; Kirby, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    To keep Cassini on its complex trajectory, more than 200 orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) have been planned from July 2004 to July 2010. With only a few days between many of these OTMs, the operations process of planning and executing the necessary commands had to be automated. The resulting Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) process minimizes the workforce required for, and maximizes the efficiency of, the maneuver design and uplink activities. The MAS process is a well-organized and logically constructed interface between Cassini's Navigation (NAV), Spacecraft Operations (SCO), and Ground Software teams. Upon delivery of an orbit determination (OD) from NAV, the MAS process can generate a maneuver design and all related uplink and verification products within 30 minutes. To date, all 112 OTMs executed by the Cassini spacecraft have been successful. MAS was even used to successfully design and execute a maneuver while the spacecraft was in safe mode.

  4. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  5. BOREAS Level-1B MAS Imagery At-sensor Radiance, Relative X and Y Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Ungar, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with the other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes detailed land cover and biophysical parameter maps such as fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (fPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI). Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-1b MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C-130 INS data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  6. Measurement of the reaction 17O(α,n)20Ne and its impact on the s process in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, A.; Beard, M.; Görres, J.; Couder, M.; deBoer, R.; Falahat, S.; Güray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Özkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2013-04-01

    Background: The ratio between the rates of the reactions 17O(α,n)20Ne and 17O(α,γ)21Ne determines whether 16O is an efficient neutron poison for the s process in massive stars, or if most of the neutrons captured by 16O(n,γ) are recycled into the stellar environment. This ratio is of particular relevance to constrain the s process yields of fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity.Purpose: Recent results on the (α,γ) channel have made it necessary to measure the (α,n) reaction more precisely and investigate the effect of the new data on s process nucleosynthesis in massive stars.Method: The 17O(α,n(0+1)) reaction has been measured with a moderating neutron detector. In addition, the (α,n1) channel has been measured independently by observation of the characteristic 1633 keV γ transition in 20Ne. The reaction cross section was determined with a simultaneous R-matrix fit to both channels. (α,n) and (α,γ) resonance strengths of states lying below the covered energy range were estimated using their known properties from the literature.Result: The reaction channels 17O(α,n0)20Ne and 17O(α,n1γ)20Ne were measured in the energy range Eα=800 keV to 2300 keV. A new 17O(α,n) reaction rate was deduced for the temperature range 0.1 GK to 10 GK. At typical He burning temperatures, the combination of the new (α,n) rate with a previously measured (α,γ) rate gives approximately the same ratio as current compilations. The influence on the nucleosynthesis of the s process in massive stars at low metallicity is discussed.Conclusions: It was found that in He burning conditions the (α,γ) channel is strong enough to compete with the neutron channel. This leads to a less efficient neutron recycling compared to a previous suggestion of a very weak (α,γ) channel. S process calculations using our rates confirm that massive rotating stars do play a significant role in the production of elements up to Sr, but they strongly reduce the s process contribution to

  7. Oxygen isotopes in nitrate: New reference materials for 18O:17O:16O measurements and observations on nitrate-water equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Despite a rapidly growing literature on analytical methods and field applications of O isotope-ratio measurements of NO3- in environmental studies, there is evidence that the reported data may not be comparable because reference materials with widely varying ?? 18O values have not been readily available. To address this problem, we prepared large quantities of two nitrate salts with contrasting O isotopic compositions for distribution as reference materials for O isotope-ratio measurements: USGS34 (KNO3) with low ??18O and USGS35 (NaNO3) with high ??18O and 'mass-independent' ??17O. The procedure used to produce USGS34 involved equilibration of HNO3 with 18O-depleted meteoric water. Nitric acid equilibration is proposed as a simple method for producing laboratory NO3- reference materials with a range of ??18O values and normal (mass-dependent) 18O: 17O:16O variation. Preliminary data indicate that the equilibrium O isotope-fractionation factor (??) between [NO 3-] and H2O decreases with increasing temperature from 1.0215 at 22??C to 1.0131 at 100??C. USGS35 was purified from the nitrate ore deposits of the Atacama Desert in Chile and has a high 17O:18O ratio owing to its atmospheric origin. These new reference materials, combined with previously distributed NO3- isotopic reference materials IAEA-N3 (=IAEA-NO-3) and USGS32, can be used to calibrate local laboratory reference materials for determining offset values, scale factors, and mass-independent effects on N and O isotope-ratio measurements in a wide variety of environmental NO 3- samples. Preliminary analyses yield the following results (normalized with respect to VSMOW and SLAP, with reproducibilities of ??0.2-0.3???, 1??): IAEA-N3 has ??18O = +25.6??? and ??17O = +13.2??? USGS32 has ?? 18O = +25.7??? USGS34 has ??18O = -27. 9??? and ??17O = -14.8??? and USGS35 has ?? 18O = +57.5??? and ??17O = +51.5???.

  8. Carbon-13 CP-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance studies of teas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Richa, Antonio; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2003-05-01

    13C CP-MAS NMR spectra of green and black tea were obtained and assigned based on the solid-state NMR spectra of tropolone, (+)-catechin hydrate, gallic acid, caffeine and flavone derivatives. The peak shape and chemical shifts observed for carbonyl carbons in CP-MAS spectra of teas indicate the existence of different chemical species, mainly free phenollic acids and ester derivatives of flavonoids. The peak patterns allow to establish differences between both teas.

  9. The Investigational Drug VT-1129 Is a Highly Potent Inhibitor of Cryptococcus Species CYP51 but Only Weakly Inhibits the Human Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Warrilow, Andrew G S; Parker, Josie E; Price, Claire L; Nes, W David; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening disease often associated with HIV infection. Three Cryptococcus species CYP51 enzymes were purified and catalyzed the 14α-demethylation of lanosterol, eburicol, and obtusifoliol. The investigational agent VT-1129 bound tightly to all three CYP51 proteins (dissociation constant [Kd] range, 14 to 25 nM) with affinities similar to those of fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole, and ketoconazole (Kd range, 4 to 52 nM), whereas VT-1129 bound weakly to human CYP51 (Kd, 4.53 μM). VT-1129 was as effective as conventional triazole antifungal drugs at inhibiting cryptococcal CYP51 activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] range, 0.14 to 0.20 μM), while it only weakly inhibited human CYP51 activity (IC50, ∼600 μM). Furthermore, VT-1129 weakly inhibited human CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4, suggesting a low drug-drug interaction potential. Finally, the cellular mode of action for VT-1129 was confirmed to be CYP51 inhibition, resulting in the depletion of ergosterol and ergosta-7-enol and the accumulation of eburicol, obtusifolione, and lanosterol/obtusifoliol in the cell membranes. PMID:27161631

  10. A Novel α/β-Hydrolase Gene IbMas Enhances Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major environmental stresses in agriculture worldwide and affects crop productivity and quality. The development of crops with elevated levels of salt tolerance is therefore highly desirable. In the present study, a novel maspardin gene, named IbMas, was isolated from salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line ND98. IbMas contains maspardin domain and belongs to α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Expression of IbMas was up-regulated in sweetpotato under salt stress and ABA treatment. The IbMas-overexpressing sweetpotato (cv. Shangshu 19) plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline content was significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbMas up-regulated the salt stress responsive genes, including pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase, pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, SOD, psbA and phosphoribulokinase genes, under salt stress. These findings suggest that overexpression of IbMas enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and increasing reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity. PMID:25501819

  11. The Consistency of the Pandemic Simulations between the SEIR Model and the MAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyosaka, Yuki; Hirose, Hideo

    There are two main methods for pandemic simulations: the SEIR model and the MAS model. The SEIR model can deal with simulations quickly for many homogeneous populations with simple ordinary differential equations; however, the model cannot accommodate many detailed conditions. The MAS model, the multi-agent simulation, can deal with detailed simulations under the many kinds of initial and boundary conditions with simple social network models. However, the computing cost will grow exponentially as the population size becomes larger. Thus, simulations in the large-scale model would hardly be realized unless supercomputers are available. By combining these two methods, we may perform the pandemic simulations in the large-scale model with lower costs. That is, the MAS model is used in the early stage of a pandemic simulation to determine the appropriate parameters to be used in the SEIR model. With these obtained parameters, the SEIR model may then be used. To investigate the validity of this combined method, we first compare the simulation results between the SEIR model and the MAS model. Simulation results of the MAS model and the SEIR model that uses the parameters obtained by the MAS model simulation are found to be close to each other.

  12. AVE 0991, a non-peptide Mas-receptor agonist, facilitates penile erection.

    PubMed

    da Costa Gonçalves, Andrey C; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Leite, Romulo; Santos, Robson A S

    2013-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system plays a crucial role in erectile function. It has been shown that elevated levels of angiotensin II contribute to the development of erectile dysfunction both in humans and in aminals. On the contrary, the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) appears to mediate penile erection by activation of the Mas receptor. Recently, we have shown that the erectile function of Mas gene-deleted mice was substantially reduced, which was associated with a marked increase in fibrous tissue in the corpus cavernosum. We have hypothesized that the synthetic non-peptide Mas agonist, AVE 0991, would potentiate penile erectile function. We showed that intracavernosal injection of AVE 0991 potentiated the erectile response of anaesthetized Wistar rats, measured as the ratio between corpus cavernosum pressure and mean arterial pressure, upon electrical stimulation of the major pelvic ganglion. The facilitatory effect of AVE 0991 on erectile function was dose dependent and completely blunted by the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, l-NAME. Importantly, concomitant intracavernosal infusion of the specific Mas receptor blocker, A-779, abolished the effect of AVE 0991. We demonstrated that AVE 0991 potentiates the penile erectile response through Mas in an NO-dependent manner. Importantly, these results suggest that Mas agonists, such as AVE 0991, might have significant therapeutic benefits for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  13. Elastic scattering measurement for the system 17O + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies with silicon strip detectors exploiting ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, C.; Manea, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Di Meo, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Boiano, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Sandoli, M.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Veronese, F.

    2013-03-01

    The quasi elastic scattering of a 17O projectile from a 58Ni target has been studied at beam energies ranging from 42.5 to 55.0 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The total reaction cross sections were derived from the measured angular distributions by using an optical model fit within the coupled-channel code FRESCO. These cross sections are very similar to those measured for 17F (loosely bound by 0.6 MeV), mirror nucleus of 17O (tightly bound by 4.14 MeV). This outcome points out that, in this energy range, the small binding energy of the 17F valence proton has negligible influence onto the reactivity of such a loosely bound projectile, contrary to simple expectations, and to what observed for other loosely bound nuclei. The reaction dynamics seems to be influenced mainly by the Coulomb interaction which is similar for both mirror projectiles.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance crystallography of 17O-enriched oxycobaltomyoglobin: Stereoelectronic structure of the cobalt dioxygen system

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, L. Charles; Chien, James C. W.

    1980-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance crystallographic study was made on oxycobaltomyoglobin with the dioxygen ligand enriched to 19.1% in 17O. There are two spectroscopically distinct cobalt dioxygen species. The less abundant species, II (40%), has nonequivalent oxygen atoms with superhyperfine tensors OAα = (5, -67.5, 22.4)G and OAβ = (5.4, -83.3, 30.3)G. Together with the previously reported 59Co hyperfine tensor [Chien, J. C. W. & Dickinson, L. C. (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 2783-2787], the orbital spin densities are found to be Oα(pη) = 0.48, Oα(pζ) = -0.11, Oβ(pη) = 0.74, Oβ(pζ) = -0.16, Co(dxz) = -0.01, Co(dyz) = 0.06 for a total electron density of 1.01. The O—O axis is directed toward His-E7, suggesting a possible hydrogen bonding interaction which may contribute to the nonequivalency of the oxygen atoms; its projection approximately bisects N1—Fe—N2. The z axis of the CoA tensor is tilted at an angle of 28° from the heme normal, resulting in a Co—O—O angle of 120°. The more abundant species, I (60%), has equivalent oxygen atoms with OAγ = (12, -72.5, 20)G and orbital spin densities of Oγ(pη) = 0.54, Oγ(pζ) = -0.05, Co(dxz) = -0.02, Co(dyz) = 0.09 for a total spin density of 1.10. Although the direction cosines for this molecule cannot be precisely determined, the projection of its O—O axis approximately bisects N2—Fe—N3 and is parallel to the imidazole ring of His-F8. Increase of temperature changes g, CoA, and OA values, with the largest effect seen with OA. This temperature dependence indicates averaging of the two bond structures which are stabilized at 77 K. PMID:6246485

  15. Influence of Impact-Oscillatory Loading upon the Mechanical Properties of the VT-22 Titanium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chausov, M. G.; Pylypenko, A. P.; Berezin, V. B.; Markashova, L. I.; Kushnariova, O. S.; Hutsaylyuk, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    This study shows the effect of the specific impact-oscillatory loading (Dynamical nonequilibrium process) on the VT-22 titanium α+β-type alloy mechanical properties and microstructure. Experiments were conducted using modified universal testing machine. Physical research revealed that significant microstructural refinement of the alloy is observed after such type of loading, as the result of which the fine grains are formed with subgrain refinement which takes place within the basis of alloy. It was found that overall plastic deformation of this alloy can be increased by a factor 2.75 compared with its initial state without significant loss of strength. Also we show that such process can be used as a preliminary microstructure refinement method for such alloy.

  16. Non-mass-dependent (17) O anomalies generated by a superimposed thermal gradient on a rarefied O(2) gas in a closed system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Bao, Huiming

    2011-01-15

    Cryogenic or heating methods have been widely used in experiments involving gas purification or isolation and in studying phase changes among solids, liquids, or gases for more than a century. Thermal gradients are often present in these routine processes. While stable isotopes of an element are known to fractionate under a thermal gradient, the largely diffusion-driven fractionation is assumed to be entirely mass-dependent. We report here, however, that distinct non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope fractionation can be generated when subjecting rarefied O(2) gas in a closed system to a simple thermal gradient. The Δ(17) O value, a measure of the (17) O anomaly, can be up to -0.51‰ (standard deviation (s.d.) 1σ = 0.03) in one of the temperature compartments. The magnitude of the (17) O anomalies decreased with increasing initial gas pressures. The authenticity of this phenomenon is substantiated by a series of blank tests and isotope mass-balance calculations. The observed anomalies are not the result of H(2) O contamination in samples or in isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Our finding calls attention to the importance of thermal gradient-induced isotope fractionation and to its implications in laboratory procedures, stable isotope geochemistry, and the physical chemistry of rarefied gases. PMID:21154650

  17. Development of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coating on ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, N.; Abbasi, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Choi, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and to improve area specific resistance (ASR), Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 is thermally grown on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS) and 4-probe ASR tests. The results show that the coating not only decreases the ASR considerably, but also acts as a barrier to mitigate the sub-scale growth and to prevent chromium migration through the coating and the cathode. The EDS analysis reveals that a mixed spinel region is formed between the coating and oxide scale after 500 h oxidation at 750 °C causing a noticeable decrease in oxygen diffusivity through this layer and subsequent decline in sub-scale growth rate. The ASR of uncoated sample is measured to be 63.5 mΩ cm2 after 500 h oxidation, while the Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coated sample shows a value of 19.3 mΩ cm2 representing ∼70% reduction compared to the uncoated sample. It is proposed that the high electrical conductivity of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 (140 S cm-1), reduction of oxide scale growth, and good bonding between the coating and substrate contribute to the substantial ASR reduction for the coated sample.

  18. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  19. Mas receptor overexpression increased Ang-(1-7) relaxation response in renovascular hypertensive rat carotid.

    PubMed

    Olivon, V C; Aires, R D; Santiago, L B; Ramalho, L Z N; Cortes, S F; Lemos, V S

    2015-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important factor in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Mas receptor, Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-activated receptor, is an important RAS component and exerts protective effects in the vasculature. Ang-(1-7) vascular effects and Mas receptor expression in carotid from renovascular hypertensive (2K-1C) rats is not clear. In the present study we investigated Mas receptor vasodilator response activated by Ang-(1-7) in the carotid rings from sham and 2K-1C rats. Changes in isometric tension were recorded on organ chamber. Mas receptors expression was investigated in carotid by Western blot. Nitric oxide production was evaluated by 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and eNOS expression and activity by immunofluoresce and western blot, respectively. Ang-(1-7) induced concentration-dependent vasodilator effect in carotid rings from sham and 2K-1C, which the hypertension increased vasodilatation response. In the 2K-1C carotid rings, A-779 (Mas receptor antagonist) reduced but not abolish the vasodilator effect of Ang-(1-7). Corroborating, Mas receptor protein expression was significantly increased in the 2K-1C rats. L-NAME and ibuprofen decreased Ang-(1-7) vasodilator response and L-NAME plus ibuprofen practically abolish the remaining vasodilatation response. Nitric oxide production is increased due increased of eNOS expression and pSer(1177) activity. Our results demonstrated that renovascular hypertension increased Mas receptors expression and nitric oxide production in the rats carotid which, consequently increased Ang-(1-7)-vasorelaxant response. PMID:26256416

  20. Triple isotope (δD, δ17O, δ18O) study on precipitation, drip water and speleothem fluid inclusions for a Western Central European cave (NW Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Häuselmann, Anamaria D.; Fleitmann, Dominik; Häuselmann, Philipp; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Deuterium (δD) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes are powerful tracers of the hydrological cycle and have been extensively used for paleoclimate reconstructions as they can provide information on past precipitation, temperature and atmospheric circulation. More recently, the use of 17Oexcess derived from precise measurement of δ17O and δ18O gives new and additional insights in tracing the hydrological cycle whereas uncertainties surround this proxy. However, 17Oexcess could provide additional information on the atmospheric conditions at the moisture source as well as about fractionations associated with transport and site processes. In this paper we trace water stable isotopes (δD, δ17O and δ18O) along their path from precipitation to cave drip water and finally to speleothem fluid inclusions for Milandre cave in northwestern Switzerland. A two year-long daily resolved precipitation isotope record close to the cave site is compared to collected cave drip water (3 months average resolution) and fluid inclusions of modern and Holocene stalagmites. Amount weighted mean δD, δ18O and δ17O are -71.0‰, -9.9‰, -5.2‰ for precipitation, -60.3‰, -8.7‰, -4.6‰ for cave drip water and -61.3‰, -8.3‰, -4.7‰ for recent fluid inclusions respectively. Second order parameters have also been derived in precipitation and drip water and present similar values with 18 per meg for 17Oexcess whereas d-excess is 1.5‰ more negative in drip water. Furthermore, the atmospheric signal is shifted towards enriched values in the drip water and fluid inclusions (Δ of ˜ + 10‰ for δD). The isotopic composition of cave drip water exhibits a weak seasonal signal which is shifted by around 8-10 months (groundwater residence time) when compared to the precipitation. Moreover, we carried out the first δ17O measurement in speleothem fluid inclusions, as well as the first comparison of the δ17O behaviour from the meteoric water to the fluid inclusions entrapment in speleothems

  1. Magnesium Silicate Dissolution Investigated by 29Si MAS, 1H-29Si CP MAS, 25Mg QCPMG, and 1H-25Mg CP QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael C.; Brouwer, William J.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-08-01

    Olivine has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of magnesium with respect to silica during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. In particular, the fate of magnesium in the system is not understood and spectroscopic interrogations through nuclear magnetic resonance can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced spectroscopic techniques (29Si MAS, 1H-29Si CP MAS, 25Mg QCPMG, and 1H-25Mg 2 CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and possible secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 oC.

  2. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed.

  3. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  4. Technology Enhanced Learning for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Cerebral Paralysis: The MAS Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Paniagua-Martín, Fernando; García-Crespo, Ángel; Ruiz-Mezcua, Belén

    Education for students with disabilities now takes place in a wide range of settings, thus, including a wider range of assistive tools. As a result of this, one of the most interesting application domains of technology enhanced learning is related to the adoption of learning technologies and designs for people with disabilities. Following this unstoppable trend, this paper presents MAS, a software platform aimed to help people with severe intellectual disabilities and cerebral paralysis in their learning processes. MAS, as a technology enhanced learning platform, provides several tools that supports learning and monitoring for people with special needs, including adaptative games, data processing and monitoring tools. Installed in a special needs education institution in Madrid, Spain, MAS provides special educators with a tool that improved students education processes.

  5. Institutional Research When the Only Constant Is Change. Proceedings of the Annual NEAIR Conference (42nd, Burlington, VT, Oct 31-Nov 3, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The NEAIR 2015 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Burlington, VT, conference. Papers in this document include:(1) Strategies to Analyze Course and Teaching Evaluation Data (Kati Li); (2) Using a Mixed Methods Approach to Assess a Leadership Mentoring Program (Betty Harper); (3) Flagship Institutions and the Struggle…

  6. Expression of the Mas receptor is upregulated in skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Meneses, Carla; Cisternas, Franco; Simon, Felipe; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy during sepsis, immobilization, and chronic diseases is characterized by an increase in expression and activity of the muscle-specific ubiquitin 3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. The classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS), by high level of circulating angiotensin II (AngII) is directly involved in skeletal muscle wasting associated with cardiac and renal failure. Ang (1-7), a peptide belonging to the non-classical RAS system, produces effects that are opposite to AngII. The actions of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its binding and signalling through the Mas receptor. Our purpose is to assess the effects of atrophic stimuli AngII, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and immobilization on the expression of the Mas receptor in skeletal muscle. For that we used gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles of C57BL10 mice treated with AngII, LPS or subjected to unilateral hindlimb immobilization by casting. In addition, we used C2C12 myotubes incubated with AngII or LPS. We evaluated Mas expression by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot immunohistochemical analysis. Skeletal muscle atrophy was corroborated by the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 and the fibre diameter. Our results show that Mas receptor expression was increased by AngII or LPS in vitro and in vivo, and upregulated by immobilization. The increase of the Mas expression was concomitantly with the upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 and the reduction of the fibre diameter. These results from studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate for the first time that the Mas receptor is increased under atrophic stimulus and suggest that the non-classical RAS system could have an important role in muscle wasting.

  7. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in European species of Lucilia (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2015-03-01

    Species identification is generally assessed to be more difficult in larval stages than in adult forms. Especially closely related species such as Lucilia caesar and Lucilia illustris are difficult to identify. The aim of this study was to simplify species determination in Lucilia larvae for entomological and forensic purposes. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns were previously found to be a good tool for species determination in blowfly larvae. Here, distinctive MAS patterns are presented for European Lucilia ampullacea, L. caesar, L. illustris, L. richardsi, L. sericata, and L. silvarum. A joint pattern for the genus Lucilia is provided for a quick classification of a larva to the genus.

  8. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of mullites from different kaolinites.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Guo, Jiugao; Zhu, Jianxi; Yuan, Peng; Hu, Cheng

    2004-04-01

    Mullites synthesized from four kaolinites with different random defect densities have been studied by 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All these mullites show the same XRD pattern. However, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that the mullites derived from kaolinites with high defect densities, have a sillimanite-type Al/Si ordering scheme and are low in silica, whereas those mullites derived from kaolinites with low defect densities, consist of both sillimanite- and mullite-type Al/Si ordering schemes and are rich in silica. PMID:15084323

  9. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  10. Simple (17) O NMR method for studying electron self-exchange reaction between UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Bányai, István; Farkas, Ildikó; Tóth, Imre

    2016-06-01

    (17) O NMR spectroscopy is proven to be suitable and convenient method for studying the electron exchange by following the decrease of (17) O-enrichment in U(17) OO(2+) ion in the presence of U(4+) ion in aqueous solution. The reactions have been performed at room temperature using I = 5 M ClO4 (-) ionic medium in acidic solutions in order to determine the kinetics of electron exchange between the U(4+) and UO2 (2+) aqua ions. The rate equation is given as R = a[H(+) ](-2)  + R', where R' is an acid independent parallel path. R' depends on the concentration of the uranium species according to the following empirical rate equation: R' = k1 [UO(2 +) ](1/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2)  + k2 [UO(2 +) ](3/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2) . The mechanism of the inverse H(+) concentration-dependent path is interpreted as equilibrium formation of reactive UO2 (+) species from UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions and its electron exchange with UO2 (2+) . The determined rate constant of this reaction path is in agreement with the rate constant of UO2 (2+) -UO2 (+) , one electron exchange step calculated by Marcus theory, match the range given experimentally of it in an early study. Our value lies in the same order of magnitude as the recently calculated ones by quantum chemical methods. The acid independent part is attributed to the formation of less hydrolyzed U(V) species, i.e. UO(3+) , which loses enrichment mainly by electron exchange with UO2 (2+) ions. One can also conclude that (17) O NMR spectroscopy, or in general NMR spectroscopy with careful kinetic analysis, is a powerful tool for studying isotope exchange reactions without the use of sophisticated separation processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854521

  11. Seasonal trends of Δ17O, δ18O, and δ15N in atmospheric NO3- of the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, D. F.; Riha, K. M.; Waldschmidt, H.; Michalski, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Archived National Atmospheric Deposition Program samples collected from eight sites between 2001 and 2003 in the Midwestern United States were analyzed for nitrate isotopes (Δ17O, δ18O and δ15N). Variations in all three isotope abundances show significant seasonal trends. Both nitrate Δ17O and δ18O values were elevated in the winter (Δ17O: ~ +28-33%; δ18O: ~ +85-95%) relative to summer (Δ17: ~ +21-25%; δ18O: ~ +55-70%). This is likely related to changes in atmospheric chemistry with changing seasons. Using photochemical models to investigate how formation pathways of NO3- in the atmosphere change with season can provide a link between the chemistry of the atmosphere and the observed isotope variations. The partitioning between different formation pathways of atmospheric NO3- is highly dependent on temperature and sunlight. Colder temperatures and less sunlight favor the N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis pathway, while warm temperatures and abundant light favor the NO2+OH pathway. Each pathway has a different degree of ozone oxidation and results in different oxygen isotope values in the production of atmospheric NO3-. δ15N exhibits the same seasonal trend (~ +10 to -5% in the winter and summer, respectively), however whether these trends are due to changing chemistry or source apportionment is unclear. Changing chemistry, particularly in polluted areas, could account for the δ15N trends we observe as per Freyer et al. (1991), however changing emission source could also have an effect. Atmospheric chemistry models can help to de-convolute the interpretations of these trends by taking a closer look at the specific chemistry responsible for the formation of atmospheric NO3-. Interpretations of these results will be aided by models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality model amended to account for isotope effects during photochemical processing in the atmosphere.

