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Sample records for 18-kda translocator protein

  1. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons.

  2. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process–commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  3. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  4. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  5. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  6. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  7. What drives the translocation of proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Peskin, C S; Oster, G F

    1992-01-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems. Images PMID:1349170

  8. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  9. The archaeal Sec-dependent protein translocation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transport of proteins across cellular membranes has been studied extensively in various model systems. One of the major transport routes, the so-called Sec pathway, is conserved in all domains of life. Very little is known about this pathway in the third domain of life, archaea. The core components of the archaeal, bacterial and eucaryal Sec machinery are similar, although the archaeal components appear more closely related to their eucaryal counterparts. Interestingly, the accessory factors of the translocation machinery are similar to bacterial components, which indicates a unique hybrid nature of the archaeal translocase complex. The mechanism of protein translocation in archaea is completely unknown. Based on genomic sequencing data, the most likely system for archaeal protein translocation is similar to the eucaryal co-translational translocation pathway for protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum, in which a protein is pushed across the translocation channel by the ribosome. However, other models can also be envisaged, such as a bacterial-like system in which a protein is translocated post-translationally with the aid of a motor protein analogous to the bacterial ATPase SecA. This review discusses the different models. Furthermore, an overview is given of some of the other components that may be involved in the protein translocation process, such as those required for protein targeting, folding and post-translational modification. PMID:15306407

  10. Toward a structural understanding of co-translational protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Rebecca M; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-08-01

    The translocation of most eukaryotic secreted and integral membrane proteins occurs co-translationally at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These nascent polypeptides are recognized on the ribosome by the signal recognition particle (SRP), targeted to the ER, and translocated across or inserted into the membrane by the Sec61 translocation channel. Structural analysis of these co-translational processes has been challenging due to the size, complexity, and flexibility of the targeting and translocation machinery. Recent technological advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have resulted in increasingly powerful tools to study large, heterogeneous, and low-abundance samples. These advances are being utilized to obtain near-atomic resolution reconstructions of functional translation, targeting, and translocation intermediates, paving the way to a mechanistic understanding of protein biogenesis.

  11. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  12. Light-regulated translocation of signaling proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Frechter, Shahar; Minke, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Illumination of Drosophila photoreceptor cells induces multi-facet responses, which include generation of the photoreceptor potential, screening pigment migration and translocation of signaling proteins which is the focus of recent extensive research. Translocation of three signaling molecules is covered in this review: (1) Light-dependent translocation of arrestin from the cytosol to the signaling membrane, the rhabdomere, determines the lifetime of activated rhodopsin. Arrestin translocates in PIP3 and NINAC myosin III dependent manner, and specific mutations which disrupt the interaction between arrestin and PIP3 or NINAC also impair the light-dependant translocation of arrestin and the termination of the response to light. (2) Activation of Drosophila visual G protein, DGq, causes a massive and reversible, translocation of the α subunit from the signaling membrane to the cytosol, accompanied by activity-dependent architectural changes. Analysis of the translocation and the recovery kinetics of DGqα in wild-type flies and specific visual mutants indicated that DGqα is necessary but not sufficient for the architectural changes. (3) The TRP-like (TRPL) but not TRP channels translocate in a light-dependent manner between the rhabdomere and the cell body. As a physiological consequence of this light-dependent modulation of the TRP/TRPL ratio, the photoreceptors of dark-adapted flies operate at a wider dynamic range, which allows the photoreceptors enriched with TRPL to function better in darkness and dim background illumination. Altogether, signal-dependent movement of signaling proteins plays a major role in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells. PMID:16458490

  13. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  14. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  15. Protein translocation and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Frain, Kelly M; Gangl, Doris; Jones, Alexander; Zedler, Julie A Z; Robinson, Colin

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria exhibit a complex form of membrane differentiation that sets them apart from most bacteria. Many processes take place in the plasma membrane, but photosynthetic light capture, electron transport and ATP synthesis take place in an abundant internal thylakoid membrane. This review considers how this system of subcellular compartmentalisation is maintained, and how proteins are directed towards the various subcompartments--specifically the plasma membrane, periplasm, thylakoid membrane and thylakoid lumen. The involvement of Sec-, Tat- and signal recognition particle- (SRP)-dependent protein targeting pathways is discussed, together with the possible involvement of a so-called 'spontaneous' pathway for the insertion of membrane proteins, previously characterised for chloroplast thylakoid membrane proteins. An intriguing aspect of cyanobacterial cell biology is that most contain only a single set of genes encoding Sec, Tat and SRP components, yet the proteomes of the plasma and thylakoid membranes are very different. The implications for protein sorting mechanisms are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux.

  16. Inhibitors of Protein Translocation Across the ER Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Römisch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) constitutes the first step of protein secretion. ER protein import is essential in all eukaryotic cells and is particularly critical in fast-growing tumour cells. Thus, the process can serve as target both for potential cancer drugs and for bacterial virulence factors. Inhibitors of protein transport across the ER membrane range from broad-spectrum to highly substrate-specific and can interfere with virtually any stage of this multistep process, and even with transport of endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for cross-presentation. PMID:26122014

  17. Translocation arrest by reversible folding of a precursor protein imported into mitochondria. A means to quantitate translocation contact sites

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Passage of precursor proteins through translocation contact sites of mitochondria was investigated by studying the import of a fusion protein consisting of the NH2-terminal 167 amino acids of yeast cytochrome b2 precursor and the complete mouse dihydrofolate reductase. Isolated mitochondria of Neurospora crassa readily imported the fusion protein. In the presence of methotrexate import was halted and a stable intermediate spanning both mitochondrial membranes at translocation contact sites accumulated. The complete dihydrofolate reductase moiety in this intermediate was external to the outer membrane, and the 136 amino acid residues of the cytochrome b2 moiety remaining after cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase spanned both outer and inner membranes. Removal of methotrexate led to import of the intermediate retained at the contact site into the matrix. Thus unfolding at the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane is a prerequisite for passage through translocation contact sites. The membrane-spanning intermediate was used to estimate the number of translocation sites. Saturation was reached at 70 pmol intermediate per milligram of mitochondrial protein. This amount of translocation intermediates was calculated to occupy approximately 1% of the total surface of the outer membrane. The morphometrically determined area of close contact between outer and inner membranes corresponded to approximately 7% of the total outer membrane surface. Accumulation of the intermediate inhibited the import of other precursor proteins suggesting that different precursor proteins are using common translocation contact sites. We conclude that the machinery for protein translocation into mitochondria is present at contact sites in limited number. PMID:2529262

  18. Protein Translocation through Tom40: Kinetics of Peptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Schlösinger, Andrea; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are almost exclusively imported into mitochondria from the cytosol in an unfolded or partially folded conformation. Regardless of whether they are destined for the outer or inner membrane, the intermembrane space, or the matrix, proteins begin the importation process by crossing the mitochondrial outer membrane via a specialized protein import machinery whose main component is the Tom40 channel. High-resolution ion conductance measurements through the Tom40 channel in the presence of the mitochondrial presequence peptide pF1β revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. Here we show that the rates for association kon and dissociation koff strongly depend on the applied transmembrane voltage. Both kinetic constants increase with an increase in the applied voltage. The increase of koff with voltage provides strong evidence of peptide translocation. This allows us to distinguish quantitatively between substrate blocking and permeation. PMID:22225796

  19. The changing landscape in translocator protein (TSPO) function.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Stocco, Douglas M

    2015-07-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein. TSPO has been shown to cooperate with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and function in the transport of cholesterol into mitochondria. TSPO has also been considered as a structural component of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). However, recent advances have changed these views of TSPO's functions and have prompted a re-evaluation of established concepts. This review summarizes the history of TSPO, key elements of the debate, and functional experiments that have changed our understanding. Moving forward, we examine how this fundamental change impacts our understanding of TSPO and affects the future of TSPO as a therapeutic and diagnostic target.

  20. Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway

    DOEpatents

    Pohlschroder, Mechtild; Kissinger, Jessica C; Rose, R. Wesley; Brueser, Thomas; Dilks, Kieran

    2008-11-04

    Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

  1. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character.

  2. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  3. Minireview: translocator protein (TSPO) and steroidogenesis: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Stocco, Douglas M; Tu, Lan N

    2015-04-01

    The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a transmembrane protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. TSPO has long been described as being indispensable for mitochondrial cholesterol import that is essential for steroid hormone production. In contrast to this initial proposition, recent experiments reexamining TSPO function have demonstrated that it is not involved in steroidogenesis. This fundamental change has forced a reexamination of the functional interpretations made for TSPO that broadly impacts both basic and clinical research across multiple fields. In this minireview, we recapitulate the key studies from 25 years of TSPO research and concurrently examine their limitations that perhaps led towards the incorrect association of TSPO and steroid hormone production. Although this shift in understanding raises new questions regarding the molecular function of TSPO, these recent developments are poised to have a significant positive impact for research progress in steroid endocrinology.

  4. Evolving understanding of translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-09-01

    The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) has been the focus of intense research by the biomedical community and the pharmaceutical industry because of its apparent involvement in many disease-related processes. These include steroidogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, neurological disease and cancer, resulting in the use of TSPO as a biomarker and its potential as a drug target. Despite more than 30 years of study, the precise function of TSPO remains elusive. A recent breakthrough in determining the high-resolution crystal structures of bacterial homologs of mitochondrial TSPO provides new insight into the structural and functional properties at a molecular level and new opportunities for investigating the significance of this ancient and highly conserved protein family. The availability of atomic level structural information from different species also provides a platform for structure-based drug development. Here we briefly review current knowledge regarding TSPO and the implications of the new structures with respect to hypotheses and controversies in the field.

  5. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  6. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  7. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  8. Structure and Activity of Tryptophan-rich TSPO Translocator Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    TSPO translocator proteins bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are fhighly conserved from bacteria to mammals. We report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  9. Translocator Protein 2 Is Involved in Cholesterol Redistribution during Erythropoiesis*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Rone, Malena B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa cholesterol- and drug-binding protein conserved from bacteria to humans. While surveying for Tspo-like genes, we identified its paralogous gene, Tspo2, encoding an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins that arose by gene duplications before the divergence of avians and mammals. Comparative analysis of Tspo1 and Tspo2 functions suggested that Tspo2 has become subfunctionalized, typical of duplicated genes, characterized by the loss of diagnostic drug ligand-binding but retention of cholesterol-binding properties, hematopoietic tissue- and erythroid cell-specific distribution, and subcellular endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear membrane localization. Expression of Tspo2 in erythroblasts is strongly correlated with the down-regulation of the enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Overexpression of TSPO2 in erythroid cells resulted in the redistribution of intracellular free cholesterol, an essential step in nucleus expulsion during erythrocyte maturation. Taken together, these data identify the TSPO2 family of proteins as mediators of cholesterol redistribution-dependent erythroblast maturation during mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:19729679

  10. Mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO): From physiology to cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Morin, Didier; Musman, Julien; Pons, Sandrine; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    The mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol binding protein which is primarily located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it has been shown to interact with proteins implicated in mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) formation. TSPO is found in different species and is expressed at high levels in tissues that synthesize steroids but is also present in other peripheral tissues especially in the heart. TSPO has been involved in the import of cholesterol into mitochondria, a key step in steroidogenesis. This constitutes the main established function of the protein which was recently challenged by genetic studies. TSPO has also been associated directly or indirectly with a wide range of cellular functions such as apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, regulation of mitochondrial function or porphyrin transport. In the heart the role of TSPO remains undefined but a growing body of evidence suggests that TSPO plays a critical role in regulating physiological cardiac function and that TSPO ligands may represent interesting drugs to protect the heart under pathological conditions. This article briefly reviews current knowledge regarding TSPO and discusses its role in the cardiovascular system under physiological and pathologic conditions. More particularly, it provides evidence that TSPO can represent an alternative strategy to develop new pharmacological agents to protect the myocardium against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  11. Translocation of green fluorescent protein to cyanobacterial periplasm using ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Chungjatupornchai, Wipa; Fa-aroonsawat, Sirirat

    2009-04-01

    The translocation of proteins to cyanobacterial cell envelope is made complex by the presence of a highly differentiated membrane system. To investigate the protein translocation in cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (InpNC) from Pseudomonas syringae KCTC 1832, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused in frame to the carboxyl-terminus of InpNC. The fluorescence of GFP was found almost entirely as a halo in the outer regions of cells which appeared to correspond to the periplasm as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, however, GFP was not displayed on the outermost cell surface. Western blotting analysis revealed that InpNC-GFP fusion protein was partially degraded. The N-terminal domain of InpNC may be susceptible to protease attack; the remaining C-terminal domain conjugated with GFP lost the ability to direct translocation across outer membrane and to act as a surface display motif. The fluorescence intensity of cells with periplasmic GFP was approximately 6-fold lower than that of cells with cytoplasmic GFP. The successful translocation of the active GFP to the periplasm may provide a potential means to study the property of cyanobacterial periplasmic substances in response to environmental changes in a non-invasive manner. PMID:19412603

  12. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  13. Stable Translocation Intermediates Jam Global Protein Export in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites and Link the PTEX Component EXP2 with Translocation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mesén-Ramírez, Paolo; Reinsch, Ferdinand; Blancke Soares, Alexandra; Bergmann, Bärbel; Ullrich, Ann-Katrin; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein export is central for the survival and virulence of intracellular P. falciparum blood stage parasites. To reach the host cell, exported proteins cross the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and the parasite-enclosing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a process that requires unfolding, suggestive of protein translocation. Components of a proposed translocon at the PVM termed PTEX are essential in this phase of export but translocation activity has not been shown for the complex and questions have been raised about its proposed membrane pore component EXP2 for which no functional data is available in P. falciparum. It is also unclear how PTEX mediates trafficking of both, soluble as well as transmembrane proteins. Taking advantage of conditionally foldable domains, we here dissected the translocation events in the parasite periphery, showing that two successive translocation steps are needed for the export of transmembrane proteins, one at the PPM and one at the PVM. Our data provide evidence that, depending on the length of the C-terminus of the exported substrate, these steps occur by transient interaction of the PPM and PVM translocon, similar to the situation for protein transport across the mitochondrial membranes. Remarkably, we obtained constructs of exported proteins that remained arrested in the process of being translocated across the PVM. This clogged the translocation pore, prevented the export of all types of exported proteins and, as a result, inhibited parasite growth. The substrates stuck in translocation were found in a complex with the proposed PTEX membrane pore component EXP2, suggesting a role of this protein in translocation. These data for the first time provide evidence for EXP2 to be part of a translocating entity, suggesting that PTEX has translocation activity and provide a mechanistic framework for the transport of soluble as well as transmembrane proteins from the parasite boundary into the host cell. PMID:27168322

  14. A role for a eukaryotic GrpE-related protein, Mge1p, in protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Laloraya, S; Gambill, B D; Craig, E A

    1994-01-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70s) function as molecular chaperones in a wide variety of cellular processes through cycles of binding and release from substrate proteins coupled to cycles of ATP hydrolysis. In the prokaryote Escherichia coli, the hsp70 DnaK functions with two other proteins, DnaJ and GrpE, which modulate the activity of DnaK. While numerous hsp70s and DnaJ-related proteins have been identified in eukaryotes, to our knowledge no GrpE-related proteins have been reported. We report the isolation and characterization of a eukaryotic grpE-related gene, MGE1. MGE1, an essential nuclear gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a soluble protein of the mitochondrial matrix. Cells with reduced expression of Mge1p accumulate the precursor form of a mitochondrial protein. Since mitochondrial hsp70 is required for translocation of precursors of mitochondrial proteins from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria, these data suggest that Mge1p acts in concert with mitochondrial hsp70 in protein translocation. Images PMID:8022808

  15. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor-Y Boosts Yersinia Effector Translocation by Activating Rac Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Manuel; Boyle, Erin C.; Lardong, Kerstin; Trülzsch, Konrad; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia spp. translocate the effectors YopT, YopE, and YopO/YpkA into target cells to inactivate Rho family GTP-binding proteins and block immune responses. Some Yersinia spp. also secrete the Rho protein activator cytotoxic necrotizing factor-Y (CNF-Y), but it has been unclear how the bacteria may benefit from Rho protein activation. We show here that CNF-Y increases Yop translocation in Yersinia enterocolitica-infected cells up to 5-fold. CNF-Y strongly activated RhoA and also delayed in time Rac1 and Cdc42, but when individually expressed, constitutively active mutants of Rac1, but not of RhoA, increased Yop translocation. Consistently, knock-out or knockdown of Rac1 but not of RhoA, -B, or -C inhibited Yersinia effector translocation in CNF-Y-treated and control cells. Activation or knockdown of Cdc42 also affected Yop translocation but much less efficiently than Rac. The increase in Yop translocation induced by CNF-Y was essentially independent of the presence of YopE, YopT, or YopO in the infecting Yersinia strain, indicating that none of the Yops reported to inhibit translocation could reverse the CNF-Y effect. In summary, the CNF-Y activity of Yersinia strongly enhances Yop translocation through activation of Rac. PMID:23803609

  16. Prediction of lipid-binding regions in cytoplasmic and extracellular loops of membrane proteins as exemplified by protein translocation membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2013-01-01

    The presence of possible lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic or extracellular loops of membrane proteins with an emphasis on protein translocation membrane proteins was investigated in this study using bioinformatics. Recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid-binding regions in proteins were found to be promising. In this study a total bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid-binding helical regions in proteins was explored. Two features of the protein translocation membrane proteins, the position of the transmembrane regions and the identification of additional lipid-binding regions, were analyzed. A number of well-studied protein translocation membrane protein structures were checked in order to demonstrate the predictive value of the bioinformatics approach. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic and extracellular loops in protein translocation membrane proteins can be predicted, and it is proposed that the interaction of these regions with phospholipids is important for proper functioning during protein translocation. PMID:22961045

  17. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  18. Translocator protein mediates the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of midazolam.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Li, Ming-Sheng; He, Jia-Li; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guan-Hua; Lai, Sha; Ma, Jian-Chun; Zeng, Jia; Li, Yan; Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yong; Shen, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), caused by neurosteroids (e.g. allopregnanolone). The present study sought to evaluate the significance of TSPO in anxiolytic and antidepressant effects induced by midazolam. The animals were administrated midazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and subjected to behavioral tests, including Vogel-type conflict test, elevated plus-maze test, forced swimming test. Midazolam produced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects Vogel-type conflict test (1 mg/kg, i.p.), elevated plus-maze test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and forced swimming test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects of Midazolam were totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). To evaluate the role of allopregnanolone in the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam, the animals were decapitated at the end of the behavioral tests. The allopregnanolone levels of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The allopregnanolone level of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was increased by midazolam (0.5, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Overall, the results indicated that the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam were mediated by TSPO, via stimulation of allopregnanolone biosynthesis. PMID:26455280

  19. Quantifying the role of chaperones in protein translocation by computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Assenza, Salvatore; De Los Rios, Paolo; Barducci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp70 plays a central role in the import of cytoplasmic proteins into organelles, driving their translocation by binding them from the organellar interior. Starting from the experimentally-determined structure of the E. coli Hsp70, we computed, by means of molecular simulations, the effective free-energy profile for substrate translocation upon chaperone binding. We then used the resulting free energy to quantitatively characterize the kinetics of the import process, whose comparison with unassisted translocation highlights the essential role played by Hsp70 in importing cytoplasmic proteins.

  20. Role of binding proteins in the translocation of carcinogen metabolites from cytoplasm into the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, K.; Bhargava, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    The role of binding proteins in the transport of azo dye hepatocarcinogen metabolites from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was investigated. When the liver cytosol prepared from rats administered /sup 14/C-3'-methyl-N,N-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (3'-Me-DAB) was subjected to Sephadex gel chromatography, four peaks (I-IV) of radioactivity containing proteins and one peak of radioactivity devoid of protein, were obtained. Over 90% of the cytosolic 3'-Me-MAB, a precursor of 3'-Me-MAB-N-sulfate, the ultimate carcinogen metabolite, was recovered in peak II. In an in vitro system, the radioactivity associated with this peak only was translocated into the nucleus. Only 10-12% of the radioactivity associated with this peak could be translocated even in the presence of an excess of nuclei. Addition of the peak II fraction isolated from untreated rats or from rats administered unlabeled 3'-Me-DAB to the translocation system, decreased the translocation of radioactivity into the nucleus. When either /sup 125/I labeled cytosolic proteins or peak II fraction were incubated with nuclei, translocation of two major (14-8K) and several minor proteins to the nucleus was observed. The results suggest that specific protein-metabolite complexes are involved in the translocation of azo dye metabolites from the cytosol to the nucleus.

  1. Apratoxin Kills Cells by Direct Blockade of the Sec61 Protein Translocation Channel.

    PubMed

    Paatero, Anja O; Kellosalo, Juho; Dunyak, Bryan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Gestwicki, Jason E; Gerwick, William H; Taunton, Jack; Paavilainen, Ville O

    2016-05-19

    Apratoxin A is a cytotoxic natural product that prevents the biogenesis of secretory and membrane proteins. Biochemically, apratoxin A inhibits cotranslational translocation into the ER, but its cellular target and mechanism of action have remained controversial. Here, we demonstrate that apratoxin A prevents protein translocation by directly targeting Sec61α, the central subunit of the protein translocation channel. Mutagenesis and competitive photo-crosslinking studies indicate that apratoxin A binds to the Sec61 lateral gate in a manner that differs from cotransin, a substrate-selective Sec61 inhibitor. In contrast to cotransin, apratoxin A does not exhibit a substrate-selective inhibitory mechanism, but blocks ER translocation of all tested Sec61 clients with similar potency. Our results suggest that multiple structurally unrelated natural products have evolved to target overlapping but non-identical binding sites on Sec61, thereby producing distinct biological outcomes.

  2. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  3. Entropic pulling: how Hsp70 chaperones translocate proteins through membrane pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the translocation of proteins across membranes and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we introduce a mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable to drive the translocation of polypeptides into mitochondria. Entropic pulling represents a possible solution to the long-standing debate between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a unifying mechanism for the different Hsp70 functions.

  4. The Candida albicans Kar2 protein is essential and functions during the translocation of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Megan R.; Lund, Kyle; Morrison, Emily P.; Paulson, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the secretory pathway is essential for Candida albicans to transition from a commensal organism to a pathogen, an understanding of how this pathway functions may be beneficial for identifying novel drug targets to prevent candidiasis. We have cloned the C. albicans KAR2 gene, which performs many roles during the translocation of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during the first committed step of the secretory pathway in many eukaryotes. Our results show that C. albicans KAR2 is essential, and that the encoded protein rescues a temperature-sensitive growth defect found in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain harboring a mutant form of the Kar2 protein. Additionally, S. cerevisiae containing CaKAR2 as the sole copy of this essential gene are viable, and ER microsomes prepared from this strain exhibit wild-type levels of post-translational translocation during in vitro translocation assays. Finally, ER microsomes isolated from a C. albicans strain expressing reduced amounts of KAR2 mRNA are defective for in vitro translocation of a secreted substrate protein, establishing a new method to study ER translocation in this organism. Together, these results suggest that C. albicans Kar2p functions during the translocation of proteins into the ER during the first step of the secretory pathway. PMID:20886215

  5. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  6. SecA Alone Can Promote Protein Translocation and Ion Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ying-hsin; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Bor-ruei; Cui, Ningren; Na, Bing; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2011-01-01

    SecA is an essential component of the Sec-dependent protein translocation pathway across cytoplasmic membranes in bacteria. Escherichia coli SecA binds to cytoplasmic membranes at SecYEG high affinity sites and at phospholipid low affinity sites. It has been widely viewed that SecYEG functions as the essential protein-conducting channel through which precursors cross the membranes in bacterial Sec-dependent pathways, and that SecA functions as a motor to hydrolyze ATP in translocating precursors through SecYEG channels. We have now found that SecA alone can promote precursor translocation into phospholiposomes. Moreover, SecA-liposomes elicit ionic currents in Xenopus oocytes. Patch-clamp recordings further show that SecA alone promotes signal peptide- or precursor-dependent single channel activity. These activities were observed with the functional SecA at about 1–2 μm. The results show that SecA alone is sufficient to promote protein translocation into liposomes and to elicit ionic channel activity at the phospholipids low affinity binding sites, thus indicating that SecA is able to form the protein-conducting channels. Even so, such SecA-liposomes are less efficient than those with a full complement of Sec proteins, and lose the signal-peptide proofreading function, resembling the effects of PrlA mutations. Addition of purified SecYEG restores the signal peptide specificity and increases protein translocation and ion channel activities. These data show that SecA can promote protein translocation and ion channel activities both when it is bound to lipids at low affinity sites and when it is bound to SecYEG with high affinity. The latter of the two interactions confers high efficiency and specificity. PMID:22033925

  7. Protein co-translocational unfolding depends on the direction of pulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2014-09-01

    Protein unfolding and translocation through pores occurs during trafficking between organelles, protein degradation and bacterial toxin delivery. In vivo, co-translocational unfolding can be affected by the end of the polypeptide that is threaded into the pore first. Recently, we have shown that co-translocational unfolding can be followed in a model system at the single-molecule level, thereby unravelling molecular steps and their kinetics. Here, we show that the unfolding kinetics of the model substrate thioredoxin, when pulled through an α-haemolysin pore, differ markedly depending on whether the process is initiated from the C terminus or the N terminus. Further, when thioredoxin is pulled from the N terminus, the unfolding pathway bifurcates: some molecules finish unfolding quickly, while others finish ~100 times slower. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of biological unfolding mechanisms and in the application of nanopore technology for the detection of proteins and their modifications.

  8. Exocyst Sec10 is Involved in Basolateral Protein Translation and Translocation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly-made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane, consists of three main subunits, Sec61α, β, and γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others showed that the highly-conserved eight protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We also showed that the exocyst was involved in basolateral, and not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery was reported. Furthermore, we showed that the exocyst was necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. Methods GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic ER microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and 35S-methionine for protein detection, were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P32-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate the Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Results Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced recruitment to ER membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral VSVG protein translation, compared to apical HA protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. Conclusion These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. PMID:23037926

  9. Stochastic but highly coordinated protein unfolding and translocation by the CIpXP proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Olivares, Adrian O.; Shin, Yongdae; Stinson, Benjamin M.; Calmat, Stephane; Schmitz, Karl R.; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Baker, Tania A.; Lang, Matthew J.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    CIpXP and other AAA+ proteases recognize, mechanically unfold, and translocate target proteins into a chamber for proteolysis. It is not known if these remarkable molecular machines operate by a stochastic or sequential mechanism or how power strokes relate to the ATP-hydrolysis cycle. Single-molecule optical trapping allows CIpXP unfolding to be directly visualized and reveals translocation steps of ~1–4 nm in length, but how these activities relate to solution degradation and the physical properties of substrate proteins remains unclear. By studying single-molecule degradation using different multi-domain substrates and CIpXP variants, we answer many of these questions and provide evidence for stochastic unfolding and translocation. We also present a mechanochemical model that accounts for single-molecule, biochemical, and structural results, for our observation of enzymatic memory in translocation stepping, for the kinetics of translocation steps of different sizes, and for probabilistic but highly coordinated subunit activity within the CIpX ring. PMID:25083874

  10. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Translocation through an α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Di Marino, Daniele; Bonome, Emma Letizia; Tramontano, Anna; Chinappi, Mauro

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore sensing is attracting the attention of a large and varied scientific community. One of the main issues in nanopore sensing is how to associate the measured current signals to specific features of the molecule under investigation. This is particularly relevant when the translocating molecule is a protein and the pore is sufficiently narrow to necessarily involve unfolding of the translocating protein. Recent experimental results characterized the cotranslocational unfolding of Thioredoxin (Trx) passing through an α-hemolisin pore, providing evidence for the existence of a multistep process. In this study we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the same system. Our data indicate that Trx translocation involves two main barriers. The first one is an unfolding barrier associated with a translocation intermediate where the N-terminal region of Trx is stuck at the pore entrance in a conformation that strongly resembles the native one. After the abrupt unfolding of the N-terminal region, the Trx enters the α-hemolisin vestibule. During this stage, the constriction is occupied not only by the translocating residue but also by a hairpin-like structure forming a tangle in the constriction. The second barrier is associated with the disentangling of this region.

  11. Manipulation of Protein Translocation through Nanopores by Flow Field Control and Application to Nanopore Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2016-09-20

    The control of biomolecule translocation through nanopores is important in nanopore protein detection. Improvement in current nanopore molecule control is desired to enhance capture rates, extend translocation times, and ensure the effective detection of various proteins in the same solutions. We present a method that simultaneously resolves these issues through the use of a gate-modulated conical nanopore coupled with solutions of varying salt concentration. Simulation results show that the presence of an induced reverse electroosmotic flow (IREOF) results in inlet flows from the two ends of the nanopore centerline entering into the nanopore in opposite directions, which simultaneously elevates the capture rate and immobilizes the protein in the nanopore, thus enabling steady current blockage measurements for a range of proteins. In addition, it is shown that proteins with different size/charge ratios can be trapped by a gate modulation intensified flow field at a similar location in the nanopore in the same solution conditions.

  12. Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO): An Old Protein with New Functions?

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Liu, Nan; Kuhn, Leslie A; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2016-05-24

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) was previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in eukaryotes, where it is mainly localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Considerable evidence indicates that it plays regulatory roles in steroidogenesis and apoptosis and is involved in various human diseases, such as metastatic cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, inflammation, and anxiety disorders. Ligands of TSPO are widely used as diagnostic tools and treatment options, despite there being no clear understanding of the function of TSPO. An ortholog in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter was independently discovered as the tryptophan-rich sensory protein (TspO) and found to play a role in the response to changes in oxygen and light conditions that regulate photosynthesis and respiration. As part of this highly conserved protein family found in all three kingdoms, the rat TSPO is able to rescue the knockout phenotype in Rhodobacter, indicating functional as well as structural conservation. Recently, a major breakthrough in the field was achieved: the determination of atomic-resolution structures of TSPO from different species by several independent groups. This now allows us to reexamine the function of TSPO with a molecular perspective. In this review, we focus on recently determined structures of TSPO and their implications for potential functions of this ubiquitous multifaceted protein. We suggest that TSPO is an ancient bacterial receptor/stress sensor that has developed additional interactions, partners, and roles in its mitochondrial outer membrane environment in eukaryotes.