  12. Structural Studies of the Molybdenum Center of the Pathogenic R160Q Mutant of Human Sulfite Oxidase by Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy and 17O and 33S Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Astashkin, Andrei V.; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Klein, Eric L.; Feng, Changjian; Wilson, Heather L.; Rajagopalan, K. V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of the Mo(V) center of the pathogenic R160Q mutant of human sulfite oxidase (hSO) confirms the presence of three distinct species whose relative abundances depend upon pH. Species 1 is exclusively present at pH ≤ 6, and remains in significant amounts even at pH 8. Variable-frequency electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) studies of this species prepared with 33S-labeled sulfite clearly show the presence of coordinated sulfate, as has previously been found for the “blocked” form of Arabidopsis thaliana at low pH (Astashkin, A. V.; Johnson-Winters, K.; Klein, E. L.; Byrne, R. S.; Hille, R.; Raitsimring, A. M.; Enemark, J. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 14800). The ESEEM spectra of Species 1 prepared in 17O-enriched water show both strongly and weakly magnetically coupled 17O atoms that can be assigned to an equatorial sulfate ligand and the axial oxo ligand, respectively. The nuclear quadrupole interaction (nqi) of the axial oxo ligand is substantially stronger than those found for other oxo-Mo(V) centers studied previously. Additionally, pulsed electron–nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements reveal a nearby weakly coupled exchangeable proton. The structure for Species 1 proposed from the pulsed EPR results using isotopic labeling is a six-coordinate Mo(V) center with an equatorial sulfate ligand that is hydrogen bonded to an exchangeable proton. Six-coordination is supported by the 17O nqi parameters for the axial oxo group of the model compound, (dttd)Mo17O(17Otms), where H2dttd = 2,3:8,9-dibenzo-1,4,7,10-tetrathiadecane; tms = trimethylsilyl. Reduction of R160Q to Mo(V) with Ti(III) gives primarily Species 2, another low pH form, whereas reduction with sulfite at higher pH values gives a mixture of Species 1 and 2, as well as the “primary” high pH form of wild-type SO. The occurrence of significant amounts of the “sulfate-blocked” form of R160Q (Species 1) at physiological p

  13. A direct underground measurement of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction cross-section at energies of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, C. G.; Collaboration, LUNA

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction plays a key role in many stellar sites, including classical novae and massive stars. Our knowledge of these scenarios might be improved by a precise measurement of the reaction’s cross-section at astrophysical energies. A direct attempt is currently underway in the Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy, using the underground LUNA 400kV accelerator. The background reduction afforded by the underground environment is essential to the success of this challenging measurement. A purpose-built experimental setup has been simulated and commissioned. Preliminary results are presented.

  14. RISK FACTORS OF HIV-1 VERTICAL TRANSMISSION (VT) AND THE INFLUENCE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY (ART) IN PREGNANCY OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Maria F.M.; de Oliveira, Gisele R.; Lobato, Rubens C.; Mendoza-Sassi, Raul A.; Martínez, Ana M.b.; Gonçalves, Carla V.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of intervention, the rate of vertical transmission of HIV can range from 15-45%. With the inclusion of antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy and the choice of delivery route this amounts to less than 2%. However ARV use during pregnancy has generated several questions regarding the adverse effects of the gestational and neonatal outcome. This study aims to analyze the risk factors for vertical transmission of HIV-1 seropositive pregnant women living in Rio Grande and the influence of the use of ARVs in pregnancy outcome. Among the 262 pregnant women studied the rate of vertical transmission of HIV was found to be 3.8%. Regarding the VT, there was a lower risk of transmission when antiretroviral drugs were used and prenatal care was conducted at the referral service. However, the use of ART did not influence the outcome of pregnancy. However, initiation of prenatal care after the first trimester had an influence on low birth weight, as well as performance of less than six visits increased the risk of prematurity. Therefore, the risk factors analyzed in this study appear to be related to the realization of inadequate pre-natal and maternal behavior. PMID:24626415

  15. Sealed Rotors for In Situ High Temperature High Pressure MAS NMR†

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are used to study AlPO4-5 molecular sieve crystallization under hydrothermal conditions, high temperature high pressure cyclohexanol dehydration reaction, and low temperature metabolomics of intact biological tissue. PMID:26171928

  16. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems...

  17. Considerations for Consortia as States Transition Away from AA-MAS. NCEO Brief. Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Outcomes, 2014

    2014-01-01

    States with an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) that received a flexibility waiver from some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind are required to phase out their use of this assessment. And, on August 23, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published a proposed rollback of regulation that allowed the…

  18. An Analysis of the Rise and Fall of the AA-MAS Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Edwards, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, to address concerns about students who might fall in the "gap" between the regular assessment and the alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), the U.S. Department of Education announced that states could develop alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). This article…

  19. Successfully Transitioning from the AA-MAS to the General Assessment. NCEO Policy Directions. Number 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christensen, Laurene; Shyyan, Vitaliy

    2014-01-01

    Federal policy initiatives such as the flexibility waivers for accountability are requiring that states transition away from the use of an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). It is expected that those students who had participated in that assessment will instead participate in the state's general assessment…

  20. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  1. The Multidimensional Attitudes Scale toward Persons with Disabilities (MAS): Construction and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Liora; Vilchinsky, Noa; Werner, Shirli

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the development of a new instrument, the "Multidimensional Attitudes Scale Toward Persons With Disabilities" (MAS). Based on the multidimensional approach, it posits that attitudes are composed of three dimensions: affect, cognition, and behavior. The scale was distributed to a sample of 132 people along with a self-esteem…

  2. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0 < 9 T) and temperatures (T > 90 K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼100 K and ∼30 K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  3. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented. PMID:26920836

  4. Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Strain 09mas018883, Isolated from a Swedish Cow.

    PubMed

    Zubair, S; de Villiers, E P; Fuxelius, H H; Andersson, G; Johansson, K-E; Bishop, R P; Bongcam-Rudloff, E

    2013-01-01

    We announce the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain 09mas018883, isolated from the milk of a cow with clinical mastitis. The availability of this genome may allow identification of candidate genes, leading to discovery of antigens that might form the basis for development of a vaccine as an alternative means of mastitis control. PMID:23846269

  5. First-principles calculation of the 17O NMR parameters in Ca oxide and Ca aluminosilicates: the partially covalent nature of the Ca-O bond, a challenge for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Profeta, Mickaël; Benoit, Magali; Mauri, Francesco; Pickard, Chris J

    2004-10-01

    We apply density functional theory (DFT) to the calculation of the (17)O NMR parameters in Ca and Mg oxides and aluminosilicates. We study the accuracy of the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation to DFT in the description of these systems and the origin of the experimentally observed large dependence of the (17)O chemical shift on the alkaline earth ion. We find that (i) the partially covalent nature of the Ca-O bond has a huge impact on the O chemical shifts. The Ca-O covalence alone explains why in Ca oxides and aluminosilicates the (17)O chemical shifts are much more deshielded than those of the corresponding Mg compounds. (ii) The Ca-O covalence is overestimated by the PBE functional. Thus PBE-DFT is not able to reproduce the measured (17)O NMR parameters in Ca oxide and Ca aluminosilicates. (iii) It is possible to correct for the PBE-DFT deficiency in a simple and transferable way and to predict very accurate (17)O NMR parameters. Such accuracy allows us to assign the (17)O NMR spectra of two important model systems: the grossite aluminate (CaAl(4)O(7)) and the wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) silicate.

  6. Stable isotope (2H, 17O, 18O) and hydro chemical patterns of precipitation collected in weekly resolution at Hannover, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeniger, Paul; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations of stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in precipitation were initiated in May 2008 at the Federal Institute of Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover, Germany. In 2014 all precipitation samples were re-analyzed because a purchase of a new laser spectrometer (Picarro L2140-i) now allowed measurements of δ17O and a calculation of the 17O-excess parameter. Starting in October 2015 a routine analysis of hydro chemical parameters was added whenever enough sample aliquot was available (major ions, trace elements). A discussion of the stable isotope data of the seven year series of weekly precipitation samples (n = 370) will be presented. Beneath general patterns (seasonality and trends) we also focus on importance of amount weighing procedures, corrections for minor rain amounts, aspects of sample storage and re-analyzes, as well as impacts through changes in analytical equipment (IRMS, CRD spectroscopy) which is visible from the data. For stable isotopes a Thermo Fisher delta plus IRMS (Gasbench and H-Device) was used until 2011 and from 2012 on a Picarro L2120-i water vapor analyzer with long-term accuracies for quality check samples better than 0.2‰ and 0.8‰ for δ18O and δ2H, respectively.

  7. A theoretical study of 17O, 14N and 2H nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors in the real crystalline structure of acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Hadipour, Nasser L.

    2007-03-01

    A systematic computational investigation was carried out to characterize the 17O, 14N and 2H electric field gradient, EFG, tensors in the acetaminophen real crystalline structure. To include the hydrogen bonding effects in the calculations, the most probable interacting molecules with the target molecule in the crystalline phase were considered through the various molecular clusters. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G ∗∗ and 6-311+G ∗ standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated EFG tensors were used to evaluate the 17O, 14N, and 2H nuclear quadrupole resonance, NQR, parameters in acetaminophen crystalline structure, which are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NQR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen bonding interactions affect the EFG tensors of each nucleus. These results indicate that both O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have major influence on the NQR parameters. Moreover, the quantum chemical calculation indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions play an essential role in determining the relative orientation of quadrupole coupling principal components in the molecular frame axes.

  8. Multichannel study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O and {sup 16}O(n,{gamma}){sup 17}O reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, M.; Descouvemont, P.

    2005-07-01

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is investigated in a microscopic two-cluster model with an effective interaction recently developed for transfer reactions. The wave functions are defined in the generator coordinate method. The basis includes all {sup 13}C+{alpha} and {sup 16}O+n channels with {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O described in the p shell. Particle-hole excitations in the sd shell are also taken into account in order to include the {sup 16}O(3{sup -})+n channel. The {sup 17}O spectroscopy is in good agreement with experiment. In particular, the width of the astrophysically relevant 1/2{sub 2}{sup +} state is well reproduced ({gamma}=121 keV as compared to the experimental value {gamma}=124{+-}12 keV). The calculation of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O S factor shows the importance of the 3/2{sub 3}{sup +} resonance, and provides S(0.2 MeV)=2.1x10{sup 6} MeV b, slightly lower than the NACRE recommended value (2.5x10{sup 6} MeV b). The same model is applied to the {sup 16}O(n,{gamma}){sup 17}O radiative-capture reaction at thermal and astrophysical energies.

  9. First direct measurement of the 17O(p,γ)18F reaction cross section at Gamow energies for classical novae.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Caciolli, A; Di Leva, A; Formicola, A; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Campeggio, M; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Menegazzo, R; Marta, M; Napolitani, E; Prati, P; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Somorjai, E; Salvo, C; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Terrasi, F; Trezzi, D

    2012-11-16

    Classical novae are important contributors to the abundances of key isotopes, such as the radioactive (18)F, whose observation by satellite missions could provide constraints on nucleosynthesis models in novae. The (17)O(p,γ)(18)F reaction plays a critical role in the synthesis of both oxygen and fluorine isotopes, but its reaction rate is not well determined because of the lack of experimental data at energies relevant to novae explosions. In this study, the reaction cross section has been measured directly for the first time in a wide energy range E(c.m.)~/= 200-370 keV appropriate to hydrogen burning in classical novae. In addition, the E(c.m.)=183 keV resonance strength, ωγ=1.67±0.12 μeV, has been measured with the highest precision to date. The uncertainty on the (17)O(p,γ)(18)F reaction rate has been reduced by a factor of 4, thus leading to firmer constraints on accurate models of novae nucleosynthesis. PMID:23215474

  10. The calculation of accurate 17O hyperfine coupling constants in the hydroxyl radical: A difficult problem for current quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetmore, Stacey D.; Eriksson, Leif A.; Boyd, Russell J.

    1998-12-01

    The hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) in the hydroxyl radical are investigated through comparison of results obtained from a variety of quantum chemical methods. The couplings obtained from the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) wave function, built upon the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) reference determinant, are investigated in terms of the basis set, the configuration selection energy threshold, and the size of the reference space. Overall results which converge to the experimental couplings are obtained for hydrogen, but not for oxygen. In particular, the MRCI method shows no improvement over density functional theory (the B3LYP functional), for the calculation of Aiso(17O). On the other hand, results in excellent agreement with experiment are obtained through the use of the quadratic configuration interaction (QCISD) method based on the unrestricted HF (UHF) reference determinant with the identical basis sets. Examination of UHF and ROHF based coupled-cluster methods, CCSD and CCSD(T), indicates that once a high enough level of electron correlation is included, the oxygen HFCC is independent of the form of the reference determinant. Unlike the ROHF-CCSD method, which yields reliable results once the effects of triple excitations have been taken into account, the MRCI wave function cannot easily be adjusted to account for the inadequacies of the ROHF reference determinant in order to accurately predict 17O HFCCs.

  11. Extended analysis of the Ångström band system (B1Σ+ - A1Π) in the rare 12C17O isotopologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, R.; Szajna, W.; Zachwieja, M.

    2012-11-01

    The Ångström band system (B1Σ+ - A1Π), so far unobserved in the rare 12C17O isotopologue, was obtained under high resolution as an emission spectrum using high accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy. In total, 200 transition wave numbers belonging to the 0-1 and 0-2 bands were precisely measured and rotationally analysed. The obtained result was the merged rotational constants B0 = 1.898 8823(41) cm-1 and D0 = 6.4283(26) × 10-6 cm-1 for the B1Σ+ Rydberg state as well as the individual rotational constants B1 = 1.540 88(12) cm-1, D1 = 6.950(87) × 10-6 cm-1, B2 = 1.519 292(69) cm-1, D2 = 8.22(16) × 10-6 cm-1 for the A1Π state in the 12C17O isotopologue. The \\sigma _{0 - v^{\\prime \\prime }} band origins were also calculated. Numerous rotational perturbations observed in the A1Π state in this molecule have been identified. The observed perturbations were confronted with those predicted from theoretical calculations.

  12. Protonated hydronium dication, H/sub 4/O/sup 2 +/. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of D/sub 2/H/sup 17/O/sup +/ in HF:SbF/sub 5/ and DH/sub 2//sup 17/O/sup +/ in DF:SbF/sub 5/ and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Prakash, G.K.S.; Barzaghi, M.; Lammertsma, K.; von R. Schleyer, P.; Pople, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Isotopic hydronium ions D/sub 2/H/sup 17/O/sup +/ and DH/sub 2//sup 17/O/sup +/ in 1:1 (molar) HF:SbF/sub 5//SO/sub 2/ and DF:SbF/sub 2/SO/sub 2/ solutions, respectively, at -15/sup 0/C undergo slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange as monitored by /sup 17/O NMR spectroscopy. The rate of such exchange increases with the increase in the acidity of the fluoroantimonic acid medium (1:2 molar composition). The previously observed lack of exchange of isotopic hydronium ions in the somewhat weaker Magic Acid, FSO/sub 3/H:SbF/sub 5/, medium (H/sub 0/ approx. -21.5) suggests that in the stronger HF:SbF/sub 5/ medium (H/sub 0/ approx. -25 to -28), the exchange occurs through the intermediacy of protonated hydronium dication. Consequently, the structure and stability of protonated hydronium dication has been probed by ab initio theory. The T/sub d/ symmetry structure was found to be the minimum energy structure at the HF/6.31G* level. At the HF/6.31G* level this structure is thermodynamically unstable (dissociation preferred by 59.2 kcal/mol), it seems to have significant kinetic stability (deprotonation barrier 39.4 kcal/mol). 20 references, 1 table.

  13. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  14. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) Architecture and Design Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence; Racette, Paul; Blackwell, William; Galbraith, Christopher; Thompson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term "hyperspectral microwave" is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth s atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4-9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the scan head computer

  15. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2009. Synthesis Report 75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    All students, including students with disabilities, must be included in state accountability systems as required by law. In April 2007, federal regulations provided states the flexibility to offer another assessment option--an Alternate Assessment based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The AA-MAS is…

  16. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophyin vivousing unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    PubMed Central

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A.; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  19. Heteromerization Between the Bradykinin B2 Receptor and the Angiotensin-(1-7) Mas Receptor: Functional Consequences.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Bruno D; Carretero, Oscar A; Janic, Brana; Grecco, Hernán E; Gironacci, Mariela M

    2016-10-01

    Bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) and angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor (MasR)-mediated effects are physiologically interconnected. The molecular basis for such cross talk is unknown. It is hypothesized that the cross talk occurs at the receptor level. We investigated B2R-MasR heteromerization and the functional consequences of such interaction. B2R fused to the cyan fluorescent protein and MasR fused to the yellow fluorescent protein were transiently coexpressed in human embryonic kidney293T cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis showed that B2R and MasR formed a constitutive heteromer, which was not modified by their agonists. B2R or MasR antagonists decreased fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency, suggesting that the antagonist promoted heteromer dissociation. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced an 8-fold increase in the MasR ligand-binding affinity. On agonist stimulation, the heteromer was internalized into early endosomes with a slower sequestration rate from the plasma membrane, compared with single receptors. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced a greater increase in arachidonic acid release and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation after angiotensin-(1-7) stimulation, and this effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist. Concerning serine/threonine kinase Akt activity, a significant bradykinin-promoted activation was detected in B2R-MasR but not in B2R-expressing cells. Angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin elicited antiproliferative effects only in cells expressing B2R-MasR heteromers, but not in cells expressing each receptor alone. Proximity ligation assay confirmed B2R-MasR interaction in human glomerular endothelial cells supporting the interaction between both receptors in vivo. Our findings provide an explanation for the cross talk between bradykinin B2R and angiotensin-(1-7) MasR-mediated effects. B2R-MasR heteromerization induces functional changes in the receptor that may lead to long-lasting protective properties. PMID

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacilli bacterium Strain VT-13-104 Isolated from the Intestine of a Patient with Duodenal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Bacilli bacterium strain VT-13-104 isolated from the intestine of a patient with duodenal cancer. The genome is composed of 3,573,421 bp, with a G+C content of 35.7%. It possesses 3,254 predicted protein-coding genes encoding multidrug resistance transporters, resistance to antibiotics, and virulence factors. PMID:26139715

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Bacillus sp. VT 712 Strain Isolated from the Duodenum of a Patient with Intestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the spore-forming Bacillus sp. strain VT 712 isolated from the duodenum of a patient with intestinal cancer. The genome is 3,921,583 bp, with 37.9% G+C content. It contains 3,768 predicted protein-coding genes for multidrug resistance transporters, virulence factors, and daunorubicin resistance. PMID:27491975

  2. Ice Core Measurements and GCM Simulation of the Spatial Distribution and Glacial-Interglacial Change of 17O-excess in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenemann, S.; Ding, Q.; Steig, E.; Schauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotope ratios of water in polar precipitation, as measured in ice cores, have been fundamental to the quantification of past climate variability and change. Recent development of techniques to measure the 17O/16O ratio precisely has allowed 17Oexcess to be added to the ice-core isotope toolbox. The combination of δ17O with the conventional measurements of δ18O and δD - giving the parameter 17Oexcess - provides valuable new information on the evaporative conditions of the oceanic moisture sources for Antarctic precipitation. We measured δ17O and δ18O from a number of Antarctic ice cores (West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide, Siple Dome, Taylor Dome), and determined 17Oexcesson modern, Holocene, and glacial timescales. These results, combined with the work of Landais et al. [2008] and Winkler et al. [2011] at Talos Dome, Dome C, and Vostok, provide the most complete spatial and temporal view of Antarctic 17Oexcess to date. We have added 17Oexcess to the independent isotope modules of two atmospheric general circulation models (CCSM CAM3 and ECHAM4.6). Both models are capable of qualitatively reproducing the observed spatial distribution of modern 17Oexcess in Antarctic precipitation, although our current implementation of CAM3 currently overestimates the average value of 17Oexcess. Simulation of glacial-interglacial changes in ECHAM4.6 also realistically captures the differences in magnitude of the glacial/interglacial changes in 17Oexcess between different ice core sites, with the details dependent on the magnitude of sea ice changes and to a lesser degree the chosen supersaturation parameter. Both models show strong gradients in 17Oexcess at the ocean-sea ice boundary, associated with the strong gradient in near surface water vapor concentration (i.e., the normalized relative humidity). Our results suggest that the low 17Oexcess values found at Talos Dome and Siple Dome reflect their proximity to local moisture sources (e.g. from sea ice leads and polynyas

  3. Solid-state 29Si MAS NMR studies of diatoms: structural characterization of biosilica deposits.

    PubMed

    Bertermann, R; Kröger, N; Tacke, R

    2003-03-01

    Four different diatom species (Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros didymum, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, Nitzschia angularis) were studied by solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. To determine the Q(2):Q(3):Q(4) ratios in the biosilica deposits of the diatoms, quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR experiments were performed. This analysis did not reveal any differences regarding the molecular architecture of the silica (i.e. the degree of condensation of the SiOH units (2 identical with SiOH --> identical with Si-O-Si identical with + H(2)O)) from the different diatom species. However, complete cells showed significantly smaller Q(4):Q(3) ratios (1.8-1.9) than extracted cell walls (2.5-2.8), indicating the existence of intracellular pools of less condensed silica.

  4. Technology Development for a Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term hyperspectral microwave is used to indicate an all-weather sounding instrument that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earths atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions.

  5. Verification of the MAS TMM by infrared TB/TV testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigetvari, Z.

    1990-09-01

    The structural/Thermal Mathematical Model (TMM) of the remote sensing instrument MAS (Microwave Atmospheric Sounder) was successfully TB/TV tested in a space simulation chamber. MAS is thermally characterized by strongly varying orbital heat loads and multiple solar reflections when situated in the orbiter cargo bay. Due to the complicated orbital environment and to budget limitations, the test objectives were simplified and achieved by infrared TB/TV testing methods. The simulation of the external radiative heat loads from Sun, Earth and orbiter cargo bay walls was realized by controlling the test chamber shroud temperatures at desired levels. The activities during preparation, completion and evaluation of the conducted infrared TB/TV tests are described and among others the implemented test data evaluation system DIANA is highlighted.

  6. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W.; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  7. Cornelian cherry (cornus MAS L.) juices as a source of minerals in human diet.

    PubMed

    Krośniak, M; Gastoł, M; Szałkowski, M; Zagrodzki, P; Derwisz, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mineral content of Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.), as this fruit and its preservatives may be considered as important nutritional supplements. Potassium (K), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) were present in Cornelian cherry juice as measured by atomic absorption. Compared to other juices obtained from plum, pear, and apple, Cornelian cherry juice contained high levels of Ca, reaching 10-fold higher (323 mg/L) levels than other juices (14-77 mg/L). With respect to the remaining elements, K, Na, Fe, Zn, and Mn, the levels noted for Cornus mas juice were also higher than in other juices studied. The reverse was true for Cu, for which levels were lower. Data indicate that Cornelian cherry juices are rich in various essential elements and might be considered as an important dietary mineral supplementation for individuals deficient in nutritional elements. PMID:20706938

  8. OptiMAS: a decision support tool to conduct marker-assisted selection programs.

    PubMed

    Valente, Fabio; Gauthier, Franck; Bardol, Nicolas; Blanc, Guylaine; Joets, Johann; Charcosset, Alain; Moreau, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing major advances in plant genotyping and phenotyping lead to a better understanding of genetic architecture of agronomical traits. In this context, it is important to develop decision support tools to help breeders in implementing marker-assisted selection (MAS) projects to assemble new allele combinations. Algorithms have been developed within an interactive graphical interface to (a) trace parental QTL alleles throughout selection generations, (b) propose strategies to select the best plants based on estimated molecular scores, and (c) efficiently intermate them depending on the expected value of their progenies. By investigating multi-allelic context and diverse pedigree structure, OptiMAS enables to assemble favorable alleles issued from diverse parents and further accelerate genetic gain.

  9. Modelling Lyman α forest cross-correlations with LyMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhaas, Cassandra; Weinberg, David H.; Peirani, Sébastien; Dubois, Yohan; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-10-01

    We use the Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS) to predict cross-correlations at z = 2.5 between dark matter haloes and transmitted flux in the Lyα forest, and compare to cross-correlations measured for quasars and damped Lyα systems (DLAs) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) by Font-Ribera et al. We calibrate LyMAS using Horizon-AGN hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of a (100 h- 1 Mpc)3 comoving volume. We apply this calibration to a (1 h- 1 Gpc)3 simulation realized with 20483 dark matter particles. In the 100 h- 1 Mpc box, LyMAS reproduces the halo-flux correlations computed from the full hydrodynamic gas distribution very well. In the 1 h- 1 Gpc box, the amplitude of the large-scale cross-correlation tracks the halo bias bh as expected. We provide empirical fitting functions that describe our numerical results. In the transverse separation bins used for the BOSS analyses, LyMAS cross-correlation predictions follow linear theory accurately down to small scales. Fitting the BOSS measurements requires inclusion of random velocity errors; we find best-fitting rms velocity errors of 399 and 252 {km} {s}^{-1} for quasars and DLAs, respectively. We infer bias-weighted mean halo masses of M_h/10^{12} h^{-1} M_{⊙}=2.19^{+0.16}_{-0.15} and 0.69^{+0.16}_{-0.14} for the host haloes of quasars and DLAs, with ˜0.2 dex systematic uncertainty associated with redshift evolution, intergalactic medium parameters, and selection of data fitting range.

  10. Investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, J H; Hoatson, G L; Vold, R L

    1998-11-01

    The technique of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy is presented for the investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics. To evaluate the effects of discrete random reorientation a Lie algebraic formalism based on the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is developed. The solution to the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is obtained both in the presence and absence of rf irradiation. This allows effects of molecular dynamics to be evaluated during rf pulses and extends the applicability of the formalism to arbitrary multiple pulse experiments. Theoretical methods are presented for the description of multiaxial dynamics with particular emphasis on the application of vector parameters to represent molecular rotations. Numerical time and powder integration algorithms are presented that are both efficient and easy to implement computationally. The applicability of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy for investigating molecular dynamics is evaluated from theoretical spectra. To demonstrate the potential of the technique the dynamics of thiourea-2H4 is investigated experimentally. From a series of variable temperature MAS and quadrupole echo spectra it has been found that the dynamics can be described by composite rotation about the CS and CN bonds. Both experiments are sensitive to the fast CS rotation which is shown to be described by the Arrhenius parameters E(CS) = 46.4 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CS))= 32.6 +/- 0.9. The MAS experiment represents a significant improvement by simultaneously allowing the dynamics of the slow CN rotation to be fully characterized in terms of E(CN) = 56.3 +/- 3.4 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CN)) = 25.3 +/- 1.1. PMID:9875600

  11. Elucidating proline dynamics in spider dragline silk fibre using 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2014-05-14

    (2)H-(13)C HETCOR MAS NMR is performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-Pro enriched A. aurantia dragline silk. Proline dynamics are extracted from (2)H NMR line shapes and T1 in a site-specific manner to elucidate the backbone and side chain molecular dynamics for the MaSp2 GPGXX β-turn regions for spider dragline silk in the dry and wet, supercontracted states.

  12. UPLC-TOF-MS Characterization and Identification of Bioactive Iridoids in Cornus mas Fruit

    PubMed Central

    West, Brett J.; Jensen, C. Jarakae

    2013-01-01

    Cornus mas L. is indigenous to Europe and parts of Asia. Although Cornus is widely considered to be an iridoid rich genera, only two iridoids have been previously found in this plant. The lack of information on taxonomically and biologically active iridoids prompted us to develop and optimize an analytical method for characterization of additional phytochemicals in C. mas fruit. An ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with photodiode array spectrophotometry (PDA) and electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) was employed and mass parameters were optimized. Identification was made by elucidating the mass spectral data and further confirmed by comparing retention times and UV spectra of target peaks with those of reference compounds. Primary DNA damage and antigenotoxicity tests in E. coli PQ37 were used to screen the iridoids for biological activity. As a result, ten phytochemicals were identified, including iridoids loganic acid, loganin, sweroside, and cornuside. Nine of these were reported for the first time from C. mas fruit. The iridoids did not induce SOS repair of DNA, indicating a lack of genotoxic activity in E. coli PQ37. However, loganin, sweroside, and cornuside did reduce the amount of DNA damage caused by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, suggesting potential antigenotoxic activity. PMID:24228188

  13. MAS/MILS Arc/Info point coverage for the western U.S. (excluding Hawaii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has two international and one regional digital database that contains information on mineral properties. This report describes the conversion of selected data from one of the international databases - MAS/MILS (Mineral Availability System/Mineral Industry Location System) - into a spatial data product. The MAS/MILS database, obtained from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) upon its closure, contains over 221,000 records of mineral properties and processing facilities throughout the world. However, the majority of the records in the database are of sites located in the western U.S. This is due to the extensive mineral activity that has occurred in the West, and the work done by mineral professionals in the Western, Alaska, and Intermountain Field Operations Centers of the USBM. The purpose of this project was to create a spatial coverage of the western U.S. containing mineral resource information. This coverage includes information for the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. For this report, locations from MAS/MILS were converted to a point coverage using a geographic information system (GIS). All work was done using Arc/Info v. 7.0.4. There are 128,441 points in the coverage.

  14. Processing of CP MAS kinetics: Towards NMR crystallography for complex solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagys, Laurynas; Klimavicius, Vytautas; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2016-09-01

    Variable temperature and high data point density measurements of 1H-31P cross-polarization kinetics in the powdered ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) have been carried out in the range of -40 °C to +90 °C upon 7 and 10 kHz MAS. The advanced route of processing CP MAS kinetic data has been developed. It is based on reducing the incoherent far range order spin couplings and extracting the CP oscillatory term with the sequent mathematical treatment. The proper replica has been found, which allowed to reduce the Fourier-Bessel (Hankel) transform calculating the angularly averaged and purely distance-depending spin distribution profile to the routine Fourier transform. The shortest 31P-1H distances determined by CP MAS kinetics get between the values obtained by neutron and X-ray diffraction, whereas those for more remote protons are slightly larger. The changes in P⋯H distances are hardly noticeable, though a certain trend to increase upon the heating can be deduced. The clearly pronounced effect was the increase of the spin-diffusion rate constant upon heating. It allows to state that the communication between interacting spins is the process extremely easy to activate.

  15. On the density scaling of pVT data and transport properties for molecular and ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Enriqueta R.; Pensado, Alfonso S.; Fernández, Josefa; Harris, Kenneth R.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a general equation of state (EOS) recently derived by Grzybowski et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 041505 (2011)] is applied to 51 molecular and ionic liquids in order to perform density scaling of pVT data employing the scaling exponent γEOS. It is found that the scaling is excellent in most cases examined. γEOS values range from 6.1 for ammonia to 13.3 for the ionic liquid [C4C1im][BF4]. These γEOS values are compared with results recently reported by us [E. R. López, A. S. Pensado, M. J. P. Comuñas, A. A. H. Pádua, J. Fernández, and K. R. Harris, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144507 (2011)] for the scaling exponent γ obtained for several different transport properties, namely, the viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and electrical conductivity. For the majority of the compounds examined, γEOS > γ, but for hexane, heptane, octane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, CCl4, dimethyl carbonate, m-xylene, and decalin, γEOS < γ. In addition, we find that the γEOS values are very much higher than those of γ for alcohols, pentaerythritol esters, and ionic liquids. For viscosities and the self-diffusion coefficient-temperature ratio, we have tested the relation linking EOS and dynamic scaling parameters, proposed by Paluch et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 987-992 (2010)] and Grzybowski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 161101 (2010); Grzybowski et al. Phys. Rev. E 82, 013501 (2010)], that is, γ = (γEOS/ϕ) + γG, where ϕ is the stretching parameter of the modified Avramov relation for the density scaling of a transport property, and γG is the Grüneisen constant. This relationship is based on data for structural relaxation times near the glass transition temperature for seven molecular liquids, including glass formers, and a single ionic liquid. For all the compounds examined in our much larger database the ratio (γEOS/ϕ) is actually higher than γ, with the only exceptions of propylene carbonate and 1-methylnaphthalene. Therefore, it seems the relation proposed by

  16. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  17. If you are interested in submitting a paper to this journal visit: Isotopic fractionation and the quantification of ^1^7O anomalies in the oxygen three-isotope system - an appraisal and geochemical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Martin F.

    2002-06-01

    The oxygen three-isotope plot provides valuable insights to geochemical and cosmochemical processes in which the relationship of 17O/ 16O relative to 18O/ 16O is of interest. It is generally recognised, however, that the usual format of this diagram, illustrating the variation of δ 17O with δ 18O, is based on the approximation of a power law function to linear format. In contrast, the relationship between δ 17O and δ 18O for entity a measured with respect to reference b is accurately represented by the linear function: 1000 ln1+ δ 17O/1000=λ1000 ln1+ δ 18O/1000+1000 ln[1+k a,b] where k a,b is a measure of the offset (if any) of a from the mass-dependent fractionation line, of slope λ, on which b lies. The respective ordinate and abscissa scales are essentially unchanged from those of the corresponding δ 17O versus δ 18O plot yet, unlike the latter, the slope of the fractionation line is invariant to both the magnitude of the δ values and to the isotopic composition of the reference. Application to high precision measurements which encompass a wide range of δ values reveals that slope differences (or indeed similarities) between comparable data sets may be disguised by the limitations of the δ 17O versus δ 18O diagram, with adverse consequences for the accurate quantification of Δ 17O values. This may be addressed by re-defining Δ 17O, the offset from a reference fractionation line, as 1000 k a,b. In turn, this is very closely approximated by 1000ln[1+ k a,b], the intercept on the ordinate axis of a 1000ln[1+(δ 17O/1000)] versus 1000ln[1+(δ 18O/1000)] plot, for values of 1000 k a,b not exceeding ˜5. The same analysis shows that the fractionation factor α 17/16 for a given system is related to the corresponding α 18/16 value by: α 17/16=[1+k a,b](α 18/16) λ These findings are equally applicable to the reporting of data from other three-isotope systems, such as magnesium.

  18. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Inferred from Simultaneous Measurement of (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O Ratios and Implications for the (182)Hf-(182)W Systematics.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Accurate (182)Hf-(182)W chronology of early planetary differentiation relies on highly precise and accurate tungsten isotope measurements. WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry requires W(17)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O2(16)O(-), W(18)O(16)O2(-), W(17)O3(-), W(17)O(18)O(16)O(-), and W(18)O2(16)O(-) isotopologue interference corrections on W(16)O3(-) species ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ; Touboul et al. Nature 2015 , 520 , 530 ; Touboul et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2012 , 309 , 109 ). In addition, low ion beam intensity counting statistics combined with Faraday cup detection noise limit the precision on the determination of (18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O relative abundances. Mass dependent variability of (18)O/(16)O over the course of an analysis and between different analyses calls for oxide interference correction on a per integration basis, based on the in-run monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O ratio ( Harper et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1996 , 60 , 1131 ; Quitté et al. Geostandard. Newslett. 2002 , 26 , 149 ; Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). Yet, the (17)O/(16)O variation is normally not being monitored and, instead, inferred from the measured (18)O/(16)O variation, assuming a δ(17)O-δ(18)O Terrestrial Fractionation Line ( Trinquier et al. Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 1542 ). The purpose of the present study is to verify the validity of this assumption. Using high resistivity amplifiers, (238)U(17)O2 and (238)U(18)O2 ion beams down to 1.6 fA have been monitored simultaneously with (235,238)U(16)O2 species in a uranium certified reference material. This leads to a characterization of O isotope fractionation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in variable loading and running conditions (additive-to-sample ratio, PO2 pressure, presence of ionized metal and oxide species). Proper determination of O

  19. Theory of 14N and 17O Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in the Single Amino Acids Occurring in the Protein Chain of Cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, R. H.; Cammarere, D.; Sahoo, N.; Nagamine, K.; Das, T. P.

    2002-07-01

    The understanding of electron transport in proteins based on a novel technique involving muon spin rotation (μSR)measurements is a topic of great current interest. The technique, which involves study of spin relaxation of a positive muon (μ+) trapped in amino acids in protein chains due to the fluctuating magnetic field that the moving electron produces, is based on the premise that the electron is generated by ionization of a muonium (Mu) which was trapped at the same site as the μ+ left behind. In attempting to test this premise from first-principles for the Cytochrome c (Cyt c) system in which recent μSR measurements have been made, we have carried out Hartree- Fock investigations of the electronic structures of the bare amino acids and amino acids with + and Mu trapped at the oxygen of the C=O group common to all amino acids. With the aim that the comparison of theoretically predicted experimental nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters will provide a useful test of the electron distribution in the amino acids of Cyt c, we present results for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (e2qQ) and asymmetry parameters (η) for the bare amino acids and the amino acids with trapped μ+ and Mu. The trends in 2 and for 14N and 17O between the various amino acids, as well as the changes in these parameters in the presence of μ+ and Mu are being analyzed. It would be helpful to have experimental data for e2qQ and to η compare with our predictions for the amino acids as they occur in vitro in polycrystalline Cyt c in which the SR measurements have been carried out. It is also hoped that the μSR technique will be able to provide experimental data on e2qQ and for the 14N and 17O nuclei to compare with our predictions

  20. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  1. Phase cycling schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS solid state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY4(1)4, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D (1)H/(1)H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY4(1)2, XY4(1)3, XY4(1)4, and XY8(1)4 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T(10)T(2,±2), T(1,±1)T(2,±1), etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field inhomogeneity effects revealed that XY4(1)4 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp

  2. Protective Effect of Cornus mas Fruits Extract on Serum Biomarkers in CCl4-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Banihabib, Nafiseh; Es. Haghi, Masoud; Panahi, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays attention to use herbs such as cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is increasing, which contains high levels of antioxidants and anthocyanins. Cornus mas fruits have been used for gastrointestinal and excretory disorders for many years in traditional medicine, also may improve liver and kidney functions, and have protective effects such as anti-allergic, antidiabetic, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antihistamine and antimalarial properties. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate protective effects of Cornus mas fruits extract on serum biomarkers in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in male rats. Materials and Methods: Hepatotoxicity was induced by administration of carbon tetrachloride (1 mL/kg i.p.) in 1:1 dilution with olive oil. To evaluate the effect of Cornus mas fruits extract on disease progression, serum marker enzymes, serum total protein and albumin and liver lipid peroxidation were determined in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. Results: Oral administration of Cornus mas fruits extract to rats for 14 days provided a significant (P < 0.05) hepatoprotection by decreasing elevated serum level of enzymes, total serum protein, albumin and liver lipid peroxidation content. Conclusions: Cornus mas fruit extract effect may be due to including some antioxidant components, which caused membrane stabilizing and normalization of fluctuated biochemical profiles induced by CCl4 exposure. Our results validated the traditional use of Cornus mas in the treatment of liver disorders. PMID:24829584

  3. Influence of N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds on the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2007-06-01

    A computational investigation was carried out to characterize the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen. We found that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds around the acetaminophen molecule in the crystal lattice have different influences on the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding eigenvalues and their orientations in the molecular frame of axes. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-311+G(d) standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated chemical shielding tensors were used to evaluate the (17)O, (15)N, and (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors in crystalline acetaminophen, which are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NMR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen-bonding interactions affect the chemical shielding tensors of each nucleus. The computed (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(1), which is involved in two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, shows remarkable sensitivity toward the choice of the cluster model, whereas the (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(2) involved in one N-H...O hydrogen bond, shows smaller improvement toward the hydrogen-bonding interactions. Also, a reasonably good agreement between the experimentally obtained solid-state (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations is achievable only in molecular cluster model where a complete hydrogen-bonding network is considered. Moreover, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensor orientations are able to reproduce the experimental values to a reasonably good degree of accuracy.

  4. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  5. Changes in Precipitation Sources over Glacial/Interglacial MIS 11 and 12 Examined by Δ17O of SiO2 Obtained from Diatoms along the Valles Caldera Lake Core, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, J.; Sharp, Z. D.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of the isotopic composition of paleo-lake water have been made using 18O/16O (ẟ18O) in diatom silica (Dodd and Sharp, GCA, 2010). Post-mortem diatom silica equilibrates with ambient lake water within six months, chronicling the bulk oxygen isotope composition of the lake and resulting in silica that is near the quartz-water fractionation line (Dodd et al, GGG, 2012). The δ18O values of lacustrine diatoms from the Valles Caldera, NM, vary by ~25‰ between glacial and interglacial periods and suggest a collapse of the summer monsoon that currently provides 50% of the modern precipitation in NM. Triple oxygen isotope measurements of diatom silica may serve as a proxy for the isotopic composition of the lake water and as an estimate of paleo-humidity over the precipitation source. The deuterium excess parameter (d= ẟD - 8 ẟ18O) has been used along ice cores as a source relative humidity index, but is difficult to make in lake sediments. Instead, high precision 17O-excess (∆17O) measurements (=ẟ17O - 0.528 ẟ18O) may provide paleo-humidity information. Landais et al. (GRL, 2008) found a ∆17O difference of 0.02‰ in the Vostok ice core between glacial and interglacial times, interpreted as a function of changing relative humidity of the precipitation source. A 0.03‰ change was observed in glacial (∆17O=-0.22‰) and interglacial (∆17O=-0.19‰) diatom silica along the Valles Caldera lake core. Further information regarding the δ18O value of meteoric water can be calculated from paired δ18O-δ17O measurements. The combined δ18O-δ17O values of interglacial diatoms suggest a δ18Ometeoric water value of -9‰. Modern δ18O value of monsoonal precipitation in NM is ~-10‰. The δ18O of glacial diatoms suggest a δ18Ometeoric water = -20‰. Modern δ18O value of winter precipitation in NM is ~-20‰. These results suggest that the seasonality of precipitation in New Mexico can be inferred based on changes in the relative

  6. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  7. The Novel 10-Item Asthma Prediction Tool: External Validation in the German MAS Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Grabenhenrich, Linus B.; Reich, Andreas; Fischer, Felix; Zepp, Fred; Forster, Johannes; Schuster, Antje; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Bergmann, Renate L.; Bergmann, Karl E.; Wahn, Ulrich; Keil, Thomas; Lau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel non-invasive asthma prediction tool from the Leicester Cohort, UK, forecasts asthma at age 8 years based on 10 predictors assessed in early childhood, including current respiratory symptoms, eczema, and parental history of asthma. Objective We aimed to externally validate the proposed asthma prediction method in a German birth cohort. Methods The MAS-90 study (Multicentre Allergy Study) recorded details on allergic diseases prospectively in about yearly follow-up assessments up to age 20 years in a cohort of 1,314 children born 1990. We replicated the scoring method from the Leicester cohort and assessed prediction, performance and discrimination. The primary outcome was defined as the combination of parent-reported wheeze and asthma drugs (both in last 12 months) at age 8. Sensitivity analyses assessed model performance for outcomes related to asthma up to age 20 years. Results For 140 children parents reported current wheeze or cough at age 3 years. Score distribution and frequencies of later asthma resembled the Leicester cohort: 9% vs. 16% (MAS-90 vs. Leicester) of children at low risk at 3 years had asthma at 8 years, at medium risk 45% vs. 48%. Performance of the asthma prediction tool in the MAS-90 cohort was similar (Brier score 0.22 vs. 0.23) and discrimination slightly better than in the original cohort (area under the curve, AUC 0.83 vs. 0.78). Prediction and discrimination were robust against changes of inclusion criteria, scoring and outcome definitions. The secondary outcome ‘physicians’ diagnosed asthma at 20 years' showed the highest discrimination (AUC 0.89). Conclusion The novel asthma prediction tool from the Leicester cohort, UK, performed well in another population, a German birth cohort, supporting its use and further development as a simple aid to predict asthma risk in clinical settings. PMID:25536057

  8. Recent Results from the MicroMAS Global Environmental MonitoringNanosatellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, W. J.; Cahoy, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite (MicroMAS) is a dual-spinning 3U CubeSat equipped with apassive microwave radiometer that observes in nine channels near the 118.75-GHz oxygen absorption line.MicroMAS is designed to observe convective thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, and hurricanes from a midinclinationorbit. The MicroMAS flight unit was developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the MIT Space SystemsLaboratory and was launched to the International Space Station on July 13, 2014, and scheduled for an earlySeptember deployment for a ~90-day mission. The payload is housed in the "lower" 1U of the dual-spinning 3UCubeSat and mechanically rotated approximately once per second as the spacecraft orbits the Earth, resulting in across-track scanned beam with a full-width half-max (FWHM) beamwidth of 2.4 degrees and an approximately 17-km diameter footprint at nadir incidence from a nominal altitude of 400 km. The relatively low cost of MicroMASenables the deployment of a constellation of sensors, spaced equally around several orbit planes. A small fleet ofMicroMAS systems could yield high-resolution global temperature and water vapor profiles, as well as cloudmicrophysical and precipitation parameters.Significant advancements were made in the Assembly, Integration, and Test phase of the project developmentlifecycle. The flight software and communications architecture was refined and tested in relevant lab facilities. Thepower subsystem was modified to include additional required inhibits for the ISS launch. Hardware in the loop testsas well as simulations of the attitude determination and control system (ADCS) were performed to validate theunique dual-spinning, local vertical, local horizontal (LVLH) stabilized flight design. ADCS algorithms were testedon a 3-axis air bearing and custom rig inside a 3-axis programmable Helmholtz cage. Finally, the integratedspacecraft underwent a series of environmental tests in order to verify the results of thermal modeling

  9. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in five species of Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To further establish species determination using the muscle attachment site (MAS) pattern method, third instar larvae of five forensically important species of Sarcophaga Meigen were investigated: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt, Sarcophaga melanura Meigen, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen and Sarcophaga similis Meade. As in the previously investigated Calliphoridae, patterns were found to be species specific. The main feature of the Sarcophaga patterns is the divided central horizontal row of segment four. A genus pattern was established to be used as base for comparison in further species determination. PMID:26391172

  10. MAS Equipped with Ant Colony Applied into Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kai; Zhang, Ren Feng; Yang, Yan Qing

    This paper presents a methodology adopting the new structure of MAS(multi-agent system) equipped with ACO(ant colony optimization) algorithm for a better schedule in dynamic job shop. In consideration of the dynamic events in the job shop arriving indefinitely schedules are generated based on tasks with ant colony algorithm. Meanwhile, the global objective is taken into account for the best solution in the actual manufacturing environment. The methodology is tested on a simulated job shop to determine the impact with the new structure.

  11. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in five species of Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To further establish species determination using the muscle attachment site (MAS) pattern method, third instar larvae of five forensically important species of Sarcophaga Meigen were investigated: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt, Sarcophaga melanura Meigen, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen and Sarcophaga similis Meade. As in the previously investigated Calliphoridae, patterns were found to be species specific. The main feature of the Sarcophaga patterns is the divided central horizontal row of segment four. A genus pattern was established to be used as base for comparison in further species determination.

  12. An Experimental Study on What Controls the Ratios of 18O/16O and 17O/16O of O2 During Microbial Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Ward, B. B.; Fischer, W. W.; Bender, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios of atmospheric and dissolved oceanic O2 are key biogeochemical tracers of total photosynthesis and respiration on global to local length scales and glacial/interglacial time scales (Luz et al., 1999). Critical to the use of these ratios as biogeochemical tracers is knowledge of how they are affected by production, consumption, and transport of O2. We present new measurements of O2 respiration by E. coli and N. oceanus, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, to test three assumptions of isotopically enabled models of the O2 cycle: (i) laboratory-measured respiratory 18O/16O isotope effects (18α) of microorganisms are constant under all experimental and natural conditions (e.g., temperature and growth rate); (ii) the respiratory 'mass law' relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O [17α = (18α)β] is universal; and (iii) 18α and β for aerobic ammonia and organic carbon oxidation are identical. For E. coli, we find that both 18α and β are variable. From 37°C to 15°C, 18α varies linearly with temperature from 17 to 14‰, and β varies linearly from 0.513 to 0.508. 18α and β do not appear to vary with growth rate (as tested using different carbon sources). Both 18α and β are lower than previous observations for bacteria: 18α = 17-20‰ (Kiddon et al., 1993) and β = 0.515 (Luz and Barkan, 2005). We were able to simulate the observed temperature dependence of 18α and β using a model of respiration with two isotopically discriminating steps: O2 binding to cytochrome bo oxidase (the respiratory enzyme) and reduction of O2 to H2O. Finally, initial results on N. oceanus suggest it has similar values for 18α and β as previously studied aerobic bacteria that consume organic carbon, providing the first support for assumption (iii). Based on these results, isotopically constrained biogeochemical models of O2 cycling may need to consider a temperature dependence for 18α and β for microbial respiration. For example, these results may

  13. Immobilized MAS1 lipase showed high esterification activity in the production of triacylglycerols with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumei; Li, Daoming; Qu, Man; Durrani, Rabia; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-02-01

    Immobilization of lipase MAS1 from marine Streptomyces sp. strain W007 and its application in catalyzing esterification of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with glycerol were investigated. The resin XAD1180 was selected as a suitable support for the immobilization of lipase MAS1, and its absorption ability was 75mg/g (lipase/resin ratio) with initial buffer pH value of 8.0. The thermal stability of immobilized MAS1 was improved significantly compared with that of the free lipase. Immobilized MAS1 had no regiospecificity in the hydrolysis of triolein. The highest esterification degree (99.31%) and TAG content (92.26%) by immobilized MAS1-catalyzed esterification were achieved under the optimized conditions, which were significantly better than those (82.16% and 47.26%, respectively) by Novozym 435. More than 92% n-3 PUFA was incorporated into TAG that had similar fatty acids composition to the substrate (n-3 PUFA). The immobilized MAS1 exhibited 50% of its initial activity after being used for five cycles. PMID:27596418

  14. Multipass membrane air-stripping (MAS) for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Sabatini, David A

    2009-10-30

    Air-stripping is one of the most effective technologies for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant solutions, although the presence of surfactant poses some unique challenges. This study evaluated the effect of a mixed surfactant system on the apparent Henry's law constant of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and the efficiency of PCE removal from surfactant solutions using a lab-scale hollow fiber membrane contactor. Results show that the presence of surfactant significantly reduced the apparent Henry's law constant of PCE, and the reduction was proportional to the total surfactant concentration. PCE removal efficiency by membrane air-stripping (MAS) decreased as the surfactant system transitioned from solubilization to supersolubilization. Besides significantly reducing the apparent volatility of VOCs, the presence of surfactant brings additional mass transfer resistance in air-stripping, which makes it difficult to achieve high levels of contaminant removal, even at very high air/liquid (A/L) ratios. In contrast, multipass/multistage MAS operated at low A/L ratios could achieve near 100% contaminant removal because of less mass transfer limitation during each stripping pass/stage. Experimental results, together with model calculations demonstrate multipass (and multistage) air-stripping as a cost-effective alternative for removing VOCs from surfactant micellar solutions compared to the options of using large air strippers or operating at high A/L ratios.

  15. Protective effects of Cornus mas fruit extract on carbon tetrachloride induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Es.Haghi, M.; Dehghan, G.; Banihabib, N.; Zare, S.; Mikaili, P.; Panahi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Cornus mas is used for in renal aliments traditionally in Iran. The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant activity of C. mas fruit extract (CMFE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treated oxidative stress in Wistar albino rats. Forty two male albino rats were divided into seven groups. Group I served as a sham; Group II served as a normal control; Group III served as a toxic control, with CCl4 (1 ml/kg body weight; 80% in olive oil); Groups IV and V received CMFE at doses of 300 and 700 mg/kg before CCl4 injection; Groups VI and VII received extract at same doses orally at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after CCl4 intoxication. CCl4 injection produced a significant rise in serum markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde along with the reduction of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismuta, catalase and glutathion peroxidase. Serum creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations were increased whereas level of protein and albumin were reduced. Treatment of rats with different doses of fruit extract (300 and 700 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) ameliorated the alterations induced with CCl4 in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defenses, biochemical and renal lesions. Based on these results, we conclude that CMFE protects kidney from oxidative stress induced by CCl4. PMID:25249718

  16. X-mas trees: A new application for duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hochoertler, G.; Zeiler, G.; Haberfellner, K.

    1995-12-31

    The development of fields in severe areas (subsea installations, deserts) necessitates the use of materials which can operate maintenance free in these conditions. Depending on production route and aggressivity of relevant media, the materials used until now, such as AISI 4130, are being superseded by higher alloyed materials such as F6NM, Duplex and Super Duplex Steels. Extensive investigation of metallurgical, mechanical, technological and stress aspects as well as research into the influence of melting, forging and heat treatment processes on high alloyed materials enables ``High Tech`` forgings to be manufactured. Based on investigations and experience gained by previously produced forgings (WYE-piece, Gate Valve components, Swivel forgings, line pipes made of Super Duplex Stainless Steels and Duplex Stainless Steels), the first X-mas trees made of solid Duplex Stainless Steel has been produced. Due to the excellent mechanical and corrosion properties of Duplex Stainless Steel, the expensive and time consuming cladding can be eliminated for most environments, which results in good economy and significantly reduced production time. To obtain information about the quality of such a large forging, samples were taken from one of these X-mas trees and the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated.

  17. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  18. Altered condensed-phase electron affinities of carbonyl-/sup 13/C-, /sup 14/C, and -/sup 17/O- substituted ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Lauricella, T.L.; Pescatore, J.A. Jr.; Reiter, R.C.; Stevenson, R.D.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1988-06-16

    Electron spin resonance experiments have shown that the solution affinities of both benzoquinone (BQ) and benzophenone (BZO) in liquid ammonia are diminished when a /sup 13/C replaces the /sup 12/C in the carbonyl position. For the reaction *R + R/sup .-/ reversible *R/sup .-/ + R, where *R represents the /sup 13/C-substituted material (either BZO-13C or BQ-13C), the equilibrium constants (K/sub eq/) are 0.80 and 0.50 at -75/sup 0/ C for the BQ and BZO systems, respectively. The reduction of radioactive samples of benzophenone (mixtures of BZO and BZO-14C, /sup 14/C substitution at the carbonyl carbon) with deficient amounts of sodium metal in liquid ammonia followed by removal of the ammonia leaves a solid mixture of benzophenone and benzophenone ketyl. Sublimation of the neutral benzophenone from the anion radical salt produces benzophenone that is enhanced in radioactivity relative to the starting BZO/BZO-14C mixture. This enhancement in radioactivity is consistent with the equilibrium constant again being less than unity when *R represents the /sup 14/C-substituted benzophenone. In contrast to these results, substitution of the oxygen atom with /sup 17/O results in an increase in the relative solution electron affinity. This is explained in terms of the increase in bonding involving the oxygen upon reduction, due to ion association.