  13. Translocation boost protein-folding efficiency of double-barreled chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Coluzza, Ivan; van der Vies, Saskia M; Frenkel, Daan

    2006-05-15

    Incorrect folding of proteins in living cells may lead to malfunctioning of the cell machinery. To prevent such cellular disasters from happening, all cells contain molecular chaperones that assist nonnative proteins in folding into the correct native structure. One of the most studied chaperone complexes is the GroEL-GroES complex. The GroEL part has a "double-barrel" structure, which consists of two cylindrical chambers joined at the bottom in a symmetrical fashion. The hydrophobic rim of one of the GroEL chambers captures nonnative proteins. The GroES part acts as a lid that temporarily closes the filled chamber during the folding process. Several capture-folding-release cycles are required before the nonnative protein reaches its native state. Here we report molecular simulations that suggest that translocation of the nonnative protein through the equatorial plane of the complex boosts the efficiency of the chaperonin action. If the target protein is correctly folded after translocation, it is released. However, if it is still nonnative, it is likely to remain trapped in the second chamber, which then closes to start a reverse translocation process. This shuttling back and forth continues until the protein is correctly folded. Our model provides a natural explanation for the prevalence of double-barreled chaperonins. Moreover, we argue that internal folding is both more efficient and safer than a scenario where partially refolded proteins escape from the complex before being recaptured.

  14. Crystal structure of a substrate-engaged SecY protein-translocation channel

    PubMed Central

    Ling, JingJing; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic signal sequences target secretory polypeptides to a protein-conducting channel formed by a heterotrimeric membrane protein complex, the prokaryotic SecY or eukaryotic Sec61 complex. How signal sequences are recognized is poorly understood, particularly because they are diverse in sequence and length. Structures of the inactive channel show that the largest subunit, SecY or Sec61α, consists of two halves that form an hourglass-shaped pore with a constriction in the middle of the membrane and a lateral gate that faces lipid1-10. The cytoplasmic funnel is empty, while the extracellular funnel is filled with a plug domain. In bacteria, the SecY channel associates with the translating ribosome in co-translational translocation, and with the SecA ATPase in post-translational translocation 11. How a translocating polypeptide inserts into the channel is uncertain, as cryo-EM structures of the active channel have a relatively low resolution (~10Å) or are of insufficient quality 6-8. Here we report a crystal structure of the active channel, assembled from SecY complex, the SecA ATPase, and a segment of a secretory protein fused into SecA. The translocating protein segment inserts into the channel as a loop, displacing the plug domain. The hydrophobic core of the signal sequence forms a helix that sits in a groove outside the lateral gate, while the following polypeptide segment intercalates into the gate. The C-terminal section of the polypeptide loop is located in the channel, surrounded by residues of the pore ring. Thus, during translocation, the hydrophobic segments of signal sequences, and probably bilayer-spanning domains of nascent membrane proteins, exit the lateral gate and dock at a specific site that faces the lipid phase. PMID:26950603

  15. Translocation of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins: conformation matters.

    PubMed

    de Marcos-Lousa, Carine; Sideris, Dionisia P; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2006-05-01

    Most of the mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins are generated without a presequence and their targeting depends on inadequately defined internal segments. Despite the numerous components of the import machinery identified by proteomics, the properties of hydrophobic import substrates remain poorly understood. Recent studies support several principles for these membrane proteins: first, they become organized into partially assembled forms within the translocon; second, they present noncontiguous targeting signals; and third, they induce conformational changes in translocase subunits, thereby mediating "assembly on demand" of the import machinery. It is possible that the energy needed for these proteins to pass across the outer membrane, to travel through the intermembrane space and to target the inner-membrane surface is provided by conformational changes involving import components that seem to have natively unfolded structures. Such structural malleability might render some of the translocase subunits more adept at driving the protein import process.

  16. Bioinformatic and mass spectrometry identification of Anaplasma phagocytophilum proteins translocated into host cell nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Sara H. G.; Garcia-Garcia, Jose C.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria have an arsenal of proteins that alter host cells to establish and maintain a hospitable environment for replication. Anaplasma phagocytophilum secrets Ankyrin A (AnkA), via a type IV secretion system, which translocates to the nucleus of its host cell, human neutrophils. A. phagocytophilum-infected neutrophils have dramatically altered phenotypes in part explained by AnkA-induced transcriptional alterations. However, it is unlikely that AnkA is the sole effector to account for infection-induced transcriptional changes. We developed a simple method combining bioinformatics and iTRAQ protein profiling to identify potential bacterial-derived nuclear-translocated proteins that could impact transcriptional programming in host cells. This approach identified 50 A. phagocytophilum candidate genes or proteins. The encoding genes were cloned to create GFP fusion protein-expressing clones that were transfected into HEK-293T cells. We confirmed nuclear translocation of six proteins: APH_0062, RplE, Hup, APH_0382, APH_0385, and APH_0455. Of the six, APH_0455 was identified as a type IV secretion substrate and is now under investigation as a potential nucleomodulin. Additionally, application of this approach to other intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia trachomatis and other intracellular bacteria identified multiple candidate genes to be investigated. PMID:25705208

  17. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  18. Real-time imaging of dynamic translocation of fluorescent proteins at synapses in living neurons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Koninck, Paul

    2003-02-01

    To understand the biology of living cells, such as the neurons in our brain, we focus on the molecular signaling interactions that proteins perform intracellularly. We have been studying the behavior of an enzyme, termed 'CaMKII', inside living neurons maintained in tissue culture. This enzyme plays a critical role in the control of synaptic transmission. Such role may involve the dynamic translocation of the enzyme at synaptic sites upon specific stimuli. To study this translocation, we use a cellular imaging technique that allows us to monitor the movement and targeting of CaMKII tagged by genetic engineering with a green fluorescent protein (GFP). We find that the enzyme translocates within seconds to synapses upon synaptic activation by neurotransmitter application. Our approach has lead to several key findings on the regulation of CaMKII translocation to the synapse and on its potential role in synaptic plasticity. However, several new advances in photonics and image analysis, which we will implement in our laboratory, will greatly help pushing the limits of our resolution of such type molecular event in living cells.

  19. Chimeric adaptor proteins translocate diverse type VI secretion system effectors in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Daniel; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Ötjengerdes, Rina; Wilton, Ashley; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-08-13

    Vibrio cholerae is a diverse species of Gram-negative bacteria, commonly found in the aquatic environment and the causative agent of the potentially deadly disease cholera. These bacteria employ a type VI secretion system (T6SS) when they encounter prokaryotic and eukaryotic competitors. This contractile puncturing device translocates a set of effector proteins into neighboring cells. Translocated effectors are toxic unless the targeted cell produces immunity proteins that bind and deactivate incoming effectors. Comparison of multiple V. cholerae strains indicates that effectors are encoded in T6SS effector modules on mobile genetic elements. We identified a diverse group of chimeric T6SS adaptor proteins required for the translocation of diverse effectors encoded in modules. An example for a T6SS effector that requires T6SS adaptor protein 1 (Tap-1) is TseL found in pandemic V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains and other clinical isolates. We propose a model in which Tap-1 is required for loading TseL onto the secretion apparatus. After T6SS-mediated TseL export is completed, Tap-1 is retained in the bacterial cell to load other T6SS machines.

  20. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  1. VirB/D4-dependent protein translocation from Agrobacterium into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Vergunst, A C; Schrammeijer, B; den Dulk-Ras, A; de Vlaam, C M; Regensburg-Tuïnk, T J; Hooykaas, P J

    2000-11-01

    The Agrobacterium VirB/D4 transport system mediates the transfer of a nucleoprotein T complex into plant cells, leading to crown gall disease. In addition, several Virulence proteins must somehow be transported to fulfill a function in planta. Here, we used fusions between Cre recombinase and VirE2 or VirF to directly demonstrate protein translocation into plant cells. Transport of the proteins was monitored by a Cre-mediated in planta recombination event resulting in a selectable phenotype and depended on the VirB/D4 transport system but did not require transferred DNA. PMID:11062129

  2. Ribonuclease-neutralized pancreatic microsomal membranes from livestock for in vitro co-translational protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Allan, Susanne; Provinciael, Becky; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Here, we demonstrate that pancreatic microsomal membranes from pigs, sheep, or cattle destined for human consumption can be used as a valuable and ethically correct alternative to dog microsomes for cell-free protein translocation. By adding adequate ribonuclease (RNase) inhibitors to the membrane fraction, successful in vitro co-translational translocation of wild-type and chimeric pre-prolactin into the lumen of rough microsomes was obtained. In addition, the human type I integral membrane proteins CD4 and VCAM-1 were efficiently glycosylated in RNase-treated microsomes. Thus, RNase-neutralized pancreatic membrane fractions from pig, cow, or sheep are a cheap, easily accessible, and fulfilling alternative to canine microsomes. PMID:26050631

  3. Translocator protein (TSPO) role in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Repalli, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Cellular damage and deregulated apoptotic cell death lead to functional impairment, and a main consequence of these events is aging. Cellular damage is initiated by different stress/risk factors such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and heavy metals. These stress/risk factors affect the cellular homeostasis by altering methylation status of several aging and Alzheimer's disease associated genes; these effects can be manifested immediately after exposure to stress and at later stages of life. However, when cellular damage exceeds certain threshold levels apoptosis is initiated. This review discusses the stress factors involved in cellular damage and the role and potential of TSPO-mediated cell death in aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease, which is also characterized by extensive cell death. Mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic death through the release of cytochrome c is regulated by TSPO, and increased expression of this protein is observed in both elderly people and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. TSPO forms and mediates opening of the mitochondrial membrane pore, mPTP and oxidizes cardiolipin, and these events lead to the leakage of apoptotic death mediators, such as cytochrome c, resulting in cell death. However, TSPO has many proposed functions and can also increase steroid synthesis, which leads to inhibition of inflammation and inhibition of the release of apoptotic factors, thereby decreasing cell damage and promoting cell survival. Thus, TSPO mediates apoptosis and decreases the cell damage, which in turn dictates the process of aging as well as the functionality of organs such as the brain. TSPO modulation with ligands in the Alzheimer's disease mouse model showed improvement in behavioral symptoms, and studies in Drosophila species showed increased cell survival and prolonged lifespan in flies after TSPO inhibition. These data suggest that since effects/signs of stress can manifest at any time, prevention through change in lifestyle and TSPO

  4. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  5. Protein translocation through the anthrax toxin transmembrane pore is driven by a proton gradient.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Bryan A; Finkelstein, Alan; Collier, R John

    2006-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) from anthrax toxin assembles into a homoheptamer on cell surfaces and forms complexes with the enzymatic components: lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Endocytic vesicles containing these complexes are acidified, causing the heptamer to transform into a transmembrane pore that chaperones the passage of unfolded LF and EF into the cytosol. We show in planar lipid bilayers that a physiologically relevant proton gradient (DeltapH, where the endosome is acidified relative to the cytosol) is a potent driving force for translocation of LF, EF and the LF amino-terminal domain (LFN) through the PA63 pore. DeltapH-driven translocation occurs even under a negligible membrane potential. We found that acidic endosomal conditions known to destabilize LFN correlate with an increased translocation rate. The hydrophobic heptad of lumen-facing Phe427 residues in PA (or phi clamp) drives translocation synergistically under a DeltapH. We propose that a Brownian ratchet mechanism proposed earlier for the phi clamp is cooperatively linked to a protonation-state, DeltapH-driven ratchet acting trans to the phi-clamp site. In a sense, the channel functions as a proton/protein symporter.

  6. Slowing down single-molecule trafficking through a protein nanopore reveals intermediates for peptide translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Roy, Mahua; Asandei, Alina; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Yoonkyung; Andricioaei, Ioan; Luchian, Tudor

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic details of how peptides translocate one at a time through nanopores are crucial determinants for transport through membrane pores and important in developing nano-technologies. To date, the translocation process has been too fast relative to the resolution of the single molecule techniques that sought to detect its milestones. Using pH-tuned single-molecule electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate how peptide passage through the α-hemolysin protein can be sufficiently slowed down to observe intermediate single-peptide sub-states associated to distinct structural milestones along the pore, and how to control residence time, direction and the sequence of spatio-temporal state-to-state dynamics of a single peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide translocation reveal the time- dependent ordering of intermediate structures of the translocating peptide inside the pore at atomic resolution. Calculations of the expected current ratios of the different pore-blocking microstates and their time sequencing are in accord with the recorded current traces.

  7. Single color FRET based measurements of conformational changes of proteins resulting from translocation inside cells.

    PubMed

    Gahl, Robert F; Tekle, Ephrem; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-03-15

    Translocation of proteins to different parts of the cell is necessary for many cellular mechanisms as a means for regulation and a variety of other functions. Identifying how these proteins undergo conformational changes or interact with various partners during these events is critical to understanding how these mechanisms are executed. A protocol is presented that identifies conformational changes in a protein that occur during translocation while overcoming challenges in extracting distance information in very different environments of a living cell. Only two samples are required to be prepared and are observed with one optical setup. Live-cell FRET imaging has been applied to identify conformational changes between two native cysteines in Bax, a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins that regulates apoptosis. Bax exists in the cytosol and translocates to the mitochondria outer membrane upon apoptosis induction. The distance, r, between the two native cysteines in the cytosolic structure of Bax necessitates the use of a FRET donor-accepter pair with R0~r as the most sensitive probe for identifying structural changes at these positions. Alexa Fluor 546 and Dabcyl, a dark acceptor, were used as FRET pairs - resulting in single color intensity variations of Alexa-546 as a measure of FRET efficiency. An internal reference, conjugated to Bax, was employed to normalize changes in fluorescence intensity of Alexa Fluor 546 due to inherent inhomogeneities in the living cell. This correction allowed the true FRET effects to be measured with increased precision during translocation. Normalization of intensities to the internal reference identified a FRET efficiency of 0.45±0.14 in the cytosol and 0.11±0.20 in the mitochondria. The procedure for the conjugation of the internal reference and FRET probes as well as the data analysis is presented.

  8. BCL2 protein expression in follicular lymphomas with t(14;18) chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Masir, Noraidah; Campbell, Lisa J; Goff, Lindsey K; Jones, Margaret; Marafioti, Teresa; Cordell, Jacqueline; Clear, Andrew J; Lister, T Andrew; Mason, David Y; Lee, Abigail M

    2009-03-01

    The t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation induces BCL2 protein overexpression in most follicular lymphomas. However the expression of BCL2 is not always homogeneous and may demonstrate a variable degree of heterogeneity. This study analysed BCL2 protein expression pattern in 33 cases of t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphomas using antibodies against two different epitopes (i.e. the widely used antibody BCL2/124 and an alternative antibody E17). 16/33 (49%) cases demonstrated strong BCL2 expression. In 10/33 (30%) cases, BCL2 expression was heterogeneous and in some of these, its loss appeared to be correlated with cell proliferation, as indicated by Ki67 expression. Double immunofluorescence labelling confirmed an inverse BCL2/Ki67 relationship, where in 24/28 (86%) cases cellular expression of BCL2 and Ki67 was mutually exclusive. In addition, seven BCL2 'pseudo-negative' cases were identified in which immunostaining was negative with antibody BCL2/124, but positive with antibody E17. Genomic DNA sequencing of these 'pseudo-negative' cases demonstrated eleven mutations in four cases and nine of these were missense mutations. It can be concluded that in follicular lymphomas, despite carrying the t(14;18) translocations, BCL2 protein expression may be heterogeneous and loss of BCL2 could be related to cell proliferation. Secondly, mutations in translocated BCL2 genes appear to be common and may cause BCL2 pseudo-negative immunostaining. PMID:19120369

  9. a Computational Approach to Explore Protein Translocation Through Type III Secretion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) that is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. Interestingly, the electronegative channel interior creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, while the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally-known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region have also such electronegative interior, while effector proteins have considerable electronegative patches on their surfaces. Based on these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the TTSA. This mechanism is supported by the suggestion that an ATPase is required for protein translocation through these nanomachines, which may provide the energy to overcome the initial electrostatic energy barrier. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported.

  10. Genetic and biochemical characterization of ISP6, a small mitochondrial outer membrane protein associated with the protein translocation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kassenbrock, C K; Cao, W; Douglas, M G

    1993-01-01

    To search genetically for additional components of the protein translocation apparatus of mitochondria, we have used low fidelity PCR mutagenesis to generate temperature-sensitive mutants in the outer membrane translocation pore component ISP42. A high copy number suppressor of temperature-sensitive isp42 has been isolated and sequenced. This novel gene, denoted ISP6, encodes a 61 amino acid integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is oriented with its amino-terminus facing the cytosol. Disruption of the ISP6 gene is without apparent effect in wild type yeast cells, but is lethal in temperature-sensitive isp42 mutants. Immunoprecipitation of the gene product, ISP42p, from mitochondria solubilized under mild conditions reveals a multi-protein complex containing ISP6p and ISP42p. Images PMID:8344244

  11. Topology and functional domains of Sec63p, an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for secretory protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Feldheim, D; Rothblatt, J; Schekman, R

    1992-01-01

    SEC63 encodes a protein required for secretory protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (J. A. Rothblatt, R. J. Deshaies, S. L. Sanders, G. Daum, and R. Schekman, J. Cell Biol. 109:2641-2652, 1989). Antibody directed against a recombinant form of the protein detects a 73-kDa polypeptide which, by immunofluorescence microscopy, is localized to the nuclear envelope-ER network. Cell fractionation and protease protection experiments confirm the prediction that Sec63p is an integral membrane protein. A series of SEC63-SUC2 fusion genes was created to assess the topology of Sec63p within the ER membrane. The largest hybrid proteins are unglycosylated, suggesting that the carboxyl terminus of Sec63p faces the cytosol. Invertase fusion to a loop in Sec63p that is flanked by two putative transmembrane domains produces an extensively glycosylated hybrid protein. This loop, which is homologous to the amino terminus of the Escherichia coli heat shock protein, DnaJ, is likely to face the ER lumen. By analogy to the interaction of the DnaJ and Hsp70-like DnaK proteins in E. coli, the DnaJ loop of Sec63p may recruit luminal Hsp70 (BiP/GRP78/Kar2p) to the translocation apparatus. Mutations in two highly conserved positions of the DnaJ loop and short deletions of the carboxyl terminus inactivate Sec63p activity. Sec63p associates with several other proteins, including Sec61p, a 31.5-kDa glycoprotein, and a 23-kDa protein, and together with these proteins may constitute part of the polypeptide translocation apparatus. A nonfunctional DnaJ domain mutant allele does not interfere with the formation of the Sec63p/Sec61p/gp31.5/p23 complex. Images PMID:1620130

  12. Phenethyl alcohol disorders phospholipid acyl chains and promotes translocation of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c across a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Jordi, W; Nibbeling, R; de Kruijff, B

    1990-02-12

    The interaction of phenethyl alcohol with model membranes and its effect on translocation of the chemically prepared mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c across a lipid bilayer was studied. Phenethyl alcohol efficiently penetrates into monolayers and causes acyl chain disordering judged from deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements with specific acyl chain-deuterated phospholipids. Translocation of apocytochrome c across a phospholipid bilayer was stimulated on addition of phenethyl alcohol indicating that the efficiency of translocation of this precursor protein is enhanced due to a disorder of the acyl chain region of the bilayer.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  14. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Yarkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  15. Subcellular Dynamics of Multifunctional Protein Regulation: Mechanisms of GAPDH Intracellular Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sirover, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) exhibit distinct activities unrelated to their originally identified functions. Apart from glycolysis, GAPDH participates in iron metabolism, membrane trafficking, histone biosynthesis, the maintenance of DNA integrity and receptor mediated cell signaling. Further, multifunctional proteins exhibit distinct changes in their subcellular localization reflecting their new activities. As such, GAPDH is not only a cytosolic protein but is localized in the membrane, the nucleus, polysomes, the ER and the Golgi. In addition, although the initial subcellular localizations of multifunctional proteins may be of significance, dynamic changes in intracellular distribution may occur as a consequence of those new activities. As such, regulatory mechanisms may exist through which cells control multifunctional protein expression as a function of their subcellular localization. The temporal sequence through which subcellular translocation and the acquisition of new GAPDH functions is considered as well as post-translational modification as a basis for its intracellular transport. PMID:22388977

  16. N-terminal lysines are essential for protein translocation via a modified ERAD system in complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Lau, Julia B; Stork, Simone; Moog, Daniel; Sommer, Maik S; Maier, Uwe G

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear-encoded pre-proteins being imported into complex plastids of red algal origin have to cross up to five membranes. Thereby, transport across the second outermost or periplastidal membrane (PPM) is facilitated by SELMA (symbiont-specific ERAD-like machinery), an endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD)-derived machinery. Core components of SELMA are enzymes involved in ubiquitination (E1-E3), a Cdc48 ATPase complex and Derlin proteins. These components are present in all investigated organisms with four membrane-bound complex plastids of red algal origin, suggesting a ubiquitin-dependent translocation process of substrates mechanistically similar to the process of retro-translocation in ERAD. Even if, according to the current model, translocation via SELMA does not end up in the classical poly-ubiquitination, transient mono-/oligo-ubiquitination of pre-proteins might be required for the mechanism of translocation. We investigated the import mechanism of SELMA and were able to show that protein transport across the PPM depends on lysines in the N-terminal but not in the C-terminal part of pre-proteins. These lysines are predicted to be targets of ubiquitination during the translocation process. As proteins lacking the N-terminal lysines get stuck in the PPM, a 'frozen intermediate' of the translocation process could be envisioned and initially characterized.

  17. The type III protein translocation system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli involves EspA-EspB protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Neves, B C; Wallis, T; Shaw, R K; Hale, C; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2000-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), like many bacterial pathogens, use a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins across the bacterial cell wall. In EPEC, four proteins, EspA, EspB, EspD and Tir are known to be exported by a type III secretion system and to be essential for 'attaching and effacing' (A/E) lesion formation, the hallmark of EPEC pathogenicity. EspA was recently shown to be a structural protein and a major component of a large, transiently expressed, filamentous surface organelle which forms a direct link between the bacterium and the host cell. In contrast, EspB is translocated into the host cell where it is localized to both membrane and cytosolic cell fractions. EspA and EspB are required for translocation of Tir to the host cell membrane suggesting that they may both be components of the translocation apparatus. In this study, we show that EspB co-immunoprecipitates with the EspA filaments and that, during EPEC infection of HEp-2 cells, EspB localizes closely with EspA. Using a number of binding assays, we also show that EspB can bind and be copurified with EspA. Nevertheless, binding of EspA filaments to the host cell membranes occurred even in the absence of EspB. These results suggest that following initial attachment of the EspA filaments to the target cells, EspB is delivered into the host cell membrane and that the interaction between EspA and EspB may be important for protein translocation.

  18. Expression and translocation of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dascher, C; Roll, D; Bavoil, P M

    1993-12-01

    The entire gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A tightly regulated T7 promoter is used to control expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Upon induction of expression, the precursor (pre-MOMP) is synthesized in the cell. This is followed by the appearance of a lower molecular weight protein that comigrates with mature MOMP from chlamydial elementary bodies by both one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. When E. coli cells expressing MOMP are converted to spheroplasts and subjected to protease treatment, MOMP is quantitatively degraded while cytoplasmic pre-MOMP is protected from degradation. Whole cells subjected to the same protease treatment show no degradation of MOMP. Furthermore, MOMP is not detected in surface-labeling experiments using several MOMP-specific antibodies. These data indicate that pre-MOMP is translocated to the periplasmic space and processed but is not surface exposed in E. coli. Expression of MOMP in this system causes a significant reduction in cell viability. In addition, coexpression in E. coli of MOMP or a MOMP-PhoA fusion with various chaperone proteins does not alter the level of MOMP translocation.

  19. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2. PMID:27165942

  20. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  1. Heterologous expression of Translocated promoter region protein, Tpr, identified as a transcription factor from Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Dixit, Aparna

    2011-05-01

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated that the 35 kDa isoform of Translocated promoter region protein (Tpr) of Rattus norvegicus was able to augment c-jun transcription efficiently. Identification of direct targets that may in part downregulate c-jun transcription might prove to be an ideal target to curtail the proliferation of normal cells under pathophysiological conditions. In order to evaluate its potential as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified in sufficiently high yields. In the present study, we report the high level expression of Tpr protein of R. norvegicus employing heterologous host, Escherichia coli, to permit its structural characterization in great detail. We here demonstrate that the Tpr protein was expressed in soluble form and approximately 90 mg/L of the purified protein at the shake flask level could be achieved to near homogeneity using single step-metal chelate affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed by mass spectroscopic analysis. The highly unstable and disordered Tpr protein was imparted structural and functional stability by the addition of glycerol and it has been shown that the natively unfolded Tpr protein retains DNA binding ability under these conditions only. Thus, the present study emphasizes the significance of an efficient prokaryotic system, which results in a high level soluble expression of a DNA binding protein of eukaryotic origin. Thus, the present strategy employed for purification of the R. norvegicus Tpr protein bypasses the need for the tedious expression strategies associated with the eukaryotic expression systems.

  2. Proton transfer is rate-limiting for translocation of precursor proteins by the Escherichia coli translocase.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Wickner, W

    1991-01-01

    The protonmotive force stimulates translocation in vivo, in crude in vitro reactions, and in a purified, reconstituted reaction. Translocation activity is a function of the pH at the inner face of the membrane. Both the transmembrane pH gradient and the transmembrane electrical potential stimulate translocation. A late-stage translocation intermediate of the proOmpA preprotein completes its translocation in the absence of ATP when a protonmotive force is imposed. This completion of translocation is retarded by a factor of greater than 3 in deuterium oxide relative to water, demonstrating that translocation involves proton-transfer reactions in rate-limiting steps. Images PMID:1826054

  3. Signal-on Protein Detection via Dye Translocation between Aptamer and Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Chi, Chun-Wei; Friedrich, Sarah M; Peck, Konan; Wang, Tza-Huei; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2016-05-18

    A unique interaction between the cyanine dye and negatively charged quantum dot is used to construct a signal-on biaptameric quantum dot (QD) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) beacon for protein detection and distinct aptamer characterization. The beacon comprises a pair of aptamers, one intercalated with the cyanine dye (YOYO-3) and the other conjugated to a negatively charged, carboxyl-QD. When the target protein is present, structural folding and sandwich association of the two aptamers take place. As a consequence, YOYO-3 is displaced from the folded aptamer and transferred to the unblocked QD surface to yield a target concentration-dependent FRET signal. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of thrombin ranging from nanomolar to submicromolar concentrations and confirm the dye translocation using cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy (CICS). The proposed beacon provides a simple, rapid, signal-on FRET detection for protein as well as a potential platform for distinct aptamer screening.

  4. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  5. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  6. A novel IRS-1-associated protein, DGKζ regulates GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, TingYu; Yu, BuChin; Kakino, Mamoru; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Ando, Yasutoshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) are major targets of insulin receptor tyrosine kinases. Here we identified diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) as an IRS-1-associated protein, and examined roles of DGKζ in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane. When DGKζ was knocked-down in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, insulin-induced GLUT4 translocation was inhibited without affecting other mediators of insulin-dependent signaling. Similarly, knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase 1α (PIP5K1α), which had been reported to interact with DGKζ, also inhibited insulin-induced GLUT4 translocation. Moreover, DGKζ interacted with IRS-1 without insulin stimulation, but insulin stimulation decreased this interaction. Over-expression of sDGKζ (short-form DGKζ), which competed out DGKζ from IRS-1, enhanced GLUT4 translocation without insulin stimulation. Taking these results together with the data showing that cellular PIP5K activity was correlated with GLUT4 translocation ability, we concluded that IRS-1-associated DGKζ prevents GLUT4 translocation in the absence of insulin and that the DGKζ dissociated from IRS-1 by insulin stimulation enhances GLUT4 translocation through PIP5K1α activity. PMID:27739494

  7. Adaptation of Clostridium difficile toxin A for use as a protein translocation system

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, Stephanie M.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Catalytic domain of TcdA was replaced by a luciferase reporter. {yields} Each functional domain retains activity in the context of the fusion protein. {yields} We provide evidence that reporter proteins are delivered into vero cells. {yields} System releases cargo into the cytosol, providing a powerful new biotechnology tool. -- Abstract: A cellular delivery system is a useful biotechnology tool, with many possible applications. Two derivatives of Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) have been constructed (GFP-TcdA and Luc-TcdA), by fusing reporter genes to functional domains of TcdA, and evaluated for their ability to translocate their cargo into mammalian cells. The cysteine protease and receptor binding domains of TcdA have been examined and found to be functional when expressed in the chimeric construct. Whereas GFP failed to internalize in the context of the TcdA fusion, significant cellular luciferase activity was detected in vero cell lysates after treatment with Luc-TcdA. Treatment with bafilomycin A1, which inhibits endosomal acidification, traps the luciferase activity within endosomes. To further understand these results, clarified lysates were subjected to molecular weight sieving, demonstrating that active luciferase was released from Luc-TcdA after translocation and internal processing.