  19. The effect of FF-MAS on porcine cumulus-oocyte complex maturation, fertilization and pronucleus formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Faerge, Inger; Strejcek, Frantisek; Laurincik, Jozef; Rath, Detlef; Niemann, Heiner; Schellander, Karl; Rosenkranz, Christine; Hyttel, Poul Maddox; Grøndahl, Christian

    2006-08-01

    Follicular fluid meiosis-activating sterol (FF-MAS) has been isolated from the follicular fluid (FF) of several species including man. FF-MAS increases the quality of in vitro oocyte maturation, and thus the developmental potential of oocytes exposed to FF-MAS during in vitro maturation is improved. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FF-MAS on porcine oocyte maturation and pronucleus formation in vitro. Porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were isolated from abattoir ovaries and in vitro matured for 48 h in NCSU 37 medium supplemented with 1 mg/l cysteine, 10 ng/ml epidermal growth factor and 50 microM 2-mercaptoethanol with or without 10% porcine follicular fluid (pFF). For the first 22 h, 1 mM db-cAMP and 10 I.E PMSG/hCG was added. The medium was supplemented with 1 microM, 3 microM, 10 microM, 30 microM or 100 microM FF-MAS dissolved in ethanol. After maturation the COCs were denuded mechanically using a fine glass pipette under constant pH and in vitro fertilized with fresh semen (5 x 10(5) spermatozoa/ml). The presumptive zygotes were evaluated 18 h after fertilization. The addition of pFF increased the monospermic as well as the polyspermic penetration of oocytes. In the absence of pFF, the addition of FF-MAS decreased the polyspermic penetration rate, whereas FF-MAS in combination with pFF decreased monospermic and increased polyspermic penetration. The degeneration rate of ova decreased in the presence of FF-MAS irrespective of the presence or absence of pFF. In the absence of pFF, FF-MAS at 3-10 microM increased the number of zygotes with advanced maternal pronuclear stages. In supraphysiological doses, i.e. 30-100 microM, FF-MAS dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited nuclear maturation in the absence of pFF.

  20. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  1. The effect of the recent 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion cross section measurements in the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion reactions and to extract the strengths of the resonances that more contribute to the reaction rates at astrophysical energies. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. Since, proton-induced fusion reactions on 17O and 18O belong to the CNO cycle network for H-burning in stars, the new estimates of the cross sections have been introduced into calculations of Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis to determine their impact on astrophysical environments. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains. These solids form in the cold and dusty envelopes that surround AGB stars and once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of fusion reactions in astrophysical environments.

  2. Investigation of trap properties of Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 high-k gate stack p-type MOSFETs by low-frequency (1/f) noise and random telegraph noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shih-Chang; Wu, San-Lein; Huang, Po-Chin; Wang, Bo-Chin; Tsai, Kai-Shiang; Kao, Tsung-Hsien; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Guo; Cheng, Osbert; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Chen, Jone-Fang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the trap properties of composite Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 high-k gate stack p-type MOSFETs (pMOSFETs) were investigated by simultaneous low-frequency (1/f) noise and random telegraph noise measurements. Compared with pure ZrO2 pMOSFETs, the interface property and drive current of Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 pMOSFETs were both improved, and the depth of the effective centroid of the fixed charges was close to the insulator/semiconductor interface. This result indicated that the trapping behavior of hole capture from a ZrO2 film can be suppressed by mixing the film with a HfO2 film. Consequently, comparable oxide trap densities and trapping depths between Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 and HfO2 pMOSFETs can be seen. In addition, it was found that the unified model can appropriately interpret the 1/f noise mechanism in Hf0.83Zr0.17O2 pMOSFETs.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of novel Wells-Dawson-type mono vanadium(V)-substituted tungsto-polyoxometalate isomers: 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-).

    PubMed

    Ueda, Tadaharu; Ohnishi, Miho; Shiro, Motoo; Nambu, Jun-ichi; Yonemura, Toshiaki; Boas, John F; Bond, Alan M

    2014-05-19

    Two vanadium(V)-substituted tungsto-polyoxometalate isomers, 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-), were prepared as their tetra-alkyl ammonium salts from a W(VI)-H2SO4-V(V) reaction mixture in aqueous CH3CN solution. X-ray crystallographic structural analysis revealed that both isomers have a Wells-Dawson-type structure with a higher occupancy of vanadium at polar sites and belt sites for 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-), respectively. The isomers were also characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, Raman, UV-vis, and (51)V NMR spectroscopies as well as voltammetry, and the data obtained were compared with that derived from [S2W18O62](4-). Significantly, the reversible potentials for the vanadium(V/IV) couple for both 1- and 4-[S2VW17O62](5-) in CH3CN (0.1 M n-Bu4NPF6) are considerably more positive than the tungstate reduction process exhibited by the [S2W18O62](4-) framework, implying that the presence of vanadium should be useful in catalytic reactions. The one-electron-reduced [S2V(IV)W17O62](6-) forms of both isomers were prepared in solution by controlled potential bulk electrolysis and characterized by voltammetry and EPR spectroscopy.

  4. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool to investigate low-energy resonances: the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cases

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-08-12

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O, {alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O, {alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  5. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element Vt b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t -channel cross section is measured to be σt=2.2 5-0.31+0.29 pb . We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s - vs t -channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s +t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs +t=3.3 0-0.40+0.52 pb , without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt . The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vt b|=1.0 2-0.05+0.06 , corresponding to |Vt b|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  6. HERSCHEL/HIFI SEARCH FOR H{sub 2}{sup 17}O AND H{sub 2}{sup 18}O IN IRC+10216: CONSTRAINTS ON MODELS FOR THE ORIGIN OF WATER VAPOR

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, David A.; Tolls, Volker; Melnick, Gary J.; Agundez, Marcelino; Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Decin, Leen; Daniel, Fabien; Cernicharo, Jose; Schmidt, Miroslaw; Szczerba, Ryszard

    2013-04-10

    We report the results of a sensitive search for the minor isotopologues of water, H{sub 2}{sup 17}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, toward the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC+10216 (a.k.a. CW Leonis) using the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This search was motivated by the fact that any detection of isotopic enhancement in the H{sub 2}{sup 17}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O abundances would have strongly implicated CO photodissociation as the source of the atomic oxygen needed to produce water in a carbon-rich circumstellar envelope. Our observations place an upper limit of 1/470 on the H{sub 2}{sup 17}O/H{sub 2}{sup 16}O abundance ratio. Given the isotopic {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O ratio of 1/840 inferred previously for the photosphere of IRC+10216, this result places an upper limit of a factor 1.8 on the extent of any isotope-selective enhancement of H{sub 2}{sup 17}O in the circumstellar material, and provides an important constraint on any model that invokes CO photodissociation as the source of O for H{sub 2}O production. In the context of the clumpy photodissociation model proposed previously for the origin of water in IRC+10216, our limit implies that {sup 12}C{sup 16}O (not {sup 13}C{sup 16}O or SiO) must be the dominant source of {sup 16}O for H{sub 2}O production, and that the effects of self-shielding can only have reduced the {sup 12}C{sup 16}O photodissociation rate by at most a factor {approx}2.

  7. The RGB and AGB Star Nucleosynthesis in Light of the Recent 17O(p, α)14N and 18O(p, α)15N Reaction-rate Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on A = 17 and A = 18 oxygen isotopes, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. In particular, the strengths of the 20 keV and 65 keV resonances in the 18O(p, α)15N and 17O(p, α)14N reactions, respectively, have been extracted, as well as the contribution of the tail of the broad 656 keV resonance in the 18O(p, α)15N reaction inside the Gamow window. The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p, α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. As a result, more accurate reaction rates for the 18O(p, α)15N, 17O(p, α)14N, and 17O(p, γ)18F processes have been deduced, devoid of systematic errors due to extrapolation or the electron screening effect. Such rates have been introduced into state-of-the-art red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis coupled with extra-mixing episodes. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The low 14N/15N found in SiC grains cannot be explained by the revised nuclear reaction rates and remains a serious problem that has not been satisfactorily addressed.

  8. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.

  9. Role of Mas receptor in renal blood flow response to angiotensin-(1-7) in ovariectomized estradiol treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Shadan; Dehghani, Aghdas; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7), is abundantly produced in kidneys and antagonizes the function of angiotensin II through Mas receptor (MasR) or other unknown mechanisms. In the current study, the role of MasR and steroid hormone estrogen on renal blood flow response to Ang 1-7 administration was investigated in ovariectomized (OV) female rats. OV female Wistar-rats received estradiol (500 μg/kg/week) or vehicle for two weeks. In the day of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized, cannulated, and the responses including mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance at the constant level of renal perfusion pressure to graded infusion of Ang 1-7 at 0, 100 and 300 ng/kg/min were determined in OV and OV estradiol-treated (OVE) rats, treated with vehicle or MasR antagonist; A779. RBF response to Ang 1-7 infusion increased dose-dependently in vehicle (Pdose<0.001) and A779-treated (Pdose<0.01) animals. However, when MasR was blocked, the RBF response to Ang 1-7 significantly increased in OV animals compared with OVE rats (P<0.05). When estradiol was limited by ovariectomy, A779 increased RBF response to Ang 1-7 administration, while this response was attenuated in OVE animals. PMID:27051434

  10. Role of Mas receptor in renal blood flow response to angiotensin-(1-7) in ovariectomized estradiol treated rats.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Shadan; Dehghani, Aghdas; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7), is abundantly produced in kidneys and antagonizes the function of angiotensin II through Mas receptor (MasR) or other unknown mechanisms. In the current study, the role of MasR and steroid hormone estrogen on renal blood flow response to Ang 1-7 administration was investigated in ovariectomized (OV) female rats. OV female Wistar-rats received estradiol (500 μg/kg/week) or vehicle for two weeks. In the day of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized, cannulated, and the responses including mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance at the constant level of renal perfusion pressure to graded infusion of Ang 1-7 at 0, 100 and 300 ng/kg/min were determined in OV and OV estradiol-treated (OVE) rats, treated with vehicle or MasR antagonist; A779. RBF response to Ang 1-7 infusion increased dose-dependently in vehicle (Pdose <0.001) and A779-treated (Pdose <0.01) animals. However, when MasR was blocked, the RBF response to Ang 1-7 significantly increased in OV animals compared with OVE rats (P<0.05). When estradiol was limited by ovariectomy, A779 increased RBF response to Ang 1-7 administration, while this response was attenuated in OVE animals. PMID:27051434

  11. Evidence for a Systematic Offset of ‑0.25 mas in the Gaia DR1 Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-11-01

    We test the parallaxes reported in the Gaia first data release using the sample of eclipsing binaries with accurate, empirical distances from Stassun & Torres. We find an average offset of ‑0.25 ± 0.05 mas in the sense of the Gaia parallaxes being too small (i.e., the distances too long). The offset does not depend strongly on obvious parameters such as color or brightness. However, we find with high confidence that the offset may depend on ecliptic latitude: the mean offset is ‑0.38 ± 0.06 mas in the ecliptic north and ‑0.05 ± 0.09 mas in the ecliptic south. The ecliptic latitude dependence may also be represented by the linear relation, {{Δ }}π ≈ -0.22(+/- 0.05)-0.003(+/- 0.001)× β mas (β in degrees). Finally, there is a possible dependence of the parallax offset on distance, with the offset becoming negligible for π ≲ 1 mas; we discuss whether this could be caused by a systematic error in the eclipsing binary distance scale, and reject this interpretation as unlikely.

  12. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE PAGES

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimensionmore » without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  13. Metallic Li colloids studied by Li-7 MAS NMR in electron-irradiated LiF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogal, O. J.; Beuneu, F.; Vajda, P.; Florian, P.; Massiot, D.

    Li-7 MAS NMR spectra of 2.5 MeV electron-irradiated LiF crystals have been measured in a field of 9.4 T. Besides the resonance line of the ionic compound, a second well-separated spectrum is observed in the region of the Knight shift value for metallic lithium. At room temperature, the latter can be decomposed into two components with different Knight shift and linewidth values. When the temperature is increased, line narrowing takes place at first, indicating shortening of correlation times for self-diffusion, independently in both components. Above 370 K, both lines broaden and approach each other before collapsing into a single line. The high ppm component disappears after crossing the melting temperature of metallic lithium (454 K). The two lines are attributed to different types of metallic Li: one to bulk-like metal, the other to Li present initially under pressure and relaxing to the former under thermal treatment.

  14. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance. PMID:24104201

  15. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-10-09

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance.

  16. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  17. Chaenomeles japonica, Cornus mas, Morus nigra fruits characteristics and their processing potential.

    PubMed

    Tarko, Tomasz; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra; Satora, Paweł; Sroka, Paweł; Pogoń, Piotr; Machalica, Justyna

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica), cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) and black mulberry (Morus nigra) fruits as raw materials for processing. All analyzed fruits were characterized by high antioxidant activity and total phenolic content. Fruits of Japanese quince and cornelian cherry had also high acidity. Products such as fruit wines and liquors were prepared from the tested fruits. In respect of soluble solid content and reducing sugars content the obtained wine should be classified as dry wines. All analyzed liquors were characterized by similar alcohol content and the soluble solid content. Moreover, liquors made from Japanese quince and cornelian cherry were characterized by high total acidity and antioxidant capacity. The results of sensory analysis showed high commercial potential of the examined fruits. PMID:25477663

  18. OptiMAS: A Decision Support Tool for Marker-Assisted Assembly of Diverse Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Fabio; Gauthier, Franck; Bardol, Nicolas; Blanc, Guylaine; Joets, Johann; Charcosset, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Current advances in plant genotyping lead to major progress in the knowledge of genetic architecture of traits of interest. It is increasingly important to develop decision support tools to help breeders and geneticists to conduct marker-assisted selection methods to assemble favorable alleles that are discovered. Algorithms have been implemented, within an interactive graphical interface, to 1) trace parental alleles throughout generations, 2) propose strategies to select the best plants based on estimated molecular scores, and 3) efficiently intermate them depending on the expected value of their progenies. With the possibility to consider a multi-allelic context, OptiMAS opens new prospects to assemble favorable alleles issued from diverse parents and further accelerate genetic gain. PMID:23576670

  19. OptiMAS: a decision support tool for marker-assisted assembly of diverse alleles.

    PubMed

    Valente, Fabio; Gauthier, Franck; Bardol, Nicolas; Blanc, Guylaine; Joets, Johann; Charcosset, Alain; Moreau, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Current advances in plant genotyping lead to major progress in the knowledge of genetic architecture of traits of interest. It is increasingly important to develop decision support tools to help breeders and geneticists to conduct marker-assisted selection methods to assemble favorable alleles that are discovered. Algorithms have been implemented, within an interactive graphical interface, to 1) trace parental alleles throughout generations, 2) propose strategies to select the best plants based on estimated molecular scores, and 3) efficiently intermate them depending on the expected value of their progenies. With the possibility to consider a multi-allelic context, OptiMAS opens new prospects to assemble favorable alleles issued from diverse parents and further accelerate genetic gain.

  20. Not all M&As are alike--and that matters.

    PubMed

    Bower, J L

    2001-03-01

    Despite all that's been written about mergers and acquisitions, even the experts know surprisingly little about them. The author recently headed up a year-long study sponsored by Harvard Business School on the subject of M&A activity. In-depth findings will emerge over the next few years, but the research has already revealed some interesting results. Most intriguing is the notion that, although academics, consultants, and businesspeople lump M&As together, they represent very different strategic activities. Acquisitions occur for the following reasons: to deal with overcapacity through consolidation in mature industries; to roll up competitors in geographically fragmented industries; to extend into new products and markets; as a substitute for R&D; and to exploit eroding industry boundaries by inventing an industry. The different strategic intents present distinct integration challenges. For instance, if you acquire a company because your industry has excess capacity, you have to determine which plants to shut down and which people to let go. If, on the other hand, you buy a company because it has developed an important technology, your challenge is to keep the acquisition's best engineers from jumping ship. These scenarios require the acquiring company to engage in nearly opposite managerial behaviors. The author explores each type of M&A--its strategic intent and the integration challenges created by that intent. He underscores the importance of the acquiring company's assessment of the acquired group's culture. Depending on the type of M&A, approaches to the culture in place must vary, as will the level to which culture interferes with integration. He draws from the experiences of such companies as Cisco, Viacom, and BancOne to exemplify the different kinds of M&As. PMID:11246927

  1. Not all M&As are alike--and that matters.

    PubMed

    Bower, J L

    2001-03-01

    Despite all that's been written about mergers and acquisitions, even the experts know surprisingly little about them. The author recently headed up a year-long study sponsored by Harvard Business School on the subject of M&A activity. In-depth findings will emerge over the next few years, but the research has already revealed some interesting results. Most intriguing is the notion that, although academics, consultants, and businesspeople lump M&As together, they represent very different strategic activities. Acquisitions occur for the following reasons: to deal with overcapacity through consolidation in mature industries; to roll up competitors in geographically fragmented industries; to extend into new products and markets; as a substitute for R&D; and to exploit eroding industry boundaries by inventing an industry. The different strategic intents present distinct integration challenges. For instance, if you acquire a company because your industry has excess capacity, you have to determine which plants to shut down and which people to let go. If, on the other hand, you buy a company because it has developed an important technology, your challenge is to keep the acquisition's best engineers from jumping ship. These scenarios require the acquiring company to engage in nearly opposite managerial behaviors. The author explores each type of M&A--its strategic intent and the integration challenges created by that intent. He underscores the importance of the acquiring company's assessment of the acquired group's culture. Depending on the type of M&A, approaches to the culture in place must vary, as will the level to which culture interferes with integration. He draws from the experiences of such companies as Cisco, Viacom, and BancOne to exemplify the different kinds of M&As.

  2. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1–7/Mas axis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-01-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1–7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1–7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1–7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1–7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1–7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1–7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1–7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1–7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1–7. They also suggest that ANG1–7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1–7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) through Mas receptor activation induces peripheral antinociception by interaction with adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Castor, Marina G M; Santos, Robson A S; Duarte, Igor D G; Romero, Thiago R L

    2015-07-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] develops its functions interacting with Mas receptor. Mas receptor was recently identified in the DRG and its activation by Ang-(1-7) resulted in peripheral antinociception against PGE2 hyperalgesia in an opioid-independent pathway. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) induce peripheral antinociception was not yet elucidated. Considering that endogenous noradrenaline could induce antinociceptive effects by activation of the adrenoceptors the aim of this study was verify if the Ang-(1-7) is able to induce peripheral antinociception by interacting with the endogenous noradrenergic system. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (2μg). Ang-(1-7) was administered locally into the right hindpaw alone and after either agents, α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (5, 10 and 20 μg/paw), α2C-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine (10, 15 and 20 μg/paw), α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/paw), β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (150, 300 and 600 ng/paw). Noradrenaline (NA) reuptake inhibitor reboxetine (30 μg/paw) was administered prior to Ang-(1-7) low dose (20 ng) and guanetidine 3 days prior to experiment (30 mg/kg/animal, once a day), depleting NA storage. Intraplantar Ang-(1-7) induced peripheral antinociception against hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. This effect was reversed, in dose dependent manner, by intraplantar injection of yohimbine, rauwolscine, prazosin and propranolol. Reboxetine intensified the antinociceptive effects of low-dose of Ang-(1-7) and guanethidine, which depletes peripheral sympathomimetic amines, reversed almost 70% the Ang-(1-7)-induced peripheral antinociception. Then, this study provides evidence that Ang-(1-7) induce peripheral antinociception stimulating an endogenous noradrenaline release that activates peripheral adrenoceptors inducing antinociception.

  4. Protective effects of cornus mas extract on in vitro fertilization potential in methotrexate treated male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Leila; Shahrooz, Rasoul; Sadrkhanlou, Rajabali; Malekinejad, Hassan; Ahmadi, Abbas; Bakhtiary, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Current study was aimed to evaluating protective effects of cornus mas fruit extract (CMFE) in mice treated with methotrexate (MTX). For this purpose, 48 young mature male mice were divided into 6 groups. Control group received only normal saline (0.1 mL per day, intraperitoneally), and the second group was administered MTX (20 mg kg-1 per week, intraperitoneally). The third, fourth and fifth groups received MTX daily oral doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg kg-1 CMFE as well as MTX. The sixth group was only given CMFE with a dose of 1000 mg kg-1 per day, orally, for 35 days. Then, the animals were anesthetically euthanized and the sperms were separated from epididymis. DNA damage level, the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as in vitro fertility was evaluated. The number of sperms with damaged DNA and MDA level in MTX-treated group showed a significant increase compared to control group (p < 0.05). In groups receiving CMFE along with MTX, DNA damage level and MDA amount suggested a decrease in comparison with MTX group (p < 0.05). Also, in vitro fertilization and embryonic development in MTX-treated group was significantly lower than the control group, and the level of embryonic arresting was higher (p < 0.05). In groups which received CMFE along with MTX, in vitro fertility and embryonic development was higher than MTX group (p < 0.05) and the arrested embryos showed a decrease. This study suggested that cornus mas is able to ameliorate the side effects of MTX. PMID:25992252

  5. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  6. Induced Signal Quenching in MAS-DNP Experiments in Homogeneous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Corzilius, Björn; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.; Ni, Qing Zhe; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nuclear signal quenching induced by the presence of a paramagnetic polarizing agent are documented for conditions used in magic angle spinning (MAS)-dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments on homogeneous solutions. In particular, we present a detailed analysis of three time constants: (1) the longitudinal build-up time constant TB for 1H; (2) the rotating frame relaxation time constant T1ρ for 1H and 13C and (3) T2 of 13C, the transverse relaxation time constant in the laboratory frame. These relaxation times were measured during microwave irradiation at a magnetic field of 5 T (140 GHz) as a function of the concentration of four polarizing agents: TOTAPOL, 4-amino-TEMPO, trityl (OX063), and Gd-DOTA and are compared to those obtained for a sample lacking paramagnetic doping. We also report the EPR relaxation time constants T1S and T2S, the DNP enhancements, ε, and the parameter E, defined below, which measures the sensitivity enhancement for the four polarizing agents as a function of the electron concentration. We observe substantial intensity losses (paramagnetic quenching) with all of the polarizing agents due to broadening mechanisms and cross relaxation during MAS. In particular, the monoradical trityl and biradical TOTAPOL induce ~40 and 50% loss of signal intensity. In contrast there is little suppression of signal intensity in static samples containing these paramagnetic species. Despite the losses due to quenching, we find that all of the polarizing agents provide substantial gains in signal intensity, and in particular that the net enhancement is optimal for biradicals that operate with the cross effect. We discuss the possibility that much of this polarization loss can be regained with the development of instrumentation and methods to perform electron decoupling. PMID:24394190

  7. Paramagnet induced signal quenching in MAS-DNP experiments in frozen homogeneous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzilius, Björn; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.; Ni, Qing Zhe; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-03-01

    The effects of nuclear signal quenching induced by the presence of a paramagnetic polarizing agent are documented for conditions used in magic angle spinning (MAS)-dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments on homogeneous solutions. In particular, we present a detailed analysis of three time constants: (1) the longitudinal build-up time constant TB for 1H; (2) the rotating frame relaxation time constant T1ρ for 1H and 13C and (3) T2 of 13C, the transverse relaxation time constant in the laboratory frame. These relaxation times were measured during microwave irradiation at a magnetic field of 5 T (140 GHz) as a function of the concentration of four polarizing agents: TOTAPOL, 4-amino-TEMPO, trityl (OX063), and Gd-DOTA and are compared to those obtained for a sample lacking paramagnetic doping. We also report the EPR relaxation time constants T1S and T2S, the DNP enhancements, ε, and the parameter E, defined below, which measures the sensitivity enhancement for the four polarizing agents as a function of the electron concentration. We observe substantial intensity losses (paramagnetic quenching) with all of the polarizing agents due to broadening mechanisms and cross relaxation during MAS. In particular, the monoradical trityl and biradical TOTAPOL induce ∼40% and 50% loss of signal intensity. In contrast there is little suppression of signal intensity in static samples containing these paramagnetic species. Despite the losses due to quenching, we find that all of the polarizing agents provide substantial gains in signal intensity with DNP, and in particular that the net enhancement is optimal for biradicals that operate with the cross effect. We discuss the possibility that much of this polarization loss can be regained with the development of instrumentation and methods to perform electron decoupling.

  8. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  9. Rapid identification of osmolytes in tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zea Obando, Claudia; Linossier, Isabelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Zubia, Mayalen; Turquet, Jean; Faÿ, Fabienne; Rehel, Karine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the chemical characterization of 47 tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by HR-MAS. The generated data confirm the interest of HR-MAS as a rapid screening technique with the major advantage of its easiness. The sample is used as powder of freeze-dried microalgae without any extraction process before acquisition. The spectral fingerprints of strains are then tested as variables for a chemotaxonomy study to discriminate cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The individual factor map generated by PCA analysis succeeds in separating the two groups, essentially thanks to the presence of specific carbohydrates. Furthermore, more resolved signals enable to identify many osmolytes. More precisely the characteristics δ of 2-O-alpha-D-glucosylglycerol (GG) are observed in all 21 h-MAS spectra of tropical cyanobacteria. After specific extraction, complementary analysis by 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopies validates the identification of this osmolyte. PMID:27130130

  10. A 4-mm Probe for C-13 CP/MAS NMR of Solids at 21.15 T

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Daugaard, P; Hald, E; Rice, D; Kupce, Eriks; Ellis, Paul D. )

    2002-05-31

    With the recent announcement of a persistent 21.15 Tesla (i.e., 900 MHz for 1H NMR) narrow-bore (54 mm bore) superconducting magnet by Oxford Instruments and the associated Unity INOVA-900 console by Varian Inc. we were challenged with the task of designing a double-resonance broadband solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probe in particular for evaluating the 13C-{1H} cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiment on this magnet and spectrometer system. In this communication we report the successful construction of an efficient X-1H/19F double resonance multinuclear MAS probe for this purpose along with our preliminary results on its performance at the 900 MHz spectrometer.

  11. An automated decision-support system for non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy disease based on MAs and HAs detection.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Marwan D; Eswaran, C

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has become a serious threat in our society, which causes 45% of the legal blindness in diabetes patients. Early detection as well as the periodic screening of DR helps in reducing the progress of this disease and in preventing the subsequent loss of visual capability. This paper provides an automated diagnosis system for DR integrated with a user-friendly interface. The grading of the severity level of DR is based on detecting and analyzing the early clinical signs associated with the disease, such as microaneurysms (MAs) and hemorrhages (HAs). The system extracts some retinal features, such as optic disc, fovea, and retinal tissue for easier segmentation of dark spot lesions in the fundus images. That is followed by the classification of the correctly segmented spots into MAs and HAs. Based on the number and location of MAs and HAs, the system quantifies the severity level of DR. A database of 98 color images is used in order to evaluate the performance of the developed system. From the experimental results, it is found that the proposed system achieves 84.31% and 87.53% values in terms of sensitivity for the detection of MAs and HAs respectively. In terms of specificity, the system achieves 93.63% and 95.08% values for the detection of MAs and HAs respectively. Also, the proposed system achieves 68.98% and 74.91% values in terms of kappa coefficient for the detection of MAs and HAs respectively. Moreover, the system yields sensitivity and specificity values of 89.47% and 95.65% for the classification of DR versus normal.

  12. Change of the kinetics of shock-wave deformation and fracture of VT1-0 titanium as a result of annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Pavlenko, A. V.; Malyugina, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of measurements of shock-wave compression profiles of VT1-0 titanium samples after rolling and in the annealed state. In the experiments, the pressure of shock compression and distance passed by the wave before emerging to the sample surface were varied. From measurements of the elastic precursor decay and compression rate in a plastic shock wave of different amplitudes, the plastic strain and the corresponding shear stresses in the initial and subsequent stages of high-rate deformation in an elastoplastic shock wave are determined. It is found that the reduction in the dislocation density as a result of annealing reduces the hardness of the material but significantly increases its dynamic yield strengh, corresponding to the strain rate above 104 s-1. With a reduction in the strain rate, this anomalous difference in the flow stresses is leveled off.

  13. The role of electro-explosion alloying with titanium diboride and treatment with pulsed electron beam in the surface modification of VT6 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Sergey Gromov, Victor Kobzareva, Tatyana; Semina, Olga; Bataev, Vladimir; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of VT6 titanium alloy subjected to electro-explosion alloying with TiB{sub 2} and irradiation with pulsed electron beam. It was established that electro-explosion alloying resulted in a high level of roughness of the surface layer with high adhesion of the modified layer and matrix. Further irradiation of the material with electron beam resulted in the smoothing of the surface of alloying and formation of a porous structure with various scale levels in the surface layer. It was also established that the energetic exposure causes the formation of a gradient structure with a changing elemental composition along the direction from the surface of alloying.

  14. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  15. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  16. An experimentally determined set of V-T and V-V rate constants involving the OH radical. Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, H.; Aker, P.; Sloan, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first application of an analytical technique verifying a generalized rate law for vibrational relaxation based on a complete solution of the master equation. Experimental V-T and V-V energy transfer rate constants for the collisional deactivation of OH( v = 1-4) at 300 K by O 3 and OH are reported. It is found that the rate constant for 2OH( v = 1) → OH( v = 0) + OH( v = 2) is 1.8 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and that for OH( v = 1) + O 3 → OH( v = 0) + O 3 is 1.0 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, both ±30%. Altogether 40 V-T and V-V rate constants involving vibrationally excited OH are extracted from the time evolution of the OH( v) distribution produced by the chemical reaction O( 1D) + H 2 → OH( v) + H. The rate constants obey a combined Landau-Teller-exponential gap law, with the gap constants being very similar in magnitude to the Polanyi-Woodall or Lambert-Salter constants. It is also shown that measurements of OH quenching by O 3 as reported by others are correct in magnitude but might be falsely attributed to chemical reaction, throwing doubts on atmospheric models of OH chemistry. Furthermore, using the energy transfer rate constants just determined, the time-evolution of the population distribution is extrapolated backwards in time. The resulting initial distribution is found to be yet more sharply peaked than reported heretofore for the reaction O( 1D) + H 2 → OH( v) + H. Finally it is shown that commonly used rate laws for vibrational relaxation, such as the Bethe-Teller law and quasi-first-order decay laws of initially excited levels, should be abandoned.

  17. Diffusivity fractionations of H2(16)O/H2(17)O and H2(16)O/H2(18)O in air and their implications for isotope hydrology.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Eugeni; Luz, Boaz

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the isotope effects of (17)O and (18)O substitution of (16)O in H(2)O on molecular diffusivities of water vapor in air by the use of evaporation experiments. The derived diffusion fractionation coefficients (17)alpha(diff) and (18)alpha(diff) are 1.0146 +/- 0.0002 and 1.0283 +/- 0.0003, respectively. We also determined, for the first time, the ratio ln((17)alpha(diff))/ln((18)alpha(diff)) as 0.5185 +/- 0.0002. This ratio, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical value of 0.5184, is significantly smaller than the ratio in vapor-liquid equilibrium (0.529). We show how this new experimental information gives rise to (17)O excess in meteoric water, and how it can be applied in isotope hydrology.

  18. Measurement of the cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n,{alpha}){sup 17}O in the neutron-energy between 4 and 7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khryachkov, V. A.; Bondarenko, I. P.; Kuzminov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2012-04-15

    The cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O was measured in the neutron-energy range 4-7 MeV. An ionization chamber equipped with a Frisch grid combined with a pulse-shape digitizer was used as a detector. Gaseous neon that served as a target on which the reaction being studied proceeded was added to the gas filling the ionization chamber. The partial cross sections for the {alpha}{sub 0}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 3} channels of the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O were obtained for the first time.

  19. Δ17O Isotopic Investigation of Nitrate Salts Found in Co-Occurrence with Naturally Formed Perchlorate in the Mojave Desert, California, USA and the Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Parker, D.; Rech, J.; Prellwitz, J.; Michalski, G.

    2009-12-01

    Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and manmade contaminant that has been identified in soil, groundwater and surface water. Perchlorate directly affects human health by interfering with iodide uptake in the thyroid gland, which may in turn lower the production of key hormones that are needed for proper growth and development. Until recently, the Atacama Desert, Chile was thought to be the only location where perchlorate salts formed naturally. Recent work has documented the occurrence of these salts in several semi-arid regions of the United States. This study identified putatively natural sources of perchlorate in the Mojave Desert of California. Soil samples were collected from six field sites varying in geologic age. The co-occurrence of perchlorate and nitrate in caliches from the Atacama Desert and soils from the Mojave Desert was also investigated. Although the former are richer in NO3-, near-ore-grade (~5%) deposits occur in the vicinity of Death Valley National Park. Weak but significant correlations exist between ClO4- and NO3- at both locations, but the perchlorate levels are much higher (up to 800 mg/kg) in the Chilean samples than in California (<25 mg/kg). Oxygen isotopes in the nitrate were examined to identify variation within the Mojave Desert field sites, and to compare with those in samples collected from the Atacama Desert. The Mojave Desert Δ17O values ranged from 7-13‰ and those from the Atacama were between 17-21‰. This isotopic analysis revealed a dominantly atmospheric origin for the Atacama nitrate salts, and a mixture between biological nitrate and atmospherically-derived nitrate for the Mojave samples. When corrected for the percentage of atmospheric nitrate measured in the Atacama samples, the Mojave samples still contain much lower perchlorate concentrations than would be expected if the occurrence of perchlorate correlated strictly with atmospherically derived nitrate. These results indicate that the variation in the

  20. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  1. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  2. Preparation, electrochemistry and crystal structure of a derivative of 18-tungstophosphate with Dawson structure: K 16H[Yb(α-2-P 2W 17O 61) 2]·44H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jingyang; Zhao, Junwei; Guo, Dongjie; Wang, Jingping

    2004-04-01

    The heteropolyanion [Yb(α-2-P 2W 17O 61) 2] 17- has been isolated as a potassium salt in ˜30% yield by five-day decreasing temperature-programmed from 60 °C to room temperature, in a potassium acetate buffer, formed by reaction of K 6P 2W 18O 62·10H 2O with Yb(NO 3) 3 and characterized by IR, UV spectra. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of K 16H[Yb(α-2-P 2W 17O 61) 2]·44H 2O (triclinic, space group PI a=14.499(3), b=22.433(5), c=24.505(5) Å, α=95.36(3), β=102.67(3), γ=100.06(3)°, Z=2, 24,089 independent reflections, R1=0.0497) reveals that two chemically identical [α-2-P 2W 17O 61] 10- moieties are connected through one Yb atom, which is in a square antiprismatic coordination environment with eight oxygen atoms, four from each of the two [α-2-P 2W 17O 61] 10- moieties. The Yb(III) ion substitutes for two [W=O] 4+ units in the 'cap' regions of the tungsten-oxygen frameworks of the two parent Wells-Dawson ions. The point group symmetry of the title polyanion is C 2. In the extensive pH region from 10.5 to 1.60, the cyclic voltammograms for the title compound in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution as supporting electrolyte mainly illustrate nearly reversible one-electron reduction processes. The results of the thermogravimetric analysis of the title compound show one one-step slow weight loss and the framework decomposition of the polyanion in the title compound is at 560.0 °C.

  3. Arabidopsis MAS2, an Essential Gene That Encodes a Homolog of Animal NF-κ B Activating Protein, Is Involved in 45S Ribosomal DNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Aguilera, Verónica; Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Jover-Gil, Sara; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires stoichiometric amounts of ribosomal proteins and rRNAs. Synthesis of rRNAs consumes most of the transcriptional activity of eukaryotic cells, but its regulation remains largely unclear in plants. We conducted a screen for ethyl methanesulfonate-induced suppressors of Arabidopsis thaliana ago1-52, a hypomorphic allele of AGO1 (ARGONAUTE1), a key gene in microRNA pathways. We identified nine extragenic suppressors as alleles of MAS2 (MORPHOLOGY OF AGO1-52 SUPPRESSED2). Positional cloning showed that MAS2 encodes the putative ortholog of NKAP (NF-κ B activating protein), a conserved eukaryotic protein involved in transcriptional repression and splicing in animals. The mas2 point mutations behave as informational suppressors of ago1 alleles that cause missplicing. MAS2 is a single-copy gene whose insertional alleles are embryonic lethal. In yeast two-hybrid assays, MAS2 interacted with splicing and ribosome biogenesis proteins, and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that MAS2 colocalizes with the 45S rDNA at the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). The artificial microRNA amiR-MAS2 partially repressed MAS2 and caused hypomethylation of 45S rDNA promoters as well as partial NOR decondensation, indicating that MAS2 negatively regulates 45S rDNA expression. Our results thus reveal a key player in the regulation of rRNA synthesis in plants. PMID:26139346

  4. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reaction rate determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-24

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of 'presolar' grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  5. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  6. Dual action of neurokinin-1 antagonists on Mas-related GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Ehsan; Reddy, Vemuri B.; Shade, Kai-Ting C.; Anthony, Robert M.; Pereira, Paula Juliana Seadi; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of translating findings from animal models to the clinic is well known. An example of this challenge is the striking effectiveness of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonists in mouse models of inflammation coupled with their equally striking failure in clinical investigations in humans. Here, we provide an explanation for this dichotomy: Mas-related GPCRs (Mrgprs) mediate some aspects of inflammation that had been considered mediated by NK-1R. In support of this explanation, we show that conventional NK-1R antagonists have off-target activity on the mouse receptor MrgprB2 but not on the homologous human receptor MRGPRX2. An unrelated tripeptide NK-1R antagonist has dual activity on MRGPRX2. This tripeptide both suppresses itch in mice and inhibits degranulation from the LAD-2 human mast cell line elicited by basic secretagogue activation of MRGPRX2. Antagonists of Mrgprs may fill the void left by the failure of NK-1R antagonists. PMID:27734033

  7. The neuroprotective effect of cornus MAS on brain tissue of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Francik, Renata; Kryczyk, Jadwiga; Krośniak, Mirosław; Berköz, Mehmet; Sanocka, Ilona; Francik, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is a valuable source of phenolic antioxidants. Flavonoid derivatives as nonenzymatic antioxidants are important in the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or heart disease. In this study, we examined the effect of an addition of freeze-dried fruit of cornelian cherry on three types of diets: control diet, fructose diet, and diet enriched in fats (high-fat diet). This effect was studied by determining the following antioxidant parameters in both brain tissue and plasma in rats: catalase, ferric reducing ability of plasma, paraoxonase, protein carbonyl groups, and free thiol groups. Results indicate that both fructose diet and high-fat diet affect the antioxidant capacity of the organism. Furthermore, an addition of cornelian cherry resulted in increased activity of catalase in brain tissue, while in plasma it caused the opposite effect. In turn, with regard to paraoxonase activity in both brain tissue and plasma, it had a stimulating effect. Adding cornelian cherry to the tested diets increased the activity of PON in both tested tissues. Moreover, protective effect of fruits of this plant was observed in the process of oxidation of proteins by decreasing levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiol groups in brain tissue as well as in plasma.

  8. Molybdenum modified phosphate glasses studied by 31P MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2015-02-25

    Glasses have been synthesized in the system P2O5-SiO2-K2O-MgO-CaO modified by addition of MoO3. Glasses were prepared by conventional fusion method from 40 g batches. The influence of Mo-cations on the analysed glass structure was investigated by means of Raman and (31)P MAS-NMR techniques. It has been found that molybdate units can form Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-P and/or Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-Si bonds with non-bridging oxygens atoms of Q2 methaphosphate units, resulting in the transformation of chain methaphosphate structure into pyrophosphate and finally into orthophosphate structure. It has been also found that increasing amount of MoO3 in the structure of investigated glasses causes their gradual depolymerization and molybdenum ions in the analysed glass matrix act as modifying cations.

  9. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  10. Cornelian cherry (cornus MAS L.) juice as a potential source of biological compounds.

    PubMed

    Gąstoł, Maciej; Krośniak, Mirosław; Derwisz, Małgorzata; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.), apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cultivars Jonagold and Red Boskoop), pear (Pyrus communis cv. Conference), and plum (Prunus domestica L. cv. Common Plum) juices were assayed for their quality, organic acids, polyphenol content, and antioxidant activity (determined as a ferric-reducing antioxidant power [FRAP]). Cornelian cherry juice revealed the highest titratable acidity-2.58 g malic acid/100 g. The highest polyphenol content was also noted for Cornelian cherry-45.6 mg gallic acid (GA)/g. The medium level of polyphenols was proved for Jonagold apple (22.8 mg GA1/g). The lowest level was recorded for Common Plum (9.60 mg GA/g), followed by Conference pear and Red Boskoop apple (12.3 and 21.3 mg GA/g, respectively). The FRAP values were 1.97 mmol Fe/L for Common Plum juice, 2.37 mmol Fe/L for Conference pear juice, and 3.92 mmol Fe/L for both Red Boskoop and Jonagold apple juices. However, the obtained data indicated outstanding antioxidant properties for Cornelian cherry juice. In this case, FRAP reached 23.5 mmol Fe/L. The calculated correlation coefficient FRAP versus polyphenols indicates that the antioxidant status for Cornelian cherry is not only correlated with polyphenols but also with other biological compounds. The obtained results indicated that Cornelian cherry is a valuable source of substances with a high antioxidant activity.

  11. The Neuroprotective Effect of Cornus mas on Brain Tissue of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Francik, Renata; Kryczyk, Jadwiga; Krośniak, Mirosław; Berköz, Mehmet; Sanocka, Ilona; Francik, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is a valuable source of phenolic antioxidants. Flavonoid derivatives as nonenzymatic antioxidants are important in the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or heart disease. In this study, we examined the effect of an addition of freeze-dried fruit of cornelian cherry on three types of diets: control diet, fructose diet, and diet enriched in fats (high-fat diet). This effect was studied by determining the following antioxidant parameters in both brain tissue and plasma in rats: catalase, ferric reducing ability of plasma, paraoxonase, protein carbonyl groups, and free thiol groups. Results indicate that both fructose diet and high-fat diet affect the antioxidant capacity of the organism. Furthermore, an addition of cornelian cherry resulted in increased activity of catalase in brain tissue, while in plasma it caused the opposite effect. In turn, with regard to paraoxonase activity in both brain tissue and plasma, it had a stimulating effect. Adding cornelian cherry to the tested diets increased the activity of PON in both tested tissues. Moreover, protective effect of fruits of this plant was observed in the process of oxidation of proteins by decreasing levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiol groups in brain tissue as well as in plasma. PMID:25401157

  12. The neuroprotective effect of cornus MAS on brain tissue of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Francik, Renata; Kryczyk, Jadwiga; Krośniak, Mirosław; Berköz, Mehmet; Sanocka, Ilona; Francik, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is a valuable source of phenolic antioxidants. Flavonoid derivatives as nonenzymatic antioxidants are important in the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or heart disease. In this study, we examined the effect of an addition of freeze-dried fruit of cornelian cherry on three types of diets: control diet, fructose diet, and diet enriched in fats (high-fat diet). This effect was studied by determining the following antioxidant parameters in both brain tissue and plasma in rats: catalase, ferric reducing ability of plasma, paraoxonase, protein carbonyl groups, and free thiol groups. Results indicate that both fructose diet and high-fat diet affect the antioxidant capacity of the organism. Furthermore, an addition of cornelian cherry resulted in increased activity of catalase in brain tissue, while in plasma it caused the opposite effect. In turn, with regard to paraoxonase activity in both brain tissue and plasma, it had a stimulating effect. Adding cornelian cherry to the tested diets increased the activity of PON in both tested tissues. Moreover, protective effect of fruits of this plant was observed in the process of oxidation of proteins by decreasing levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiol groups in brain tissue as well as in plasma. PMID:25401157

  13. Cornelian cherry (cornus MAS L.) juice as a potential source of biological compounds.

    PubMed

    Gąstoł, Maciej; Krośniak, Mirosław; Derwisz, Małgorzata; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.), apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cultivars Jonagold and Red Boskoop), pear (Pyrus communis cv. Conference), and plum (Prunus domestica L. cv. Common Plum) juices were assayed for their quality, organic acids, polyphenol content, and antioxidant activity (determined as a ferric-reducing antioxidant power [FRAP]). Cornelian cherry juice revealed the highest titratable acidity-2.58 g malic acid/100 g. The highest polyphenol content was also noted for Cornelian cherry-45.6 mg gallic acid (GA)/g. The medium level of polyphenols was proved for Jonagold apple (22.8 mg GA1/g). The lowest level was recorded for Common Plum (9.60 mg GA/g), followed by Conference pear and Red Boskoop apple (12.3 and 21.3 mg GA/g, respectively). The FRAP values were 1.97 mmol Fe/L for Common Plum juice, 2.37 mmol Fe/L for Conference pear juice, and 3.92 mmol Fe/L for both Red Boskoop and Jonagold apple juices. However, the obtained data indicated outstanding antioxidant properties for Cornelian cherry juice. In this case, FRAP reached 23.5 mmol Fe/L. The calculated correlation coefficient FRAP versus polyphenols indicates that the antioxidant status for Cornelian cherry is not only correlated with polyphenols but also with other biological compounds. The obtained results indicated that Cornelian cherry is a valuable source of substances with a high antioxidant activity. PMID:23905648

  14. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  15. HR-MAS NMR Tissue Metabolomic Signatures Cross-Validated by Mass Spectrometry Distinguish Bladder Cancer from Benign Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Pratima; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Ponnusamy, M.; Gursky, Amy; Dailey, Stephen; Kunju, Priya; Lee, Cheryl T.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    Effective diagnosis and surveillance of Bladder Cancer (BCa) is currently challenged by detection methods that are of poor sensitivity, particularly for low-grade tumors, resulting in unnecessary invasive procedures and economic burden. We performed HR-MAS NMR-based global metabolomic profiling and applied unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering performed on NMR dataset of bladder derived tissues and identified metabolic signatures that differentiate BCa from benign disease. A partial least-square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model (leave-one-out cross-validation) was used as diagnostic model to distinguish benign and BCa tissues. Receiver operating characteristic curve generated either from PC1 loadings of PCA or from predicted Y-values resulted in an area under curve of 0.97. Relative quantification of more than fifteen tissue metabolites derived from HR-MAS NMR showed significant differences (P < 0.001) between benign and BCa samples. Noticeably, striking metabolic signatures were observed even for early stage BCa tissues (Ta-T1) demonstrating the sensitivity in detecting BCa. With the goal of cross-validating metabolic signatures derived from HR-MAS NMR, we utilized the same tissue samples to analyze eight metabolites through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-targeted analysis, which undoubtedly complements HR-MAS NMR derived metabolomic information. Cross-validation through GC-MS clearly demonstrates the utility of straightforward, non-destructive and rapid HR-MAS NMR technique for clinical diagnosis of BCa with even greater sensitivity. In addition to its utility as a diagnostic tool, these studies will lead to a better understanding of aberrant metabolic pathways in cancer as well as the design and implementation of personalized cancer therapy through metabolic modulation. PMID:23731241

  16. HIGH-PRECISION C{sup 17}O, C{sup 18}O, AND C{sup 16}O MEASUREMENTS IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS: ANALOGUES FOR CO SELF-SHIELDING IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rachel L.; Young, Edward D.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Morris, Mark R.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. E-mail: pontoppi@gps.caltech.edu E-mail: morris@astro.ucla.edu

    2009-08-10

    Using very high resolution ({lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 95 000) 4.7 {mu}m fundamental and 2.3 {mu}m overtone rovibrational CO absorption spectra obtained with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph infrared spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report detections of four CO isotopologues-C{sup 16}O, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O, and the rare species, C{sup 17}O-in the circumstellar environment of two young protostars: VV CrA, a binary T Tauri star in the Corona Australis molecular cloud, and Reipurth 50, an intermediate-mass FU Ori star in the Orion Molecular Cloud. We argue that the observed CO absorption lines probe a protoplanetary disk in VV CrA, and a protostellar envelope in Reipurth 50. All CO line profiles are spectrally resolved, with intrinsic line widths of {approx}3-4 km s{sup -1} (FWHM), permitting direct calculation of CO oxygen isotopologue ratios with 5%-10% accuracy. The rovibrational level populations for all species can be reproduced by assuming that CO absorption arises in two temperature regimes. In the higher temperature regime, in which the column densities are best determined, the derived oxygen isotope ratios in VV CrA are: [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 18}O] =690 {+-} 30; [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 17}O] =2800 {+-} 300, and [C{sup 18}O]/[C{sup 17}O]=4.1 {+-} 0.4. For Reipurth 50, we find [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 18}O] =490 {+-} 30; [C{sup 16}O]/[C{sup 17}O] =2200 {+-} 150, [C{sup 18}O]/[C{sup 17}O] = 4.4 {+-} 0.2. For both objects, {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C are on the order of 100, nearly twice the expected interstellar medium (ISM) ratio. The derived oxygen abundance ratios for the VV CrA disk show a significant mass-independent deficit of C{sup 17}O and C{sup 18}O relative to C{sup 16}O compared to ISM baseline abundances. The Reipurth 50 envelope shows no clear differences in oxygen CO isotopologue ratios compared with the local ISM. A mass-independent fractionation can be interpreted as being due to selective photodissociation of CO in the disk

  17. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, William J; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F; Nefertiti, Aline S G; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-02-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:26643331

  18. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, William J.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F.; Nefertiti, Aline S. G.; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.

    2015-01-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:26643331

  19. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, William J; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F; Nefertiti, Aline S G; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-02-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy.

  20. Characterization of cation environments in polycrystalline forsterite by Mg-25 MAS, MQMAS, and QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael C.; Brouwer, William J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Gan, Zhehong; Mueller, Karl T.

    2010-11-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is a silicate mineral frequently studied in the Earth sciences as it has a simple crystal structure and fast dissolution kinetics (elemental release rates under typical conditions on the order of 10-7 mol/m2/s1). During the dissolution process, spectroscopic techniques are often utilized to augment solution chemical analysis and to provide data for determining reaction mechanisms. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is able to interrogate the local bonding arrangement and coordination of a particular nuclide to obtain in structural information. Although previous NMR studies have focused on the silicon and oxygen environments in forsterite, studies focusing on the two nonequivalent magnesium environments in forsterite are limited to a few single-crystal studies. In this study, we present the results of 25Mg MAS, MQMAS, and static QCMG experiments performed on a powdered sample of pure synthetic forsterite. We also present spectral fits obtained from simulation software packages, which directly provide quadrupolar parameters for 25Mg nuclei occupying each of the two nonequivalent magnesium sites in the forsterite structure. These results are compared to calculations of the electric field gradient tenor conducted in previous ab initio studies to make definitive assignments correlating each peak to their respective magnesium site in the forsterite structure. Although previous NMR investigations of forsterite have focused on single-crystal samples, we have focused on powdered forsterite as the increased surface area of powdered samples makes them more amenable to laboratory-scale dissolution studies and, ultimately, the products from chemical weathering may be monitored an quantified.

  1. Experimental investigation of drying characteristics of cornelian cherry fruits ( Cornus mas L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgen, Filiz

    2015-03-01

    Major target of present paper is to investigate the drying kinetics of cornelian cherry fruits ( Cornus mas L.) in a convective dryer, by varying the temperature and the velocity of drying air. Freshly harvested fruits are dried at drying air temperature of 35, 45 and 55 °C. The considered drying air velocities are V air = 1 and 1.5 m/s for each temperature. The required drying time is determined by taking into consideration the moisture ratio measurements. When the moisture ratio reaches up to 10 % at the selected drying air temperature, then the time is determined ( t = 40-67 h). The moisture ratio, fruit temperature and energy requirement are presented as the functions of drying time. The lowest drying time (40 h) is obtained when the air temperature is 55 °C and air velocity is 1.5 m/s. The highest drying time (67 h) is found under the conditions of 35 °C temperature and 1 m/s velocity. Both the drying air temperature and the air velocity significantly affect the required energy for drying system. The minimum amount of required energy is found as 51.12 kWh, at 55 °C and 1 m/s, whilst the maximum energy requirement is 106.7 kWh, at 35 °C and 1.5 m/s. It is also found that, air temperature significantly influences the total drying time. Moreover, the energy consumption is decreasing with increasing air temperature. The effects of three parameters (air temperature, air velocity and drying time) on drying characteristics have also been analysed by means of analysis of variance method to show the effecting levels. The experimental results have a good agreement with the predicted ones.

  2. Who Are the Students Who May Qualify for an Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS)?: Focus Group Results. Synthesis Report 79

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Sandra; Ebben, Barbara; Kubinski, Eva; Sim, Grant; Liu, Kristin; Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christian, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 2007, federal regulations to two major education laws gave state departments of education the option to develop an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The regulations stated that the AA-MAS was intended for students who were being instructed in the grade-level…

  3. Development of microsatellites from Cornus mas L. (Cornaceae) and characterization of genetic diversity of cornelian cherries from China, central Europe, and the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) is indigenous to central and southeastern Europe and is an ecologically and economically important shrub or small tree. The aim of this study was to develop molecular tools for assessing genetic diversity and provide unique molecular identification of C. mas cultivar...

  4. LyMAS: Predicting Large-scale Lyα Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Weinberg, David H.; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon-MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 h -1 Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(Fs |δ s ) of the transmitted flux Fs , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ s , smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h -1 Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(Fs |δ s ) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h -1 Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ("Fluctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation"), often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 10243 N-body simulations of a 300 h -1 Mpc and 1.0 h -1 Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful tool for interpreting 3D Lyα forest data, thereby transforming measurements from BOSS and

  5. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Lyα forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h {sup –1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup –1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup –1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful

  6. Purification, Characterization, and Potential Bacterial Wax Production Role of an NADPH-Dependent Fatty Aldehyde Reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wahlen, Bradley D.; Oswald, Whitney S.; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Barney, Brett M.

    2009-01-01

    Wax esters, ester-linked fatty acids and long-chain alcohols, are important energy storage compounds in select bacteria. The synthesis of wax esters from fatty acids is proposed to require the action of a four-enzyme pathway. An essential step in the pathway is the reduction of a fatty aldehyde to the corresponding fatty alcohol, although the enzyme responsible for catalyzing this reaction has yet to be identified in bacteria. We report here the purification and characterization of an enzyme from the wax ester-accumulating bacterium Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8, which is a proposed fatty aldehyde reductase in this pathway. The enzyme, a 57-kDa monomer, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with the maltose binding protein on the N terminus and was purified to near homogeneity by using amylose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was found to reduce a number of long-chain aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols coupled to the oxidation of NADPH. The highest specific activity was observed for the reduction of decanal (85 nmol decanal reduced/min/mg). Short-chain and aromatic aldehydes were not substrates. The enzyme showed no detectable catalysis of the reverse reaction, the oxidation of decanol by NADP+. The mechanism of the enzyme was probed with several site-specific chemical probes. The possible uses of this enzyme in the production of wax esters are discussed. PMID:19270127

  7. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and |Vt b| in Events with One Charged Lepton, Large Missing Transverse Energy, and Jets at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV using a data set corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process t →W b →ℓν b by requiring the presence of an electron or muon, a large imbalance of transverse momentum indicating the presence of a neutrino, and two or three jets including at least one originating from a bottom quark. An artificial neural network is used to discriminate the signal from backgrounds. We measure a single top quark production cross section of 3.0 4-0.53+0.57 pb and set a lower limit on the magnitude of the coupling between the top quark and bottom quark |Vt b|>0.78 at the 95% credibility level.