  8. Endocytosis Regulates Cell Soma Translocation and the Distribution of Adhesion Proteins in Migrating Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jennifer C.; Schaar, Bruce T.; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brodsky, Frances M.; McConnell, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final location to form a properly functioning nervous system. During these movements, young neurons must attach and subsequently detach from their substrate to facilitate migration, but little is known about the mechanisms cells use to release their attachments. We show that the machinery for clathrin-mediated endocytosis is positioned to regulate the distribution of adhesion proteins in a subcellular region just proximal to the neuronal cell body. Inhibiting clathrin or dynamin function impedes the movement of migrating neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting dynamin function in vitro shifts the distribution of adhesion proteins to the rear of the cell. These results suggest that endocytosis may play a critical role in regulating substrate detachment to enable cell body translocation in migrating neurons. PMID:21445347

  9. Translocation of double-stranded DNA through membrane-adapted phi29 motor protein nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, David; Jing, Peng; Geng, Jia; Subramaniam, Varuni; Lee, Tae Jin; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    Biological pores have been used to study the transport of DNA and other molecules, but most pores have channels that allow only the movement of small molecules and single-stranded DNA and RNA. The bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging motor, which allows double-stranded DNA to enter the virus during maturation and exit during an infection, contains a connector protein with a channel that is between 3.6 and 6 nm wide. Here we show that a modified version of this connector protein, when reconstituted into liposomes and inserted into planar lipid bilayers, allows the translocation of double-stranded DNA. The measured conductance of a single connector channel was 4.8 nS in 1 M KCl. This engineered and membrane-adapted phage connector is expected to have applications in microelectromechanical sensing, microreactors, gene delivery, drug loading and DNA sequencing.

  10. Prediction of nuclear proteins using nuclear translocation signals proposed by probabilistic latent semantic indexing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of subcellular localization in proteins is crucial to elucidate cellular processes and molecular functions in a cell. However, given a tremendous amount of sequence data generated in the post-genomic era, determining protein localization based on biological experiments can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, developing prediction systems to analyze uncharacterised proteins efficiently has played an important role in high-throughput protein analyses. In a eukaryotic cell, many essential biological processes take place in the nucleus. Nuclear proteins shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm based on recognition of nuclear translocation signals, including nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear export signals (NESs). Currently, only a few approaches have been developed specifically to predict nuclear localization using sequence features, such as putative NLSs. However, it has been shown that prediction coverage based on the NLSs is very low. In addition, most existing approaches only attained prediction accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) around 54%~70% and 0.250~0.380 on independent test set, respectively. Moreover, no predictor can generate sequence motifs to characterize features of potential NESs, in which biological properties are not well understood from existing experimental studies. Results In this study, first we propose PSLNuc (Protein Subcellular Localization prediction for Nucleus) for predicting nuclear localization in proteins. First, for feature representation, a protein is represented by gapped-dipeptides and the feature values are weighted by homology information from a smoothed position-specific scoring matrix. After that, we incorporate probabilistic latent semantic indexing (PLSI) for feature reduction. Finally, the reduced features are used as input for a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In addition to PSLNuc, we further identify gapped-dipeptide signatures for putative NLSs and NESs

  11. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-07-15

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca(2+)- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations ("spiking") at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K(+) depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca(2+)]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca(2+)]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function.

  12. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca2+- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations (“spiking”) at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K+ depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca2+]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca2+]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  13. Tic21 Is an Essential Translocon Component for Protein Translocation across the Chloroplast Inner Envelope Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yi-Shan; Su, Yi-shin; Chen, Lih-Jen; Lee, Yong Jik; Hwang, Inhwan; Li, Hsou-min

    2006-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective in chloroplast protein import was isolated and the mutant locus, cia5, identified by map-based cloning. CIA5 is a 21-kD integral membrane protein in the chloroplast inner envelope membrane with four predicted transmembrane domains, similar to another potential chloroplast inner membrane protein-conducting channel, At Tic20, and the mitochondrial inner membrane counterparts Tim17, Tim22, and Tim23. cia5 null mutants were albino and accumulated unprocessed precursor proteins. cia5 mutant chloroplasts were normal in targeting and binding of precursors to the chloroplast surface but were defective in protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane. Expression levels of CIA5 were comparable to those of major translocon components, such as At Tic110 and At Toc75, except during germination, at which stage At Tic20 was expressed at its highest level. A double mutant of cia5 At tic20-I had the same phenotype as the At tic20-I single mutant, suggesting that CIA5 and At Tic20 function similarly in chloroplast biogenesis, with At Tic20 functioning earlier in development. We renamed CIA5 as Arabidopsis Tic21 (At Tic21) and propose that it functions as part of the inner membrane protein-conducting channel and may be more important for later stages of leaf development. PMID:16891400

  14. Multifunctional roles for the protein translocation machinery in RNA anchoring to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J; Moseley, Arthur M; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-09-12

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis.

  15. Serotonin transporter (SERT) and translocator protein (TSPO) expression in the obese ob/ob mouse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An ever growing body of evidences is emerging concerning metabolism hormones, neurotransmitters or stress-related biomarkers as effective modulators of eating behavior and body weight in mammals. The present study sought at examining the density and affinity of two proteins related to neurotransmission and cell metabolism, the serotonin transporter SERT and the cholesterol import-benzodiazepine site TSPO (translocator protein), in a rodent leptin-lacking mutant, the obese ob/ob mouse. Binding studies were thus carried out in brain or peripheral tissues, blood platelets (SERT) and kidneys (TSPO), of ob/ob and WT mice supplied with a standard diet, using the selective radiochemical ligands [3H]-paroxetine and [3H]-PK11195. Results We observed comparable SERT number or affinity in brain and platelets of ob/ob and WT mice, whilst a significantly higher [3H]-PK11195 density was reported in the brain of ob/ob animals. TSPO binding parameters were similar in the kidneys of all tested mice. By [3H]-PK11195 autoradiography of coronal hypothalamic-hippocampal sections, an increased TSPO signal was detected in the dentate gyrus (hippocampus) and choroids plexus of ob/ob mice, without appreciable changes in the cortex or hypothalamic-thalamic regions. Conclusions These findings show that TSPO expression is up-regulated in cerebral regions of ob/ob leptin-deficient mice, suggesting a role of the translocator protein in leptin-dependent CNS trophism and metabolism. Unchanged SERT in mutant mice is discussed herein in the context of previous literature as the forerunner to a deeper biochemical investigation. PMID:21299850

  16. Translocation of an 89-kDa periplasmic protein is associated with Holospora infection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Koichi; Dohra, Hideo; Lang, B. Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Hori, Manabu; Fujishima, Masahiro . E-mail: fujishim@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-02

    The symbiotic bacterium Holospora obtusa infects the macronucleus of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. After ingestion by its host, an infectious form of Holospora with an electron-translucent tip passes through the host digestive vacuole and penetrates the macronuclear envelope with this tip. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this process, we raised a monoclonal antibody against the tip-specific 89-kDa protein, sequenced this partially, and identified the corresponding complete gene. The deduced protein sequence carries two actin-binding motifs. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy shows that during escape from the host digestive vacuole, the 89-kDa proteins translocates from the inside to the outside of the tip. When the bacterium invades the macronucleus, the 89-kDa protein is left behind at the entry point of the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of fine fibrous structures that co-localize with the antibody-labeled regions of the bacterium. Our findings suggest that the 89-kDa protein plays a role in Holospora's escape from the host digestive vacuole, the migration through the host cytoplasm, and the invasion into the macronucleus.

  17. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein's folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca(2+)-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  18. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  19. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  20. Visualization of VirE2 protein translocation by the Agrobacterium type IV secretion system into host cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakalis, Philippe A; van Heusden, G Paul H; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2014-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) can mediate the translocation of bacterial virulence proteins into host cells. The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens uses a T4SS to deliver a VirD2-single stranded DNA complex as well as the virulence proteins VirD5, VirE2, VirE3, and VirF into host cells so that these become genetically transformed. Besides plant cells, yeast and fungi can efficiently be transformed by Agrobacterium. Translocation of virulence proteins by the T4SS has so far only been shown indirectly by genetic approaches. Here we report the direct visualization of VirE2 protein translocation by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and Split GFP visualization strategies. To this end, we cocultivated Agrobacterium strains expressing VirE2 tagged with one part of a fluorescent protein with host cells expressing the complementary part, either fused to VirE2 (for BiFC) or not (Split GFP). Fluorescent filaments became visible in recipient cells 20–25 h after the start of the cocultivation indicative of VirE2 protein translocation. Evidence was obtained that filament formation was due to the association of VirE2 with the microtubuli. PMID:24376037

  1. Visualization of VirE2 protein translocation by the Agrobacterium type IV secretion system into host cells.

    PubMed

    Sakalis, Philippe A; van Heusden, G Paul H; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2014-02-01

    Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) can mediate the translocation of bacterial virulence proteins into host cells. The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens uses a T4SS to deliver a VirD2-single stranded DNA complex as well as the virulence proteins VirD5, VirE2, VirE3, and VirF into host cells so that these become genetically transformed. Besides plant cells, yeast and fungi can efficiently be transformed by Agrobacterium. Translocation of virulence proteins by the T4SS has so far only been shown indirectly by genetic approaches. Here we report the direct visualization of VirE2 protein translocation by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and Split GFP visualization strategies. To this end, we cocultivated Agrobacterium strains expressing VirE2 tagged with one part of a fluorescent protein with host cells expressing the complementary part, either fused to VirE2 (for BiFC) or not (Split GFP). Fluorescent filaments became visible in recipient cells 20-25 h after the start of the cocultivation indicative of VirE2 protein translocation. Evidence was obtained that filament formation was due to the association of VirE2 with the microtubuli. PMID:24376037

  2. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  3. Ethanol and diolein stimulate PKC (protein kinase C) translocation in astroglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Skwish, S. ); Shain, W. New York State Department of Health, Albany )

    1990-01-01

    Ethanol exposure stimulates taurine release from astroglial cells. To determine if ethanol mediates this release using protein kinase C (PKC), PKC activity was measured using LRM55 astroglial cells. When ethanol or diolein was applied to cells for 30 seconds, PKC activity was observed to decrease in the cytosol and increase in the membrane fraction of the cell while the whole cell activity remained unchanged. The membrane-associated activity increased by almost 100%. When ethanol and diolein were applied simultaneously, membrane-associated activity increased to become 3-5 times greater than when either PKC activator was applied alone. These changes in PKC activity parallel changes in taurine release observed when cells are exposed to ethanol and the PKC activator diolein. Ethanol-stimulated release may be associated with the translocation of PKC activity from the cytosol to the membrane.

  4. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Translocates from the Cytosol to Mitochondria during UV-Induced Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Shengnan; Feng, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic structures that frequently divide and fuse with one another to form interconnecting network. This network disintegrates into punctiform organelles during apoptosis. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are still not well characterized. In this study, we investigate the role of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPase that mediates outer mitochondrial membrane fission, in mitochondrial dynamics in response to UV irradiation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-α-1) and HeLa cells. Using time-lapse fluorescent imaging, we find that Drp1 primarily distributes in cytosol under physiological conditions. After UV treatment, Drp1 translocates from cytosol to mitochondria, indicating the enhancement of Drp1 mitochondrial accumulation. Our results suggest that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of transition from an interconnecting network to a punctiform mitochondrial phenotype during UV-induced apoptosis.

  5. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein’s folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca2+-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  6. Evidence for contractile protein translocation in macrophage spreading, phagocytosis, and phagolysosome formation.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, J H; Davies, W A; Stossel, T P

    1977-12-01

    Macrophage pseudopodia that surround objects during phagocytosis contain a meshwork of actin filaments and exclude organelles. Between these pseudopodia at the base of developing phagosomes, the organelle exclusion ceases, and lysosomes enter the cell periphery to fuse with the phagosomes. Macrophages also extend hyaline pseudopodia on the surface of nylon wool fibers and secrete lysosomal enzymes into the extracellular medium instead of into phagosomes. To analyze biochemically these concurrent alterations in cytoplasmic architecture, we allowed rabbit lung macrophages to spread on nylon wool fibers and then subjected the adherent cells to shear. This procedure caused the selective release of beta-glucoronidase into the extracellular medium and yielded two fractions, cell bodies and isolated pseudopod blebs resembling podosomes, which are plasma-lemma-bounded sacs of cortical cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic extracts of the cell bodies eluted from nylon fibers contained two-thirds less actin-binding protein and myosin, and approximately 20 percent less actin and two-thirds of the other two proteins were accounted for in podosomes. The alterations in protein composition correlated with assays of myosin-associated EDTA-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity, and with a diminution in the capacity of extracts of nylon wool fiber-treated cell bodies to gel, a property dependent on the interaction between actin-binding protein and F-actin. However, the capacity of the remaining actin in cell bodies to polymerize did not change. We propose that actin-binding protein and myosin are concentrated in the cell cortex and particularly in pseudopodia where prominent gelation and syneresis of actin occur. Actin in the regions from which actin-binding protein and myosin are displaced disaggregates without depolymerizing, permitting lysosomes to gain access to the plasmalemma. Translocation of contractile proteins could therefore account for the concomitant differences in organelle

  7. Unfolding and translocation pathway of substrate protein controlled by structure in repetitive allosteric cycles of the ClpY ATPase.

    PubMed

    Kravats, Andrea; Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2011-02-01

    Clp ATPases are ring-shaped AAA+ motors in the degradation pathway that perform critical actions of unfolding and translocating substrate proteins (SPs) through narrow pores to deliver them to peptidase components. These actions are effected by conserved diaphragm-forming loops found in the central channel of the Clp ATPase hexamer. Conformational changes, that take place in the course of repetitive ATP-driven cycles, result in mechanical forces applied by the central channel loops onto the SP. We use coarse-grained simulations to elucidate allostery-driven mechanisms of unfolding and translocation of a tagged four-helix bundle protein by the ClpY ATPase. Unfolding is initiated at the tagged C-terminal region via an obligatory intermediate. The resulting nonnative conformation is competent for translocation, which proceeds on a different time scale than unfolding and involves sharp stepped transitions. Completion of the translocation process requires assistance from the ClpQ peptidase. These mechanisms contrast nonallosteric mechanical unfolding of the SP. In atomic force microscopy experiments, multiple unfolding pathways are available and large mechanical forces are required to unravel the SP relative to those exerted by the central channel loops of ClpY. SP threading through a nonallosteric ClpY nanopore involves simultaneous unfolding and translocation effected by strong pulling forces.

  8. Signal-on Protein Detection via Dye Translocation between Aptamer and Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Chi, Chun-Wei; Friedrich, Sarah M; Peck, Konan; Wang, Tza-Huei; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2016-05-18

    A unique interaction between the cyanine dye and negatively charged quantum dot is used to construct a signal-on biaptameric quantum dot (QD) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) beacon for protein detection and distinct aptamer characterization. The beacon comprises a pair of aptamers, one intercalated with the cyanine dye (YOYO-3) and the other conjugated to a negatively charged, carboxyl-QD. When the target protein is present, structural folding and sandwich association of the two aptamers take place. As a consequence, YOYO-3 is displaced from the folded aptamer and transferred to the unblocked QD surface to yield a target concentration-dependent FRET signal. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of thrombin ranging from nanomolar to submicromolar concentrations and confirm the dye translocation using cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy (CICS). The proposed beacon provides a simple, rapid, signal-on FRET detection for protein as well as a potential platform for distinct aptamer screening. PMID:27101438

  9. Structure-to-function relationships of bacterial translocator protein (TSPO): a focus on Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Connil, Nathalie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), which was previously designated as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a 3.5 billion year-old evolutionarily conserved protein expressed by most Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, but its organization and functions differ remarkably. By taking advantage of the genomic data available on TSPO, we focused on bacterial TSPO and attempted to define functions of TSPO in Pseudomonas via in silico approaches. A tspo ortholog has been identified in several fluorescent Pseudomonas. This protein presents putative binding motifs for cholesterol and PK 11195, which is a specific drug ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. While it is a common surface distribution, the sense of insertion and membrane localization differ between α- and γ-proteobacteria. Experimental published data and STRING analysis of common TSPO partners in fluorescent Pseudomonas indicate a potential role of TSPO in the oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis and virulence expression. In these bacteria, TSPO could also take part in signal transduction and in the preservation of membrane integrity.

  10. Nuclear translocation of the cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, upon induction of skeletal muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambier, Linda; Pomies, Pascal

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, is expressed in differentiated skeletal muscle. {yields} smALP is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts upon induction of myogenesis. {yields} The differentiation-dependent nuclear translocation of smALP occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. {yields} The LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear accumulation of the protein. {yields} smALP might act in the nucleus to control some critical aspect of the muscle differentiation process. -- Abstract: The skALP isoform has been shown to play a critical role in actin organization and anchorage within the Z-discs of skeletal muscles, but no data is available on the function of the smALP isoform in skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that upon induction of differentiation a nuclear translocation of smALP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts, concomitant to an up-regulation of the protein expression, occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear translocation of the protein.

  11. Nuclear translocation of IQGAP1 protein upon exposure to puromycin aminonucleoside in cultured human podocytes: ERK pathway involvement.

    PubMed

    Rigothier, Claire; Saleem, Moin Ahson; Bourget, Chantal; Mathieson, Peter William; Combe, Christian; Welsh, Gavin Iain

    2016-10-01

    IQGAP1, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to slit diaphragm proteins, is involved in podocyte motility and permeability. Its regulation in glomerular disease is not known. We have exposed human podocytes to puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), an inducer of nephrotic syndrome in rats, and studied the effects on IQGAP1 biology and function. In human podocytes exposed to PAN, a nuclear translocation of IQGAP1 was observed by immunocytolocalization and confirmed by Western blot after selective nuclear/cytoplasmic extraction. In contrast to IQGAP1, IQGAP2 expression remained cytoplasmic. IQGAP1 nuclear translocation was associated with a significant decrease in its interaction with nephrin and podocalyxin. Activation of the ERK pathway was observed in PAN treated podocytes with a preponderant nuclear localization of the phosphorylated form of ERK (P-ERK). The interaction between IQGAP1 and P-ERK increased upon podocyte exposure to PAN. Inhibitors of ERK pathway activation blocked IQGAP1 nuclear translocation (p<0.02). Chromatin interaction protein assays demonstrated an interaction of IQGAP1 with chromatin and with Histone H3, which increased in response to PAN. In summary, PAN induces the ERK dependent translocation of IQGAP1 into the nuclei in human podocytes which leads to the interaction of IQGAP1 with chromatin and Histone H3, and decreased interactions between IQGAP1 and slit-diaphragm proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 may have a role in podocyte gene regulation in glomerular disease.

  12. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  13. PK11195 effect on steroidogenesis is not mediated through the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2015-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of unknown function with high physiological expression in steroidogenic cells. Using TSPO gene-deleted mice, we recently demonstrated that TSPO function is not essential for steroidogenesis. The first link between TSPO and steroidogenesis was established in studies showing modest increases in progesterone production by adrenocortical and Leydig tumor cell lines after treatment with PK11195. To reconcile discrepancies between physiological and pharmacological interpretations of TSPO function, we generated TSPO-knockout MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) and examined their steroidogenic potential after exposure to either dibutyryl-cAMP or PK11195. Progesterone production in MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ after dibutyryl-cAMP was not different from control MA-10:Tspo+/+ cells, confirming that TSPO function is not essential for steroidogenesis. Interestingly, when treated with increasing concentrations of PK11195, both control MA-10:Tspo+/+ cells and MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells responded in a similar dose-dependent manner showing increases in progesterone production. These results show that the pharmacological effect of PK11195 on steroidogenesis is not mediated through TSPO.

  14. Translocation of capsular polysaccharides in pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli requires a 60-kilodalton periplasmic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R P; Aaronson, W; Vann, W F

    1987-01-01

    An 11.6-kilobase (kb) region of a 34-kb fragment of Escherichia coli DNA that encodes the K1 capsular polysaccharide genes is necessary for translocation of the K1 polysaccharide to the bacterial cell surface. This 11.6-kb region contains a gene, kpsD, encoding a 60-kilodalton protein. The kpsD gene was localized to a 2.4-kb PstI-BamHI fragment. Cells harboring a Tn1000 insertion in kpsD did not synthesize the 60-kilodalton protein and did not express polysaccharide on the cell surface. Immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts, however, demonstrated that K1 polysaccharide was synthesized by these cells. We present evidence that the kpsD gene product is synthesized as a precursor and that the processed form is located in the periplasmic space. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity of a kpsD-phoA fusion demonstrated that kpsD expression was under positive regulation. A 260-base-pair AluI fragment located within the kpsD coding sequence was used as a probe and was found to hybridize to chromosomal DNA from E. coli that synthesizes the K2, K5, K7, K12, and K13 capsular polysaccharides but not K3 and K100. These results suggest that the kpsD gene product may be required for export not only of K1 but for other K antigens as well. Images PMID:3119565

  15. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Health and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Amani; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein found primarily in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Although TSPO is found in many tissue types, it is expressed at the highest levels under normal conditions in tissues that synthesize steroids. TSPO has been associated with cholesterol import into mitochondria, a key function in steroidogenesis, and directly or indirectly with multiple other cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, anion transport, porphyrin transport, heme synthesis, and regulation of mitochondrial function. Aberrant expression of TSPO has been linked to multiple diseases, including cancer, brain injury, neurodegeneration, and ischemia reperfusion injury. There has been an effort during the last decade to understand the mechanisms regulating tissue- and disease-specific TSPO expression and to identify pharmacological means to control its expression. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the chemicals, hormones, and molecular mechanisms regulating Tspo gene expression under physiological conditions in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The results described here provide evidence that the PKCε-ERK1/2-AP1/Stat3 signal transduction pathway is the primary regulator of Tspo gene expression in normal and pathological tissues expressing high levels of TSPO. PMID:20600583

  16. Protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions in pharmacology: the case of the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Hatty, Claire R; Banati, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    The targets of many small molecule drugs are membrane proteins, and traditionally the focus of pharmacology is on the interaction between such receptors and their small molecule drug ligands. However, the lipid membranes of cells and organelles are increasingly appreciated as diverse and dynamic structures that also specifically interact with small molecule drugs and peptides, causing profound changes in the properties of these membranes, and modulating the function of the membrane and the proteins within it. Drug-membrane interactions are likely to have a role in both the therapeutic and toxic activity of a variety of compounds, and their role in the overall pharmacological effect of a drug needs to be understood more clearly. This is the case for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and its ligands, where functions that were established based on pharmacological studies are being called into question. Re-examining the putative functions of the TSPO and the effects of its ligands reveals a need to consider in more detail the interplay between protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions, and the modulatory relationship between TSPO and the lipid membrane.

  17. Identification of functional domains of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator protein (ARNT).

    PubMed Central

    Reisz-Porszasz, S; Probst, M R; Fukunaga, B N; Hankinson, O

    1994-01-01

    The activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) bind DNA as a heterodimer. Both proteins represent a novel class of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-containing transcription factors in that (i) activation of AHR requires the binding of ligand (e.g., 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD]), (ii) the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) recognized by the AHR/ARNT heterodimer differs from the recognition sequence for nearly all other bHLH proteins, and (iii) both proteins contain a PAS homology region, which in the Drosophila PER and SIM proteins functions as a dimerization domain. A cDNA for mouse ARNT has been cloned, and potential functional domains of ARNT were investigated by deletion analysis. A mutant lacking all regions of ARNT other than the bHLH and PAS regions is unimpaired in TCDD-dependent dimerization and subsequent XRE binding and only modestly reduced in ability to complement an ARNT-deficient mutant cell line, c4, in vivo. Both the first and second alpha helices of the bHLH region are required for dimerization. The basic region is required for XRE binding but not for dimerization. Deletion of either the A or B segments of the PAS region slightly affects TCDD-induced heterodimerization, while deletion of the complete PAS region severely affects (but does not eliminate) dimerization. Thus, ARNT possesses multiple domains required for maximal heterodimerization. Mutants deleted for PAS A, PAS B, and the complete PAS region all retain some degree of XRE binding, yet none can rescue the c4 mutant. Therefore, both the PAS A and PAS B segments, besides contributing to dimerization, apparently fulfill additional, unknown functions required for biological activity of ARNT. Images PMID:8065341

  18. Translocator Protein (TSPO) Affects Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Steroidogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Hussein, Mahmoud; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein present in specific subpopulations of cells within different tissues. In recent studies, the presumptive model depicting mammalian TSPO as a critical cholesterol transporter for steroidogenesis has been refuted by studies examining effects of Tspo gene deletion in vivo and in vitro, biochemical testing of TSPO cholesterol transport function, and specificity of TSPO-mediated pharmacological responses. Nevertheless, high TSPO expression in steroid-producing cells seemed to indicate an alternate function for this protein in steroidogenic mitochondria. To seek an explanation, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated TSPO knockout steroidogenic MA-10 Leydig cell (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) clones to examine changes to core mitochondrial functions resulting from TSPO deficiency. We observed that 1) MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells had a shift in substrate utilization for energy production from glucose to fatty acids with significantly higher mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increased reactive oxygen species production; and 2) oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, and proton leak were not different between MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ and MA-10:Tspo+/+ control cells. Consistent with this finding, TSPO-deficient adrenal glands from global TSPO knockout (Tspo(-/-)) mice also showed up-regulation of genes involved in FAO compared with the TSPO floxed (Tspo(fl/fl)) controls. These results demonstrate the first experimental evidence that TSPO can affect mitochondrial energy homeostasis through modulation of FAO, a function that appears to be consistent with high levels of TSPO expression observed in cell types active in lipid storage/metabolism.

  19. Targeting mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux and lipid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janice M W; Allen, Anne-Marie; Graham, Annette

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as a potential therapeutic target, capable of increasing macrophage cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. Expression and activity of TSPO in human (THP-1) macrophages were manipulated genetically and by the use of selective TSPO ligands. Cellular responses were analysed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), immunoblotting and radiolabelling, including [3H]cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and human serum. Induction of macrophage cholesterol deposition by acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) increased expression of TSPO mRNA and protein, reflecting findings in human carotid atherosclerosis. Transient overexpression of TSPO enhanced efflux (E%) of [3H]cholesterol to apoA-I, HDL and human serum compared with empty vector (EV) controls, whereas gene knockdown of TSPO achieved the converse. Ligation of TSPO (using PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and flunitrazepam) triggered increases in [3H]cholesterol efflux, an effect that was amplified in TSPO-overexpressing macrophages. Overexpression of TSPO induced the expression of genes [PPARA (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α), NR1H3 (nuclear receptor 1H3/liver X receptor α), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1), ABCG4 (ATP-binding cassette G4) and APOE (apolipoprotein E)] and proteins (ABCA1 and PPARα) involved in cholesterol efflux, reduced macrophage neutral lipid mass and lipogenesis and limited cholesterol esterification following exposure to AcLDL. Thus, targeting TSPO reduces macrophage lipid content and prevents macrophage foam cell formation, via enhanced cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors.

  20. Translocation of cellular prion protein to non-lipid rafts protects human prion-mediated neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-03-01

    Prions are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Cellular prion proteins (PrPC) connect with cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich lipid rafts through association of their glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor with saturated raft lipids and interaction of their N-terminal regions. Our previous study showed that cellular cholesterol enrichment prevented PrP(106-126)-induced neuronal death. We have now studied the influence of membrane cholesterol in PrP(106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and identified membrane domains involved in this activity. We found that PrPC is normally distributed in lipid rafts, but high membrane cholesterol levels as a result of cholesterol treatment led to the translocation of PrPC from lipid rafts to non-lipid rafts. Moreover, cholesterol-mediated PrPC translocation protects PrP(106-126)-mediated apoptosis and p-38 activation and caspase-3 activation. In a mitochondrial functional assay including mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cholesterol treatment prevented the loss of mitochondrial potential, translocation of Bax and cytochrome c by prion protein fragment. Our results indicate that modulation of the PrPC location appears to protect against neuronal cell death caused by prion peptides. The results of this study suggest that regulation of membrane cholesterol affects the translocation of PrPC, which in turn regulates PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity.

  1. SopB effector protein of Salmonella Typhimurium is translocated in mesenteric lymph nodes during murine salmonellosis.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Cerquetti, María C

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium harbors two Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), each encoding a type three secretion system for virulence proteins. Although there is increasing evidence of postinvasion roles for SPI-1, it has been generally accepted that SPI-1 genes are downregulated following the invasion process. Here, we analyzed the expression and translocation of SopB in vitro, in cell culture and in vivo. To this end, a sopB-FLAG-tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was obtained by epitope tagging. Tagged proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-FLAG antibodies. SopB expression was observed in vitro under cultured conditions that mimic the intestinal niche and different intracellular environments. In agreement, bacteria isolated from infected monolayers expressed and translocated SopB for at least 24 h postinoculation. For in vivo experiments, BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with the tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Infecting bacteria and infected cells were recovered from mesenteric lymph nodes. Our results showed that SopB continues to be synthesized in vivo during 5 days after inoculation. Interestingly, translocation of SopB was detected in the cytosol of cells isolated from lymph nodes 1 day after infection. Altogether, these findings indicate that the expression and translocation of SopB during Salmonella infection is not constrained to the initial host-bacteria encounter in the intestinal environment as defined previously.