  8. Shrimp Serine Proteinase Homologues PmMasSPH-1 and -2 Play a Role in the Activation of the Prophenoloxidase System

    PubMed Central

    Jearaphunt, Miti; Amparyup, Piti; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2015-01-01

    Melanization mediated by the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system is a rapid immune response used by invertebrates against intruding pathogens. Several masquerade-like and serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) have been demonstrated to play an essential role in proPO activation in insects and crustaceans. In a previous study, we characterized the masquerade-like SPH, PmMasSPH1, in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon as a multifunctional immune protein based on its recognition and antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio harveyi. In the present study, we identify a novel SPH, known as PmMasSPH2, composed of an N-terminal clip domain and a C-terminal SP-like domain that share high similarity to those of other insect and crustacean SPHs. We demonstrate that gene silencing of PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 significantly reduces PO activity, resulting in a high number of V. harveyi in the hemolymph. Interestingly, knockdown of PmMasSPH1 suppressed not only its gene transcript but also other immune-related genes in the proPO system (e.g., PmPPAE2) and antimicrobial peptides (e.g., PenmonPEN3, PenmonPEN5, crustinPm1 and Crus-likePm). The PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 also show binding activity to peptidoglycan (PGN) of Gram-positive bacteria. Using a yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that PmMasSPH1 specifically interacted with the final proteinase of the proPO cascade, PmPPAE2. Furthermore, the presence of both PmMasSPH1 and PmPPAE2 enhances PGN-induced PO activity in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest the importance of PmMasSPHs in the activation of the shrimp proPO system. PMID:25803442

  9. Antioxidant capacity of cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) - comparison between permanganate reducing antioxidant capacity and other antioxidant methods.

    PubMed

    Popović, Boris M; Stajner, Dubravka; Slavko, Kevrešan; Sandra, Bijelić

    2012-09-15

    Ethanol extracts (80% in water) of 10 cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) genotypes were studied for antioxidant properties, using methods including DPPH(), ()NO, O(2)(-) and ()OH antiradical powers, FRAP, total phenolic and anthocyanin content (TPC and ACC) and also one relatively new, permanganate method (permanganate reducing antioxidant capacity-PRAC). Lipid peroxidation (LP) was also determined as an indicator of oxidative stress. The data from different procedures were compared and analysed by multivariate techniques (correlation matrix calculation and principal component analysis (PCA)). Significant positive correlations were obtained between TPC, ACC and DPPH(), ()NO, O(2)(-), and ()OH antiradical powers, and also between PRAC and TPC, ACC and FRAP. PCA found two major clusters of cornelian cherry, based on antiradical power, FRAP and PRAC and also on chemical composition. Chemometric evaluation showed close interdependence between PRAC method and FRAP and ACC. There was a huge variation between C. mas genotypes in terms of antioxidant activity. PMID:23107685

  10. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  11. Pulsed field gradient MAS-NMR studies of the mobility of carboplatin in cubic liquid-crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, André; Michel, Dieter; Reszka, Regina

    2002-05-01

    A drug delivery system with cubic liquid-crystalline phase structure (cubic phase) containing the anti-cancer drug Carboplatin is studied. It is demonstrated that the combination of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and MAS-NMR is a useful tool to study the biophysical properties of a cubic phase. The linewidth in 1H-NMR spectra is narrowed by MAS, which can be exploited to perform PFG diffusion NMR experiments under high-resolution conditions. Measurement of self-diffusion coefficients of all components of the cubic phase becomes possible. The influence of polyethylene glycol chains on the drug mobility is discussed. It is shown that polyethylene glycol chains interact with Carboplatin.

  12. Directly and indirectly detected through-bond heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy under fast MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi; Pruski, Marek

    2009-09-10

    Two-dimensional through-bond {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) solid-state NMR experiments utilizing fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and homonuclear multipulse {sup 1}H decoupling are presented. Remarkable efficiency of polarization transfer can be achieved at MAS rates exceeding 40 kHz, which is instrumental in these measurements. Schemes utilizing direct and indirect detection of heteronuclei are compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity. A simple procedure for optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling sequences under these conditions is proposed. The capabilities of these techniques were confirmed on two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal.

  13. DRIFT and HR MAS NMR characterization of humic substances from a soil treated with different organic and mineral fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Erika; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella; Saladini, Monica; Ferro, Nicola Dal; Morari, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    In this study, using DRIFT and HR MAS NMR, we analyzed the humic substances isolated from a soil treated, over 40 years, with different organic, mineral and organic plus mineral treatments and cultivated with maize as the main crop. As expected, the structure of humic substances was very complex but by combining both techniques (DRIFT and HR MAS NMR) additional information was obtained on aromatic and aliphatic components, the most recalcitrant parts of these macromolecules. In so doing we wanted to investigate the relationship between HS structure and long-term management practices. An elevated content of lignin, aminoacids, peptides and proteins was observed mainly for farmyard manure treatments with respect to mineral or liquid manure amendments; this supports how the different management practices have greatly influenced the humification process of cultivated soils.

  14. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  15. X-ray and MAS NMR characterization of the thermal transformation of Li(Na)-Y zeolite to lithium aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.A.; Corbin, D.R.; Farlee, R.D.

    1986-12-01

    The high temperature thermal transformation of Li-exchanged Na-Y zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and /sup 29/Si MAS NMR studies. At 700/sup 0/C, the zeolite was transformed into an amorphous phase and upon further heating to 800/sup 0/C, formation of lithium aluminosilicate with high-quartz structure, in addition to an amorphous phase, was noted. When heated above 900/sup 0/C, the high-quartz structure was transformed into a ..beta..-spodumene related solid solution. X-ray and MAS NMR studies indicate the ..beta..-spodumene solid solution formed has the composition close to (Li/sub 0.23/Na/sub 0.06/)A iota /sub 0.29/Si/sub 0.71/O/sub 2/, which is in agreement with chemical analysis.

  16. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A.; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional 13C-13C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-13C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all 13C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  18. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  19. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-(13)C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all (13)C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  20. Characterizing crystal disorder of trospium chloride: a comprehensive,(13) C CP/MAS NMR, DSC, FTIR, and XRPD study.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Sturcova, Adriana; Brus, Jiri; Benes, Hynek; Skorepova, Eliska; Kratochvil, Bohumil; Cejka, Jan; Sedenkova, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Policianova, Olivia; Sturc, Antonin

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction data of trospium chloride (TCl) products crystallized from different mixtures of water-ethanol [φ(EtOH) = 0.5-1.0] at various temperatures (0°C, 20°C) and initial concentrations (saturated solution, 30%-50% excess of solvent) revealed extensive structural variability of TCl. Although (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated broad variety of structural phases arising from molecular disorder, temperature-modulated DSC identified presence of two distinct components in the products. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the hydrogen bonding network (ionic hydrogen bond formation), whereas the X-ray diffraction reflected unchanged unit cell parameters. These results were explained by a two-component character of TCl products in which a dominant polymorphic form is accompanied by partly separated nanocrystalline domains of a secondary phase that does not provide clear Bragg reflections. These phases slightly differ in the degree of molecular disorder, in the quality of crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding network. It is also demonstrated that, for the quality control of such complex products, (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy combined with factor analysis (FA) can satisfactorily be used for categorizing the individual samples: FA of (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra found clear relationships between the extent of molecular disorder and crystallization conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1235-1248, 2013.

  1. Perinatally administered losartan augments renal ACE2 expression but not cardiac or renal Mas receptor in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Olvedy, Michael; Ochodnicka-Mackovicova, Katarina; Kruzliak, Peter; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Krenek, Peter; Ochodnicky, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Since the identification of the alternative angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a new complex target for a pharmacological intervention. We investigated the expression of RAS components in the heart and kidney during the development of hypertension and its perinatal treatment with losartan in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Expressions of RAS genes were studied by the RT-PCR in the left ventricle and kidney of rats: normotensive Wistar, untreated SHR, SHR treated with losartan since perinatal period until week 9 of age (20 mg/kg/day) and SHR treated with losartan only until week 4 of age and discontinued until week 9. In the hypertrophied left ventricle of SHR, cardiac expressions of Ace and Mas were decreased while those of AT1 receptor (Agtr1a) and Ace2 were unchanged. Continuous losartan administration reduced LV weight (0.43 ± 0.02; P < 0.05 versus SHR) but did not influence altered cardiac RAS expression. Increased blood pressure in SHR (149 ± 2 in SHR versus 109 ± 2 mmHg in Wistar; P < 0.05) was associated with a lower renal expressions of renin, Agtr1a and Mas and with an increase in ACE2. Continuous losartan administration lowered blood pressure to control levels (105 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05 versus SHR), however, only renal renin and ACE2 were significantly up-regulated (for both P < 0.05 versus SHR). Conclusively, prevention of hypertension and LV hypertrophy development by losartan was unrelated to cardiac or renal expression of Mas. Increased renal Ace2, and its further increase by losartan suggests the influence of locally generated Ang-(1-7) in organ response to the developing hypertension in SHRs.

  2. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  3. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  4. QuBiLs-MAS method in early drug discovery and rational drug identification of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Medina Marrero, R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Barigye, S J; Echeverría Díaz, Y; Acevedo-Barrios, R; Casañola-Martín, G M; García Bernal, M; Torrens, F; Pérez-Giménez, F

    2015-01-01

    The QuBiLs-MAS approach is used for the in silico modelling of the antifungal activity of organic molecules. To this effect, non-stochastic (NS) and simple-stochastic (SS) atom-based quadratic indices are used to codify chemical information for a comprehensive dataset of 2478 compounds having a great structural variability, with 1087 of them being antifungal agents, covering the broadest antifungal mechanisms of action known so far. The NS and SS index-based antifungal activity classification models obtained using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) yield correct classification percentages of 90.73% and 92.47%, respectively, for the training set. Additionally, these models are able to correctly classify 92.16% and 87.56% of 706 compounds in an external test set. A comparison of the statistical parameters of the QuBiLs-MAS LDA-based models with those for models reported in the literature reveals comparable to superior performance, although the latter were built over much smaller and less diverse datasets, representing fewer mechanisms of action. It may therefore be inferred that the QuBiLs-MAS method constitutes a valuable tool useful in the design and/or selection of new and broad spectrum agents against life-threatening fungal infections. PMID:26567876

  5. Effects of fluoride on in vitro enamel demineralization analyzed by ¹⁹F MAS-NMR.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, N R; Kent, N W; Lynch, R J M; Karpukhina, N; Hill, R; Anderson, P

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic action of fluoride on inhibition of enamel demineralization was investigated using (19)F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). The aim of this study was to monitor the fluoride-mineral phase formed on the enamel as a function of the concentration of fluoride ions [F(-)] in the demineralizing medium. The secondary aim was to investigate fluorapatite formation on enamel in the mechanism of fluoride anti-caries efficacy. Enamel blocks were immersed into demineralization solutions of 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 4) with increasing concentrations of fluoride up to 2,262 ppm. At and below 45 ppm [F(-)] in the solution, (19)F MAS-NMR showed fluoride-substituted apatite formation, and above 45 ppm, calcium fluoride (CaF2) formed in increasing proportions. Further increases in [F(-)] caused no further reduction in demineralization, but increased the proportion of CaF2 formed. Additionally, the combined effect of strontium and fluoride on enamel demineralization was also investigated using (19)F MAS-NMR. The presence of 43 ppm [Sr(2+)] in addition to 45 ppm [F(-)] increases the fraction of fluoride-substituted apatite, but delays formation of CaF2 when compared to the demineralization of enamel in fluoride-only solution. PMID:23712030

  6. Simultaneous removal of organic matter and nitrogen from milking parlor wastewater by a magnetic activated sludge (MAS) process.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chun; Umetsu, Kazutaka; Ihara, Ikko; Sakai, Yasuzo; Yamashiro, Takaki

    2010-06-01

    The magnetic activated sludge (MAS) process is a modification of the conventional activated sludge process to improve the solid-liquid separation characteristics. It was developed to reduce the production of excess sludge and the time required for the conventional activated sludge process. In this study, actual milking parlor wastewater was treated with a MAS process and no sludge was removed. The effectiveness of continuous aeration and intermittent aeration in removing organic matter and nitrogen were compared. Both processes were highly efficient at removing chemical oxygen demand (COD) (averaged 91% removal) and ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)-N) (averaged 99% removal). In marked contrast to the continuous aeration process, the 30-min aeration/90-min non-aeration cycle of the intermittent aeration process rapidly reduced the nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)-N) concentration to near-zero. This result indicates that NO(3)-N was almost completely denitrified via nitrite nitrogen (NO(2)-N) to nitrogen gas. Removal of organic material and nitrogen can be considered to have occurred simultaneously in the single tank of the MAS process.

  7. QuBiLs-MAS method in early drug discovery and rational drug identification of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Medina Marrero, R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Barigye, S J; Echeverría Díaz, Y; Acevedo-Barrios, R; Casañola-Martín, G M; García Bernal, M; Torrens, F; Pérez-Giménez, F

    2015-01-01

    The QuBiLs-MAS approach is used for the in silico modelling of the antifungal activity of organic molecules. To this effect, non-stochastic (NS) and simple-stochastic (SS) atom-based quadratic indices are used to codify chemical information for a comprehensive dataset of 2478 compounds having a great structural variability, with 1087 of them being antifungal agents, covering the broadest antifungal mechanisms of action known so far. The NS and SS index-based antifungal activity classification models obtained using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) yield correct classification percentages of 90.73% and 92.47%, respectively, for the training set. Additionally, these models are able to correctly classify 92.16% and 87.56% of 706 compounds in an external test set. A comparison of the statistical parameters of the QuBiLs-MAS LDA-based models with those for models reported in the literature reveals comparable to superior performance, although the latter were built over much smaller and less diverse datasets, representing fewer mechanisms of action. It may therefore be inferred that the QuBiLs-MAS method constitutes a valuable tool useful in the design and/or selection of new and broad spectrum agents against life-threatening fungal infections.

  8. Evidence for intrinsic impurities in the high-temperature superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} from {sup 17}O nuclear magnetic resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Halperin, W. P.; Guptasarma, P.; Hinks, D. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee

    2008-02-01

    We have found that high quality crystals of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi-2212) have intrinsic magnetic defects that depend on oxygen doping. Our {sup 17}O nuclear magnetic resonance spectra provide evidence that local moments form in the CuO{sub 2} plane in both normal and superconducting states. We suggest that these magnetic impurities are related to the electronic disorder that scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify with the oxygen dopant atoms.

  9. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-15

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li{sub 2}O-(72-x)SiO{sub 2}-xZnO-5.1Na{sub 2}O-1.3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-4.1B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 5.5{<=}x{<=}17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q{sup 2}, Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} sites are identified from {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From {sup 31}P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-(Q{sup 0}) and pyro-phosphate (Q{sup 1}) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li{sub 3}Zn{sub 0.5}SiO{sub 4}), tridymite (SiO{sub 2}) and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, {sup 31}P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and (Na,Li){sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the glass-ceramics. - Graphical abstract: {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR analyses were carried out on multi-component Li{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2}-ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses and glass-ceramics developed for sealing application. Structural data are reported, including phase separation process and quantification of amorphous and crystalline phases.

  10. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P < 0.05). The MS + XST group showed notable decreases in systolic and diastolic pressures than that of the MS group. The MS group showed significant increases in the SOD activity and NO level and decrease in the MDA level after being intervened with Astragali Radix. ACE and AT1R protein expressions in renal tissues of the MS group were higher than that in the NC group, but with lower ACE2 and -Mas receptor expressions (all P < 0.05). Compared with the MS group, the MS + HQ group showed significant increase in Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, Astragali Radix can increase the Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues. PMID:27071265

  11. Conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites LaNaY and HY investigated by gas chromatography and in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, M.; Horvath, T.

    1997-04-01

    The conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites HY and LaNaY has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions using a new MAS NMR microreactor with cylindrical catalyst bed. At reaction temperatures of T = 373 K and T = 393 K a propan-2-ol conversion of 50 and 100%, respectively, and the formation of propene, diisopropyl. ether, and small amounts of acetone was determined by GC. Applying in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy, the initial step of the reaction was found to be the physisorption of propan-2-ol on Bronsted acid sites. A formation of isopropoxy species could be excluded by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy indicated that the Bronsted acid sites of the zeolites LaNaY and HY were hydrated by water molecules in the first part of the induction period. These water molecules were formed in result of the propan-2-ol dehydration. The strong low-field shift of the {sup 1}H MAS NMR signals of the hydrated Bronsted acid sites is due to a partial protonation of adsorbed water molecules. At T = 393 K, a significant {sup 13}C MAS NMR signal of strongly bonded acetone molecules appeared at 220 ppm in the spectra of zeolites LaNaY and HY. As demonstrated by propan-2-ol conversion on a partially dealuminated zeolite HY, this by-reaction is promoted by extra-framework aluminium species. The formation of coke precursors which caused {sup 13}C MAS NMR signals at 10-50 ppm is explained by an oligomerization of propene. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR experiments carried out under a continuous flow of propene showed that the above-mentioned coke precursors are also formed on partially rehydrated zeolite HY. 25 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Central effect of vasotocin 4 receptor (VT4R/V1aR) antagonists on the stress response and food intake in chicks given neuropeptide Y (NPY).

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Wayne J; Hancock, Megan; Nagarajan, Gurueswar; Aman, N Alphonse; Kang, Seong W

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies identified SR-49059 as a most effective antagonist of the avian vasotocin 4 receptor (VT4R) compared to other candidate blockers including the Manning compound using in silico 3 dimensional (3D) modeling/docking analysis of the chicken VT4R and an in vitro anterior pituitary cell culture study. The present experiments were designed to validate whether SR-49059 and the Manning compound would likewise be effective in vivo in blocking the VT4R when applied intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to chicks. Two treatments were tested, a stressor (immobilization) and administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a potent orexigenic compound. In the first experiment, birds were given the Manning compound, SR-49059 or physiological saline ICV followed by immobilization stress. Blood samples were taken and corticosterone (CORT) was determined by radioimmunoassay. It was hypothesized that both antagonists would reduce the stress response. A second experiment examined the role of the VT4R in food intake regulation. The Manning compound, SR-49059 or physiological saline was administered prior to NPY and food intake was monitored for 1h. It was hypothesized that each of the two antagonists coupled with NPY would augment food intake above the intake resulting from saline plus NPY administration. Related to the second experiment was a third that examined the difference between the effect of central administration of NPY versus SR-49059 in releasing CORT. Results of the first study showed that the Manning compound or SR-49059 prior to stress decreased CORT levels compared to controls while the second experiment showed that SR-49059 or the Manning compound plus NPY, enhanced food intake above that of the experimental group given saline and NPY. The last study showed that NPY increased plasma CORT above birds given SR-49059 centrally or saline administered controls. Taken together, results suggest that the avian VT4R is involved in the central neuroendocrine stress response as

  13. Theoretical Study of the Electrostatic and Steric Effects on the Spectroscopic Characteristics of the Metal-Ligand Unit of Heme Proteins. 2. C-O Vibrational Frequencies, 17O Isotropic Chemical Shifts, and Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Constants

    PubMed Central

    Kushkuley, Boris; Stavrov, Solomon S.

    1997-01-01

    The quantum chemical calculations, vibronic theory of activation, and London-Pople approach are used to study the dependence of the C-O vibrational frequency, 17O isotropic chemical shift, and nuclear quadrupole coupling constant on the distortion of the porphyrin ring and geometry of the CO coordination, changes in the iron-carbon and iron-imidazole distances, magnitude of the iron displacement out of the porphyrin plane, and presence of the charged groups in the heme environment. It is shown that only the electrostatic interactions can cause the variation of all these parameters experimentally observed in different heme proteins, and the heme distortions could modulate this variation. The correlations between the theoretically calculated parameters are shown to be close to the experimentally observed ones. The study of the effect of the electric field of the distal histidine shows that the presence of the four C-O vibrational bands in the infrared absorption spectra of the carbon monoxide complexes of different myoglobins and hemoglobins can be caused by the different orientations of the different tautomeric forms of the distal histidine. The dependence of the 17O isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling constant on pH and the distal histidine substitution can be also explained from the same point of view. PMID:9017215

  14. β-alumina-14H and β-alumina-21R: Two chromic Na2-δ(Al,Mg,Cr)17O25 polysomes observed in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejny, Clivia; Kahlenberg, Volker; Schmidmair, Daniela; Tribus, Martina; deVilliers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structures of unknown phases found in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium were studied by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Two phases of Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 composition were found to be composed of an alternating stacking of a spinel-type and a Na-hosting block. Similar structures are known for β-alumina and β"-alumina, NaAl11O17. However, the spinel-type block in Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 is composed of five cation layers in contrast to three cation layers in the β-alumina spinel-block. The two new phases, β-alumina-14H, P63/mmc, a=5.6467(2), c=31.9111(12) Å, and β-alumina-21R, R 3 ̅m, a=5.6515(3), c=48.068(3) Å have a 14-layer and 21-layer stacking with a 2 × (cccccch) and a 3 × (ccccccc) repeat sequence of oxygen layers in cubic and hexagonal close packing, respectively.

  15. Indirect study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction via the {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegriti, M. G.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Vilmay, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Stanoiu, M.

    2008-04-15

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is considered the main neutron source for the s process in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In the Gamow peak, the cross section sensitively depends on the 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O (E{sub x}=6.356 MeV). In this work, we determined the astrophysical S factor through an evaluation of the {alpha} spectroscopic factor and the corresponding asymptotic normalization factor (ANC) of the 6.356 MeV state using the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O at two different incident energies. Our result confirms that the contribution of the 1/2{sup +} state is dominant at astrophysical energies. Our reaction rate at T=0.09 GK is slightly lower than the value adopted in the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates (NACRE), but two times larger than the one obtained in a recent ANC measurement.

  16. Simultaneous CT-13C and VT-15N chemical shift labelling: application to 3D NOESY-CH3NH and 3D 13C,15N HSQC-NOESY-CH3NH.

    PubMed

    Uhrín, D; Bramham, J; Winder, S J; Barlow, P N

    2000-11-01

    Based on the HSQC scheme, we have designed a 2D heterocorrelated experiment which combines constant time (CT) 13C and variable time (VT) 15N chemical shift labelling. Although applicable to all carbons, this mode is particularly suitable for simultaneous recording of methyl-carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts at high digital resolution. The methyl carbon magnetisation is in the transverse plane during the whole CT period (1/J(CC) = 28.6 ms). The magnetisation originating from NH protons is initially stored in the 2HzNz state, then prior to the VT chemical shift labelling period is converted into 2HzNy coherence. The VT -15N mode eliminates the effect of 1J(N,CO) and 1,2J(N,CA) coupling constants without the need for band-selective carbon pulses. An optional editing procedure is incorporated which eliminates signals from CH2 groups, thus removing any potential overlap with the CH3 signals. The CT-13CH3,VT-15N HSQC building block is used to construct two 3D experiments: 3D NOESY-CH3NH and 3D 13C,15N HSQC-NOESY-CH3NH. Combined use of these experiments yields proton and heteronuclear chemical shifts for moieties experiencing NOEs with CH3 and NH protons. These NOE interactions are resolved as a consequence of the high digital resolution in the carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts of CH3 and NH groups, respectively. The techniques are illustrated using a double labelled sample of the CH domain from calponin.

  17. A cross-polarization based rotating-frame separated-local-field NMR experiment under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Damron, Joshua; Vosegaard, Thomas; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Rotating-frame separated-local-field solid-state NMR experiments measure highly resolved heteronuclear dipolar couplings which, in turn, provide valuable interatomic distances for structural and dynamic studies of molecules in the solid-state. Though many different rotating-frame SLF sequences have been put forth, recent advances in ultrafast MAS technology have considerably simplified pulse sequence requirements due to the suppression of proton-proton dipolar interactions. In this study we revisit a simple two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C dipolar coupling/chemical shift correlation experiment using (13)C detected cross-polarization with a variable contact time (CPVC) and systematically study the conditions for its optimal performance at 60 kHz MAS. In addition, we demonstrate the feasibility of a proton-detected version of the CPVC experiment. The theoretical analysis of the CPVC pulse sequence under different Hartmann-Hahn matching conditions confirms that it performs optimally under the ZQ (w1H-w1C=±wr) condition for polarization transfer. The limits of the cross polarization process are explored and precisely defined as a function of offset and Hartmann-Hahn mismatch via spin dynamics simulation and experiments on a powder sample of uniformly (13)C-labeled L-isoleucine. Our results show that the performance of the CPVC sequence and subsequent determination of (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings are insensitive to (1)H/(13)C frequency offset frequency when high RF fields are used on both RF channels. Conversely, the CPVC sequence is quite sensitive to the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch, particularly for systems with weak heteronuclear dipolar couplings. We demonstrate the use of the CPVC based SLF experiment as a tool to identify different carbon groups, and hope to motivate the exploration of more sophisticated (1)H detected avenues for ultrafast MAS.

  18. Remote Sensing of Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Clouds During TC (sup 4): Results from MAS, MASTER, MODIS, and MISR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Arnold, G. Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS) and MODIS/Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Airborne Simulator (MASTER) were used to obtain measurements of the bidirectional reflectance and brightness temperature of clouds at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.2 microns (12.9 microns for MASTER). These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment conducted over Central America and surrounding Pacific and Atlantic Oceans between 17 July and 8 August 2007. Multispectral images in eleven distinct bands were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability Of cloud) over land and ocean ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of the cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (liquid water, ice, or undetermined phase). The cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both liquid water and ice clouds that were detected during each flight, using a nearly identical algorithm to that implemented operationally to process MODIS Cloud data from the Aqua and Terra satellites (Collection 5). This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS and MASTER data in TC(sup 4), is quite capable of distinguishing both liquid water and ice clouds during daytime conditions over both land and ocean. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals use five distinct bands of the MAS (or MASTER), and these results were compared with nearly simultaneous retrievals of marine liquid water clouds from MODIS on the Terra spacecraft. Finally, this MODIS-based algorithm was adapted to Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) data to infer the cloud optical thickness Of liquid water clouds from MISR. Results of this analysis are compared and contrasted.