  2. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  3. Characterisation of a mobile protein-binding epitope in the translocation domain of colicin E9.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Colin J; Tozawa, Kaeko; Collins, Emily S; Penfold, Christopher N; James, Richard; Kleanthous, Colin; Clayden, Nigel J; Moore, Geoffrey R

    2004-09-01

    The 61 kDa colicin E9 protein toxin enters the cytoplasm of susceptible cells by interacting with outer membrane and periplasmic helper proteins, and kills them by hydrolysing their DNA. The membrane translocation function is located in the N-terminal domain of the colicin, with a key signal sequence being a pentapeptide region that governs the interaction with the helper protein TolB (the TolB box). Previous NMR studies (Collins et al., 2002 J. Mol. Biol. 318, 787-804) have shown that the N-terminal 83 residues of colicin E9, which includes the TolB box, is largely unstructured and highly flexible. In order to further define the properties of this region we have studied a fusion protein containing residues 1-61 of colicin E9 connected to the N-terminus of the E9 DNase by an eight-residue linking sequence. 53 of the expected 58 backbone NH resonances for the first 61 residues and all of the expected 7 backbone NH resonances of the linking sequence were assigned with 3D (1)H-(13)C-(15)N NMR experiments, and the backbone dynamics of these regions investigated through measurement of (1)H-(15)N relaxation properties. Reduced spectral density mapping, extended Lipari-Szabo modelling, and fitting backbone R(2) relaxation rates to a polymer dynamics model identifies three clusters of interacting residues, each containing a tryptophan. Each of these clusters is perturbed by TolB binding to the intact colicin, showing that the significant region for TolB binding extends beyond the recognized five amino acids of the TolB box and demonstrating that the binding epitope for TolB involves a considerable degree of order within an otherwise disordered and flexible domain. Abbreviations : Im9, the immunity protein for colicin E9; E9 DNase, the endonuclease domain of colicin E9; HSQC, heteronuclear single quantum coherence; ppm, parts per million; DSS, 2,2-(dimethylsilyl)propanesulfonic acid; TSP, sodium 3-trimethylsilypropionate; T(1 - 61)-DNase fusion protein, residues 1-61 of

  4. Analysis of polypeptide movement in the SecY channel during SecA-mediated protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Karl J; Or, Eran; Osborne, Andrew R; Rapoport, Tom A

    2008-06-01

    In bacteria most secretory proteins are transported across the plasma membrane by the interplay of the ATPase SecA with the translocation channel formed by the SecY complex; SecA uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to "push" consecutive segments of a polypeptide substrate through the channel. Here we have addressed the mechanism of this process by following the fate of stalled translocation intermediates. These were generated by using a polypeptide substrate containing a bulky disulfide-bonded loop, thus preventing the final residues from passing through the channel. Protease protection experiments showed that the intermediates were stable in the presence of ATP and could complete translocation once the block was removed. The translocation intermediate was also stable when SecA associated with ATPgammaS, a poorly hydrolyzable ATP analog, or ADP plus AlF(4), which mimics the transition state during ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, when SecA was in its ADP-bound state, the translocating polypeptide moved back into the cytosol, as indicated by the disappearance of the protected fragment. Backsliding was not significantly altered by deletion of the plug domain, a short helix in the center of the SecY channel, but it was slowed down when changes were introduced into the pore ring, the constriction of the hourglass-shaped channel. In all cases, backsliding was significantly slower than forward translocation. Together, these data suggest that SecA binds the polypeptide chain in its ATP state and releases it in the ADP state. The channel itself does not bind the polypeptide chain but provides "friction" that minimizes backsliding when ADP-bound SecA resets to "grab" the next segment of the substrate. PMID:18359943

  5. Mitochondrial Translocator Protein (TSPO) Function Is Not Essential for Heme Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Amy H; Tu, Lan N; Mukai, Chinatsu; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Pillai, Viju V; Morohaku, Kanako; Cohen, Roy; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-01-22

    Function of the mammalian translocator protein (TSPO; previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) remains unclear because its presumed role in steroidogenesis and mitochondrial permeability transition established using pharmacological methods has been refuted in recent genetic studies. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is considered a conserved endogenous ligand for TSPO. In bacteria, TSPO was identified to regulate tetrapyrrole metabolism and chemical catalysis of PPIX in the presence of light, and in vertebrates, TSPO function has been linked to porphyrin transport and heme biosynthesis. Positive correlation between high TSPO expression in cancer cells and susceptibility to photodynamic therapy based on their increased ability to convert the precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to PPIX appeared to reinforce this mechanism. In this study, we used TSPO knock-out (Tspo(-/-)) mice, primary cells, and different tumor cell lines to examine the role of TSPO in erythropoiesis, heme levels, PPIX biosynthesis, phototoxic cell death, and mitochondrial bioenergetic homeostasis. In contrast to expectations, our results demonstrate that TSPO deficiency does not adversely affect erythropoiesis, heme biosynthesis, bioconversion of ALA to PPIX, and porphyrin-mediated phototoxic cell death. TSPO expression levels in cancer cells do not correlate with their ability to convert ALA to PPIX. In fibroblasts, we observed that TSPO deficiency decreased the oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) indicative of a cellular metabolic shift, without a negative impact on porphyrin biosynthetic capability. Based on these findings, we conclude that mammalian TSPO does not have a critical physiological function related to PPIX and heme biosynthesis.

  6. Translocator Protein-Mediated Stabilization of Mitochondrial Architecture during Inflammation Stress in Colonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Issop, Leeyah; Ostuni, Mariano A.; Lee, Sunghoon; Laforge, Mireille; Péranzi, Gabriel; Rustin, Pierre; Benoist, Jean-François; Estaquier, Jérome; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract increasing the risk of cancer has been described to be linked to the high expression of the mitochondrial translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO). Accordingly, TSPO drug ligands have been shown to regulate cytokine production and to improve tissue reconstruction. We used HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells to evaluate the role of TSPO and its drug ligands in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced inflammation. TNF-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression, coupled to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was followed by TSPO overexpression. TNF also destabilized mitochondrial ultrastructure, inducing cell death by apoptosis. Treatment with the TSPO drug ligand PK 11195 maintained the mitochondrial ultrastructure, reducing IL-8 and ROS production and cell death. TSPO silencing and overexpression studies demonstrated that the presence of TSPO is essential to control IL-8 and ROS production, so as to maintain mitochondrial ultrastructure and to prevent cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that inflammation results in the disruption of mitochondrial complexes containing TSPO, leading to cell death and epithelia disruption. Significance: This work implicates TSPO in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity and in the control of mitochondrial ROS production, ultimately favoring tissue regeneration. PMID:27054921

  7. Intracellular cholesterol changes induced by translocator protein (18 kDa) TSPO/PBR ligands.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Angela Maria; Battetta, Barbara; Sanna, Francesca; Piludu, Marco; Sogos, Valeria; Serra, Mariangela; Melis, Marta; Putzolu, Martina; Diaz, Giacomo

    2007-08-01

    One of the main functions of the translocator protein (18 kDa) or TSPO, previously known as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is the regulation of cholesterol import into mitochondria for steroid biosynthesis. In this paper we show that TSPO ligands induce changes in the distribution of intracellular cholesterol in astrocytes and fibroblasts. NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol, was rapidly removed from membranes and accumulated into lipid droplets. This change was followed by a block of cholesterol esterification, but not by modification of intracellular cholesterol synthesis. NBD-cholesterol droplets were in part released in the medium, and increased cholesterol efflux was observed in [(3)H]cholesterol-prelabeled cells. TSPO ligands also induced a prominent shrinkage and depolarization of mitochondria and depletion of acidic vesicles with cytoplasmic acidification. Consistent with NBD-cholesterol changes, MTT assay showed enhanced accumulation of formazan into lipid droplets and inhibition of formazan exocytosis after treatment with TSPO ligands. The effects of specific TSPO ligands PK 11195 and Ro5-4864 were reproduced by diazepam, which binds with high affinity both TSPO and central benzodiazepine receptors, but not by clonazepam, which binds exclusively to GABA receptor, and other amphiphilic substances such as DIDS and propranolol. All these effects and the parallel immunocytochemical detection of TSPO in potentially steroidogenic cells (astrocytes) and non-steroidogenic cells (fibroblasts) suggest that TSPO is involved in the regulation and trafficking of intracellular cholesterol by means of mechanisms not necessarily related to steroid biosynthesis.

  8. TLR4 Signaling augments monocyte chemotaxis by regulating G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Yong; Li, Yuehua; Wang, Juan; Fan, Liyan; Scott, Melanie J; Xiao, Guozhi; Li, Song; Billiar, Timothy R; Wilson, Mark A; Fan, Jie

    2013-07-15

    Monocytes are critical effector cells of the innate immune system that protect the host by migrating to inflammatory sites, differentiating to macrophages and dendritic cells, eliciting immune responses, and killing pathogenic microbes. MCP-1, also known as CCL2, plays an important role in monocyte activation and migration. The chemotactic function of MCP-1 is mediated by binding to the CCR2 receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Desensitization of GPCR chemokine receptors is an important regulator of the intensity and duration of chemokine stimulation. GPCR kinases (GRKs) induce GPCR phosphorylation, and this leads to GPCR desensitization. Regulation of subcellular localization of GRKs is considered an important early regulatory mechanism of GRK function and subsequent GPCR desensitization. Chemokines and LPS are both present during Gram-negative bacterial infection, and LPS often synergistically exaggerates leukocyte migration in response to chemokines. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanism of LPS-TLR4 signaling on the regulation of monocyte chemotaxis. We demonstrate that LPS augments MCP-1-induced monocyte migration. We also show that LPS, through p38 MAPK signaling, induces phosphorylation of GRK2 at serine 670, which, in turn, suppresses GRK2 translocation to the membrane, thereby preventing GRK2-initiated internalization and desensitization of CCR2 in response to MCP-1. This results in enhanced monocyte migration. These findings reveal a novel function for TLR4 signaling in promoting innate immune cell migration.

  9. [Effects of sprinkler irrigation on the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Yao, Su-mei; Kang, Yue-hu; Ru, Zhen-gang; Liu, Ming-jiu; Yang, Wen-ping; Li, Gan

    2013-08-01

    Taking wheat cultivar Bainong AK58 as test material, a field experiment was conducted to study the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat under sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation, aimed to understand the differences in the nitrogen metabolism characteristics of winter wheat under different irrigation regimes. At booting stage, no significant difference was observed in the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation between sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation; while from booting stage to maturing stage, the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation under sprinkler irrigation was significantly higher. Under sprinkler irrigation, the translocation amount and contribution rate of the nitrogen stored in leaf, glume, stem and sheath at pre-anthesis to the kernel increased, while the contribution rate of the assimilated nitrogen after anthesis to the kernel nitrogen declined. Both the relative protein content and the total protein yield in the kernel increased significantly under sprinkler irrigation. In conclusion, sprinkler irrigation could significantly regulate the nitrogen translocation and kernel protein accumulation of winter wheat. PMID:24380339

  10. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke on the Translocator Protein (TSPO) in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Rafael; Cohen, Shiri; Gavish, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is prevalent in cigarette smokers. The mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (TSPO), is thought to protect cells from free radical damage. We examined the effect of cigarette smoke (CS) (containing free radicals) alone and in the presence of saliva (containing redox active free iron), on survival of H1299 lung cancer cells and on their mitochondrial characteristics, and whether TSPO binding was influenced by CS and by saliva. We exposed H1299 cells to CS in the presence/absence of saliva and also characterized TSPO binding in the cells using [3H]PK 11195 as a radioligand. CS induced a significant drop in mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm), while addition of saliva did not lead to further loss of ΔΨm (42.5% vs. 39.85%). Scatchard analysis of the saturation curve of [3H]PK 11195 binding (0.2-6 nM final concentration) yielded a straight-line plot (R =  0.9). Average Bmax value was 3274 ± 787 fmol/mg of protein, and average Kd value was 9.2 ± 1.3 nM. Benzodiazepine diazepam partially prevented decrease in cell survival following exposure to CS and redox active iron containing media (saliva) while benzodiazepine clonazepam did not, indicating that this effect is TSPO-specific. Exposure of cells to CS resulted in alternation of biomolecules expressed by CLs peroxidation, reduction of TSPO binding, and depletion of the mitochondrial potential. This irreversible damage was enhanced in the presence of saliva. All these modulations may result in cellular death increase following CS exposure, enhanced in the presence of saliva.

  11. Structural requirements to obtain highly potent and selective 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Ligands.

    PubMed

    Taliani, Sabrina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The (18 kDa) Translocator Protein (TSPO), was initially identified in 1977 as peripheral binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam and named "Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)". It is an evolutionarily well-conserved protein particularly located at the outer/inner mitochondrial membrane contact sites, in closely association with the 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), thus forming the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). TSPO is ubiquitary expressed in peripheral tissues (steroid producing tissues, liver, heart, kidney, lung, immune system) and in lower levels in the central nervous system, where it is mainly located in glial cells, and in neurons. TSPO is involved in a variety of biological processes such as cholesterol transport, steroidogenesis, calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial oxidation, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis induction, and regulation of immune functions. In the last decade, many studies have reported that TSPO basal expression is altered in a number of human pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders (Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases), as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation and anxiety. Consequently, TSPO has not only been suggested as a promising drug target for a number of therapeutic applications (anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, immunomodulating, etc.), but also as valid diagnostic marker for related-disease state and progression, prompting the development of specific labelled ligands as powerful tools for imaging techniques. A number of structurally different classes of ligands have been reported, showing high affinity and selectivity towards TSPO. Indeed, most of these ligands have been designed starting from selective CBR ligands which were structurally modified in order to shift their affinity towards TSPO. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies were performed allowing to

  12. DNA translocation across protein channels: How does a polymer worm through a hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2001-03-01

    Free energy barriers control the translocation of polymers through narrow channels. Based on an analogy with the classical nucleation and growth process, we have calculated the translocation time and its dependencies on the length, stiffness, and sequence of the polymer, solution conditions, and the strength of the driving electrochemical potential gradient. Our predictions will be compared with experimental results and prospects of reading polymer sequences.

  13. Response to Comment on "Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism".

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-10-30

    Wang comments that the diffraction data for the structure of the A139T mutant of translocator protein TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides should be used to 1.65 instead of 1.8 angstroms and that the density interpreted as porphyrin and monoolein is better fitted as polyethylene glycol. Although different practices of data processing exist, in this case they do not substantially influence the final map. Additional data are presented supporting the fit of a porphyrin and monooleins. PMID:26516277

  14. Oridonin induces NPM mutant protein translocation and apoptosis in NPM1c+ acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-fei; Yi, Sha; Wen, Lu; He, Jing; Yang, Li-jing; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Ben-ping; Cui, Guo-hui; Chen, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Skewed cytoplasmic accumulation of NPM mutant protein (NPM1c+) is close related to leukemia pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from the Chinese traditional medicine Rabdosia rubescens, was able to interfere with NPM1c+ protein trafficking and induce apoptosis in NPM1c+ acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro. Methods: OCI-AML3 cell line harboring a NPM1 gene mutation was examined. Cell growth was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The expression and subcellular localization of relevant proteins were detected by Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. The mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. Results: Oridonin (2–12 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the viability of OCI-AML3 cells (the IC50 value was 3.27±0.23 μmol/L at 24 h). Moreover, oridonin induced OCI-AML3 cell apoptosis accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and nuclear translocation of NPM1c+ protein. Oridonin did not change the expression of Crm1 (the export receptor for nuclear export signal-containing proteins), but induced nuclear translocation of Crm1. Oridonin markedly increased the expression of nucleoporin98 (Nup98), which had an important role in Crm1-mediated nuclear protein export, and induced nuclear accumulation of Nup98. Furthermore, oridonin markedly increased the expression of p14arf and p53. Conclusion: In NPM1c+ leukemia cells, oridonin induces NPM1c+ protein translocation into the nucleus possibly via nuclear accumulation of Crm1; the compound markedly increases p53 and p14arf expression, which may contribute to cell apoptosis. PMID:24902788

  15. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein to plasma membrane leads to necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Li, Wenjuan; Ren, Junming; Huang, Deli; He, Wan-ting; Song, Yunlong; Yang, Chao; Li, Wanyun; Zheng, Xinru; Chen, Pengda; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) was identified to function downstream of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced necrosis (also called necroptosis). However, how MLKL functions to mediate necroptosis is unknown. By reconstitution of MLKL function in MLKL-knockout cells, we showed that the N-terminus of MLKL is required for its function in necroptosis. The oligomerization of MLKL in TNF-treated cells is essential for necroptosis, as artificially forcing MLKL together by using the hormone-binding domain (HBD*) triggers necroptosis. Notably, forcing together the N-terminal domain (ND) but not the C-terminal kinase domain of MLKL causes necroptosis. Further deletion analysis showed that the four-α-helix bundle of MLKL (1-130 amino acids) is sufficient to trigger necroptosis. Both the HBD*-mediated and TNF-induced complexes of MLKL(ND) or MLKL are tetramers, and translocation of these complexes to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane precedes cell death. The homo-oligomerization is required for MLKL translocation and the signal sequence for plasma membrane location is located in the junction of the first and second α-helices of MLKL. The plasma membrane translocation of MLKL or MLKL(ND) leads to sodium influx, and depletion of sodium from the cell culture medium inhibits necroptosis. All of the above phenomena were not seen in apoptosis. Thus, the MLKL oligomerization leads to translocation of MLKL to lipid rafts of plasma membrane, and the plasma membrane MLKL complex acts either by itself or via other proteins to increase the sodium influx, which increases osmotic pressure, eventually leading to membrane rupture. PMID:24366341

  16. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain β-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts.

    PubMed

    Bumba, Ladislav; Masin, Jiri; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomas; Motlova, Lucia; Bibova, Ilona; Klimova, Nela; Bednarova, Lucie; Veverka, Vaclav; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I; Barinka, Cyril; Sebo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-binding RTX proteins are equipped with C-terminal secretion signals and translocate from the Ca(2+)-depleted cytosol of Gram-negative bacteria directly into the Ca(2+)-rich external milieu, passing through the "channel-tunnel" ducts of type I secretion systems (T1SSs). Using Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, we solved the structure of an essential C-terminal assembly that caps the RTX domains of RTX family leukotoxins. This is shown to scaffold directional Ca(2+)-dependent folding of the carboxy-proximal RTX repeat blocks into β-rolls. The resulting intramolecular Brownian ratchets then prevent backsliding of translocating RTX proteins in the T1SS conduits and thereby accelerate excretion of very large RTX leukotoxins from bacterial cells by a vectorial "push-ratchet" mechanism. Successive Ca(2+)-dependent and cosecretional acquisition of a functional RTX toxin structure in the course of T1SS-mediated translocation, through RTX domain folding from the C-terminal cap toward the N terminus, sets a paradigm that opens for design of virulence inhibitors of major pathogens.

  18. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain β-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts.

    PubMed

    Bumba, Ladislav; Masin, Jiri; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomas; Motlova, Lucia; Bibova, Ilona; Klimova, Nela; Bednarova, Lucie; Veverka, Vaclav; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I; Barinka, Cyril; Sebo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-binding RTX proteins are equipped with C-terminal secretion signals and translocate from the Ca(2+)-depleted cytosol of Gram-negative bacteria directly into the Ca(2+)-rich external milieu, passing through the "channel-tunnel" ducts of type I secretion systems (T1SSs). Using Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, we solved the structure of an essential C-terminal assembly that caps the RTX domains of RTX family leukotoxins. This is shown to scaffold directional Ca(2+)-dependent folding of the carboxy-proximal RTX repeat blocks into β-rolls. The resulting intramolecular Brownian ratchets then prevent backsliding of translocating RTX proteins in the T1SS conduits and thereby accelerate excretion of very large RTX leukotoxins from bacterial cells by a vectorial "push-ratchet" mechanism. Successive Ca(2+)-dependent and cosecretional acquisition of a functional RTX toxin structure in the course of T1SS-mediated translocation, through RTX domain folding from the C-terminal cap toward the N terminus, sets a paradigm that opens for design of virulence inhibitors of major pathogens. PMID:27058787

  19. The planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Diversin translocates to the nucleus to interact with the transcription factor AF9

    SciTech Connect

    Haribaskar, Ramachandran; Puetz, Michael; Schupp, Birte; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Walz, Gerd; Schaefer, Tobias

    2009-09-11

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, a {beta}-catenin-independent branch of the Wnt signaling pathway, orients cells and their appendages with respect to the body axes. Diversin, the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila PCP protein Diego, acts as a molecular switch that blocks {beta}-catenin-dependent and promotes {beta}-catenin-independent Wnt signaling. We report now that Diversin, containing several nuclear localization signals, translocates to the nucleus, where it interacts with the transcription factor AF9. Both Diversin and AF9 block canonical Wnt signaling; however, this occurs independently of each other, and does not require nuclear Diversin. In contrast, AF9 strongly augments the Diversin-driven activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent gene expression in the nucleus, and this augmentation largely depends on the presence of nuclear Diversin. Thus, our findings reveal that components of the PCP cascade translocate to the nucleus to participate in transcriptional regulation and PCP signaling.

  20. Long-Distance Translocation of Protein during Morphogenesis of the Fruiting Body in the Filamentous Fungus, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, Benjamin M.; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Wilkinson, Jack; Larsen, Jeffrey; Shi, Zhixin; Mayer, Kimberly M.; Walters, Donald S.; Curtis, Wayne R.; Romaine, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of the mushroom fungus, Agaricus bisporus, utilizes a substrate consisting of a lower layer of compost and upper layer of peat. Typically, the two layers are seeded with individual mycelial inoculants representing a single genotype of A. bisporus. Studies aimed at examining the potential of this fungal species as a heterologous protein expression system have revealed unexpected contributions of the mycelial inoculants in the morphogenesis of the fruiting body. These contributions were elucidated using a dual-inoculant method whereby the two layers were differientially inoculated with transgenic β-glucuronidase (GUS) and wild-type (WT) lines. Surprisingly, use of a transgenic GUS line in the lower substrate and a WT line in the upper substrate yielded fruiting bodies expressing GUS activity while lacking the GUS transgene. Results of PCR and RT-PCR analyses for the GUS transgene and RNA transcript, respectively, suggested translocation of the GUS protein from the transgenic mycelium colonizing the lower layer into the fruiting body that developed exclusively from WT mycelium colonizing the upper layer. Effective translocation of the GUS protein depended on the use of a transgenic line in the lower layer in which the GUS gene was controlled by a vegetative mycelium-active promoter (laccase 2 and β-actin), rather than a fruiting body-active promoter (hydrophobin A). GUS-expressing fruiting bodies lacking the GUS gene had a bonafide WT genotype, confirmed by the absence of stably inherited GUS and hygromycin phosphotransferase selectable marker activities in their derived basidiospores and mycelial tissue cultures. Differientially inoculating the two substrate layers with individual lines carrying the GUS gene controlled by different tissue-preferred promoters resulted in up to a ∼3.5-fold increase in GUS activity over that obtained with a single inoculant. Our findings support the existence of a previously undescribed phenomenon of long

  1. Nuclear translocation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) protein prior to its cytosolic degradation by UV enhances DNA repair and survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Suk; Kim, Joo Young; Sohn, Jeongwon

    2009-12-25

    We previously reported that UV induced rapid proteasomal degradation of p21 protein in an ubiquitination-independent manner. Here, UV-induced p21 proteolysis was found to occur in the cytosol. Before cytosolic degradation, however, p21 protein translocated to and transiently accumulated in the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of p21 was not required for its degradation, but rather promoted DNA repair and cell survival. Overexpression of the wild type p21, but not the one with defective nuclear localization signal (NLS), reduced UV-induced DNA damage and cell death. Some of p21 protein translocated to the nucleus were associated with chromatin-bound PCNA and saved from UV-induced proteolysis. These data together show that p21 translocates to the nucleus to participate in DNA repair, while the rest is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We propose that our findings reflect a mechanism to facilitate removal of damaged cells, enhancing DNA repair at the same time.

  2. Nuclear translocation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein prior to its cytosolic degradation by UV enhances DNA repair and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Suk; Kim, Joo Young; Sohn, Jeongwon

    2009-12-25

    We previously reported that UV induced rapid proteasomal degradation of p21 protein in an ubiquitination-independent manner. Here, UV-induced p21 proteolysis was found to occur in the cytosol. Before cytosolic degradation, however, p21 protein translocated to and transiently accumulated in the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of p21 was not required for its degradation, but rather promoted DNA repair and cell survival. Overexpression of the wild type p21, but not the one with defective nuclear localization signal (NLS), reduced UV-induced DNA damage and cell death. Some of p21 protein translocated to the nucleus were associated with chromatin-bound PCNA and saved from UV-induced proteolysis. These data together show that p21 translocates to the nucleus to participate in DNA repair, while the rest is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We propose that our findings reflect a mechanism to facilitate removal of damaged cells, enhancing DNA repair at the same time.

  3. Cholesterol and steroid synthesizing smooth endoplasmic reticulum of adrenocortical cells contains high levels of proteins associated with the translocation channel.

    PubMed

    Black, Virginia H; Sanjay, Archana; van Leyen, Klaus; Lauring, Brett; Kreibich, Gert

    2005-10-01

    Steroid-secreting cells are characterized by abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum whose membranes contain many enzymes involved in sterol and steroid synthesis. Yet they have relatively little morphologically identifiable rough endoplasmic reticulum, presumably required for synthesis and maintenance of the smooth membranes. In this study, we demonstrate that adrenal smooth microsomal subfractions enriched in smooth endoplasmic reticulum membranes contain high levels of translocation apparatus and oligosaccharyltransferase complex proteins, previously thought confined to rough endoplasmic reticulum. We further demonstrate that these smooth microsomal subfractions are capable of effecting cotranslational translocation, signal peptide cleavage, and N-glycosylation of newly synthesized polypeptides. This shifts the paradigm for distinction between smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Confocal microscopy revealed the proteins to be distributed throughout the abundant tubular endoplasmic reticulum in these cells, which is predominantly smooth surfaced. We hypothesize that the broadly distributed translocon and oligosaccharyltransferase proteins participate in local synthesis and/or quality control of membrane proteins involved in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in a sterol-dependent and hormonally regulated manner.

  4. Carbenoxolone induces permeability transition pore opening in rat mitochondria via the translocator protein TSPO and connexin43.

    PubMed

    Azarashvili, Tamara; Baburina, Yulia; Grachev, Dmitry; Krestinina, Olga; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lemasters, John J; Odinokova, Irina; Reiser, Georg

    2014-09-15

    Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in isolated rat brain mitochondria is promoted through targeting of connexin43. After a threshold Ca(2+) load, mitochondrial membrane potential drops and efflux of accumulated Ca(2+) from the mitochondrial matrix occurs, indicating the mPTP opening. Specific antibodies were used to assess the role of the translocator protein (18kDa; TSPO) and connexin43 in swelling of isolated rat liver and brain mitochondria induced by carbenoxolone and the endogenous TSPO ligand protoporphyrin IX. Mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) transport and oxygen consumption were determined using selective electrodes. All the parameters were detected simultaneously in a chamber with the selective electrodes. The phosphorylation state of mitochondrial protein targets was assessed. We report that Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling was strengthened in the presence of both carbenoxolone and protoporphyrin IX. The carbenoxolone- and protoporphyrin IX-accelerated mPTP induction in brain mitochondria was completely prevented by antibodies specific for the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO). The anti-TSPO antibodies were more effective than anti-сonnexin43 antibodies. Moreover, carbenoxolone-stimulated phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins was inhibited by anti-TSPO antibodies. Taken together, the data suggests that, in addition to acting via connexion43, carbenoxolone may exert its effect on mPTP via mitochondrial outer membrane TSPO.

  5. The kinetics of translocation and cellular quantity of protein kinase C in human leukocytes are modified during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Gaubert, F.; Lewis, M. L.; Darsel, Y.; Ohlmann, P.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that play an important role in mediating intracellular signal transduction in eukaryotes. U937 cells were exposed to microgravity during a space shuttle flight and stimulated with a radiolabeled phorbol ester ([3H]PDBu) to both specifically label and activate translocation of PKC from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of the cell. Although significant translocation of PKC occurred at all g levels, the kinetics of translocation in flight were significantly different from those on the ground. In addition, the total quantity of [3H]PDBu binding PKC was increased in flight compared to cells at 1 g on the ground, whereas the quantity in hypergravity (1.4 g) was decreased with respect to 1 g. Similarly, in purified human peripheral blood T cells the quantity of PKCdelta varied in inverse proportion to the g level for some experimental treatments. In addition to these novel findings, the results confirm earlier studies which showed that PKC is sensitive to changes in gravitational acceleration. The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity are poorly understood but the demonstrated sensitivity of PKC to this stimulus provides us with a useful means of measuring the effect of altered gravity levels on early cell activation events.

  6. Identification of Streptomyces lividans proteins secreted by the twin-arginine translocation pathway following growth with different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Julien; Morosoli, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    Genome-based signal peptide predictions classified Streptomyces coelicolor as the microorganism that secretes the most proteins through the twin-arginine translocation (Tat)-dependent secretion pathway. Availability of a DeltatatC mutant of the closely related strain Streptomyces lividans impaired Tat-dependent protein secretion and enabled identification of many extracellular proteins that are secreted via the Tat pathway. Proteomic techniques were applied to analyze proteins from the supernatants of log-phase cultures. Since the bacterial secretome depends mainly on the carbon sources available during growth, xylose, glucose, chitin, and soil extracts were used. A total of 63 proteins were identified, among which 7 were predicted by the TATscan program, and 20 were not predicted but contained a potential Tat signal motif. Thirteen proteins having no signal sequence could be co-transported by Tat-dependent proteins because the genes that encode these proteins are in close proximity in the genome. Finally, the presence of 23 proteins lacking signal peptides was difficult to explain. More secreted proteins could be identified as Tat substrates in varying carbon sources.

  7. The Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-encoded type III secretion systems can translocate Chlamydia trachomatis proteins into the cytosol of host cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Theresa D; Starnbach, Michael N

    2005-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate, intracellular pathogen that is a major cause of preventable blindness and infertility worldwide. Although the published genome sequence suggests that C. trachomatis encodes a type III secretion system, the lack of genetic tools for studying Chlamydia has hindered the examination of this potentially important class of virulence genes. We have developed a technique to identify Chlamydia proteins that can be translocated into the host cell cytoplasm by a type III secretion system. We have selected several Chlamydia proteins and tagged them with a multiple peptide motif element called F8M4. Epitopes contained in the F8M4 tag allow us to use tools corresponding to different arms of the adaptive immune system to detect the expression and translocation of these proteins by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In particular, CD8(+)-T-cell reactivity can be used to detect the translocation of F8M4-tagged proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. We have found that CD8(+)-T-cell activity assays are sensitive enough to detect translocation of even a small amount of F8M4-tagged protein. We have used CD8(+)-T-cell activity to show that CopN, a Chlamydia protein previously shown to be translocated by Yersinia type III secretion, can be translocated by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) type III secretion system. Additionally, we demonstrate that CopD and Pkn5, two Chlamydia proteins hypothesized to be substrates of a type III secretion system, are translocated via the SPI-2 type III secretion system of serovar Typhimurium. The epitope tag system described here can be used more generally to examine the expression and subcellular compartmentalization of bacterial proteins deployed during the interaction of pathogens with mammalian cells.

  8. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  9. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Baldwin, Steve A; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-05-16

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids.

  10. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C; Westaway, David; Williams, David B

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrP(C) expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrP(C) expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrP(C) expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrP(C) into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrP(C) signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrP(C). However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrP(C) into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrP(Sc) propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrP(C) biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  11. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E.; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C.; Westaway, David; Williams, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrPC expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrPC expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrPC expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrPC into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrPC signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrPC. However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrPC into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrPSc propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrPC biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  12. Exercise-induced translocation of protein kinase C and production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in rat skeletal muscle in vivo. Relationship to changes in glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Cleland, P J; Appleby, G J; Rattigan, S; Clark, M G

    1989-10-25

    Contraction-induced translocation of protein kinase C (Richter E.A., Cleland, P.J.F., Rattigan, S., and Clark, M.G. (1987) FEBS Lett. 217, 232-236) implies a role for this enzyme in muscle contraction or the associated metabolic adjustments. In the present study, this role is further examined particularly in relation to changes in glucose transport. Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve of the anesthetized rat in vivo led to a time-dependent translocation of protein kinase C and a 2-fold increase in the concentrations of both diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Maximum values for the latter were reached at 2 min and preceded the maximum translocation of protein kinase C (10 min). Stimulation of muscles in vitro increased the rate of glucose transport, but this required 20 min to reach maximum. There was no reversal of translocation or decrease in the concentrations of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid even after 30 min of rest following a 5-min period of stimulation in vivo. Translocation was not influenced by variations in applied load at maximal fiber recruitment but was dependent on the frequency of nontetanic stimuli, reaching a maximum at 4 Hz. The relationship between protein kinase C and glucose transport was also explored by varying the number of tetanic stimuli. Whereas only one train of stimuli (200 ms, 100 Hz) was required for maximal effects on protein kinase C, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid, more than 35 trains of stimuli were required to activate glucose transport. It is concluded that the production of diacylglycerol and the translocation of protein kinase C may be causally related. However, if the translocated protein kinase C is involved in the activation of glucose transport during muscle contractions, an accumulated exposure to Ca2+, resulting from multiple contractions, would appear to be necessary.

  13. A C-terminal translocation signal required for Dot/Icm-dependent delivery of the Legionella RalF protein to host cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiroki; Cambronne, Eric D; Kagan, Jonathan C; Amor, Juan Carlos; Kahn, Richard A; Roy, Craig R

    2005-01-18

    The Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm system is a type IV secretion apparatus that transfers bacterial proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The RalF protein is a substrate engaged and translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. In this study, the mechanism of Dot/Icm-mediated translocation of RalF has been investigated. It was determined that RalF translocation into host cells occurs before bacterial internalization. Sequences essential for RalF translocation were located at the C terminus of the RalF protein. A fusion protein consisting of a 20-aa C-terminal RalF peptide appended to the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase protein was translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. A leucine (L372) residue at the -3 position in relation to the RalF C terminus was critical for translocation. Consistent with RalF L372 playing an important role in substrate recognition by the Dot/Icm system, most other Dot/Icm substrates were found to have amino acid residues with similar physical properties at their -3 or -4 C-terminal positions. These data demonstrate that the Dot/Icm system can transfer bacterial proteins that modulate host cellular functions before uptake and indicate that substrate recognition involves a C-terminal translocation signal. Thus, Legionella has the ability to engage synthesized substrate proteins and transfer them into host cells on contact, enabling Legionella to rapidly alter transport of the vacuole in which it resides. PMID:15613486

  14. Endoproteolytic Cleavage of TUG Protein Regulates GLUT4 Glucose Transporter Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, Jonathan S.; Rubin, Bradley R.; Yu, Chenfei; Löffler, Michael G.; Orme, Charisse M.; Belman, Jonathan P.; McNally, Leah J.; Hao, Mingming; Cresswell, James A.

    2012-01-01

    To promote glucose uptake into fat and muscle cells, insulin causes the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters from intracellular vesicles to the cell surface. Previous data support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4-containing vesicles and tethers them intracellularly in unstimulated cells and in which insulin mobilizes this pool of vesicles by releasing this tether. Here we show that TUG undergoes site-specific endoproteolytic cleavage, which separates a GLUT4-binding, N-terminal region of TUG from a C-terminal region previously suggested to bind an intracellular anchor. Cleavage is accelerated by insulin stimulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and is highly dependent upon adipocyte differentiation. The N-terminal TUG cleavage product has properties of a novel 18-kDa ubiquitin-like modifier, which we call TUGUL. The C-terminal product is observed at the expected size of 42 kDa and also as a 54-kDa form that is released from membranes into the cytosol. In transfected cells, intact TUG links GLUT4 to PIST and also binds Golgin-160 through its C-terminal region. PIST is an effector of TC10α, a GTPase previously shown to transmit an insulin signal required for GLUT4 translocation, and we show using RNAi that TC10α is required for TUG proteolytic processing. Finally, we demonstrate that a cleavage-resistant form of TUG does not support highly insulin-responsive GLUT4 translocation or glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Together with previous results, these data support a model whereby insulin stimulates TUG cleavage to liberate GLUT4 storage vesicles from the Golgi matrix, which promotes GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and enhances glucose uptake. PMID:22610098

  15. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for graphene surface modification and protein translocation through the chemically modified graphene nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Xuewen; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-03-01

    The multilayer graphene surface has been modified using mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-750] (DPPE-PEG750). The surface modifications are evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS measurements show the better graphene surface passivation with DPPE-PEG750 than with MHA. After modification with ferritin, the MHA modified surface shows greater charge transfer resistance (Rct) change than DPPE-PEG750 modified surface. Based on these results the translocations of ferritin through modified graphene nanopore with diameter 5-20 nm are studied. The translocation is more successful through DPPE-PEG750 modified graphene nanopore. This concludes that that the attachment of ferritin to DPPE-PEG750 modified graphene nanopore is not significant compared to MHA modified pore for the ferritin translocation hindrance. These results nicely correlate with the EIS data for respective Rct change of ferritin modified surfaces. P. Tiwari would like to thank FIU School of Integrated Science & Humanity, College Arts & Sciences for the research assistantship.

  16. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  17. Arabidopsis ABCG14 protein controls the acropetal translocation of root-synthesized cytokinins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kewei; Novak, Ondrej; Wei, Zhaoyang; Gou, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuebin; Yu, Yong; Yang, Huijun; Cai, Yuanheng; Strnad, Miroslav; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Cytokinins are a major group of phytohormones regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. However, in contrast to the well-defined polar transport of auxins, the molecular basis of cytokinin transport is poorly understood. Here we show that an ATP-binding cassette transporter in Arabidopsis, AtABCG14, is essential for the acropetal (root to shoot) translocation of the root-synthesized cytokinins. AtABCG14 is expressed primarily in the pericycle and stelar cells of roots. Knocking out AtABCG14 strongly impairs the translocation of trans-zeatin (tZ)-type cytokinins from roots to shoots, thereby affecting the plant’s growth and development. AtABCG14 localizes to the plasma membrane of transformed cells. In planta feeding of C14 or C13-labelled tZ suggests that it acts as an efflux pump and its presence in the cells directly correlates with the transport of the fed cytokinin. Therefore, AtABCG14 is a transporter likely involved in the long-distance translocation of cytokinins in planta.

  18. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein. PMID:27456980

  19. How can proteins enter the interior of a MOF? Investigation of cytochrome c translocation into a MOF consisting of mesoporous cages with microporous windows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Lykourinou, Vasiliki; Vetromile, Carissa; Hoang, Tran; Ming, Li-June; Larsen, Randy W; Ma, Shengqian

    2012-08-15

    It has been demonstrated for the first time that the heme protein cytochrome c (Cyt c) can enter the interior of a MOF despite the larger molecular dimension of the protein relative to the access pore sizes. Mechanistic studies suggest that the Cyt c molecules must undergo a significant conformational change during translocation into the MOF interior through the relatively small nanopores.

  20. Characterization of the Translocation-competent Complex between the Helicobacter pylori Oncogenic Protein CagA and the Accessory Protein CagF*

    PubMed Central

    Bonsor, Daniel A.; Weiss, Evelyn; Iosub-Amir, Anat; Reingewertz, Tali H.; Chen, Tiffany W.; Haas, Rainer; Friedler, Assaf; Fischer, Wolfgang; Sundberg, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    CagA is a virulence factor that Helicobacter pylori inject into gastric epithelial cells through a type IV secretion system where it can cause gastric adenocarcinoma. Translocation is dependent on the presence of secretion signals found in both the N- and C-terminal domains of CagA and an interaction with the accessory protein CagF. However, the molecular basis of this essential protein-protein interaction is not fully understood. Herein we report, using isothermal titration calorimetry, that CagA forms a 1:1 complex with a monomer of CagF with nm affinity. Peptide arrays and isothermal titration calorimetry both show that CagF binds to all five domains of CagA, each with μm affinity. More specifically, a coiled coil domain and a C-terminal helix within CagF contacts domains II-III and domain IV of CagA, respectively. In vivo complementation assays of H. pylori with a double mutant, L36A/I39A, in the coiled coil region of CagF showed a severe weakening of the CagA-CagF interaction to such an extent that it was nearly undetectable. However, it had no apparent effect on CagA translocation. Deletion of the C-terminal helix of CagF also weakened the interaction with CagA but likewise had no effect on translocation. These results indicate that the CagA-CagF interface is distributed broadly across the molecular surfaces of these two proteins to provide maximal protection of the highly labile effector protein CagA. PMID:24072713

  1. Characterization of the translocation-competent complex between the Helicobacter pylori oncogenic protein CagA and the accessory protein CagF.

    PubMed

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Weiss, Evelyn; Iosub-Amir, Anat; Reingewertz, Tali H; Chen, Tiffany W; Haas, Rainer; Friedler, Assaf; Fischer, Wolfgang; Sundberg, Eric J

    2013-11-15

    CagA is a virulence factor that Helicobacter pylori inject into gastric epithelial cells through a type IV secretion system where it can cause gastric adenocarcinoma. Translocation is dependent on the presence of secretion signals found in both the N- and C-terminal domains of CagA and an interaction with the accessory protein CagF. However, the molecular basis of this essential protein-protein interaction is not fully understood. Herein we report, using isothermal titration calorimetry, that CagA forms a 1:1 complex with a monomer of CagF with nM affinity. Peptide arrays and isothermal titration calorimetry both show that CagF binds to all five domains of CagA, each with μM affinity. More specifically, a coiled coil domain and a C-terminal helix within CagF contacts domains II-III and domain IV of CagA, respectively. In vivo complementation assays of H. pylori with a double mutant, L36A/I39A, in the coiled coil region of CagF showed a severe weakening of the CagA-CagF interaction to such an extent that it was nearly undetectable. However, it had no apparent effect on CagA translocation. Deletion of the C-terminal helix of CagF also weakened the interaction with CagA but likewise had no effect on translocation. These results indicate that the CagA-CagF interface is distributed broadly across the molecular surfaces of these two proteins to provide maximal protection of the highly labile effector protein CagA.

  2. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH.

    PubMed

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Pärt

    2012-06-22

    AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  3. Angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation is necessary for angiogenesis but is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hye-Mi; Kang, Dong-Ku; Kim, Hak Yong; Kang, Sang Sun; Chang, Soo-Ik . E-mail: sichang@cbnu.ac.kr

    2007-01-12

    Angiogenin, a potent angiogenic factor, binds to endothelial cells and is endocytosed and rapidly translocated to and concentrated in the nucleolus where it binds to DNA. In this study, we report that angiogenin induces transient phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. LY294002 inhibits the angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation and also angiogenin-induced cell migration in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane in vivo without affecting nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells. These results suggest that cross-talk between angiogenin and protein kinase B/Akt signaling pathways is essential for angiogenin-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and that angiogenin-induced PKB/Akt activation is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells.

  4. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D-glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF-κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose-treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF-κB were also increased in the high glucose-treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF-κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF-κB. PMID:27599553

  5. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D‑glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF‑κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose‑treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF‑κB were also increased in the high glucose‑treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF‑κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF‑κB. PMID:27599553

  6. Cdc42-Interacting Protein 4 Represses E-Cadherin Expression by Promoting β-Catenin Translocation to the Nucleus in Murine Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuou; Zhou, Qiaodan; Liu, Lili; Liu, Ping; Pei, Guangchang; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2015-08-14

    Renal fibrosis is an inevitable outcome of end-stage chronic kidney disease. During this process, epithelial cells lose E-cadherin expression. β-Catenin may act as a mediator by accumulation and translocation to the nucleus. Studies have suggested that CIP4, a Cdc42 effector protein, is associated with β-catenin. However, whether CIP4 contributes to E-cadherin loss in epithelial cells by regulating β-catenin translocation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the involvement of CIP4 in β-catenin translocation. Expression of CIP4 was upregulated in renal tissues of 5/6 nephrectomized rats and mainly distributed in renal tubular epithelia. In TGF-β1-treated NRK-52E cells, upregulation of CIP4 expression was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin. CIP4 overexpression promoted the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus, which was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin even without TGF-β1 stimulation. In contrast, CIP4 depletion by using siRNA inhibited the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus and reversed the decrease in expression of E-cadherin. The interaction between CIP4 and β-catenin was detected. We also show that β-catenin depletion could restore the expression of E-cadherin that was suppressed by CIP4 overexpression. In conclusion, these results suggest that CIP4 overexpression represses E-cadherin expression by promoting β-catenin translocation to the nucleus.

  7. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  8. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha induces translocation of protein kinase C in tumour necrosis factor-sensitive cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Fuchimoto, S; Orita, K

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was associated with the activation of protein kinase C (PKC), using PANC-1 cells (TNF-alpha sensitive) and LoVo cells (TNF-alpha resistant). In combination with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of PKC, TNF-alpha caused marked inhibition of the growth of LoVo cells. Inhibition of PANC-1 cell growth by TNF-alpha was blocked by pretreatment with TPA for 24 hr, along with down-regulation of PKC activity. Intracellular translocation of PKC from cytosol to membrane was induced by TNF-alpha treatment in PANC-1 cells but not in LoVo cells. PMID:1916896

  9. Protein domain of unknown function 3233 is a translocation domain of autotransporter secretory mechanism in gamma proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3(rd) of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  10. Ca2+-dependent translocation of the calcyclin-binding protein in neurons and neuroblastoma NB-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Filipek, Anna; Jastrzebska, Beata; Nowotny, Marcin; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Hetman, Michal; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2002-06-01

    The calcyclin-binding protein (CacyBP) binds calcyclin (S100A6) at physiological levels of [Ca(2+)] and is highly expressed in brain neurons. Subcellular localization of CacyBP was examined in neurons and neuroblastoma NB-2a cells at different [Ca(2+)](i). Immunostaining indicates that CacyBP is present in the cytoplasm of unstimulated cultured neurons in which resting [Ca(2+)](i) is known to be approximately 50 nm. When [Ca(2+)](i) was increased to above 300 nm by KCl treatment, the immunostaining was mainly apparent as a ring around the nucleus. Such perinuclear localization of CacyBP was observed in untreated neuroblastoma NB-2a cells in which [Ca(2+)](i) is approximately 120 nm. An additional increase in [Ca(2+)](i) to above 300 nm by thapsigargin treatment did not change CacyBP localization. However, when [Ca(2+)](i) in NB-2a cells dropped to 70 nm, because of BAPTA/AM treatment, perinuclear localization was diminished. Ca(2+)-induced translocation of CacyBP was confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy and by fluorescence of NB-2a cells transfected with an EGFP-CacyBP vector. Recombinant CacyBP can be phosphorylated by protein kinase C in vitro. In untreated neuroblastoma NB-2a cells, CacyBP is phosphorylated on a serine residue(s), but exists in the dephosphorylated form in BAPTA/AM-treated cells. Thus, phosphorylation of CacyBP occurs in the same [Ca(2+)](i) range that leads to its perinuclear translocation.

  11. Impact of the Diffusion of Microtubule-Associated Protein EB1 on Kinesin Translocation in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Benjamin; Valentine, Megan

    2014-03-01

    Using the slowly hydrolyzable GTP analog GMPCPP, we polymerize microtubules that recapitulate the end binding behavior of EB1 along their entire length, and investigate the impact of EB1 on kinesin translocation. Through direct observation of single molecules of EB1 fused to GFP, we find that EB1 diffuses along the microtubule lattice, and that the presence of taxol affects the rate of diffusion. To test whether EB1 presence and diffusion has an effect on kinesin-driven cargo transport, we observe quantum dot labeled kinesins walking on microtubules assembled with GMPCPP and taxol and coated with EB1. We find that the addition of EB1 significantly reduces kinesin speed compared to the no EB1 condition, but when microtubules stabilized by both taxol and GMPCPP are used, the speed reduction is nearly abolished. Our data suggest a new possible mechanism for the regulation of kinesin function by EB1 in which kinesin speed is directly modulated through the interference of EB1 diffusion. Our results also raise important questions about the effects of taxol on microtubule-MAP interactions.

  12. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  13. Long lasting MDM2/Translocator protein modulator: a new strategy for irreversible apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zappelli, Elisa; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Da Settimo, Federico; Taliani, Sabrina; Trincavelli, Maria L.; Martini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The development of multi-target drugs and irreversible modulators of deregulated signalling proteins is the major challenge for improving glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment. Reversible single-target drugs are not sufficient to sustain a therapeutic effect over time and may favour the activation of alternative signalling pathways and the onset of resistance phenomena. Thus, a multi-target compound that has a long-lasting mechanism of action might have a greater and longer life span of anti-proliferative activity. Recently, a dual-target indol-3ylglyoxyldipeptide derivative, designed to bind to the Translocator Protein (TSPO) and reactivate p53 function via dissociation from its physiological inhibitor, murine double minute 2 (MDM2), has been developed as a potent GBM pro-apoptotic agent. In this study, this derivative was chemically modified to irreversibly bind MDM2 and TSPO. The new compound elicited a TSPO-mediated mitochondrial membrane dissipation and restored p53 activity, triggering a long-lasting apoptosis of GBM cells. These effects were sustained over time, involved a stable activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases and were specifically observed in cancer cells, in which these protein kinases are deregulated. Dual-targeting and irreversible binding properties combined in the same molecule may represent a useful strategy to overcome the time-limited effects elicited by classical chemotherapies. PMID:26761214

  14. REST/NRSF-Interacting LIM Domain Protein, a Putative Nuclear Translocation Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masahito; Hersh, Louis B.

    2003-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor REST/NRSF (RE-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor) and the transcriptional regulator REST4 share an N-terminal zinc finger domain structure involved in nuclear targeting. Using this domain as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, a novel protein that contains three LIM domains, putative nuclear localization sequences, protein kinase A phosphorylation sites, and a CAAX prenylation motif was isolated. This protein, which is localized around the nucleus, is involved in determining the nuclear localization of REST4 and REST/NRSF. We propose the name RILP, for REST/NRSF-interacting LIM domain protein, to label this novel protein. RILP appears to serve as a nuclear receptor for REST/NRSF, REST4, and possibly other transcription factors. PMID:14645515

  15. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Kravats, Andrea N; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  16. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Kravats, Andrea N; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation.

  17. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  18. Translocation of a store of maternal cytoplasmic c-myc protein into nuclei during early development.

    PubMed Central

    Gusse, M; Ghysdael, J; Evan, G; Soussi, T; Méchali, M

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is expressed as a maternal protein during oogenesis in Xenopus laevis, namely, in nondividing cells. A delayed translation of c-myc mRNA accumulated in early oocytes results in the accumulation of the protein during late oogenesis. The oocyte c-myc protein is unusually stable and is located in the cytoplasm, contrasting with its features in somatic cells. A mature oocyte contains a maternal c-myc protein stockpile of 4 x 10(5) to 6 x 10(5) times the level in a somatic growing cell. This level of c-myc protein is preserved only during the cleavage stage of the embryo. Fertilization triggers its rapid migration into the nuclei of the cleaving embryo and a change in the phosphorylation state of the protein. The c-myc protein content per nucleus decreases exponentially during the cleavage stage until a stoichiometric titration by the embryonic nuclei is reached during a 0.5-h period at the midblastula stage. Most of the maternal c-myc store is degraded by the gastrula stage. These observations implicate the participation of c-myc in the events linked to early embryonic development and the midblastula transition. Images PMID:2685563

  19. Rapid regulation of nuclear proteins by rapamycin-induced translocation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Laor, Dana; Weisman, Ronit; Forsburg, Susan L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic analysis of protein function requires a rapid means of inactivating the gene under study. Typically, this exploits temperature-sensitive mutations or promoter shut-off techniques. We report the adaptation to Schizosaccharomyces pombe of the anchor-away technique, originally designed in budding yeast by Laemmli lab. This method relies on a rapamycin-mediated interaction between the FRB- and FKBP12-binding domains to relocalize nuclear proteins of interest to the cytoplasm. We demonstrate a rapid nuclear depletion of abundant proteins as proof of principle.

  20. In search of Brucella abortus Type IV secretion substrates: screening and identification of four proteins translocated into host cells through VirB system

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Herrmann, Claudia K.; Salcedo, Suzana P.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) are specialized protein complexes used by many bacterial pathogens for the delivery of effector molecules that subvert varied host cellular processes. Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens capable of survival and replication inside mammalian cells. Brucella T4SS (VirB) is essential to subvert lysosome fusion and to create an organelle permissive for replication. One possible role for VirB is to translocate effector proteins that modulate host cellular functions for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. We hypothesized that proteins with eukaryotic domains or protein-protein interaction domains, among others, would be good candidates for modulation of host cell functions. To identify these candidates, we performed an in silico screen looking for proteins with distinctive features. Translocation of 84 potential substrates was assayed using adenylate cyclase reporter. By this approach, we identified six proteins that are delivered to the eukaryotic cytoplasm upon infection of macrophage-like cells and we could determine that four of them, encoded by genes BAB1_1043, BAB1_2005, BAB1_1275 and BAB2_0123, require a functional T4SS for their delivery. We confirmed VirB-mediated translocation of one of the substrates by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, and we found that the N-terminal 25 amino acids are required for its delivery into cells. PMID:21707904

  1. Mutations in the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion System Needle Protein, YscF, That Specifically Abrogate Effector Translocation into Host Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alison J.; Mecsas, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The trafficking of effectors, termed Yops, from Yersinia spp. into host cells is a multistep process that requires the type III secretion system (TTSS). The TTSS has three main structural parts: a base, a needle, and a translocon, which work together to ensure the polarized movement of Yops directly from the bacterial cytosol into the host cell cytosol. To understand the interactions that take place at the interface between the tip of the TTSS needle and the translocon, we developed a screen to identify mutations in the needle protein YscF that separated its function in secretion from its role in translocation. We identified 25 translocation-defective (TD) yscF mutants, which fall into five phenotypic classes. Some classes exhibit aberrant needle structure and/or reduced levels of Yop secretion, consistent with known functions for YscF. Strikingly, two yscF TD classes formed needles and secreted Yops normally but displayed distinct translocation defects. Class I yscF TD mutants showed diminished pore formation, suggesting incomplete pore insertion and/or assembly. Class II yscF TD mutants formed pores but showed nonpolar translocation, suggesting unstable needle-translocon interactions. These results indicate that YscF functions in Yop secretion and translocation can be genetically separated. Furthermore, the identification of YscF residues that are required for the assembly of the translocon and/or productive interactions with the translocon has allowed us to initiate the mapping of the needle-translocon interface. PMID:17071752

  2. Dietary long-chain n-3 fatty acids modify blood and cardiac phospholipids and reduce protein kinase-C-delta and protein kinase-C-epsilon translocation.

    PubMed

    Judé, Sébastien; Martel, Eric; Vincent, Fanny; Besson, Pierre; Couet, Charles; Ogilvie, Gregory K; Pinault, Michelle; De Chalendar, Catherine; Bougnoux, Philippe; Richard, Serge; Champeroux, Pascal; Crozatier, Bertrand; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    The effects of an n-3 PUFA-enriched diet on cardiac cell membrane phospholipid fraction compositions and associated protein kinase-C (PKC) translocation modification have never been studied in higher mammals. This is of importance since membrane fatty acid composition has been shown to influence PKC signalling pathways. In the present study, we have tested whether the incorporation of n-3 PUFA in cardiac membrane phospholipids correlated with changes in the fatty acid composition of diacylglycerols (DAG) and led to a differential translocation of PKC isoforms. Two groups of five dogs were fed the standard diet supplemented with palm oil or fish oil for 8 weeks. Dogs fed a fish oil-enriched diet showed a preferential incorporation of EPA and, to a lesser extent, of DHA, at the expense of arachidonic acid, in the circulating TAG, plasma phospholipids, erythrocyte phospholipids and cardiomyocyte phospholipid fractions. Analysis of 1,2-DAG fatty acid composition also indicated a preferential enrichment of EPA compared with DHA. Associated with these results, a reduction in the expression of PKC-delta and PKC-epsilon isoforms in the particulate fractions was observed whereas no effect was seen for PKC-alpha and PKC-zeta. We conclude that a fish oil-enriched diet induces a modification in fatty acid composition of cardiac membrane phospholipids, associated with a differential translocation of PKC isoforms. These results can be explained by the production of structurally different DAG that may participate in some of the protective effects of n-3 PUFA against various chronic diseases.

  3. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  4. Coexistence of translocated cytochrome c and nitrated protein in neurons of the rat cerebral cortex after oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Alonso, D; Encinas, J M; Uttenthal, L O; Boscá, L; Serrano, J; Fernández, A P; Castro-Blanco, S; Santacana, M; Bentura, M L; Richart, A; Fernández-Vizarra, P; Rodrigo, J

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of immunoreactive cytochrome c and protein nitration were studied in the rat cerebral cortex after oxygen and glucose deprivation by bright field, confocal and electron microscopy. In control cerebral cortex, nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity indicating protein nitration was found mostly in the neuronal nuclear region, with only a small amount distributed in the cytosol, whereas cytochrome c immunoreactivity was found at the inner membrane and in the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. During the recovery phase after oxygen and glucose deprivation, cytochrome c immunoreactivity was released from the intermembrane space of swollen mitochondria into the surrounding cytosol. The cytosol now also displayed nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, which had diminished in the nuclear region. Both immunoreactivities were dispersed throughout the soma and processes of the cortical neurons. These changes were largely prevented by the administration of cyclosporin A, which inhibits both the mitochondrial permeability transition and the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase while blocking the induction of the inducible isoform. Ischemia/reperfusion injury increases the production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and intracellular factors that damage the mitochondria and liberate apoptotic factors. We suggest that translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, which has been shown to precede the mitochondrial permeability transition, could result from peroxynitrite-mediated nitration. This phenomenon is attenuated by cyclosporin A administration, suggesting a neuroprotective role for this agent.

  5. The 18-kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Disrupts Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis and Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoting; Gallo, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in cancer progression and have emerged as viable targets for cancer therapy. Increasing levels of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein, 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), are associated with advancing breast cancer stage. In particular, higher TSPO levels are found in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors, compared with ER-positive tumors. In this study, we sought to define the roles of TSPO in the acquisition of breast cancer malignancy. Using a three-dimensional Matrigel culture system, we determined the impact of elevated TSPO levels on mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Our studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of TSPO in mammary epithelial MCF10A acini drives proliferation and provides partial resistance to luminal apoptosis, resulting in enlarged acinar structures with partially filled lumen that resemble early stage breast lesions leading to breast cancer. In breast cancer cell lines, TSPO silencing or TSPO overexpression significantly altered the migratory activity. In addition, we found that combination treatment with the TSPO ligands (PK 11195 or Ro5-4864) and lonidamine, a clinical phase II drug targeting mitochondria, decreased viability of ER-negative breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, these data demonstrate that increases in TSPO levels at different stages of breast cancer progression results in the acquisition of distinct properties associated with malignancy. Furthermore, targeting TSPO, particularly in combination with other mitochondria-targeting agents, may prove useful for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:23967175

  6. Mitochondria-Translocated PGK1 Functions as a Protein Kinase to Coordinate Glycolysis and the TCA Cycle in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yuhui; Meisenhelder, Jill; Yang, Weiwei; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Xia, Yan; Aldape, Kenneth; He, Jie; Hunter, Tony; Wang, Liwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear how the Warburg effect that exemplifies enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol is coordinated with suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism. We demonstrate here that hypoxia, EGFR activation, and expression of K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E induce mitochondrial translocation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1); this is mediated by ERK-dependent PGK1 S203 phosphorylation and subsequent PIN1-mediated cis-trans isomerization. Mitochondrial PGK1 acts as a protein kinase to phosphorylate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) at T338, which activates PDHK1 to phosphorylate and inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. This reduces mitochondrial pyruvate utilization, suppresses reactive oxygen species production, increases lactate production, and promotes brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 S203 and PDHK1 T338 phosphorylation levels correlate with PDH S293 inactivating phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. This work highlights that PGK1 acts as a protein kinase in coordinating glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is instrumental in cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis.