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  20. Identification of Metastasis-Associated Metabolic Profiles of Tumors by 1H-HR-MAS-MRS123

    PubMed Central

    Gorad, Saurabh S.; Ellingsen, Christine; Bathen, Tone F.; Mathiesen, Berit S.; Moestue, Siver A.; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2015-01-01

    Tumors develop an abnormal microenvironment during growth, and similar to the metastatic phenotype, the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells is tightly linked to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we explored relationships between metabolic profile, metastatic propensity, and hypoxia in experimental tumors in an attempt to identify metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. Two human melanoma xenograft lines (A-07, R-18) showing different TMEs were used as cancer models. Metabolic profile was assessed by proton high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-HR-MAS-MRS). Tumor hypoxia was detected in immunostained histological preparations by using pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Twenty-four samples from 10 A-07 tumors and 28 samples from 10 R-18 tumors were analyzed. Metastasis was associated with hypoxia in both A-07 and R-18 tumors, and 1H-HR-MAS-MRS discriminated between tissue samples with and tissue samples without hypoxic regions in both models, primarily because hypoxia was associated with high lactate resonance peaks in A-07 tumors and with low lactate resonance peaks in R-18 tumors. Similarly, metastatic and non-metastatic R-18 tumors showed significantly different metabolic profiles, but not metastatic and non-metastatic A-07 tumors, probably because some samples from the metastatic A-07 tumors were derived from tumor regions without hypoxic tissue. This study suggests that 1H-HR-MAS-MRS may be a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hypoxia and lactate in tumor metastasis as well as for identification of metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. PMID:26585232

  1. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  2. Selected Water- and Sediment-Quality, Aquatic Biology, and Mine-Waste Data from the Ely Copper Mine Superfund Site, Vershire, VT, 1998-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Argue, Denise M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hathaway, Edward; Coles, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The data contained in this report are a compilation of selected water- and sediment-quality, aquatic biology, and mine-waste data collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site in Vershire, VT, from August 1998 through May 2007. The Ely Copper Mine Superfund site is in eastern, central Vermont (fig. 1) within the Vermont Copper Belt (Hammarstrom and others, 2001). The Ely Copper Mine site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2001. Previous investigations conducted at the site documented that the mine is contributing metals and highly acidic waters to local streams (Hammarstrom and others, 2001; Holmes and others, 2002; Piatak and others, 2003, 2004, and 2006). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, compiled selected data from previous investigations into uniform datasets that will be used to help characterize the extent of contamination at the mine. The data may be used to determine the magnitude of biological impacts from the contamination and in the development of remediation activities. This report contains analytical data for samples collected from 98 stream locations, 6 pond locations, 21 surface-water seeps, and 29 mine-waste locations. The 98 stream locations are within 3 streams and their tributaries. Ely Brook flows directly through the Ely Copper Mine then into Schoolhouse Brook (fig. 2), which joins the Ompompanoosuc River (fig. 1). The six pond locations are along Ely Brook Tributary 2 (fig. 2). The surface-water seeps and mine-waste locations are near the headwaters of Ely Brook (fig. 2 and fig. 3). The datasets 'Site_Directory' and 'Coordinates' contain specific information about each of the sample locations including stream name, number of meters from the mouth of stream, geographic coordinates, types of samples collected (matrix of sample), and the figure on which the sample location is depicted. Data have been collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site by the

  3. LIMS for Lasers 2015 for achieving long-term accuracy and precision of δ2H, δ17O, and δ18O of waters using laser absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2015-01-01

    Although laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) instrumentation is easy to use, its incorporation into laboratory operations is not easy, owing to extensive offline manipulation of comma-separated-values files for outlier detection, between-sample memory correction, nonlinearity (δ-variation with water amount) correction, drift correction, normalization to VSMOW-SLAP scales, and difficulty in performing long-term QA/QC audits. METHODS: A Microsoft Access relational-database application, LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) for Lasers 2015, was developed. It automates LAS data corrections and manages clients, projects, samples, instrument-sample lists, and triple-isotope (δ(17) O, δ(18) O, and δ(2) H values) instrumental data for liquid-water samples. It enables users to (1) graphically evaluate sample injections for variable water yields and high isotope-delta variance; (2) correct for between-sample carryover, instrumental drift, and δ nonlinearity; and (3) normalize final results to VSMOW-SLAP scales. RESULTS: Cost-free LIMS for Lasers 2015 enables users to obtain improved δ(17) O, δ(18) O, and δ(2) H values with liquid-water LAS instruments, even those with under-performing syringes. For example, LAS δ(2) HVSMOW measurements of USGS50 Lake Kyoga (Uganda) water using an under-performing syringe having ±10 % variation in water concentration gave +31.7 ± 1.6 ‰ (2-σ standard deviation), compared with the reference value of +32.8 ± 0.4 ‰, after correction for variation in δ value with water concentration, between-sample memory, and normalization to the VSMOW-SLAP scale. CONCLUSIONS: LIMS for Lasers 2015 enables users to create systematic, well-founded instrument templates, import δ(2) H, δ(17) O, and δ(18) O results, evaluate performance with automatic graphical plots, correct for δ nonlinearity due to variable water concentration, correct for between-sample memory, adjust for drift, perform VSMOW-SLAP normalization, and

  4. Recognition of Membrane Sterols by Polyene Antifungals Amphotericin B and Natamycin, A 13C MAS NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Filip; Griffin, David C.; Loraine, Jessica; Rittig, Michael; Delves-Broughton, Joss; Bonev, Boyan B.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular action of polyene macrolides with antifungal activity, amphotericin B and natamycin, involves recognition of sterols in membranes. Physicochemical and functional studies have contributed details to understanding the interactions between amphotericin B and ergosterol and, to a lesser extent, with cholesterol. Fewer molecular details are available on interactions between natamycin with sterols. We use solid state 13C MAS NMR to characterize the impact of amphotericin B and natamycin on mixed lipid membranes of DOPC/cholesterol or DOPC/ergosterol. In cholesterol-containing membranes, amphotericin B addition resulted in marked increase in both DOPC and cholesterol 13C MAS NMR linewidth, reflecting membrane insertion and cooperative perturbation of the bilayer. By contrast, natamycin affects little either DOPC or cholesterol linewidth but attenuates cholesterol resonance intensity preferentially for sterol core with lesser impact on the chain. Ergosterol resonances, attenuated by amphotericin B, reveal specific interactions in the sterol core and chain base. Natamycin addition selectively augmented ergosterol resonances from sterol core ring one and, at the same time, from the end of the chain. This puts forward an interaction model similar to the head-to-tail model for amphotericin B/ergosterol pairing but with docking on opposite sterol faces. Low toxicity of natamycin is attributed to selective, non-cooperative sterol engagement compared to cooperative membrane perturbation by amphotericin B. PMID:27379235

  5. Proton HR-MAS spectroscopy and quantitative pathologic analysis of MRI/3D-MRSI-targeted postsurgical prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Mark G; Vigneron, Daniel B; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Males, Ryan G; Schmitt, Lars; Carroll, Peter R; James, Joyce K; Hurd, Ralph E; Kurhanewicz, John

    2003-11-01

    Proton high-resolution magic angle spinning ((1)H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantitative histopathology were performed on the same 54 MRI/3D-MRSI-targeted postsurgical prostate tissue samples. Presurgical MRI/3D-MRSI targeted healthy and malignant prostate tissues with an accuracy of 81%. Even in the presence of substantial tissue heterogeneity, distinct (1)H HR-MAS spectral patterns were observed for different benign tissue types and prostate cancer. Specifically, healthy glandular tissue was discriminated from prostate cancer based on significantly higher levels of citrate (P = 0.04) and polyamines (P = 0.01), and lower (P = 0.02) levels of the choline-containing compounds choline, phosphocholine (PC), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). Predominantly stromal tissue lacked both citrate and polyamines, but demonstrated significantly (P = 0.01) lower levels of choline compounds than cancer. In addition, taurine, myo-inositol, and scyllo-inositol were all higher in prostate cancer vs. healthy glandular and stromal tissues. Among cancer samples, larger increases in choline, and decreases in citrate and polyamines (P = 0.05) were observed with more aggressive cancers, and a MIB-1 labeling index correlated (r = 0.62, P = 0.01) with elevated choline. The elucidation of spectral patterns associated with mixtures of different prostate tissue types and cancer grades, and the inclusion of new metabolic markers for prostate cancer may significantly improve the clinical interpretation of in vivo prostate MRSI data.

  6. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  7. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  8. (1)H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication.

  9. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication. PMID:26495154

  10. Magnesium silicate dissolution investigated by Si-29 MAS, H-1-Si-29 CPMAS, Mg-25 QCPMG NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M C; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    Olivine-(Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}-has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of the divalent cation with respect to silicon during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon-rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. The pure magnesium end member of the olivine series (forsterite-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) was chosen for detailed investigations in this study because paramagnetic iron hinders NMR investigations by providing an extra mode of relaxation for neighboring nuclei, causing lineshapes to become significantly broadened and unobservable in the NMR spectrum. For reacting forsterite, spectroscopic interrogations using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced NMR techniques ({sup 29}Si MAS, {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si CP MAS, {sup 25}Mg QCPMG, and {sup 1}H-{sup 25}Mg CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 C.

  11. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  12. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  13. Development of a rapid method for the quantification of cellulose in tobacco by (13)C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhui; Hu, Yonghua; Tian, Zhenfeng; Chen, Kaibo; Ge, Shaolin; Xu, Yingbo; Tian, Dong; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed for rapid quantitative determination of cellulose in tobacco by utilizing (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy ((13)C CP/MAS NMR). Sample powder was loaded into NMR rotor, which was customized rotor containing a matched silicon tube as an intensity reference. (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of tobacco samples were processed with spectral deconvolution to obtain the area of the C-1 resonance at 105.5ppm and the internal standard at 0ppm. The ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm of a set of standard cellulose samples was used to construct a calibration curve. The cellulose content of a tobacco sample was determined by comparison of the ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm to the calibration curve. Results of this developed method showed good agreement with those obtained from chemical analysis. The proposed method has such advantages of accuracy, quickness and efficiency, and could be an alternative to chemical analyses of cellulose.

  14. Sensitivity gains, linearity, and spectral reproducibility in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional MAS NMR spectra of high dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C, 15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high-quality artifact-free datasets. PMID:24752819

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (CHESTH00030010) on Town Highway 3 (VT 35), crossing the South Branch of Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESTH00030010 on Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing the South Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 9.44-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest.In the study area, the South Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 67 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 69.0 mm (0.226 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 26-27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 3 (VT 35) crossing of the South Branch Williams River is a 69-foot-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 67-foot steel-stringer span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 23, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 64.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees.The scour protection (spill

  16. Measurement of the D/H, 18O/16O, and 17O/16O Isotope Ratios in Water by Laser Absorption Spectroscopy at 2.73 μm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Weidong; Fertein, Eric; Masselin, Pascal; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Yingjian; Koeth, Johannes; Brückner, Daniela; He, Xingdao

    2014-01-01

    A compact isotope ratio laser spectrometry (IRLS) instrument was developed for simultaneous measurements of the D/H, 18O/16O and 17O/16O isotope ratios in water by laser absorption spectroscopy at 2.73 μm. Special attention is paid to the spectral data processing and implementation of a Kalman adaptive filtering to improve the measurement precision. Reduction of up to 3-fold in standard deviation in isotope ratio determination was obtained by the use of a Fourier filtering to remove undulation structure from spectrum baseline. Application of Kalman filtering enables isotope ratio measurement at 1 s time intervals with a precision (<1‰) better than that obtained by conventional 30 s averaging, while maintaining a fast system response. The implementation of the filter is described in detail and its effects on the accuracy and the precision of the isotope ratio measurements are investigated. PMID:24854363

  17. Effect of iron content on the structure and disorder of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses: A high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Im; Sur, Jung Chul; Lee, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its geochemical importance and implications for the properties of natural magmatic melts, understanding the detailed structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses remains among the outstanding problems in geochemistry. This is mainly because solid-state NMR techniques, one of the most versatile experimental methods to probe the structure of oxide glasses, cannot be fully utilized for exploring the structural details of iron-bearing glasses as the unpaired electrons in Fe induce strong local magnetic fields that mask the original spectroscopic features (i.e., paramagnetic effect). Here, we report high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR spectra of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses (Na2O-Fe2O3-SiO2, Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.89 ± 0.04, thus containing both ferric and ferrous iron) with varying XFe2O3 [=Fe2O3/(Na2O + Fe2O3)], containing up to 22.9 wt% Fe2O3. This compositional series involves Fe-Na substitution at constant SiO2 contents of 66.7 mol% in the glasses. For both nuclides, the NMR spectra exhibit a decrease in the signal intensities and an increase in the peak widths with increasing iron concentration partly because of the paramagnetic effect. Despite the intrinsic difficulties that result from the pronounced paramagnetic effect, the 29Si and 17O NMR results yield structural details regarding the effect of iron content on Q speciation, spatial distribution of iron, and the extent of polymerization in the iron-bearing silicate glasses. The 29Si NMR spectra show an apparent increase in highly polymerized Q species with increasing XFe2O3 , suggesting an increase in the degree of melt polymerization. The 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra exhibit well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) peaks with varying iron concentration. By replacing Na2O with Fe2O3 (and thus with increasing iron content), the fraction of Na-O-Si decreases. Quantitative consideration of this effect confirms that the degree of polymerization is likely to

  18. Dicobalt-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound, [(α(2)-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-): a potent species for water oxidation, C-H bond activation, and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Barats-Damatov, Delina; Shimon, Linda J W; Weiner, Lev; Schreiber, Roy E; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Poblet, Josep M; de Graaf, Coen; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-02-01

    High-valent oxo compounds of transition metals are often implicated as active species in oxygenation of hydrocarbons through carbon-hydrogen bond activation or oxygen transfer and also in water oxidation. Recently, several examples of cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation have been reported, and cobalt(IV) species have been suggested as active intermediates. A reactive species, formally a dicobalt(IV)-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound [(α2-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-), [(POMCo)2O], has now been isolated and characterized by the oxidation of a monomeric [α2-P2W17O61Co(II)(H2O)](8-), [POMCo(II)H2O], with ozone in water. The crystal structure shows a nearly linear Co-O-Co moiety with a Co-O bond length of ∼1.77 Å. In aqueous solution [(POMCo)2O] was identified by (31)P NMR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Reactivity studies showed that [(POMCo)2O]2O] is an active compound for the oxidation of H2O to O2, direct oxygen transfer to water-soluble sulfoxides and phosphines, indirect epoxidation of alkenes via a Mn porphyrin, and the selective oxidation of alcohols by carbon-hydrogen bond activation. The latter appears to occur via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Density functional and CASSCF calculations strongly indicate that the electronic structure of [(POMCo)2O]2O] is best defined as a compound having two cobalt(III) atoms with two oxidized oxygen atoms.

  19. Hydro-Methanolic Extract of Cornus Mas L. and Blood Glucose, Lipid Profile and Hematological Parameters of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Bita; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Zakeri Milani, Parvin; Nourdadgar, Ashraf Sadat; Banan Khojasteh, Seyyed Mehdi; Nejati, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cornus mas L, an olive-shaped red-colored single-seeded fruit, is used in traditional medicine in different parts of Europe and Asia. Objectives: In the present study, 40 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, and the effects of 21 days of intraperitoneally (IP) administration of 50, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of C. mas hydro-methanolic extract on the rats hematological and biochemical parameters were investigated. The experimental study was carried out in Tabriz, Iran. Materials and Methods: The hematology and biochemical tests were performed by the Technicon H1 Hematology Analyzer and enzymatic methods, respectively. Results: The results indicated that all doses of the extract caused significant (P < 0.05) decreases in the hemoglobin distribution width (HDW) (2.3 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2, P = 0.049) and platelet distribution width (PDW) (56.5 ± 1.8 vs. 63.9 ± 3.6, P = 0.001) of the treated groups vs. control group, whereas only high doses caused significant elevation in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) (30.3 ± 0.8 vs. 28.6 ± 0.6, P = 0.047), mean platelet volume (MPV) (5.0 ± 0.6 vs. 4.1 ± 0.3, P = 0.002), total platelet mass (PCT) (0.33 ± 0.07 vs. 0.26 ± 0.01, P = 0.050), and significant decrease in the red cell distribution width (RDW) (13.8 ± 0.4 vs. 14.7 ± 1.3, P = 0.048) of the treated groups vs. control group. Conclusions: Decreasing effect of the extract on platelet activity might classify it as an alternative for antiplatelet therapy in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The results of this study suggested that further investigations with higher doses of C. mas fruit extract are necessary to obtain significant protective and nonprotective changes in hematological and biochemical parameters. PMID:25031858

  20. SCAM-STMAS: satellite-transition MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with self-compensation for magic-angle misset.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    Several methods are available for the acquisition of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin quantum number. Satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) offers an approach that employs only conventional MAS hardware and can yield substantial signal enhancements over the widely used multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) experiment. However, the presence of the first-order quadrupolar interaction in the satellite transitions imposes the requirement of a high degree of accuracy in the setting of the magic angle on the NMR probehead. The first-order quadrupolar interaction is only fully removed if the sample spinning angle, chi, equals cos(-1)(1/3) exactly and rotor synchronization is performed. The required level of accuracy is difficult to achieve experimentally, particularly when the quadrupolar interaction is large. If the magic angle is not set correctly, the first-order splitting is reintroduced and the spectral resolution is severely compromised. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel STMAS method (SCAM-STMAS) that is self-compensated for angle missets of up to +/-1 degrees via coherence transfer between the two different satellite transitions ST(+)(m(I)=+3/2<-->+1/2) and ST(-)(m(I)=-1/2<-->-3/2) midway through the t(1) period. In this work we describe in more detail the implementation of SCAM-STMAS and demonstrate its wider utility through 23Na (I=3/2), 87 Rb (I=3/2), 27 Al (I=5/2), and 59 Co (I=7/2) NMR. We discuss linewidths in SCAM-STMAS and the limits over which angle-misset compensation is achieved and we demonstrate that SCAM-STMAS is more tolerant of temporary spinning rate fluctuations than STMAS, resulting in less "t(1) noise" in the two-dimensional spectrum. In addition, alternative correlation experiments, for example involving the use of double-quantum coherences, that similarly display self-compensation for angle misset are investigated. The use of SCAM-STMAS is also considered in systems where other high-order interactions

  1. Signal intensities in ¹H-¹³C CP and INEPT MAS NMR of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Nowacka, A; Bongartz, N A; Ollila, O H S; Nylander, T; Topgaard, D

    2013-05-01

    Spectral editing with CP and INEPT in (13)C MAS NMR enables identification of rigid and mobile molecular segments in concentrated assemblies of surfactants, lipids, and/or proteins. In order to get stricter definitions of the terms "rigid" and "mobile", as well as resolving some ambiguities in the interpretation of CP and INEPT data, we have developed a theoretical model for calculating the CP and INEPT intensities as a function of rotational correlation time τc and C-H bond order parameter SCH, taking the effects of MAS into account. According to the model, the range of τc can at typical experimental settings (5kHz MAS, 1ms ramped CP at 80-100kHz B1 fields) be divided into four regimes: fast (τc<1ns), fast-intermediate (τc≈0.1μs), intermediate (τc≈1μs), and slow (τc>0.1ms). In the fast regime, the CP and INEPT intensities are independent of τc, but strongly dependent on |SCH|, with a cross-over from dominating INEPT to dominating CP at |SCH|>0.1. In the intermediate regime, neither CP nor INEPT yield signal on account of fast T1ρ and T2 relaxation. In both the fast-intermediate and slow regimes, there is exclusively CP signal. The theoretical predictions are tested by experiments on the glass-forming surfactant n-octyl-β-d-maltoside, for which τc can be varied continuously in the nano- to millisecond range by changing the temperature and the hydration level. The atomistic details of the surfactant dynamics are investigated with MD simulations. Based on the theoretical model, we propose a procedure for calculating CP and INEPT intensities directly from MD simulation trajectories. While MD shows that there is a continuous gradient of τc from the surfactant polar headgroup towards the methyl group at the end of the hydrocarbon chain, analysis of the experimental CP and INEPT data indicates that this gradient gets steeper with decreasing temperature and hydration level, eventually spanning four orders of magnitude at completely dry conditions.

  2. Characterization of active phosphorus surface sites at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite using single-pulse 1H, 31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jarlbring, Mathias; Sandström, Dan E; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Forsling, Willis

    2006-05-01

    The chemically active phosphorus surface sites defined as PO(x), PO(x)H, and PO(x)H2, where x = 1, 2, or 3, and the bulk phosphorus groups of PO4(3-) at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) have been studied by means of single-pulse 1H,31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR. The changes in composition and relative amounts of each surface species are evaluated as a function of pH. By combining spectra from single-pulse 1H and 31P MAS NMR and data from 31P CP MAS NMR experiments at varying contact times in the range 0.2-3.0 ms, it has been possible to distinguish between resonance lines in the NMR spectra originating from active surface sites and bulk phosphorus groups and also to assign the peaks in the NMR spectra to the specific phosphorus species. In the 31P CP MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was set to 4.2 kHz; in the single-pulse 1H MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was 10 kHz. The 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum of fluorapatite at pH 5.9 showed one dominating resonance line at 2.9 ppm assigned to originate from PO4(3-) groups and two weaker shoulder peaks at 5.4 and 0.8 ppm which were assigned to the unprotonated PO(x) (PO, PO2-, and PO3(2-)) and protonated PO(x)H (PO2H and PO3H-) surface sites. At pH 12.7, the intensity of the peak representing unprotonated PO(x) surface sites has increased 1.7% relative to the bulk peak, while the intensity of the peaks of the protonated species PO(x)H have decreased 1.4% relative to the bulk peak. At pH 3.5, a resonance peak at -4.5 ppm has appeared in the 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum assigned to the surface species PO(x)H2 (PO3H2). The results from the 1H MAS and 31P CP MAS NMR measurements indicated that H+, OH-, and physisorbed H2O at the surface were released during the drying process at 200 degrees C.

  3. Mas5, a homologue of bacterial DnaJ, is indispensable for the host infection and environmental adaptation of a filamentous fungal insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Hu, Yue; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Mas5, a yeast heat shock protein classified to the Hsp40 group, is homologous to bacterial archetype DnaJ but functionally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we identify a Mas5 homologue (46.86 kDa) in Beauveria bassiana and show its indispensability for host infection and environmental adaptation of the fungal insect pathogen. The deletion of mas5 caused severe defects in aerial conidiation, conidial germination and submerged blastospore production (mimic to host haemocoel). The deletion mutant lost 100% virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae through normal cuticular penetration (topical inoculation) and 50% through cuticle-bypassing infection (intrahaemocoel injection). It formed no blastospore in vivo after inoculation or only a very few after injection. Its extracellular (cuticle degrading) enzymes and virulence-relating Pr1 proteases were 62% and 32% less active respectively. It became more sensitive to high osmolarity, oxidation, cell-wall perturbation, heat shock and UV-B irradiation. These concurred with reduced contents of intracellular mannitol and trehalose, decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes, impaired cell walls and suppressed transcripts of stress-responsive and virulence-relating genes. All the changes were restored by targeted mas5 complementation. All together, Mas5 is indispensable for the in vitro and in vivo life cycle of B. bassiana by targeting many sets of enzymes/proteins at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  4. New LaMAsH(x) (M = Co, Ni, or Cu) arsenides with covalent M-H chains.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Park, SangWon; Hiraka, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-12-17

    A new series of tetragonal LaPtSi-type mixed-anion arsenides, LaMAsH(x) (M = Co, Ni, or Cu), has been synthesized using high-temperature and high-pressure techniques. The crystal structure of these intermetallic compounds determined via powder neutron diffraction is composed of a 3D framework of three connected planes with the La ions filling the cavities in the structure. Each late transition-metal ion M, all of which have relatively large electronegativities, behaves like a main group element and forms a planar coordination configuration with three As ions. The trigonal-bipyramidal coordination adopted by the H in the cavity, HM2La3, is compressed along the C3 axis, and unusual M-H chains run along the x and y directions, reinforcing the covalent framework. These chains, which are unique in solids, are stabilized by covalent interactions between the M 4s and H 1s orbitals.

  5. Temperature-rate dependences of the flow stress and the resistance to fracture of a VT6 titanium alloy under shock loading at a temperature of 20 and 600°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock compression waves in a VT6 titanium alloy is measured at a distance of 0.16-17 mm at room temperature and 600°C. The results of measuring the decay of an elastic precursors and the compression rate in a plastic shock wave are used to determine the temperature-rate dependences of the flow stress in the strain-rate range 103-107 s-1. New data for the spall strength of the alloy at normal and elevated temperatures are obtained.

  6. The protective effect of the Cornus mas fruits (cornelian cherry) on hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis through PPARα activation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sozański, T; Kucharska, A Z; Szumny, A; Magdalan, J; Bielska, K; Merwid-Ląd, A; Woźniak, A; Dzimira, S; Piórecki, N; Trocha, M

    2014-11-15

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) fruits have been used in traditional cuisine and in folk medicine in various countries. This study was conducted to evaluate the constituents and impact of cornelian cherry (C. mas L.) fruits lyophilisate on lipid levels, PPARα protein expression, atheromatous changes in the aorta, oxido-redox state, and proinflammatory cytokines in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The HPLC-MS method was used for determining active constituents in cornelian cherry. In a subsequent in vivo study the protective effect of the cornelian cherry on diet-induced hyperlipidemia was studied using a rabbit model fed 1% cholesterol. Cornelian cherry (100mg/kg b.w.) or simvastatin (5mg/kg b.w.) were administered orally for 60 days. Two iridoids - loganic acid and cornuside - and five anthocyanins were identified as the main constituents of the cornelian cherry. The administering of the cornelian cherry led to a 44% significant decrease in serum triglyceride levels, as well as prevented development of atheromatous changes in the thoracic aorta. Cornelian cherry significantly increased PPARα protein expression in the liver, indicating that its hypolipidemic effect may stem from enhanced fatty acid catabolism. Simvastatin treatment did not affect PPAR-α expression. Moreover, the cornelian cherry had a significant protective effect on diet-induced oxidative stress in the liver, as well as restored upregulated proinflammatory cytokines serum levels. In conclusion, we have shown loganic acid to be the main iridoid constituent in the European cultivar of the cornelian cherry, and proven that the cornelian cherry could have protective effects on diet-induced hypertriglicerydemia and atherosclerosis through enhanced PPARα protein expression and via regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25444446

  7. Fetal betamethasone exposure attenuates angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor expression in the dorsal medulla of adult sheep.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Allyson C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Nautiyal, Manisha; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2013-06-01

    Glucocorticoids including betamethasone (BM) are routinely administered to women entering into early preterm labor to facilitate fetal lung development and decrease infant mortality; however, fetal steroid exposure may lead to deleterious long term consequences. In a sheep model of fetal programming, BM-exposed (BMX) offspring exhibit elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) and decreased baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate by 0.5-years of age associated with changes in the circulating and renal renin-angiotensin systems (RAS). In the brain solitary tract nucleus, angiotensin (Ang) II actions through the AT1 receptor oppose the beneficial actions of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor for BRS regulation. Therefore, we examined Ang peptides, angiotensinogen (Aogen), and receptor expression in this brain region of exposed and control offspring of 0.5- and 1.8-years of age. Mas protein expression was significantly lower (>40%) in the dorsal medulla of BMX animals at both ages; however, AT1 receptor expression was not changed. BMX offspring exhibited a higher ratio of Ang II to Ang-(1-7) (2.30±0.36 versus 0.99±0.28; p<0.01) and Ang II to Ang I at 0.5-years. Although total Aogen was unchanged, Ang I-intact Aogen was lower in 0.5-year BMX animals (0.78±0.06 vs. 1.94±0.41; p<0.05) suggesting a greater degree of enzymatic processing of the precursor protein in exposed animals. We conclude that in utero BM exposure promotes an imbalance in the central RAS pathways of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) that may contribute to the elevated MAP and lower BRS in this model. PMID:23538211

  8. Visibility of lipid resonances in HR-MAS spectra of brain biopsies subject to spinning rate variation.

    PubMed

    Precht, C; Diserens, G; Oevermann, A; Vermathen, M; Lang, J; Boesch, C; Vermathen, P

    2015-12-01

    Lipid resonances from mobile lipids can be observed by ¹H NMR spectroscopy in multiple tissues and have also been associated with malignancy. In order to use lipid resonances as a marker for disease, a reference standard from a healthy tissue has to be established taking the influence of variable factors like the spinning rate into account. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of spinning rate variation on the HR-MAS pattern of lipid resonances in non-neoplastic brain biopsies from different regions and visualize polar and non-polar lipids by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Red staining. ¹H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy demonstrated higher lipid peak intensities in normal sheep brain pure white matter biopsies compared to mixed white and gray matter biopsies and pure gray matter biopsies. High spinning rates increased the visibility particularly of the methyl resonances at 1.3 and the methylene resonance at 0.89 ppm in white matter biopsies stronger compared to thalamus and brainstem biopsies, and gray matter biopsies. The absence of lipid droplets and presence of a large number of myelin sheaths observed in white matter by Nile Red fluorescence microscopy suggest that the observed lipid resonances originate from the macromolecular pool of lipid protons of the myelin sheath's plasma membranes. When using lipid contents as a marker for disease, the variable behavior of lipid resonances in different neuroanatomical regions of the brain and at variable spinning rates should be considered. The findings may open up interesting possibilities for investigating lipids in myelin sheaths.