  7. Mitochondria-translocated phosphoglycerate kinase 1 functions as a protein kinase to coordinate glycolysis and TCA cycle in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yuhui; Meisenhelder, Jill; Yang, Weiwei; Hawke, David H.; Zheng, Yanhua; Xia, Yan; Aldape, Kenneth; He, Jie; Hunter, Tony; Wang, Liwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY It is unclear how the Warburg effect that exemplifies enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol is coordinated with suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism. We demonstrate here that hypoxia, EGFR activation, and expression of K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E induce mitochondrial translocation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1); this is mediated by ERK-dependent PGK1 S203 phosphorylation and subsequent PIN1-mediated cis–trans isomerization. Mitochondrial PGK1 acts as a protein kinase to phosphorylate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) at T338, which activates PDHK1 to phosphorylate and inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. This reduces mitochondrial pyruvate utilization, suppresses reactive oxygen species production, increases lactate production, and promotes brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 S203 and PDHK1 T338 phosphorylation levels correlate with PDH S293 inactivating phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. This work highlights that PGK1 act as a protein kinase in coordinating glycolysis and the TCA cycle, which is instrumental in cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942675

  8. The exocyst affects protein synthesis by acting on the translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Mostov, Keith E

    2003-06-01

    We previously showed that the exocyst complex specifically affected the synthesis and delivery of secretory and basolateral plasma membrane proteins. Significantly, the entire spectrum of secreted proteins was increased when the hSec10 (human Sec10) component of the exocyst complex was overexpressed, suggestive of post-transcriptional regulation (Lipschutz, J. H., Guo, W., O'Brien, L. E., Nguyen, Y. H., Novick, P., and Mostov, K. E. (2000) Mol. Biol. Cell 11, 4259-4275). Here, using an exogenously transfected basolateral protein, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and a secretory protein, gp80, we show that pIgR and gp80 protein synthesis and delivery are increased in cells overexpressing Sec10 despite the fact that mRNA levels are unchanged, which is highly indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. To test specificity, we also examined the synthesis and delivery of an exogenous apical protein, CNT1 (concentrative nucleoside transporter 1), and found no increase in CNT1 protein synthesis, delivery, or mRNA levels in cells overexpressing Sec10. Sec10-GFP-overexpressing cell lines were created, and staining was seen in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was demonstrated previously in yeast that high levels of expression of SEB1, the Sec61beta homologue, suppressed sec15-1, an exocyst mutant (Toikkanen, J., Gatti, E., Takei, K., Saloheimo, M., Olkkonen, V. M., Soderlund, H., De Camilli, P., and Keranen, S. (1996) Yeast 12, 425-438). Sec61beta is a member of the Sec61 heterotrimer, which is the main component of the endoplasmic reticulum translocon. By co-immunoprecipitation we show that Sec10, which forms an exocyst subcomplex with Sec15, specifically associates with the Sec61beta component of the translocon and that Sec10 overexpression increases the association of other exocyst complex members with Sec61beta. Proteosome inhibition does not appear to be the mechanism by which increased protein synthesis occurs in the face of equivalent amounts of m

  9. Investigating the interactions of the 18kDa translocator protein and its ligand PK11195 in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hatty, Claire R; Le Brun, Anton P; Lake, Vanessa; Clifton, Luke A; Liu, Guo Jun; James, Michael; Banati, Richard B

    2014-03-01

    The functional effects of a drug ligand may be due not only to an interaction with its membrane protein target, but also with the surrounding lipid membrane. We have investigated the interaction of a drug ligand, PK11195, with its primary protein target, the integral membrane 18kDa translocator protein (TSPO), and model membranes using Langmuir monolayers, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and neutron reflectometry (NR). We found that PK11195 is incorporated into lipid monolayers and lipid bilayers, causing a decrease in lipid area/molecule and an increase in lipid bilayer rigidity. NR revealed that PK11195 is incorporated into the lipid chain region at a volume fraction of ~10%. We reconstituted isolated mouse TSPO into a lipid bilayer and studied its interaction with PK11195 using QCM-D, which revealed a larger than expected frequency response and indicated a possible conformational change of the protein. NR measurements revealed a TSPO surface coverage of 23% when immobilised to a modified surface via its polyhistidine tag, and a thickness of 51Å for the TSPO layer. These techniques allowed us to probe both the interaction of TSPO with PK11195, and PK11195 with model membranes. It is possible that previously reported TSPO-independent effects of PK11195 are due to incorporation into the lipid bilayer and alteration of its physical properties. There are also implications for the variable binding profiles observed for TSPO ligands, as drug-membrane interactions may contribute to the apparent affinity of TSPO ligands.

  10. Black pepper and piperine reduce cholesterol uptake and enhance translocation of cholesterol transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Praputbut, Sakonwun; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2013-04-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) lowers blood lipids in vivo and inhibits cholesterol uptake in vitro, and piperine may mediate these effects. To test this, the present study aimed to compare actions of black pepper extract and piperine on (1) cholesterol uptake and efflux in Caco-2 cells, (2) the membrane/cytosol distribution of cholesterol transport proteins in these cells, and (3) the physicochemical properties of cholesterol micelles. Piperine or black pepper extract (containing the same amount of piperine) dose-dependently reduced cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells in a similar manner. Both preparations reduced the membrane levels of NPC1L1 and SR-BI proteins but not their overall cellular expression. Micellar cholesterol solubility of lipid micelles was unaffected except by 1 mg/mL concentration of black pepper extract. These data suggest that piperine is the active compound in black pepper and reduces cholesterol uptake by internalizing the cholesterol transporter proteins.

  11. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  12. Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) cell surface protein in maturing mouse rod photoreceptors elevates the luminance threshold for light-driven translocation of transducin but not arrestin.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A; Sieving, Paul A

    2012-09-19

    Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) in Rs1 knock-out (Rs1-KO) retina produces a post-photoreceptor phenotype similar to X-linked retinoschisis in young males. However, Rs1 is expressed strongly in photoreceptors, and Rs1-KO mice have early reduction in the electroretinogram a-wave. We examined light-activated transducin and arrestin translocation in young Rs1-KO mice as a marker for functional abnormalities in maturing rod photoreceptors. We found a progressive reduction in luminance threshold for transducin translocation in wild-type (WT) retinas between postnatal days P18 and P60. At P21, the threshold in Rs1-KO retinas was 10-fold higher than WT, but it decreased to <2.5-fold higher by P60. Light-activated arrestin translocation and re-translocation of transducin in the dark were not affected. Rs1-KO rod outer segment (ROS) length was significantly shorter than WT at P21 but was comparable with WT at P60. These findings suggested a delay in the structural and functional maturation of Rs1-KO ROS. Consistent with this, transcription factors CRX and NRL, which are fundamental to maturation of rod protein expression, were reduced in ROS of Rs1-KO mice at P21 but not at P60. Expression of transducin was 15-30% lower in P21 Rs1-KO ROS and transducin GTPase hydrolysis was nearly twofold faster, reflecting a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signaling) level. Transduction protein expression and activity levels were similar to WT at P60. Transducin translocation threshold elevation indicates photoreceptor functional abnormalities in young Rs1-KO mice. Rapid reduction in threshold coupled with age-related changes in transduction protein levels and transcription factor expression are consistent with delayed maturation of Rs1-KO photoreceptors.

  13. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  14. Phosphatidylserine translocation at the yeast trans-Golgi network regulates protein sorting into exocytic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Hannah M.; Sere, Yves Y.; Diab, Nicholas S.; Menon, Anant K.; Graham, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    Sorting of plasma membrane proteins into exocytic vesicles at the yeast trans-Golgi network (TGN) is believed to be mediated by their coalescence with specific lipids, but how these membrane-remodeling events are regulated is poorly understood. Here we show that the ATP-dependent phospholipid flippase Drs2 is required for efficient segregation of cargo into exocytic vesicles. The plasma membrane proteins Pma1 and Can1 are missorted from the TGN to the vacuole in drs2∆ cells. We also used a combination of flippase mutants that either gain or lose the ability to flip phosphatidylserine (PS) to determine that PS flip by Drs2 is its critical function in this sorting event. The primary role of PS flip at the TGN appears to be to control the oxysterol-binding protein homologue Kes1/Osh4 and regulate ergosterol subcellular distribution. Deletion of KES1 suppresses plasma membrane–missorting defects and the accumulation of intracellular ergosterol in drs2 mutants. We propose that PS flip is part of a homeostatic mechanism that controls sterol loading and lateral segregation of protein and lipid domains at the TGN. PMID:26466678

  15. Protein and Quality Characterization of Triticale Translocation Lines in Bread Making

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) from the Glu-Did locus of wheat into triticale restores the genetic constitution of storage protein loci to that of wheat and subsequently improves the bread making quality of triticale. One means to achieve such restoration of the gen...

  16. Analysis of Vir protein translocation from Agrobacterium tumefaciens using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model: evidence for transport of a novel effector protein VirE3.

    PubMed

    Schrammeijer, Barbara; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Vergunst, Annette C; Jurado Jácome, Esmeralda; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2003-02-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease on a variety of plants. During the infection process Agrobacterium transfers a nucleoprotein complex, the VirD2 T-complex, and at least two Vir proteins, VirE2 and VirF, into the plant cell via the VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system. Recently, we found that T-DNA could also be transferred from Agrobacterium to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we describe a novel method to also detect trans-kingdom Vir protein transfer from Agrobacterium to yeast, using the Cre/lox system. Protein fusions between Cre and VirE2 or VirF were expressed in AGROBACTERIUM: Transfer of the Cre-Vir fusion proteins from Agrobacterium to yeast was monitored by a selectable excision event resulting from site-specific recombination mediated by Cre on a lox-flanked transgene in yeast. The VirE2 and VirF proteins were transported to yeast via the virB-encoded transfer system in the presence of coupling factor VirD4, analogous to translocation into plant cells. The yeast system therefore provides a suitable and fast model system to study basic aspects of trans-kingdom protein transport from Agrobacterium into host cells. Using this method we showed that VirE2 and VirF protein transfer was inhibited by the presence of the Osa protein. Besides, we found evidence for a novel third effector protein, VirE3, which has a similar C-terminal signature to VirE2 and VirF. PMID:12560481

  17. A small molecule inhibitor of redox-regulated protein translocation into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Deepa V; Hasson, Samuel A; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Johnson, Meghan E; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Douglas, Colin J; Zimmerman, Johannes; Damoiseaux, Robert; Teitell, Michael A; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-04-15

    The mitochondrial disulfide relay system of Mia40 and Erv1/ALR facilitates import of the small translocase of the inner membrane (Tim) proteins and cysteine-rich proteins. A chemical screen identified small molecules that inhibit Erv1 oxidase activity, thereby facilitating dissection of the disulfide relay system in yeast and vertebrate mitochondria. One molecule, mitochondrial protein import blockers from the Carla Koehler laboratory (MitoBloCK-6), attenuated the import of Erv1 substrates into yeast mitochondria and inhibited oxidation of Tim13 and Cmc1 in in vitro reconstitution assays. In addition, MitoBloCK-6 revealed an unexpected role for Erv1 in the carrier import pathway, namely transferring substrates from the translocase of the outer membrane complex onto the small Tim complexes. Cardiac development was impaired in MitoBloCK-6-exposed zebrafish embryos. Finally, MitoBloCK-6 induced apoptosis via cytochrome c release in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) but not in differentiated cells, suggesting an important role for ALR in hESC homeostasis.

  18. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  19. Anxiolytic-like effects of translocator protein (TSPO) ligand ZBD-2 in an animal model of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Yan-Yan; Guo, Hong-Liang; Kang, Wen-Bo; Li, Shuo; Den, Ya-Ting; Li, Xu-Bo; Feng, Bing; Feng, Dan; Zhao, Jian-Ning; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-Gao

    2015-03-26

    The activation of Translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) has been demonstrated to mediate rapid anxiolytic efficacy in stress response and stress-related disorders. This protein is involved in the synthesis of endogenous neurosteroids that promote γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission in the central neural system. However, little is known about the functions and the underlying mechanisms of TSPO in chronic pain-induced anxiety-like behaviors. The novel TSPO ligand N-benzyl-N-ethyl-2-(7,8-dihydro-7-benzyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl) acetamide (ZBD-2) was used in the present study. We found that ZBD-2 (0.15 or 1.5 mg/kg) significantly attenuated anxiety-like behaviors in mice with chronic inflammatory pain induced by hindpaw injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). However, the treatment did not alter the nociceptive threshold or inflammation in the hindpaw. Hindpaw injection of CFA induced the upregulation of TSPO, GluR1-containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, and NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). ZBD-2 administration reversed the alterations of the abovementioned proteins in the BLA of the CFA-injected mice. Electrophysiological recording revealed that ZBD-2 could prevent an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in the BLA synapses of CFA-injected mice. Therefore, as the novel ligand of TSPO, ZBD-2 induced anxiolytic effects, but did not affect the nociceptive threshold of mice under chronic pain. The anxiolytic effects of ZBD-2 were related to the regulation of the balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in the BLA.

  20. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-09-06

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology.

  1. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  2. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  3. Phospholipid translocation and miltefosine potency require both L. donovani miltefosine transporter and the new protein LdRos3 in Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Victoria, F Javier; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2006-08-18

    The antitumor drug miltefosine has been recently approved as the first oral drug active against visceral leishmaniasis. We have previously identified the L. donovani miltefosine transporter (LdMT) as a P-type ATPase involved in phospholipid translocation at the plasma membrane of Leishmania parasites. Here we show that this protein is essential but not sufficient for the phospholipid translocation activity and, thus, for the potency of the drug. Based on recent findings in yeast, we have identified the putative beta subunit of LdMT, named LdRos3, as another protein factor required for the translocation activity. LdRos3 belongs to the CDC50/Lem3 family, proposed as likely beta subunits for P4-ATPases. The phenotype of LdRos3-defective parasites was identical to that of the LdMT-/-, including a defect in the uptake of 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-amino)-phosphatidylserine, generally considered as not affected in Lem3p-deficient yeast. Both LdMT and LdRos3 normally localized to the plasma membrane but were retained inside the endoplasmic reticulum in the absence of the other protein or when inactivating point mutations were introduced in LdMT. Modulating the expression levels of either protein independently, we show that any one of them could behave as the protein limiting the level of flippase activity. Thus, LdMT and LdRos3 seem to form part of the same translocation machinery that determines flippase activity and miltefosine sensitivity in Leishmania, further supporting the consideration of CDC50/Lem3 proteins as beta subunits required for the normal functioning of P4-ATPases. PMID:16785229

  4. Lead Optimization of 2-Phenylindolylglyoxylyldipeptide Murine Double Minute (MDM)2/Translocator Protein (TSPO) Dual Inhibitors for the Treatment of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Simona; La Pietra, Valeria; Barresi, Elisabetta; Di Maro, Salvatore; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Robello, Marco; La Motta, Concettina; Cosconati, Sandro; Taliani, Sabrina; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Da Settimo, Federico

    2016-05-26

    In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), translocator protein (TSPO) and murine double minute (MDM)2/p53 complex represent two druggable targets. We recently reported the first dual binder 3 possessing a higher anticancer effect in GBM cells than the standards PK11195 1 or Nutlin-3 2 singularly applied. Herein, through a structure-activity relationship study, we developed derivatives 4-10 with improved potencies toward both TSPO and MDM2. As a result, compound 9: (i) reactivated the p53 functionality; (ii) inhibited the viability of two human GBM cells; (iii) impaired the proliferation of glioma cancer stem cells (CSCs), more resistant to chemotherapeutics and responsible of GBM recurrence; (iv) sensitized GBM cells and CSCs to the activity of temozolomide; (v) directed its effects preferentially toward tumor cells with respect to healthy ones. Thus, 9 may represent a promising cytotoxic agent, which is worthy of being further developed for a therapeutic approach against GBM, where the downstream p53 signaling is intact and TSPO is overexpressed.

  5. Synchrotron Protein Footprinting Supports Substrate Translocation by ClpA via ATP-Induced Movements of the D2 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Jen; Jennings, Laura D.; Phillips, Christine M.; Licht, Stuart; Chance, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Synchrotron x-ray protein footprinting is used to study structural changes upon formation of the ClpA hexamer. Comparative solvent accessibilities between ClpA monomer and ClpA hexamer samples are in agreement throughout most of the sequence with calculations based on two previously proposed hexameric models. The data differ substantially from the proposed models in two parts of the structure: the D1 sensor 1 domain and the D2 loop region. The results suggest that these two regions can access alternate conformations in which their solvent protection is greater than in the structural models based on crystallographic data. In combination with previously reported structural data, the footprinting data provide support for a revised model in which the D2 loop contacts the D1 sensor 1 domain in the ATP-bound form of the complex. These data provide the first direct experimental support for the nucleotide-dependent D2 loop conformational change previously proposed to mediate substrate translocation. PMID:18682217

  6. Calcium translocation mechanism in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, deduced from location studies of protein-bound spin labels.

    PubMed Central

    Champeil, P; Rigaud, J L; Gary-Bobo, C M

    1980-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were exposed to various thiol-directed spin labels, and the position of the label on the inner or outer vesicle surface was investigated as a function of the ATPase (adenosinetriphosphatase; ATP phosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.3) chemical state. Previous measurements of label accessibility to externally added ascorbate had been considered to suggest an external-internal transition of protein-bound labels, coupled with ion translocation [Tonomura, Y. & Morales, M.F. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 3687-3691]. We show that these ascorbate studies do not lead to convincing conclusions. We demonstrate, on the contrary, that transition ions (nickel and ferricyanide) can be used as selective line-broadening agents for the signals arising from external labels. No significant difference in nickel- or ferricyanide-label interaction can be attributed to a different orientation of the label in any of the enzyme chemical states tested. Our results therefore contradict the current interpretation of ascorbate quenching experiments in terms of calcium ATPase rotatory motion; rather they are consistent with ion transport models involving only limited conformational rearrangements of the pump. PMID:6446710

  7. Overexpression of Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein (VAMP) 3, but Not VAMP2, Protects Glucose Transporter (GLUT) 4 Protein Translocation in an in Vitro Model of Cardiac Insulin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Robert W.; Angin, Yeliz; Steinbusch, Laura K. M.; Dirkx, Ellen; Hoebers, Nicole; Coumans, Will A.; Bonen, Arend; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Eys, Guillaume J. J. M.; Glatz, Jan F. C.; Luiken, Joost J. F. P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac glucose utilization is regulated by reversible translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane. During the onset of diet-induced insulin resistance, elevated lipid levels in the circulation interfere with insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, leading to impaired glucose utilization. Recently, we identified vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2 and 3 to be required for insulin- and contraction-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, respectively, in cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of VAMP2 and/or VAMP3 could protect insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation under conditions of insulin resistance. HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes transiently overexpressing either VAMP2 or VAMP3 were cultured for 16 h with elevated concentrations of palmitate and insulin. Upon subsequent acute stimulation with insulin, we measured GLUT4 translocation, plasmalemmal presence of the fatty acid transporter CD36, and myocellular lipid accumulation. Overexpression of VAMP3, but not VAMP2, completely prevented lipid-induced inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Furthermore, the plasmalemmal presence of CD36 and intracellular lipid levels remained normal in cells overexpressing VAMP3. However, insulin signaling was not retained, indicating an effect of VAMP3 overexpression downstream of PKB/Akt. Furthermore, we revealed that endogenous VAMP3 is bound by the contraction-activated protein kinase D (PKD), and contraction and VAMP3 overexpression protect insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation via a common mechanism. These observations indicate that PKD activates GLUT4 translocation via a VAMP3-dependent trafficking step, which pathway might be valuable to rescue constrained glucose utilization in the insulin-resistant heart. PMID:22936810

  8. Overexpression of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 3, but not VAMP2, protects glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 protein translocation in an in vitro model of cardiac insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Robert W; Angin, Yeliz; Steinbusch, Laura K M; Dirkx, Ellen; Hoebers, Nicole; Coumans, Will A; Bonen, Arend; Broers, Jos L V; van Eys, Guillaume J J M; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P

    2012-10-26

    Cardiac glucose utilization is regulated by reversible translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane. During the onset of diet-induced insulin resistance, elevated lipid levels in the circulation interfere with insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, leading to impaired glucose utilization. Recently, we identified vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2 and 3 to be required for insulin- and contraction-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, respectively, in cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of VAMP2 and/or VAMP3 could protect insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation under conditions of insulin resistance. HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes transiently overexpressing either VAMP2 or VAMP3 were cultured for 16 h with elevated concentrations of palmitate and insulin. Upon subsequent acute stimulation with insulin, we measured GLUT4 translocation, plasmalemmal presence of the fatty acid transporter CD36, and myocellular lipid accumulation. Overexpression of VAMP3, but not VAMP2, completely prevented lipid-induced inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Furthermore, the plasmalemmal presence of CD36 and intracellular lipid levels remained normal in cells overexpressing VAMP3. However, insulin signaling was not retained, indicating an effect of VAMP3 overexpression downstream of PKB/Akt. Furthermore, we revealed that endogenous VAMP3 is bound by the contraction-activated protein kinase D (PKD), and contraction and VAMP3 overexpression protect insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation via a common mechanism. These observations indicate that PKD activates GLUT4 translocation via a VAMP3-dependent trafficking step, which pathway might be valuable to rescue constrained glucose utilization in the insulin-resistant heart.

  9. Visualization and translocation of ternary Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B/Calmodulin-2 protein complexes by dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Waadt, Rainer; Kudla, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence complementation (FC) techniques are expedient for analyzing bimolecular protein-protein interactions. Here we aimed to develop a method for visualization of ternary protein complexes using dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation (TriFC). Dual-color TriFC combines protein fragments of mCherry and mVenus, in which a scaffold protein is bilaterally fused to C-terminal fragments of both fluorescent proteins and combined with potential interacting proteins fused to an N-terminal fluorescent protein fragment. For efficient visual verification of ternary complex formation, TriFC was combined with a cytoplasm to plasma membrane translocation assay. Modular vector sets were designed which are fully compatible with previously reported bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) vectors. As a proof-of-principle, the ternary complex formation of the PP2B protein phosphatase Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B with Calmodulin-2 was investigated in transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells. The results indicate a Calcineurin-B-induced interaction of Calmodulin-2 with Calcineurin-A. TriFC and the translocation of TriFC complexes provide a novel tool to investigate ternary complex formations with the simplicity of a BiFC approach. The robustness of FC applications and the opportunity to quantify fluorescence complementation render this assay suitable for a broad range of interaction analyses.

  10. Drug Ligand-Induced Activation of Translocator Protein (TSPO) Stimulates Steroid Production by Aged Brown Norway Rat Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, J.-Y.; Chen, H.; Midzak, A.; Burnett, A. L.; Papadopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDA) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein that is integrally involved in cholesterol transfer from intracellular stores into mitochondria, the rate-determining step in steroid formation. Previous studies have shown that TSPO drug ligands are able to activate steroid production by MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells and by mitochondria isolated from steroidogenic cells. We hypothesized herein that the direct, pharmacological activation of TSPO might induce aged Leydig cells, which are characterized by reduced T production, to produce significantly higher levels of T both in vitro and in vivo. To test this, we first examined the in vitro effects of the TSPO selective and structurally distinct drug ligands N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide (FGIN-1-27) and benzodiazepine 4′-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864) on steroidogenesis by Leydig cells isolated from aged (21-24 months old) and young adult (3-6 months old) Brown Norway rats. The ligands stimulated Leydig cell T production significantly, and equivalently, in cells of both ages, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific TSPO inhibitor 5-androsten-3,17,19-triol (19-Atriol). Additionally, we examined the in vivo effects of administering FGIN-1-27 to young and aged rats. In both cases, serum T levels increased significantly, consistent with the in vitro results. Indeed, serum T levels in aged rats administered FGIN-1-27 were equivalent to T levels in the serum of control young rats. Taken together, these results indicate that although there are reduced amounts of TSPO in aged Leydig cells, its direct activation is able to increase T production. We suggest that this approach might serve as a therapeutic means to increase steroid levels in vivo in cases of primary hypogonadism. PMID:23525219

  11. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine.

  12. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases. PMID:27030010

  13. Proteins from rat liver cytosol which stimulate mRNA transport. Purification and interactions with the nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H C; Rottmann, M; Bachmann, M; Müller, W E; McDonald, A R; Agutter, P S

    1986-08-15

    Two polysome-associated proteins with particular affinities for poly(A) have been purified from rat liver. These proteins stimulate the efflux of mRNA from isolated nuclei in conditions under which such efflux closely stimulates mRNA transport in vivo, and they are therefore considered as mRNA-transport-stimulatory proteins. Their interaction with the mRNA-translocation system in isolated nuclear envelopes has been studied. The results are generally consistent with the most recently proposed kinetic model of mRNA translocation. One protein, P58, has not been described previously. It inhibits the protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase, it enhances the NTPase activity in both the presence and the absence of poly(A) and it seems to increase poly(A) binding in unphosphorylated, but not in phosphorylated, envelopes. The other protein, P31, which probably corresponds to the 35,000-Mr factor described by Webb and his colleagues, enhances the binding of poly(A) to the mRNA-binding site in the envelope, thus stimulating the phosphoprotein phosphatase and, in consequence, the NTPase. The possible physiological significance of these two proteins is discussed.

  14. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  15. Cigarette smoke-induced reduction in binding of the salivary translocator protein is not mediated by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy of the head and neck and its main inducer is exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) in the presence of saliva. It is commonly accepted that CS contributes to the pathogenesis of oral cancer via reactive free radicals and volatile aldehydes. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is an intracellular receptor involved in proliferation and apoptosis, and has been linked to various types of cancer. The presence of TSPO in human saliva has been linked to oral cancer, and its binding affinity to its ligand is reduced following exposure to CS. In the present study we wished to further investigate the mechanism behind the CS-induced reduction of TSPO binding by exploring the possible mediatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volatile aldehydes in this process. We first analyzed TSPO binding in control saliva and in saliva exposed to CS in the presence and absence of various antioxidants. These experiments found that TSPO binding ability was not reversed by any of the antioxidants added, suggesting that CS exerts its effect on TSPO via mechanisms that do not involve volatile aldehydes and free radicals tested. Next, we analyzed TSPO binding in saliva following addition of exogenous ROS in the form of H2O2. These experiments found that TSPO binding was enhanced due to the treatment, once again showing that the CS-induced TSPO binding reduction is not mediated by this common form of ROS. However, the previously reported CS-induced reduction in salivary TSPO binding together with the role of TSPO in cells and its link to cancer strongly suggest that TSPO has a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced oral cancer. The importance of further elucidating the mechanisms behind it should be emphasized.

  16. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Translocator protein (Tspo) gene promoter-driven green fluorescent protein synthesis in transgenic mice: an in vivo model to study Tspo transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Jie; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a ubiquitous drug- and cholesterol-binding protein primarily found in the outer mitochondrial membrane as part of a mitochondrial cholesterol transport complex. TSPO is present at higher levels in steroid-synthesizing and rapidly proliferating tissues, and its biological role has been mainly linked to mitochondrial function, steroidogenesis, and cell proliferation/apoptosis. Aberrant TSPO levels have been linked to multiple diseases, including cancer, endocrine disorders, brain injury, neurodegeneration, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and inflammatory diseases. Investigation of the functions of this protein in vitro and in vivo have been mainly carried out using high-affinity drug ligands, such as isoquinoline carboxamides and benzodiazepines, and more recently, gene silencing methods. To establish a model to study the regulation of Tspo transcription in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea coerulescens under control of the Tspo promoter region (Tspo-AcGFP). The expression profiles of Tspo-AcGFP, endogenous TSPO, and Tspo mRNA were found to be well correlated. Tspo-AcGFP synthesis in the transgenic mice was seen in almost every tissue examined, and as with TSPO in wild-type mice, Tspo-AcGFP was highly expressed in steroidogenic cells of the endocrine and reproductive systems, epithelial cells of the digestive system, skeletal muscle, and other organs. In summary, this transgenic Tspo-AcGFP mouse model recapitulates endogenous Tspo expression patterns and could be a useful, tractable tool for monitoring the transcriptional regulation and function of Tspo in live animal experiments. PMID:22868914

  18. Loss of Retinoschisin (RS1) Cell Surface Protein in Maturing Mouse Rod Photoreceptors Elevates the Luminance Threshold for Light-Driven Translocation of Transducin But Not Arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) in Rs1 knock-out (Rs1–KO) retina produces a post-photoreceptor phenotype similar to X-linked retinoschisis in young males. However, Rs1 is expressed strongly in photoreceptors, and Rs1–KO mice have early reduction in the electroretinogram a-wave. We examined light-activated transducin and arrestin translocation in young Rs1–KO mice as a marker for functional abnormalities in maturing rod photoreceptors. We found a progressive reduction in luminance threshold for transducin translocation in wild-type (WT) retinas between postnatal days P18 and P60. At P21, the threshold in Rs1–KO retinas was 10-fold higher than WT, but it decreased to <2.5-fold higher by P60. Light-activated arrestin translocation and re-translocation of transducin in the dark were not affected. Rs1–KO rod outer segment (ROS) length was significantly shorter than WT at P21 but was comparable with WT at P60. These findings suggested a delay in the structural and functional maturation of Rs1–KO ROS. Consistent with this, transcription factors CRX and NRL, which are fundamental to maturation of rod protein expression, were reduced in ROS of Rs1–KO mice at P21 but not at P60. Expression of transducin was 15–30% lower in P21 Rs1–KO ROS and transducin GTPase hydrolysis was nearly twofold faster, reflecting a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signaling) level. Transduction protein expression and activity levels were similar to WT at P60. Transducin translocation threshold elevation indicates photoreceptor functional abnormalities in young Rs1–KO mice. Rapid reduction in threshold coupled with age-related changes in transduction protein levels and transcription factor expression are consistent with delayed maturation of Rs1–KO photoreceptors. PMID:22993419

  19. Translocation of Incoming Pseudorabies Virus Capsids to the Cell Nucleus Is Delayed in the Absence of Tegument Protein pUL37▿

    PubMed Central

    Krautwald, Mirjam; Fuchs, Walter; Klupp, Barbara G.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    After fusion of the envelope of herpesvirus particles with the host cell plasma membrane, incoming nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores. Inner tegument proteins pUL36, pUL37, and pUS3 remain attached to the nucleocapsid after entry and therefore might mediate interactions between the nucleocapsid and cellular microtubule-associated motor proteins during transport. To assay for the role of pUL37 in this process, we constructed a pUL37-deleted pseudorabies virus mutant, PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP, which expresses a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the nonessential small capsid protein pUL35, resulting in the formation of fluorescently labeled capsids. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of rabbit kidney cells infected with PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP revealed that, whereas penetration was not affected in the absence of pUL37, nuclear translocation of incoming particles was delayed by approximately 1 h compared to PrV-UL35GFP, but not abolished. In contrast, phenotypically complemented pUL37-containing virions of PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP exhibited wild type-like entry kinetics. Thus, the presence of pUL37 is required for rapid nuclear translocation of incoming nucleocapsids. PMID:19144717

  20. Translocation of incoming pseudorabies virus capsids to the cell nucleus is delayed in the absence of tegument protein pUL37.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Mirjam; Fuchs, Walter; Klupp, Barbara G; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2009-04-01

    After fusion of the envelope of herpesvirus particles with the host cell plasma membrane, incoming nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores. Inner tegument proteins pUL36, pUL37, and pUS3 remain attached to the nucleocapsid after entry and therefore might mediate interactions between the nucleocapsid and cellular microtubule-associated motor proteins during transport. To assay for the role of pUL37 in this process, we constructed a pUL37-deleted pseudorabies virus mutant, PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP, which expresses a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the nonessential small capsid protein pUL35, resulting in the formation of fluorescently labeled capsids. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of rabbit kidney cells infected with PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP revealed that, whereas penetration was not affected in the absence of pUL37, nuclear translocation of incoming particles was delayed by approximately 1 h compared to PrV-UL35GFP, but not abolished. In contrast, phenotypically complemented pUL37-containing virions of PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP exhibited wild type-like entry kinetics. Thus, the presence of pUL37 is required for rapid nuclear translocation of incoming nucleocapsids. PMID:19144717

  1. RNA interference targeting rye secalins alters flour protein composition in a wheat variety carrying a 1Bl.1RS translocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat varieties carrying chromosome translocations from rye are part of the international wheat breeding pool, despite being associated with defects in dough processing quality. Among the proposed causes for the quality defects of flours from such wheats is the presence of the secalins, encoded by ...

  2. The ciliary protein nephrocystin-4 translocates the canonical Wnt regulator Jade-1 to the nucleus to negatively regulate β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Habbig, Sandra; Hatzold, Julia; Liebau, Max C; Dafinger, Claudia; Sacarea, Ilinca; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2012-07-20

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is an autosomal-recessive cystic kidney disease and represents the most common genetic cause for end-stage renal disease in children and adolescents. It can be caused by the mutation of genes encoding for the nephrocystin proteins (NPHPs). All NPHPs localize to primary cilia, classifying this disease as a "ciliopathy." The primary cilium is a critical regulator of several cell signaling pathways. Cystogenesis in the kidney is thought to involve overactivation of canonical Wnt signaling, which is negatively regulated by the primary cilium and several NPH proteins, although the mechanism remains unclear. Jade-1 has recently been identified as a novel ubiquitin ligase targeting the canonical Wnt downstream effector β-catenin for proteasomal degradation. Here, we identify Jade-1 as a novel component of the NPHP protein complex. Jade-1 colocalizes with NPHP1 at the transition zone of primary cilia and interacts with NPHP4. Furthermore, NPHP4 stabilizes protein levels of Jade-1 and promotes the translocation of Jade-1 to the nucleus. Finally, NPHP4 and Jade-1 additively inhibit canonical Wnt signaling, and this genetic interaction is conserved in zebrafish. The stabilization and nuclear translocation of Jade-1 by NPHP4 enhances the ability of Jade-1 to negatively regulate canonical Wnt signaling. Loss of this repressor function in nephronophthisis might be an important factor promoting Wnt activation and contributing to cyst formation.

  3. Robertsonian translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Role of the Carboxy Terminus of SecA in Iron Acquisition, Protein Translocation, and Virulence of the Bacterial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E.; Nwugo, Chika C.; Penwell, William F.; Neary, John M.; Beckett, Amber C.; Arivett, Brock A.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Geiger, Sarah C.; Connerly, Pamela L.; Menke, Sharon M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that causes pneumonia and soft tissue and systemic infections. Screening of a transposon insertion library of A. baumannii ATCC 19606T resulted in the identification of the 2010 derivative, which, although capable of growing well in iron-rich media, failed to prosper under iron chelation. Genetic, molecular, and functional assays showed that 2010's iron utilization-deficient phenotype is due to an insertion within the 3′ end of secA, which results in the production of a C-terminally truncated derivative of SecA. SecA plays a critical role in protein translocation through the SecYEG membrane channel. Accordingly, the secA mutation resulted in undetectable amounts of the ferric acinetobactin outer membrane receptor protein BauA while not affecting the production of other acinetobactin membrane protein transport components, such as BauB and BauE, or the secretion of acinetobactin by 2010 cells cultured in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of the synthetic iron chelator 2,2′-dipyridyl. Outer membrane proteins involved in nutrient transport, adherence, and biofilm formation were also reduced in 2010. The SecA truncation also increased production of 30 different proteins, including proteins involved in adaptation/tolerance responses. Although some of these protein changes could negatively affect the pathobiology of the 2010 derivative, its virulence defect is mainly due to its inability to acquire iron via the acinetobactin-mediated system. These results together indicate that although the C terminus of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T SecA is not essential for viability, it plays a critical role in the production and translocation of different proteins and virulence. PMID:25605767

  5. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    Transport of molecules across membranes is an essential mechanism for life processes. These molecules are often long, and the pores in the membranes are too narrow for the molecules to pass through as a single unit. In such circumstances, the molecules have to squeeze -- i.e., translocate -- themselves through the pores. DNA, RNA and proteins are such naturally occuring long molecules in a variety of biological processes. Understandably, the process of translocation has been an active topic of current research: not only because it is a cornerstone of many biological processes, but also due to its relevance for practical applications. Translocation is a complicated process in living organisms -- the presence of chaperone molecules, pH, chemical potential gradients, and assisting molecular motors strongly influence its dynamics. Consequently, the translocation process has been empirically studied in great variety in biological literature. Study of translocation as a biophysical process is more recent. Herein, the polymer is simplified to a sequentially connected string of N monomers as it passes through a narrow pore on a membrane. The quantities of interest are the typical time scale for the polymer to leave a confining cell (the ``escape of a polymer from a vesicle'' time scale), and the typical time scale the polymer spends in the pore (the ``dwell'' time scale) as a function of N and other parameters like membrane thickness, membrane adsorption, electrochemical potential gradient, etc. Our research is focused on computer simulations of translocation. Since our main interest is in the scaling properties, we use a highly simplified description of the translocation process. The polymer is described as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and its dynamics consists of single-monomer jumps from one lattice site to another neighboring one. Since we have a very efficient program to simulate such polymer dynamics, which we decribe in Chapter 2, we can perform long

  6. The secreted effector protein of Salmonella dublin, SopA, is translocated into eukaryotic cells and influences the induction of enteritis.

    PubMed

    Wood, M W; Jones, M A; Watson, P R; Siber, A M; McCormick, B A; Hedges, S; Rosqvist, R; Wallis, T S; Galyov, E E

    2000-08-01

    Salmonella-induced enteritis is associated with the induction of an acute intestinal inflammatory response and net fluid secretion into the lumen of infected mucosa. Proteins secreted by the Inv/Spa type III secretion system of Salmonella play a key role in the induction of these responses. We have demonstrated recently that the Inv/Spa-secreted SopB and SopD effector proteins are translocated into eukaryotic cells via a Sip-dependent pathway and act in concert to mediate inflammation and fluid secretion in infected ileal mucosa. Mutations of both sopB and sopD significantly reduced, but did not abrogate, the enteropathogenic phenotype. This indicated that other virulence factors are involved in the induction of enteritis. In this work, we characterize SopA, a secreted protein belonging to the family of Sop effectors of Salmonella dublin. We demonstrate that SopA is translocated into eukaryotic cells and provide evidence suggesting that SopA has a role in the induction of enteritis.

  7. The TIC complex uncovered: The alternative view on the molecular mechanism of protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Masato

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplasts must import thousands of nuclear-encoded preproteins synthesized in the cytosol through two successive protein translocons at the outer and inner envelope membranes, termed TOC and TIC, respectively, to fulfill their complex physiological roles. The molecular identity of the TIC translocon had long remained controversial; two proteins, namely Tic20 and Tic110, had been proposed to be central to protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane. Tic40 also had long been considered to be another central player in this process. However, recently, a novel 1-megadalton complex consisting of Tic20, Tic56, Tic100, and Tic214 was identified at the chloroplast inner membrane of Arabidopsis and was demonstrated to constitute a general TIC translocon which functions in concert with the well-characterized TOC translocon. On the other hand, direct interaction between this novel TIC transport system and Tic110 or Tic40 was hardly observed. Consequently, the molecular model for protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts might need to be extensively revised. In this review article, I intend to propose such alternative view regarding the TIC transport system in contradistinction to the classical view. I also would emphasize importance of reevaluation of previous works in terms of with what methods these classical Tic proteins such as Tic110 or Tic40 were picked up as TIC constituents at the very beginning as well as what actual evidence there were to support their direct and specific involvement in chloroplast protein import. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  8. Overexpression of glutaredoxin protects cardiomyocytes against nitric oxide-induced apoptosis with suppressing the S-nitrosylation of proteins and nuclear translocation of GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Inadomi, Chiaki; Murata, Hiroaki; Ihara, Yoshito; Goto, Shinji; Urata, Yoshishige; Yodoi, Junji; Kondo, Takahito; Sumikawa, Koji

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GRX1 overexpression protects myocardiac H9c2 cells against NO-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH is suppressed in GRX overexpressors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidation of GAPDH by NO is less in GRX overexpressors than in controls. -- Abstract: There is increasing evidence demonstrating that glutaredoxin 1 (GRX1), a cytosolic enzyme responsible for the catalysis of protein deglutathionylation, plays distinct roles in inflammation and apoptosis by inducing changes in the cellular redox system. In this study, we investigated whether and how the overexpression of GRX1 protects cardiomyocytes against nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis. Cardiomyocytes (H9c2 cells) were transfected with the expression vector for mouse GRX1 cDNA, and mock-transfected cells were used as a control. Compared with the mock-transfected cells, the GRX1-transfected cells were more resistant to NO-induced apoptosis. Stimulation with NO significantly increased the nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a pro-apoptotic protein, in the mock-transfected cells, but did not change GAPDH localization in the GRX1-transfected cells. Furthermore, we found that NO stimulation clearly induced the oxidative modification of GAPDH in the mock-transfected cells, whereas less modification of GAPDH was observed in the GRX1-transfected cells. These data suggest that the overexpression of GRX1 could protect cardiomyocytes against NO-induced apoptosis, likely through the inhibition of the oxidative modification and the nuclear translocation of GAPDH.

  9. Crystal structure of the effector AvrLm4-7 of Leptosphaeria maculans reveals insights into its translocation into plant cells and recognition by resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, Karine; Blaise, Françoise; Graille, Marc; Kale, Shiv D; Linglin, Juliette; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Labarde, Audrey; Lazar, Noureddine; Daverdin, Guillaume; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Choi, Danielle H Y; Tyler, Brett M; Rouxel, Thierry; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Fudal, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    The avirulence gene AvrLm4-7 of Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of stem canker in Brassica napus (oilseed rape), confers a dual specificity of recognition by two resistance genes (Rlm4 and Rlm7) and is strongly involved in fungal fitness. In order to elucidate the biological function of AvrLm4-7 and understand the specificity of recognition by Rlm4 and Rlm7, the AvrLm4-7 protein was produced in Pichia pastoris and its crystal structure was determined. It revealed the presence of four disulfide bridges, but no close structural analogs could be identified. A short stretch of amino acids in the C terminus of the protein, (R/N)(Y/F)(R/S)E(F/W), was well-conserved among AvrLm4-7 homologs. Loss of recognition of AvrLm4-7 by Rlm4 is caused by the mutation of a single glycine to an arginine residue located in a loop of the protein. Loss of recognition by Rlm7 is governed by more complex mutational patterns, including gene loss or drastic modifications of the protein structure. Three point mutations altered residues in the well-conserved C-terminal motif or close to the glycine involved in Rlm4-mediated recognition, resulting in the loss of Rlm7-mediated recognition. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana (tobacco) and particle bombardment experiments on leaves from oilseed rape suggested that AvrLm4-7 interacts with its cognate R proteins inside the plant cell, and can be translocated into plant cells in the absence of the pathogen. Translocation of AvrLm4-7 into oilseed rape leaves is likely to require the (R/N)(Y/F)(R/S)E(F/W) motif as well as an RAWG motif located in a nearby loop that together form a positively charged region. PMID:26082394

  10. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Yukiko; Kameoka, Masanori Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Iwabu, Yukie; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Fujino, Masato; Natori, Yukikazu; Yura, Yoshiaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2008-03-30

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2{alpha}) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2{alpha} was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin {beta} and Nup153, implying that AP2{alpha} negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2{alpha} may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle.

  11. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P.; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-11-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ˜15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  12. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ∼15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  13. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ∼15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  14. Systematic Analysis of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Ligands on Toll-like Receptors-mediated Pro-inflammatory Responses in Microglia and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Nam, Hyeri

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a mitochondrial protein highly expressed on reactive microglia and astrocytes, and is considered as a biomarker for neurodegeneration and brain damage, especially neuroinflammation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely related with inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and these signaling pathways regulate neuroinflammation. Previous reports have identified the anti-inflammatory effects of TSPO ligands, however study of their effects in relation to the TLR signaling was limited. Here, we investigated the effects of five representative TSPO ligands on microglia and astrocytes following activation by various TLR ligands. Our results show that TSPO ligands reduce the pro-inflammatory response elicited by the TLR ligands with more profound effects on microglia than astrocytes. PMID:27790060

  15. In-cell protease assay systems based on trans-localizing molecular beacon proteins using HCV protease as a model system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Min Jun; Hwang, Inhwan; Hwang, Hyun Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a sensitive in-cell protease detection system that enables direct fluorescence detection of a target protease and its inhibition inside living cells. This live-cell imaging system provides a fluorescent molecular beacon protein comprised of an intracellular translocation signal sequence, a protease-specific cleavage sequence, and a fluorescent tag sequence(s). The molecular beacon protein is designed to change its intracellular localization upon cleavage by a target protease, i.e., from the cytosol to a subcellular organelle or from a subcellular organelle to the cytosol. Protease activity can be monitored at the single cell level, and accordingly the entire cell population expressing the protease can be accurately enumerated. The clear cellular change in fluorescence pattern makes this system an ideal tool for various life science and drug discovery research, including high throughput and high content screening applications.

  16. High-level secretion of a recombinant protein to the culture medium with a Bacillus subtilis twin-arginine translocation system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Albiniak, Anna M; Matos, Cristina F R O; Branston, Steven D; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Robinson, Colin

    2013-08-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria, and heterologous proteins can be exported by this pathway if a Tat-type signal peptide is present at the N-terminus. The system thus has potential for biopharmaceutical production in Escherichia coli, where export to the periplasm is often a favoured approach. Previous studies have shown that E. coli cells can export high levels of protein by the Tat pathway, and the protein product accummulates almost exclusively in the periplasm. In this study, we analysed E. coli cells that express the Bacillus subtilis TatAdCd system in place of the native TatABC system. We show that a heterologous model protein, comprising the TorA signal peptide linked to green fluorescent protein (TorA-GFP), is efficiently exported by the TatAdCd system. However, whereas the GFP is exported initially to the periplasm during batch fermentation, the mature protein is increasingly found in the extracellular culture medium. By the end of a 16-h fermentation, ~ 90% of exported GFP is present in the medium as active mature protein. The total protein profiles of the medium and periplasm are essentially identical, confirming that the outer membrane becomes leaky during the fermentation process. The cells are otherwise intact, and there is no large-scale release of cytoplasmic contents. Export levels are relatively high, with ~ 0.35 g GFP·L⁻¹ culture present in the medium. This system thus offers a means of producing recombinant protein in E. coli and harvesting directly from the medium, with potential advantages in terms of ease of purification and downstream processing. PMID:23745597

  17. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes [Hamada et al., 2009]. The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca2+ spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca2+ events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional sites to activate HT program. PMID

  18. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  19. Pseudomonas syringae lytic transglycosylases coregulated with the type III secretion system contribute to the translocation of effector proteins into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hye-Sook; Kvitko, Brian H; Morello, Joanne E; Collmer, Alan

    2007-11-01

    Pseudomonas syringae translocates virulence effector proteins into plant cells via a type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by hrp (for hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes. Three genes coregulated with the Hrp T3SS system in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 have predicted lytic transglycosylase domains: PSPTO1378 (here designated hrpH), PSPTO2678 (hopP1), and PSPTO852 (hopAJ1). hrpH is located between hrpR and avrE1 in the Hrp pathogenicity island and is carried in the functional cluster of P. syringae pv. syringae 61 hrp genes cloned in cosmid pHIR11. Strong expression of DC3000 hrpH in Escherichia coli inhibits bacterial growth unless the predicted catalytic glutamate at position 148 is mutated. Translocation tests involving C-terminal fusions with a Cya (Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase) reporter indicate that HrpH and HopP1, but not HopAJ1, are T3SS substrates. Pseudomonas fluorescens carrying a pHIR11 derivative lacking hrpH is poorly able to translocate effector HopA1, and this deficiency can be restored by HopP1 and HopAJ1, but not by HrpH(E148A) or HrpH(1-241). DC3000 mutants lacking hrpH or hrpH, hopP1, and hopAJ1 combined are variously reduced in effector translocation, elicitation of the hypersensitive response, and virulence. However, the mutants are not reduced in secretion of T3SS substrates in culture. When produced in wild-type DC3000, the HrpH(E148A) and HrpH(1-241) variants have a dominant-negative effect on the ability of DC3000 to elicit the hypersensitive response in nonhost tobacco and to grow and cause disease in host tomato. The three Hrp-associated lytic transglycosylases in DC3000 appear to have overlapping functions in contributing to T3SS functions during infection.

  20. Hsp105 family proteins suppress staurosporine-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi; Saito, Youhei; Hatayama, Takumi . E-mail: hatayama@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-10-15

    Hsp105 (Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}), major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells, belong to a subgroup of the HSP70 family, HSP105/110. Previously, we have shown that Hsp105{alpha} has completely different effects on stress-induced apoptosis depending on cell type. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hsp105{alpha} regulates stress-induced apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we established HeLa cells that overexpress either Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} by removing doxycycline and examined how Hsp105 modifies staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Apoptotic features such as the externalization of phosphatidylserine on the plasma membrane and nuclear morphological changes were induced by the treatment with STS, and the STS-induced apoptosis was suppressed by overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. In addition, we found that overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by preventing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which results in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, was also suppressed by the overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. Thus, it is suggested that Hsp105 suppresses the stress-induced apoptosis at its initial step, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells.

  1. Psychiatric disorder in a familial 15;18 translocation and sublocalization of myelin basic protein to 18q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Calzolari, E.; Aiello, V.; Palazzi, P.; Sensi, A.

    1996-04-09

    Two related patients with similar clinical features consisting of a few dysmorphic signs and psychiatric disturbance were reported to have a partial trisomy of chromosomes 15(pter-q13.3) and 18(q23-qter) deriving from a familial translocation t(15;18). One patient is affected by bipolar disorder and the other by schizoaffective disorder. Both cases have a predominantly affective course; nevertheless, a clear diagnosis is difficult in the first patient, who is 15 years of age, and only a longitudinal course will allow us to establish a definite diagnosis. The possibility that these two pathologies belong to a single category is discussed, and the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 18 is hypothesized. Cytogenetic data, FISH, and DNA studies indicate that the myelin basic protein (MPB) gene is not involved in the translocation, and localize it centromeric to the breakpoint on chromosome 18(q22.3). Thus, it is unlikely to be involved in the disease. 58 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Promoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.

    PubMed

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Röijer, E; Aström, A K; Meyen, E; Stenman, G; Van de Ven, W J

    1997-02-01

    Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis.

  3. BZLF1, an Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, induces p65 nuclear translocation while inhibiting p65 transcriptional function

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Thomas E.; Kenney, Shannon C. . E-mail: shann@med.unc.edu

    2004-10-25

    We have previously demonstrated that the Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early BZLF1 protein interacts with, and is inhibited by, the NF-{kappa}B family member p65. However, the effects of BZLF1 on NF-{kappa}B activity have not been intensively studied. Here we show that BZLF1 inhibits p65-dependent gene expression. BZLF1 inhibited the ability of IL-1, as well as transfected p65, to activate the expression of two different NF-{kappa}B-responsive genes, ICAM-1 and I{kappa}B-{alpha}. BZLF1 also reduced the constitutive level of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein in HeLa and A549 cells, and increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B to a similar extent as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) treatment. In spite of this BZLF1-associated increase in the nuclear form of NF-{kappa}B, BZLF1 did not induce binding of NF-{kappa}B to NF-{kappa}B responsive promoters (as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay) in vivo, although TNF-{alpha} treatment induced NF-{kappa}B binding as expected. Overexpression of p65 dramatically inhibited the lytic replication cycle of EBV in 293-EBV cells, confirming that NF-{kappa}B also inhibits BZLF1 transcriptional function. Our results are consistent with a model in which BZLF1 inhibits the transcriptional function of p65, resulting in decreased transcription of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, decreased expression of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein, and subsequent translocation of NF-{kappa}B to the nucleus. This nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B may promote viral latency by negatively regulating BZLF1 transcriptional activity. In situations where p65 activity is limiting in comparison to BZLF1, the ability of BZLF1 to inhibit p65 transcriptional function may protect the virus from the host immune system during the lytic form of infection.

  4. Reversible cAMP-induced translocation of cytoskeleton-associated 300- to 350-kDa proteins from nucleus to cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Tokiko; Nishizawa, Kimiko; Sato, Chicako )

    1988-08-01

    The authors previously reported that treatment of SV-3Y1 cells in an exponential growth state with db-cAMP plus theophylline induced reversible disappearance of nuclear dots stained by monoclonal anti-microtubule-associated protein (MAP)-1 antibody. In the present study, the authors examined the relation between the intracellular localization and phosphorylation of 300- to 350-kDa proteins that are intracellular antigens for our anti-Map-1 and -2 antibodies. Treatment with db-cAMP plus theophylline was found to result in a reversible decrease in immunofluorescent staining of the nucleus with polyclonal MAP-1 or -2 antibody, and a reversible increase in that of the cytoplasm. Simultaneous treatment with colchicine, colcemid, putrescine, or {alpha}-naphthyl phosphate in the presence of db-cAMP plus theophylline almost prevented this effect of db-cAMP plus theophylline. They examined the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions by immunoperoxidase staining, immunoprecipitation, and {sup 125}I-protein A with anti-MAP-1 and -2 antibodies. The present research indicated that treatment with db-cAMP plus theophylline resulted in the reversible translocation of 300- to 350-kDa proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm accompanied by the dephosphorylation of these proteins.

  5. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53.

    PubMed

    Thangima Zannat, Mst; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-06-01

    The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  6. Immunogold evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum is the site of protamine-type protein synthesis and participates in translocation of these proteins into the nucleus during Chara vulgaris spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Popłonska, Katarzyna; Kwiatkowska, Maria; Wojtczak, Agnieszka; Polit, Justyna

    2009-03-01

    During spermiogenesis of an alga Chara vulgaris, which in many aspects resembles that of animals, histones are replaced by protamine-type proteins. Our earlier immunocytochemical studies showed that this replacement started during the short stage V of spermiogenesis, when electronograms revealed an extensive system of cisternae and vesicles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The present studies revealed at stage V intensive incorporation of labeled (3)H-arginine and (3)H-lysine quickly translocating into a nucleus visualized with pulse-chase autoradiography of semithin sections. The immunogold technique with the use of the antibodies to protamine-type proteins isolated from Chara tomentosa show that both ER cisternae and vesicles are labeled with gold grains, which are absent from the spermatids not treated with the antibodies; thus, the ER is probably the site of the protamine-type protein synthesis. These proteins then are translocated to a nucleus through ER channels connected with the nuclear envelope, as suggested by gold labeling of an inner membrane of the nuclear envelope adjacent to condensed chromatin. The above results correspond with those of other authors showing that in animals, protamines bind with lamin B receptors localized in the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope. A hypothesis has been put forward that during Chara spermiogenesis the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope invaginates into a nucleus together with protamine-type proteins, which become separated from the membrane and penetrate into chromatin.

  7. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine(23) and arginine(24)) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins.

  8. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine23 and arginine24) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins. PMID:25096923

  9. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  10. High-affinity lead binding proteins in rat kidney cytosol mediate cell-free nuclear translocation of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, P.; Lucier, G.W.; Fowler, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PbII binding characteristics of the previously reported PbII binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol were investigated further. Saturation and Scatchard analysis of /sup 203/Pb binding in whole cytosol and in 40% saturated ammonium sulfate precipitated fractions disclosed a class of relatively high-affinity sites with an apparent Kd of approximately 50 nM and binding capacities of approximately 41 and 9 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. Two /sup 203/Pb binding proteins with approximate molecular masses of 63K and 11.5K daltons and a high molecular weight component (greater than 200K) were isolated by Sepharose-6B column chromatography. The time course of association of /sup 203/Pb with cytosol and the 63K protein showed maximum binding at 18 hr which was stable up to 25 hr at 4 degrees C. The approximate half-time dissociation rate (T 1/2) of specifically bound /sup 203/Pb to the 63K protein was 100 min at 4 degrees C whereas the 11.5K protein showed little dissociation of specifically bound ligand at this temperature. Saturation analysis of the three isolated proteins disclosed low capacity, high-affinity sites with similar apparent Kd values to the cytosol assay. Sucrose density gradient analysis of kidney cytosol showed approximate sedimentation coefficients of 2S, 4.6S and 7S for the 11.5K, 63K and the high molecular weight proteins, respectively. Competitive binding studies with cytosol demonstrated displacement of /sup 203/Pb by PbII, CdII and ZnII ions but not CaII ions.

  11. The human erythrocyte anion transport protein, band 3. Characterization of exofacial alkaline titratable groups involved in anion binding/translocation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chloride self-exchange across the human erythrocyte membrane at alkaline extracellular pH (pHO) and constant neutral intracellular pH (pH(i)) can be described by an exofacial deprotonatable reciprocating anion binding site model. The conversion of the transport system from the neutral to the alkaline state is related to deprotonation of a positively charged ionic strength- and substrate-sensitive group. In the absence of substrate ions ([ClO] = 0) the group has a pK of approximately 9.4 at constant high ionic strength (equivalent to approximately 150 mM KCl) and a pK of approximately 8.7 at approximately zero ionic strength. The alkaline ping-pong system (examined at constant high ionic strength) demonstrates outward recruitment of the binding sites with an asymmetry factor of approximately 0.2, as compared with the inward recruitment of the transport system at neutral pHO with an asymmetry factor of approximately 10. The intrinsic half-saturation constant for chloride binding, with [Cli] = [Clo], increased from approximately 30 mM at neutral to approximately 110 mM at alkaline pHO. The maximal transport rate was a factor of approximately 1.7 higher at alkaline pHO. This increase explains the stimulation of anion transport, the "modifier hump," observed at alkaline pHO. The translocation of anions at alkaline pHO was inhibited by deprotonation of another substrate- sensitive group with an intrinsic pK of approximately 11.3. This group together with the group with a pK of approximately 9.4 appear to form the essential part of the exofacial anion binding site. The effect of extracellular iodide inhibition on chloride transport as a function of pHO could, moreover, be simulated if three extracellular iodide binding constants were included in the model: namely, a competitive intrinsic iodide binding constant of approximately 1 mM in the neutral state, a self-inhibitor binding constant of approximately 120 mM in the neutral state, and a competitive intrinsic binding

  12. Morphological changes and nuclear translocation of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein precede apoptosis in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Baozhu Jefferson, Amy M.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Popescu, Nicholas C.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2007-11-01

    We have previously shown that reactivation of DLC1, a RhoGAP containing tumor suppressor gene, inhibits tumorigenicity of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (NSCLC). After transfection of NSCLC cells with wild type (WT) DLC1, changes in cell morphology were observed. To determine whether such changes have functional implications, we generated several DLC1 mutants and examined their effects on cell morphology, proliferation, migration and apoptosis in a DLC1 deficient NSCLC cell line. We show that WT DLC1 caused actin cytoskeleton-based morphological alterations manifested as cytoplasmic extensions and membrane blebbings in most cells. Subsequently, a fraction of cells exhibiting DLC1 protein nuclear translocation (PNT) underwent caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We also show that the RhoGAP domain is essential for the occurrence of morphological alterations, PNT and apoptosis, and the inhibition of cell migration. DLC1 PNT is dependent on a bipartite nuclear localizing sequence and most likely is regulated by a serine-rich domain at N-terminal part of the DLC1 protein. Also, we found that DLC1 functions in the cytoplasm as an inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and migration, but in the nucleus as an inducer of apoptosis. Our analyses provide evidence for a possible link between morphological alterations, PNT and proapoptotic and anti-oncogenic activities of DLC1 in lung cancer.

  13. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by the outer membrane does not involve the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (Translocator Protein of 18 kDa (TSPO)).

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Blachly-Dyson, Elizabeth; Sewell, Randall; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Di Lisa, Fabio; Ricchelli, Fernanda; Bernardi, Paolo; Forte, Michael

    2014-05-16

    Translocator protein of 18 kDa (TSPO) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is thought to play a key role in the mitochondrial transport of cholesterol, a key step in the generation of steroid hormones. However, it was first characterized as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor because it appears to be responsible for high affinity binding of a number of benzodiazepines to non-neuronal tissues. Ensuing studies have employed natural and synthetic ligands to assess the role of TSPO function in a number of natural and pathological circumstances. Largely through the use of these compounds and biochemical associations, TSPO has been proposed to play a role in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which has been associated with cell death in many human pathological conditions. Here, we critically assess the role of TSPO in the function of the PTP through the generation of mice in which the Tspo gene has been conditionally eliminated. Our results show that 1) TSPO plays no role in the regulation or structure of the PTP, 2) endogenous and synthetic ligands of TSPO do not regulate PTP activity through TSPO, 3) outer mitochondrial membrane regulation of PTP activity occurs though a mechanism that does not require TSPO, and 4) hearts lacking TSPO are as sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury as hearts from control mice. These results call into question a wide variety of studies implicating TSPO in a number of pathological processes through its actions on the PTP.