  9. A double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MAS063DP (ATOPICLAIR) in the management of atopic dermatitis in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Annalisa; Capitanio, Bruno; Neri, Iria; Giacomini, Federica; Sinagra, Jo L; Raone, Beatrice; Berardesca, Enzo

    2008-11-01

    A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MAS063DP in 60 paediatric patients affected by atopic dermatitis (AD), aged between 2 and 17 years. Using the Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score for AD, patients with a score of 2 (mild) or 3 (moderate) were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly selected to receive MAS063DP (20 patients), MAS060 (20 patients, a similar formulation with lower key ingredients' concentration and no preservatives) or vehicle (20 patients).The study consisted in a treatment period of 43 days, with clinical evaluations at baseline (day 1), days 8, 15, 22, 29 and 43, at which time the treatment was stopped. MAS063DP showed nearly 80% improvement in IGA score at day 22, compared with 16.6% and 26.3% with the MAS060 and vehicle respectively. A statistically significant difference was found by comparing MAS063DP with MAS060 (p < 0.0001); a similar result was evidenced comparing MAS063DP and vehicle (p = 0.001). By contrast, no significant difference was found between MAS060 and vehicle. A statistically significant difference was sustained until the end of the study. MAS063DP may therefore be considered as one of the available regimens effective in the treatment of mild-to-moderate AD in children and adolescents. PMID:18298424

  10. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  11. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  12. Measurement of the single top quark production cross section and |Vt b| in 1.96 TeV p p ¯ collisions with missing transverse energy and jets and final CDF combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    An updated measurement of the single top quark production cross section is presented using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to 9.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The events selected contain an imbalance in the total transverse momentum, jets identified as containing b quarks, and no identified leptons. The sum of the s - and t -channel single top quark cross sections is measured to be 3.5 3-1.16+1.25 pb and a lower limit on the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling, |Vt b| of 0.63, is obtained at the 95% credibility level. These measurements are combined with previously reported CDF results obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, jets identified as originating from b quarks, and one identified lepton. The combined cross section is measured to be 3.0 2-0.48+0.49 pb and a lower limit on |Vt b| of 0.84 is obtained at the 95% credibility level.

  13. Preparation of La 0.8Sr 0.2Ga 0.83Mg 0.17O 2.815 powders by microwave-induced poly(vinyl alcohol) solution polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yuling; Ye, Chang; Xia, Feng; Xiao, Jianzhong; Dai, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Wang, Yongqian

    A new and simple chemical route, named microwave-induced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solution polymerization, has been used to prepare fine, homogeneous and high-density pellets of purer La 0.8Sr 0.2Ga 0.83Mg 0.17O 2.815 (denoted as LS 0.2GM 0.17). The effect of different contents of PVA as the polymeric carrier, was studied and we obtained an optimal amount of PVA (1.65:1 ratio of positively charged valences of the cations (Me n+) to negatively charged hydroxyl (-OH -) groups of the organics), which could ensure homogenous distribution of the metal ions in the polymeric network structure and inhibit segregation. The behavior of the powder after calcination at different temperatures was studied. The PVA solution process consumed less organic material compared with the Pechini process, and consequently PVA was a more effective carrier in the preparation of LSGM. Higher heating rate and a more homogenous heating manner without thermal gradients in the microwave oven resulted in fewer secondary phases in the LS 0.2GM 0.17 powder after calcination at 1400 °C for 9 h and a smaller pellet grain size (2-3 μm) without segregation. The density of LS 0.2GM 0.17 pellet sintered at 1400 °C for 9 h was 6.19 g cm -3.

  14. Re-evaluation of the 16O(N, γ)17O Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies and Its Role as a Neutron Poison in the s-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter; Heinz, Christian; Pignatari, Marco; Dillmann, Iris; Mengoni, Alberto; Käppeler, Franz

    2016-08-01

    The doubly magic nucleus 16O has a small neutron-capture cross section of just a few tens of microbarns in the astrophysical energy region. Despite this, 16O plays an important role as a neutron poison in the astrophysical slow neutron capture (s) process due to its high abundance. We present in this paper a re-evaluation of the available experimental data for 16O(n,γ )17O and derive a new recommendation for the Maxwellian-averaged cross sections between kT = 5 and 100 keV. Our new recommendations are lower up to kT = 60 keV compared to the previously recommended values but up to 14% higher at kT = 100 keV. We explore the impact of this different energy dependence on the weak s-process during core helium burning (kT = 26 keV) and shell carbon burning (kT = 90 keV) in massive stars where 16O is the most abundant isotope.

  15. KrasMAS: Implementation of a nuclear material computerized accounting system at the Mining and Chemical Combine through the Russian/US cooperative MPC and A program

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeev, K.V.; Zhidkov, V.V.; Martinez, B.J.; Perry, R.T.; Scott, S.C.

    1998-12-31

    The Russian/US Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Kimichesky Kombinat, GKhK, also referred to as Krasnoyarsk-26) Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) project was initiated in June 1996. A critical component of the ongoing cooperative MPC and A enhancements at the GKhK is the implementation of a computerized nuclear material control and accountability (MC and A) system. This system must meet the MC and A requirements of the GKhK by integrating the information generated by numerous existing and new MC and A components in place at the GKhK (e.g., scales, bar-code equipment, NDA measurement systems). During the first phase of this effort, the GKhK adapted CoreMAS (developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) for use in the PuO{sub 2} storage facility. This included formulation of Web-based user interfaces for plant personnel, Russification of the existing user interface, and at the functional level, modification of the CoreMAS stored procedures. The modified system is referred to as KrasMAS and builds upon completed work on CoreMAS. Ongoing efforts include adding GKhK specific report forms and expanding the functionality of the system for implementation at the radiochemical processing and reactor plants of the GKhK. Collaborations with other Russian facilities for appropriate parts of these efforts will be pursued.

  16. Following Solid-Acid-Catalyzed Reactions by MAS NMR Spectroscopy in Liquid Phase -Zeolite-Catalyzed Conversion of Cyclohexanol in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Hu, Jian Z.; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-07

    The catalytic conversion of cyclohexanol on zeolite HBEA in hot liquid water leads to dehydration as well as alkylation products. A novel micro autoclave suitable for application in MAS NMR at high temperatures and pressures is developed and successfully applied to obtain new insight into the mechanistic pathway leading to an understanding of the reactions under selected experimental conditions.

  17. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of 0.4× 0.5 mm2, offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10-25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2} , with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2}/ dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability

  18. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of 0.4× 0.5 mm2, offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10–25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2} , with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2}/ dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability

  19. Application of REDOR subtraction for filtered MAS observation of labeled backbone carbons of membrane-bound fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Parkanzky, Paul D.; Bodner, Michele L.; Duskin, Craig A.; Weliky, David P.

    2002-12-01

    Clean MAS observation of 13C-labeled carbons in membrane-bound HIV-1 and influenza fusion peptides was made by using a rotational-echo double-resonance spectroscopy (REDOR) filter of directly bonded 13C- 15N pairs. The clean filtering achieved with the REDOR approach is superior to filtering done with sample difference spectroscopy. In one labeling approach, the peptide had labels at a single 13C carbonyl and its directly bonded 15N. The resulting chemical shift distribution of the filtered signal is used to assess the distribution of local secondary structures at the labeled carbonyl. For the influenza peptide, the Leu-2 carbonyl chemical shift distribution is shown to vary markedly with lipid and detergent composition, as well as peptide:lipid ratio, suggesting that the local peptide structure also has a strong dependence on these factors. Because most carboxylic- and amino-labeled amino acids are commercially available, this REDOR approach should have broad applicability to chemically synthesized peptides as well as bacterially synthesized proteins. In a second labeling approach, the HIV-1 fusion peptide had U- 13C, 15N labeling over three sequential residues. When a 1.6 ms REDOR dephasing time is used, only backbone 13C signals are observed. The resulting spectra are used to determine spectral linewidths and to assess feasibility of assignment of uniformly labeled peptide.

  20. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  1. TRPA1 is required for histamine-independent, Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor-mediated itch.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah R; Gerhold, Kristin A; Bifolck-Fisher, Amber; Liu, Qin; Patel, Kush N; Dong, Xinzhong; Bautista, Diana M

    2011-05-01

    Itch, the unpleasant sensation that evokes a desire to scratch, accompanies numerous skin and nervous system disorders. In many cases, pathological itch is insensitive to antihistamine treatment. Recent studies have identified members of the Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor (Mrgpr) family that are activated by mast cell mediators and promote histamine-independent itch. MrgprA3 and MrgprC11 act as receptors for the pruritogens chloroquine and BAM8-22, respectively. However, the signaling pathways and transduction channels activated downstream of these pruritogens are largely unknown. We found that TRPA1 is the downstream target of both MrgprA3 and MrgprC11 in cultured sensory neurons and heterologous cells. TRPA1 is required for Mrgpr-mediated signaling, as sensory neurons from TRPA1-deficient mice exhibited markedly diminished responses to chloroquine and BAM8-22. Similarly, TRPA1-deficient mice displayed little to no scratching in response to these pruritogens. Our findings indicate that TRPA1 is an essential component of the signaling pathways that promote histamine-independent itch.

  2. 3D NMR spectroscopy for resonance assignment and structure elucidation of proteins under MAS: novel pulse schemes and sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Seidel, Karsten; Etzkorn, Manuel; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Two types of 3D MAS NMR experiments are introduced, which combine standard (NC,CC) transfer schemes with (1H,1H) mixing to simultaneously detect connectivities and structural constraints of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with high spectral resolution. The homonuclear CCHHC and CCC experiments are recorded with one double-quantum evolution dimension in order to avoid a cubic diagonal in the spectrum. Depending on the second transfer step, spin systems or proton-proton contacts can be determined with reduced spectral overlap. The heteronuclear NHHCC experiment encodes NH-HC proton-proton interactions, which are indicative for the backbone conformation of the protein. The third dimension facilitates the identification of the amino acid spin system. Experimental results on U-[15N,13C]valine and U-[15N,13C]ubiquitin demonstrate their usefulness for resonance assignments and for the determination of structural constraints. Furthermore, we give a detailed analysis of alternative multidimensional sampling schemes and their effect on sensitivity and resolution. PMID:15705514

  3. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  4. Protective effects of vitamin E and Cornus mas fruit extract on methotrexate-induced cytotoxicity in sperms of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Leila; Sadrkhanlou, Rajabali; Shahrooz, Rasoul; Malekinejad, Hassan; Eilkhanizadeh, Behroz; Ahmadi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to assess the protective effects of Cornus mas fruit extract (CMFE) and vitamin E (Vit E) on sperm quality parameters in the methotrexate (MTX)-treated mice. Forty-eight young adult male mice (8-12 weeks) were randomly divided into six groups including control and test groups. The control group received normal saline orally , and the test groups were treated MTX (20 mg kg-1, ip, once weekly), MTX + CMFE (250 mg kg-1), MTX + CMFE (500 mg kg-1), MTX + CMFE (1000 mg kg-1), and MTX + Vit E (100 IU kg-1, po) for 35 consecutive days. On day 35, after euthanasia the epididymal sperms were isolated. Then the total mean sperm count, sperm viability and motility were determined. The total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) of all experimental groups were also evaluated. The MTX-treated animals showed a significant changes in all parameters of sperm quality assessment compared to the control group. Both Vit E and CMFE were able to protect from MTX-induced effects on sperm maturity and DNA damage. Co-administration of MTX and CMFE and/or Vit E resulted in protection from MTX-reduced TAOC. In conclusion, these data suggested that MTX administration could adversely affect the sperm quality. Moreover, the protective effect of Vit E and CMFE on MTX-induced sperm toxicity was also documented. PMID:25568688

  5. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  6. SCAR-B MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-10

    ... properties. Study the impact of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosol on the atmosphere and climate by measuring the properties of urban and industrial pollution dominated by sulfate particles. Project ...

  7. Cooperating systems: Layered MAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Distributed intelligent systems can be distinguished by the models that they use. The model developed focuses on layered multiagent system conceived of as a bureaucracy in which a distributed data base serves as a central means of communication. The various generic bureaus of such a system is described and a basic vocabulary for such systems is presented. In presenting the bureaus and vocabularies, special attention is given to the sorts of reasonings that are appropriate. A bureaucratic model has a hierarchy of master system and work group that organizes E agents and B agents. The master system provides the administrative services and support facilities for the work groups.

  8. Role of Mas Receptor Antagonist A799 in Renal Blood Flow Response to Ang 1-7 after Bradykinin Administration in Ovariectomized Estradiol-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Aghdas; Saberi, Shadan; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background. The accompanied role of Mas receptor (MasR), bradykinin (BK), and female sex hormone on renal blood flow (RBF) response to angiotensin 1-7 is not well defined. We investigated the role of MasR antagonist (A779) and BK on RBF response to Ang 1-7 infusion in ovariectomized estradiol-treated rats. Methods. Ovariectomized Wistar rats received estradiol (OVE) or vehicle (OV) for two weeks. Catheterized animals were subjected to BK and A799 infusion and mean arterial pressure (MAP), RBF, and renal vascular resistance (RVR) responses to Ang 1-7 (0, 100, and 300 ng kg−1 min−1) were determined. Results. Percentage change of RBF (%RBF) in response to Ang1-7 infusion increased in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of BK, when MasR was not blocked, %RBF response to Ang 1-7 in OVE group was greater than OV group significantly (P < 0.05). Infusion of 300 ng kg−1 min−1 Ang 1-7 increased RBF by 6.9 ± 1.9% in OVE group versus 0.9 ± 1.8% in OV group. However when MasR was blocked, %RBF response to Ang 1-7 in OV group was greater than OVE group insignificantly. Conclusion. Coadministration of BK and A779 compared to BK alone increased RBF response to Ang 1-7 in vehicle treated rats. Such observation was not seen in estradiol treated rats. PMID:26421009

  9. Effects of T2-relaxation in MAS NMR spectra of the satellite transitions for quadrupolar nuclei: a 27Al MAS and single-crystal NMR study of alum KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2005-04-01

    Asymmetries in the manifold of spinning sidebands (ssbs) from the satellite transitions have been observed in variable-temperature 27Al MAS NMR spectra of alum (KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O), recorded in the temperature range from -76 to 92 °C. The asymmetries decrease with increasing temperature and reflect the fact that the ssbs exhibit systematically different linewidths for different spectral regions of the manifold. From spin-echo 27Al NMR experiments on a single-crystal of alum, it is demonstrated that these variations in linewidth originate from differences in transverse ( T2) relaxation times for the two inner ( m = 1/2 ↔ m = 3/2 and m = -1/2 ↔ m = -3/2) and correspondingly for the two outer ( m = 3/2 ↔ m = 5/2 and m = -3/2 ↔ m = -5/2) satellite transitions. T2 relaxation times in the range 0.5-3.5 ms are observed for the individual satellite transitions at -50 °C and 7.05 T, whereas the corresponding T1 relaxation times, determined from similar saturation-recovery 27Al NMR experiments, are almost constant ( T1 = 0.07-0.10 s) for the individual satellite transitions. The variation in T2 values for the individual 27Al satellite transitions for alum is justified by a simple theoretical approach which considers the cross-correlation of the local fluctuating fields from the quadrupolar coupling and the heteronuclear ( 27Al- 1H) dipolar interaction on the T2 relaxation times for the individual transitions. This approach and the observed differences in T2 values indicate that a single random motional process modulates both the quadrupolar and heteronuclear dipolar interactions for 27Al in alum at low temperatures.

  10. Tribotechnical and Mechanical Properties of Coarse-Grained and Submicrocrystalline Ti-Al-V (VT6) Alloy with a Ti-C-Mo-S Multi-Component Antifriction Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of the effect of a nanophase Ti-C-Mo-S coating on tribotechnical and mechanical properties of a VT6 (α+β)-titanium alloy in its coarse-grained and submicrocrystalline states are presented. To form the coating of a Ti-C-Mo-S chemical composition, use is made of a low-temperature magnetron-plasma deposition process at the substrate temperature not higher than 300°С. With a 1-1.3μm multi-component nanophase coating, the friction coefficient in a friction pair of the like grain structure (submicrocrystalline or coarse-grained) is shown to reduce by a few factors, while the wear resistance appears to increase by two orders of magnitude. The high strength achieved in the alloy due to the formation of the submicrocrystalline structure is maintained.

  11. Oocyte maturation. Basic and clinical aspects of in vitro maturation (IVM) with special emphasis of the role of FF-MAS.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Christian

    2008-02-01

    In Vitro maturation (IVM) of human oocytes is an emerging infertility treatment with great promise. To be successful this future assisted reproductive technology must entail both nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of the oocytes and give rise to human embryos that have the same developmental potential as embryos resulting from the golden standard of human IVF. The aspiration of immature oocytes from small to medium size antral follicles followed by their maturation In Vitro present an attractive alternative to the hormonal stimulation of patients in In Vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, since administration of exogenous hormones is a costly treatment and may cause severe health problems. Of the long list of side effect and health concern ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome (OHSS) is by far the most severe although long term effect on cancer prevalence is another concern. Another potential group of patients that could benefit from future IVM treatments are the young women undergoing anticancer therapy (radiation- or chemotherapy). Thus, ovarian and oocyte cryopreservation techniques are emerging, however such treatments can only be fully realized when IVM becomes an efficient means of obtaining healthy birth. At present, the In Vitro maturation techniques are highly successful in mice, variable successful in domestic species and still regarded experimental in the human clinic due to suboptimal fertilization rates and embryo quality. This review discusses comparative studies of the processes of oocyte maturation In Vivo and In Vitro, in various mammalian species including human. Among the substances that have been reported to influence oocyte maturation there is an interesting endogenous signaling molecule: FF-MAS (4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,14,24-trien-3 beta -ol), an intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway present in all cells. This review gives special focus to FF-MAS, the effect seen in animal and human studies so far and its potential use in

  12. Mas-Related Gene (Mrg) C Activation Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain via Modulating Gi and NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui’e; Lei, Yishan; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study is to investigate the role of Mas-related gene (Mrg) C in the pathogenesis and treatment of bone cancer pain (BCP). Methods BCP mouse model was established by osteosarcoma cell inoculation. Pain-related behaviors were assessed with the spontaneous lifting behavior test and mechanical allodynia test. Expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results Pain-related behavior tests showed significantly increased spontaneous flinches (NSF) and decreased paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) in mouse models of BCP. Western blot analysis showed that, compared with the control group and before modeling, all the expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord of BCP mice were dramatically elevated, which were especially increased at day 7 after operation and thereafter, in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly up-regulated Gi and down-regulated NR2B expression levels, in the spinal cord of BCP mice, in a time-dependent manner. On the other hand, anti-MrgC significantly down-regulated Gi expression, while dramatically up-regulated NR2B expression, in the BCP mice. Similar results were obtained from the immunohistochemical detection. Importantly, BAM8-22 significantly attenuated the nociceptive behaviors in the BCP mice. Conclusion Our results indicated the MrgC-mediated Gi and NR2B expression alterations in the BCP mice, which might contribute to the pain hypersensitivity. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of BCP in clinic. PMID:27152740

  13. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  14. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  15. Angiotensin 1-7 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction via Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Dharmani; Lau, Yeh Siang; Lau, Wai Chi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) counter-regulates the cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II (Ang II). The present study investigated the protective effect of Ang 1–7 against Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial dysfunction. Ex vivo treatment with Ang II (0.5 μM, 24 hours) impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mouse aortas; this harmful effect of Ang II was reversed by co-treatment with ER stress inhibitors, l4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as well as Ang 1–7. The Mas receptor antagonist, A779, antagonized the effect of Ang 1–7. The elevated mRNA expression of CHOP, Grp78 and ATF4 or protein expression of p-eIF2α and ATF6 (ER stress markers) in Ang II-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse aortas were blunted by co-treatment with Ang 1–7 and the latter effect was reversed by A779. Furthermore, Ang II-induced reduction in both eNOS phosphorylation and NO production was inhibited by Ang 1–7. In addition, Ang 1–7 decreased the levels of ER stress markers and augmented NO production in HUVECs treated with ER stress inducer, tunicamycin. The present study provides new evidence for functional antagonism between the two arms of the renin-angiotensin system in endothelial cells by demonstrating that Ang 1–7 ameliorates Ang II-stimulated ER stress to raise NO bioavailability, and subsequently preserves endothelial function. PMID:26709511

  16. The evaluation of different MAS techniques at low spinning rates in aqueous samples and in the presence of magnetic susceptibility gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi Hu, Jian; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-11-01

    It was recently demonstrated that the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) linewidths for stationary biological samples are dictated mainly by magnetic susceptibility gradients, and that phase-altered spinning sideband (PASS) and phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) solid-state NMR techniques employing slow and ultra-slow magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies can be used to overcome the static susceptibility broadening to yield high-resolution, spinning sideband (SSB)-free 1H NMR spectra [Magn. Reson. Med. 46 (2001) 213; 47 (2002) 829]. An additional concern is that molecular diffusion in the presence of the susceptibility gradients may limit the minimum useful MAS frequency by broadening the lines and reducing SSB suppression at low spinning frequencies. In this article the performance of PASS, PHORMAT, total sideband suppression (TOSS), and standard MAS techniques were evaluated as a function of spinning frequency. To this end, 300 MHz (7.05 T) 1H NMR spectra were acquired via PASS, TOSS, PHORMAT, and standard MAS NMR techniques for a 230-μm-diameter spherical glass bead pack saturated with water. The resulting strong magnetic susceptibility gradients result in a static linewidth of about 3.7 kHz that is larger than observed for a natural biological sample, constituting a worst-case scenario for examination of susceptibility broadening effects. Results: (I) TOSS produces a distorted centerband and fails in suppressing the SSBs at a spinning rate below ˜1 kHz. (II) Standard MAS requires spinning speeds above a few hundred Hz to separate the centerband from the SSBs. (III) PASS produces nearly SSB-free spectra at spinning speeds as low as 30 Hz, and is only limited by T2-induced signal losses. (IV) With PHORMAT, a SSB-free isotropic projection is obtained at any spinning rate, even at an ultra-slow spinning rate as slow as 1 Hz. (V) It is found empirically that the width of the isotropic peak is proportional to F- x, where F is the spinning frequency, and x

  17. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  18. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  19. Spin Diffusion Driven by R-Symmetry Sequences: Applications to Homonuclear Correlation Spectroscopy in MAS NMR of Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Samoson, Ago; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2011-01-01

    We present a family of homonuclear 13C-13C magic angle spinning spin diffusion experiments, based on R2nv (n = 1 and 2, v = 1 and 2) symmetry sequences. These experiments are well suited for 13C-13C correlation spectroscopy in biological and organic systems, and are especially advantageous at very fast MAS conditions, where conventional PDSD and DARR experiments fail. At very fast MAS frequencies the R211, R221, and R222 sequences result in excellent quality correlation spectra both in model compounds and in proteins. Under these conditions, individual R2nv display different polarization transfer efficiency-dependencies on isotropic chemical shift differences: R221 recouples efficiently both small and large chemical shift differences (in proteins these correspond to aliphatic-to-aliphatic and carbonyl-to-aliphatic correlations, respectively), while R211 and R222 exhibit the maximum recoupling efficiency for the aliphatic-to-aliphatic or carbonyl-to-aliphatic correlations, respectively. At moderate MAS frequencies (10–20 kHz), all R2nv sequences introduced in this work display similar transfer efficiencies, and their performance is very similar to that of PDSD and DARR. Polarization transfer dynamics and chemical shift dependencies of these R2-driven spin diffusion (RDSD) schemes are experimentally evaluated and investigated by numerical simulations for [U-13C,15N]-alanine and the [U-13C,15N] N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (MLF) tripeptide. Further applications of this approach are illustrated for several proteins: spherical assemblies of HIV-1 U-13C,15N CA protein, U-13C,15N enriched dynein light chain DLC8, and sparsely 13C/uniformly 15N enriched CAP-Gly domain of dynactin. Due to the excellent performance and ease of implementation, the presented R2nv symmetry sequences are expected to be of wide applicability in studies of proteins and protein assemblies as well as other organic solids by MAS NMR spectroscopy. PMID:21361320

  20. The angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis reduces myonuclear apoptosis during recovery from angiotensin II-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carla; Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang (1-7)] is a peptide belonging to the non-classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang (1-7), through its receptor Mas, has an opposite action to angiotensin II (Ang II), the typical peptide of the classical RAS axis. Ang II produces skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterised by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is the decrease of the myofibrillar proteins produced by the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), evidenced by the increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. In addition, it has been described that Ang II also induces myonuclear apoptosis during muscle atrophy. We assessed the effects of Ang (1-7) and Mas participation on myonuclear apoptosis during skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II. Our results show that Ang (1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by Ang II in the diaphragm muscles and decreases several events associated with apoptosis in the diaphragm (increased apoptotic nuclei, increased expression of caspase-8 and caspase-9, increased caspase-3 activity and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). Concomitantly, Ang (1-7) also attenuates the decrease in fibre diameter and muscle strength, and prevents the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 during the muscle wasting induced by Ang II. Interestingly, these effects of Ang (1-7) are dependent on the Mas receptor. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that Ang (1-7) prevents myonuclear apoptosis during the recovery of skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II.