  14. Morphological changes and nuclear translocation of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein precede apoptosis in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bao-Zhu; Jefferson, Amy M; Millecchia, Lyndell; Popescu, Nicholas C; Reynolds, Steven H

    2007-11-01

    We have previously shown that reactivation of DLC1, a RhoGAP containing tumor suppressor gene, inhibits tumorigenicity of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (NSCLC). After transfection of NSCLC cells with wild type (WT) DLC1, changes in cell morphology were observed. To determine whether such changes have functional implications, we generated several DLC1 mutants and examined their effects on cell morphology, proliferation, migration and apoptosis in a DLC1 deficient NSCLC cell line. We show that WT DLC1 caused actin cytoskeleton-based morphological alterations manifested as cytoplasmic extensions and membrane blebbings in most cells. Subsequently, a fraction of cells exhibiting DLC1 protein nuclear translocation (PNT) underwent caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We also show that the RhoGAP domain is essential for the occurrence of morphological alterations, PNT and apoptosis, and the inhibition of cell migration. DLC1 PNT is dependent on a bipartite nuclear localizing sequence and most likely is regulated by a serine-rich domain at N-terminal part of the DLC1 protein. Also, we found that DLC1 functions in the cytoplasm as an inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and migration, but in the nucleus as an inducer of apoptosis. Our analyses provide evidence for a possible link between morphological alterations, PNT and proapoptotic and anti-oncogenic activities of DLC1 in lung cancer. PMID:17888903

  15. Identification and characterization of OSTL (RNF217) encoding a RING-IBR-RING protein adjacent to a translocation breakpoint involving ETV6 in childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Fontanari Krause, Luciana M.; Japp, Anna Sophia; Krause, Alexandre; Mooster, Jana; Chopra, Martin; Müschen, Markus; Bohlander, Stefan K.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic aberrations involving ETV6 on band 12p13 are amongst the most common chromosomal abnormalities in human leukemia. The translocation t(6;12)(q23;13) in a childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line fuses ETV6 with the putative long non-coding RNA gene STL. Linking STL properties to leukemia has so far been difficult. Here, we describe a novel gene, OSTL (annotated as RNF217 in Genbank), which shares the first exon and a CpG island with STL but is transcribed in the opposite direction. Human RNF217 codes for a highly conserved RING finger protein and is mainly expressed in testis and skeletal muscle with different splice variants. RNF217 shows regulated splicing in B cell development, and is expressed in a number of human B cell leukemia cell lines, primary human chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and acute T-ALL samples. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the anti-apoptotic protein HAX1 to interact with RNF217. This interaction could be mapped to the C-terminal RING finger motif of RNF217. We propose that some of the recurring aberrations involving 6q might deregulate the expression of RNF217 and result in imbalanced apoptosis signalling via HAX1, promoting leukemia development. PMID:25298122

  16. Translocation of protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez/PTPD2/PTP36 to the nucleus is associated with induction of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wadham, C; Gamble, J R; Vadas, M A; Khew-Goodall, Y

    2000-09-01

    Pez is a non-transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase with homology to the FERM (4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. The subcellular localisation of Pez in endothelial cells was found to be regulated by cell density and serum concentration. In confluent monolayers Pez was cytoplasmic, but in cells cultured at low density Pez was nuclear, suggesting that it is a nuclear protein in proliferating cells. This notion is supported by the loss of nuclear Pez when cells are serum-starved to induce quiescence, and the rapid return of Pez to the nucleus upon refeeding with serum to induce proliferation. Vascular endothelial cells normally exist as a quiescent confluent monolayer but become proliferative during angiogenesis or upon vascular injury. Using a 'wound' assay to mimic these events in vitro, Pez was found to be nuclear in the cells that had migrated and were proliferative at the 'wound' edge. TGFbeta, which inhibits cell proliferation but not migration, inhibited the translocation of Pez to the nucleus in the cells at the 'wound' edge, further strengthening the argument that Pez plays a role in the nucleus during cell proliferation. Together, the data presented indicate that Pez is a nuclear tyrosine phosphatase that may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:10934049

  17. ATPase activity and ATP/ADP-induced conformational change in the soluble domain of the bacterial protein translocator HlyB.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Hughes, C; Koronakis, E

    1993-06-01

    The haemolysin exporter HlyB and its homologues are central to the unconventional signal-peptide-independent secretion of toxins, proteases and nodulation proteins by bacteria. HlyB is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or traffic ATPase superfamily, and resembles closely in structure and function mammalian exporters such as the multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein, combining both integral membrane and cytosolic domains. Overproduction of the HlyB cytoplasmic domain as a C-terminal peptide fused to glutathione S-transferase allowed the direct affinity purification and concentration of 30-50 mg ml-1 of soluble protein (GST-Bctp) in an apparently dimeric form possessing both transferase and ATPase activity. GST-Bctp bound to ADP-agarose and was eluted specifically by ATP and ADP, affinity behaviour which was confirmed in both the full-length HlyB and the unfused HlyB cytoplasmic domain synthesized in vitro. The stoichiometry of binding to MgATP and MgADP was close to equimolar and both ligands induced substantial conformational change in the protein. Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of GST-Bctp (Vmax 1 mumol min-1 mg-1, Km 0.2 mM) was comparable with the activity of the bacterial importer MalK and human P-glycoprotein reconstituted into proteoliposomes, and over an order of magnitude higher than in vitro measurements of disaggregated MalK purified from inclusion bodies. Activity was unaffected by inhibitors of F- and V-type ATPases, non-hydrolysable ATP analogues, or translocation substrate, but was severely inhibited by inhibitors of E1E2 (P-type) ATPases, and the acidic phospholipid phosphatidyl glycerol. PMID:8361361

  18. Protein Kinase C (PKC)ζ Pseudosubstrate Inhibitor Peptide Promiscuously Binds PKC Family Isoforms and Disrupts Conventional PKC Targeting and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bogard, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    PKMζ is generated via an alternative transcriptional start site in the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)ζ isoform, which removes N-terminal regulatory elements, including the inhibitory pseudosubstrate domain, consequently rendering the kinase constitutively active. Persistent PKMζ activity has been proposed as a molecular mechanism for the long-term maintenance of synaptic plasticity underlying some forms of memory. Many studies supporting a role for PKMζ in synaptic plasticity and memory have relied on the PKCζ pseudosubstrate-derived ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP). However, recent studies have demonstrated that ZIP-induced impairments to synaptic plasticity and memory occur even in the absence of PKCζ, suggesting that ZIP exerts its actions via additional cellular targets. In this study, we demonstrated that ZIP interacts with conventional and novel PKC, in addition to atypical PKC isoforms. Moreover, when brain abundance of each PKC isoform and affinity for ZIP are taken into account, the signaling capacity of ZIP-responsive pools of conventional and novel PKCs may match or exceed that for atypical PKCs. Pseudosubstrate-derived peptides, like ZIP, are thought to exert their cellular action primarily by inhibiting PKC catalytic activity; however, the ZIP-sensitive catalytic core of PKC is known to participate in the enzyme’s subcellular targeting, suggesting an additional mode of ZIP action. Indeed, we have demonstrated that ZIP potently disrupts PKCα interaction with the PKC-targeting protein A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79 and interferes with ionomycin-induced translocation of conventional PKC to the plasma membrane. Thus, ZIP exhibits broad-spectrum action toward the PKC family of enzymes, and this action may contribute to its unique ability to impair memory. PMID:26199377

  19. DNA-binding and transcriptional activation properties of the EWS-FLI-1 fusion protein resulting from the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, R A; Bosselut, R; Zucman, J; Cormier, F; Delattre, O; Roussel, M; Thomas, G; Ghysdael, J

    1994-01-01

    The 5' half of the EWS gene has recently been described to be fused to the 3' regions of genes encoding the DNA-binding domain of several transcriptional regulators, including ATF1, FLI-1, and ERG, in several human tumors. The most frequent occurrence of this situation results from the t(11;22)(q24;q12) chromosome translocation specific for Ewing sarcoma (ES) and related tumors which joins EWS sequences to the 3' half of FLI-1, which encodes a member of the Ets family of transcriptional regulators. We show here that this chimeric gene encodes an EWS-FLI-1 nuclear protein which binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the wild-type parental FLI-1 protein. We further show that EWS-FLI-1 is an efficient sequence-specific transcriptional activator of model promoters containing FLI-1 (Ets)-binding sites, a property which is strictly dependent on the presence of its EWS domain. Comparison of the properties of the N-terminal activation domain of FLI-1 to those of the EWS domain of the fusion protein indicates that EWS-FLI-1 has altered transcriptional activation properties compared with FLI-1. These results suggest that EWS-FLI-1 contributes to the transformed phenotype of ES tumor cells by inducing the deregulated and/or unscheduled activation of genes normally responsive to FLI-1 or to other close members of the Ets family. ES and related tumors are characterized by an elevated level of c-myc expression. We show that EWS-FLI-1 is a transactivator of the c-myc promoter, suggesting that upregulation of c-myc expression is under control of EWS-FLI-1. Images PMID:8164678

  20. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. {yields} Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. {yields} Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. {yields} Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. {yields} Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  1. The 3;21 translocation in myelodysplasia results in a fusion transcript between the AML1 gene and the gene for EAP, a highly conserved protein associated with the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER 1.

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, G; Begy, C R; Erickson, P; Drabkin, H A; Rowley, J D

    1993-01-01

    In the 8;21 translocation, the AML1 gene, located at chromosome band 21q22, is translocated to chromosome 8 (q22), where it is fused to the ETO gene and transcribed as a chimeric gene. AML1 is the human homolog of the recently cloned mouse gene pebp2 alpha B, homologous to the DNA binding alpha subunit of the polyoma enhancer factor pebp2. AML1 is also involved in a translocation with chromosome 3 that is seen in patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome and in chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. We have isolated a fusion cDNA clone from a t(3;21) library derived from a patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome; this clone contains sequences from AML1 and from EAP, which we have now localized to band 3q26. EAP has previously been characterized as a highly expressed small nuclear protein of 128 residues (EBER 1) associated with Epstein-Barr virus small RNA. The fusion clone contains the DNA binding 5' part of AML1 that is fused to ETO in the t(8;21) and, in addition, at least one other exon. The translocation replaces the last nine codons of AML1 with the last 96 codons of EAP. The fusion does not maintain the correct reading frame of EAP and may not lead to a functional chimeric protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8395054

  2. Multiscale Dynamics in Soft-Matter Systems: Enzyme Catalysis, Sec-Facilitated Protein Translocation, and Ion-Conduction in Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas

    Nature exhibits dynamics that span extraordinary ranges of space and time. In some cases, these dynamical hierarchies are well separated, simplifying their understanding and description. But chemistry and biology are replete with examples of dynamically coupled scales. In this talk, we will discuss the use of high-performance computing and new simulation methods that enable the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects, such as zero point energy and tunneling, in the reaction dynamics of enzymes, as well as coarse-graining strategies to enable minute-timescale simulations of protein targeting to cell membranes and ion-conduction in polymer electrolytes for lithium-ion battery applications.

  3. Utility of Translocator Protein (18 kDa) as a Molecular Imaging Biomarker to Monitor the Progression of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatori, Akiko; Yui, Joji; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Ogawa, Masanao; Nengaki, Nobuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is the wound healing response to chronic hepatic injury caused by various factors. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the utility of translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) as a molecular imaging biomarker for monitoring the progression of hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis. Model rats were induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and liver fibrosis was assessed. Positron emission tomography (PET) with N-benzyl-N-methyl-2-[7,8-dihydro-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl]-acetamide ([18F]FEDAC), a radioprobe specific for TSPO, was used for noninvasive visualisation in vivo. PET scanning, immunohistochemical staining, ex vivo autoradiography, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to elucidate the relationships among radioactivity uptake, TSPO levels, and cellular sources enriching TSPO expression in damaged livers. PET showed that uptake of radioactivity in livers increased significantly after 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of CCl4 treatment. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TSPO was mainly expressed in macrophages and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). TSPO-expressing macrophages and HSCs increased with the progression of liver fibrosis. Interestingly, the distribution of radioactivity from [18F]FEDAC was well correlated with TSPO expression, and TSPO mRNA levels increased with the severity of liver damage. TSPO was a useful molecular imaging biomarker and could be used to track the progression of hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis with PET. PMID:26612465

  4. Radiosynthesis, In Vivo Biological Evaluation, and Imaging of Brain Lesions with [123I]-CLINME, a New SPECT Tracer for the Translocator Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mattner, F.; Quinlivan, M.; Greguric, I.; Pham, T.; Liu, X.; Jackson, T.; Berghofer, P.; Fookes, C. J. R.; Dikic, B.; Gregoire, M.-C.; Dolle, F.; Katsifis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The high affinity translocator protein (TSPO) ligand 6-chloro-2-(4′-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-methylethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide (CLINME) was radiolabelled with iodine-123 and assessed for its sensitivity for the TSPO in rodents. Moreover neuroinflammatory changes on a unilateral excitotoxic lesion rat model were detected using SPECT imaging. [123I]-CLINME was prepared in 70–80% radiochemical yield. The uptake of [123I]-CLINME was evaluated in rats by biodistribution, competition, and metabolite studies. The unilateral excitotoxic lesion was performed by injection of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid unilaterally into the striatum. The striatum lesion was confirmed and correlated with TSPO expression in astrocytes and activated microglia by immunohistochemistry and autoradiography. In vivo studies with [123I]-CLINME indicated a biodistribution pattern consistent with TPSO distribution and the competition studies with PK11195 and Ro 5-4864 showed that [123I]-CLINME is selective for this site. The metabolite study showed that the extractable radioactivity was unchanged [123I]-CLINME in organs which expresses TSPO. SPECT/CT imaging on the unilateral excitotoxic lesion indicated that the mean ratio uptake in striatum (lesion : nonlesion) was 2.2. Moreover, TSPO changes observed by SPECT imaging were confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunochemistry, and autoradiography. These results indicated that [123I]-CLINME is a promising candidate for the quantification and visualization of TPSO expression in activated astroglia using SPECT. PMID:26199457

  5. Molecular signals required for type III secretion and translocation of the Xanthomonas campestris AvrBs2 protein to pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Mudgett, M B; Chesnokova, O; Dahlbeck, D; Clark, E T; Rossier, O; Bonas, U; Staskawicz, B J

    2000-11-21

    Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) carrying avrBs2 are specifically recognized by Bs2 pepper plants, resulting in localized cell death and plant resistance. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of the Xcv avrBs2 gene in plant cells results in Bs2-dependent cell death, indicating that the AvrBs2 protein alone is sufficient for the activation of disease resistance-mediated cell death in planta. We now provide evidence that AvrBs2 is secreted from Xcv and that secretion is type III (hrp) dependent. N- and C-terminal deletion analysis of AvrBs2 has identified the effector domain of AvrBs2 recognized by Bs2 pepper plants. By using a truncated Pseudomonas syringae AvrRpt2 effector reporter devoid of type III signal sequences, we have localized the minimal region of AvrBs2 required for type III secretion in Xcv. Furthermore, we have identified the region of AvrBs2 required for both type III secretion and translocation to host plants. The mapping of AvrBs2 sequences sufficient for type III delivery also revealed the presence of a potential mRNA secretion signal. PMID:11078519

  6. Repeated administration of AC-5216, a ligand for the 18 kDa translocator protein, improves behavioral deficits in a mouse model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Zhang, Li-Ming; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, You-Zhi; Liu, Yan-Qin; Mi, Tian-Yue; Zhou, Wen-Wen; Li, Yang; Yang, Ri-Fang; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yun-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severely disabling anxiety disorder that may occur following exposure to a serious traumatic event. It is a psychiatric condition that can afflict anyone who has experienced a life-threatening or violent event. Previous studies have shown that changes in 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) expression (or function), a promising target for treating neurological disorders without benzodiazepine-like side effects, may correlate with PTSD. However, few studies have investigated the anti-PTSD effects of TSPO ligands. AC-5216, a ligand for TSPO, induces anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like effects in animal models. The present study aimed to determine whether AC-5216 ameliorates PTSD behavior in mice. Following the training session consisting of exposure to inescapable electric foot shocks, animals were administered AC-5216 daily during the behavioral assessments, i.e., situational reminders (SRs), the open field (OF) test, the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, and the staircase test (ST). The results indicated that exposure to foot shocks induced long-term behavioral deficiencies in the mice, including freezing and anxiety-like behavior, which were significantly ameliorated by repeated treatment with AC-5216 but without any effect on spontaneous locomotor activity or body weight. In summary, this study demonstrated the anti-PTSD effects of AC-5216 treatment, suggesting that TSPO may represent a therapeutic target for anti-PTSD drug discovery and that TSPO ligands may be a promising new class of drugs for the future treatment of PTSD.

  7. In vivo (R)-[11C]PK11195 PET imaging of 18kDa translocator protein in recent onset psychosis

    PubMed Central

    van der Doef, Thalia F; de Witte, Lot D; Sutterland, Arjen L; Jobse, Ellen; Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; de Haan, Lieuwe; Eriksson, Jonas; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Kahn, René S; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that immune dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It has been hypothesized that microglia activation is present in patients with schizophrenia. Various in vivo and post-mortem studies have investigated this hypothesis, but as yet with inconclusive results. Microglia activation is associated with elevations in 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) levels, which can be measured with the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195. The purpose of the present study was to investigate microglia activation in psychosis in vivo at an early stage of the disease. (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding potential (BPND) was measured in 19 patients with recent onset psychosis and 17 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Total gray matter, as well as five gray matter regions of interest (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum, and thalamus) were defined a priori. PET data were analysed using a reference tissue approach and a supervised cluster analysis algorithm to identify the reference region. No significant difference in (R)-[11C]PK11195 BPND between patients and controls was found in total gray matter, nor one of the regions of interest. These findings suggest that microglia activation is not present in recent onset psychosis or that it is a subtle phenomenon that could not be detected using the design of the present study.

  8. Lentiviral-Mediated Overexpression of the 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Ameliorates LPS-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xue, Rui; Li, Lei; Zhao, Weixing; Fu, Qiang; Mi, Weidong; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is involved in the immune/inflammatory response. However, the exact role that TSPO plays in neuroinflammation-induced cognitive impairment is still elusive. The purpose of our present study was to investigate the effects of lentiviral-mediated hippocampal overexpression of the TSPO in a mouse model of LPS-induced cognitive impairment. We established a mouse cognitive impairment model using systematic daily administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.5 mg/kg). Microinjection of the dentate gyrus of the mouse with lentiviral vectors, which contained a cDNA targeting TSPO (Lv-TSPO), resulted in a significant increase in TSPO expression and allopregnanolone production. Mice treated with LPS showed cognitive deficits in the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test that could be ameliorated by TSPO overexpression. In addition, TSPO overexpression reversed LPS-induced microglial activation and accumulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, TSPO overexpression attenuated the LPS-induced impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Our results suggest that local overexpression of TSPO in the hippocampal dentate gyrus alleviated LPS-induced cognitive deficits, and its effects might be mediated by the attenuation of inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of microglial activation, and promotion of neurogenesis. PMID:27803668

  9. In vivo (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 PET imaging of 18kDa translocator protein in recent onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    van der Doef, Thalia F; de Witte, Lot D; Sutterland, Arjen L; Jobse, Ellen; Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; de Haan, Lieuwe; Eriksson, Jonas; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Kahn, René S; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that immune dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It has been hypothesized that microglia activation is present in patients with schizophrenia. Various in vivo and post-mortem studies have investigated this hypothesis, but as yet with inconclusive results. Microglia activation is associated with elevations in 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) levels, which can be measured with the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer (R)-[(11)C]PK11195. The purpose of the present study was to investigate microglia activation in psychosis in vivo at an early stage of the disease. (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 binding potential (BPND) was measured in 19 patients with recent onset psychosis and 17 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Total gray matter, as well as five gray matter regions of interest (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum, and thalamus) were defined a priori. PET data were analysed using a reference tissue approach and a supervised cluster analysis algorithm to identify the reference region. No significant difference in (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 BPND between patients and controls was found in total gray matter, nor one of the regions of interest. These findings suggest that microglia activation is not present in recent onset psychosis or that it is a subtle phenomenon that could not be detected using the design of the present study. PMID:27602389

  10. Monocyte tethering by P-selectin regulates monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion. Signal integration and NF-kappa B translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; McIntyre, T M; McEver, R P; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion molecules that tether circulating leukocytes to endothelial cells may also transduce or modulate outside-in signals for cellular activation, providing an initial regulatory point in the inflammatory response. Adhesion of human monocytes to P-selectin, the most rapidly expressed endothelial tethering factor, increased the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by the leukocytes when they were stimulated with platelet-activating factor. Increased cytokine secretion was specifically inhibited by G1, an anti-P-selectin mAb that prevents P-selectin from binding to its ligand (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) on myeloid cells. Moreover, tethering by P-selectin specifically enhanced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), a transcription factor required for expression of MCP-1, TNF-alpha, and other immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate that P-selectin, through its ligands on monocytes, may locally regulate cytokine secretion in inflamed tissues. Images PMID:7537762

  11. Early repeated administration of progesterone improves the recovery of neuropathic pain and modulates spinal 18kDa-translocator protein (TSPO) expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Weiyan; Dai, Lihua; Zhang, Tingting; Xia, Weiliang; Liu, Hongjun; Ma, Ke; Xu, Jianguo; Jin, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Although progesterone was reported to be a neuroprotective agent against injuries to the nervous system, including the peripheral neuropathy, the mechanisms of its dose or timing-related effects remain unclear. Translocator protein (TSPO) is predominantly located in the mitochondrial outer membrane and has been recently implicated in modulation of several brain injuries and nociception. This experiment was conducted using a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) to observe the effects of progesterone against allodynia development in an 84-day period and to explore the spinal TSPO expression after treatment. Our results demonstrated that a 10-day progesterone treatment started right after injury at a dose of 15 mg/kg/d or more could significantly increase the mechanical thresholds within the 84-day observation period. Moreover, increased TSPO expression was observed in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn after SNL surgery and reached its peak on Day 14. A treatment regimen of pharmacological progesterone augmented this spinal TSPO activation and expression before Day 28 and after Day 56. Both the anti-nociception and TSPO activation augment effect of progesterone were completely abolished by 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride but not progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone. These results indicate that early repeated administration of progesterone could improve the recovery of neuropathic pain and modulate spinal TSPO activation which were dependent on its 5α-reductase metabolites.

  12. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry in Humans of a New PET Ligand, 18F-PBR06, to Image Translocator Protein (18 kDa)

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yota; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Dickstein, Leah P.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    As a PET biomarker for inflammation, translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) can be measured with an 18F-labeled aryloxyanilide, 18F-N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline (18F-PBR06), in the human brain. The objective of this study was to estimate the radiation absorbed doses of 18F-PBR06 based on biodistribution data in humans. Methods After the injection of 18F-PBR06, images were acquired from head to thigh in 7 healthy humans. Urine was collected at various time points. Radiation absorbed doses were estimated by the MIRD scheme. Results Moderate to high levels of radioactivity were observed in organs with high densities of TSPO and in organs of metabolism and excretion. Bone had low levels of radioactivity. The effective dose was 18.5 µSv/MBq. Conclusion The effective dose of 18F-PBR06, compared with other 18F radioligands, was moderate. This radioligand had negligible defluorination, as indirectly assessed by bone radioactivity. Doses to the gallbladder wall and spleen may limit the amount of permissible injected radioactivity. PMID:20008980

  13. In vivo (R)-[11C]PK11195 PET imaging of 18kDa translocator protein in recent onset psychosis

    PubMed Central

    van der Doef, Thalia F; de Witte, Lot D; Sutterland, Arjen L; Jobse, Ellen; Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; de Haan, Lieuwe; Eriksson, Jonas; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Kahn, René S; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that immune dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It has been hypothesized that microglia activation is present in patients with schizophrenia. Various in vivo and post-mortem studies have investigated this hypothesis, but as yet with inconclusive results. Microglia activation is associated with elevations in 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) levels, which can be measured with the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195. The purpose of the present study was to investigate microglia activation in psychosis in vivo at an early stage of the disease. (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding potential (BPND) was measured in 19 patients with recent onset psychosis and 17 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Total gray matter, as well as five gray matter regions of interest (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum, and thalamus) were defined a priori. PET data were analysed using a reference tissue approach and a supervised cluster analysis algorithm to identify the reference region. No significant difference in (R)-[11C]PK11195 BPND between patients and controls was found in total gray matter, nor one of the regions of interest. These findings suggest that microglia activation is not present in recent onset psychosis or that it is a subtle phenomenon that could not be detected using the design of the present study. PMID:27602389

  14. Clustering of T cell ligands on artificial APC membranes influences T cell activation and protein kinase C theta translocation to the T cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Barnett, Joellen; Bi, Kun; Samodal, Rodrigo; Lanza, Paola; Marchese, Patrizia; Billetta, Rosario; Vita, Randi; Klein, Mark R; Prakken, Berent; Kwok, William W; Sercarz, Eli; Altman, Amnon; Albani, Salvatore

    2005-03-15

    T cell activation is associated with active clustering of relevant molecules in membrane microdomains defined as the supramolecular activation cluster. The contact area between these regions on the surface of T cells and APC is defined as the immunological synapse. It has been recently shown that preclustering of MHC-peptide complexes in membrane microdomains on the APC surface affects the efficiency of immune synapse formation and the related T cell activation. Disruption of such clusters may reduce the efficiency of stimulation. We describe here an entirely artificial system for Ag-specific, ex vivo stimulation of human polyclonal T cells (artificial APC (aAPC)). aAPC are based on artificial membrane bilayers containing discrete membrane microdomains encompassing T cell ligands (i.e., appropriate MHC-peptide complexes in association with costimulatory molecules). We show here that preclustering of T cell ligands triggered a degree of T cell activation significantly higher than the one achieved when we used either soluble tetramers or aAPC in which MHC-peptide complexes were uniformly distributed within artificial bilayer membranes. This increased efficiency in stimulation was mirrored by increased translocation from the cytoplasm to the membrane of protein kinase theta, a T cell signaling molecule that colocalizes with the TCR within the supramolecular activation cluster, thus indicating efficient engagement of T cell activation pathways. Engineered aAPC may have immediate application for basic and clinical immunology studies pertaining to modulation of T cells ex vivo.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of new coordination complexes of platinum(II) and rhenium(I) with a ligand targeting the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Nicola; Denora, Nunzio; Piccinonna, Sara; Laquintana, Valentino; Lasorsa, Francesco Massimo; Franco, Massimo; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-11-21

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is overexpressed in many types of cancers and is also abundant in activated microglial cells occurring in inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases. The TSPO-selective ligand 2-(8-(2-(bis-(pyridin-2-yl-methyl)amino)acetamido)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)H-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N,N-dipropylacetamide (CB256), which fulfills the requirements of a bifunctional chelate approach, has been used to synthesize coordination complexes containing either Pt (1) or Re (3), or both metal ions (2). The new metal complexes showed a cellular uptake markedly greater than that of the precursor metallic compounds and were also able to induce apoptosis in C6 glioma cells. The good cytotoxicity of the free ligand CB256 towards C6, A2780, and A2780cisR tumor cell lines was attenuated after coordination of the dipicolylamine moiety to Pt while coordination of the imidazopyridine residue to Re reduces the affinity towards TSPO. The results of the present investigation are essential for the design of new imidazopyridine bifunctional chelate ligands targeted to TSPO.

  16. The antibacterial toxin colicin N binds to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide and close to its translocator protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher L; Ridley, Helen; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Griffin, David C; Crawford, Lucy; Bonev, Boyan; Molinaro, Antonio; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2014-05-01

    Colicins are a diverse family of large antibacterial protein toxins, secreted by and active against Escherichia coli and must cross their target cell's outer membrane barrier to kill. To achieve this, most colicins require an abundant porin (e.g. OmpF) plus a low-copy-number, high-affinity, outer membrane protein receptor (e.g. BtuB). Recently, genetic screens have suggested that colicin N (ColN), which has no high-affinity receptor, targets highly abundant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) instead. Here we reveal the details of this interaction and demonstrate that the ColN receptor-binding domain (ColN-R) binds to a specific region of LPS close to the membrane surface. Data from in vitro studies using calorimetry and both liquid- and solid-state NMR reveal the interactions behind the in vivo requirement for a defined oligosaccharide region of LPS. Delipidated LPS (LPS(Δ) (LIPID) ) shows weaker binding; and thus full affinity requires the lipid component. The site of LPS binding means that ColN will preferably bind at the interface and thus position itself close to the surface of its translocon component, OmpF. ColN is, currently, unique among colicins in requiring LPS and, combined with previous data, this implies that the ColN translocon is distinct from those of other known colicins.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Bloom homologue, a nucleocytoplasmic protein, translocates in 3' to 5' direction and is essential for parasite growth.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Farhana; Tarique, Mohammed; Tuteja, Renu

    2016-05-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium, particularly Plasmodium falciparum, is the most serious and widespread parasitic disease of humans. RecQ helicase family members are essential in homologous recombination-based error-free DNA repair processes in all domains of life. RecQ helicases present in each organism differ and several homologues have been identified in various multicellular organisms. These proteins are involved in various pathways of DNA metabolism by providing duplex unwinding function. Five members of RecQ family are present in Homo sapiens but P. falciparum contains only two members of this family. Here we report the detailed biochemical and functional characterization of the Bloom (Blm) homologue (PfBlm) from P. falciparum 3D7 strain. Purified PfBlm exhibits ATPase and 3' to 5' direction specific DNA helicase activity. The calculated average reaction rate of ATPase was ~13 pmol of ATP hydrolyzed/min/pmol of enzyme. The immunofluorescence assay results show that PfBlm is expressed in all the stages of intraerythrocytic development of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain. In some stages of development in addition to nucleus PfBlm also localizes in the cytoplasm. The gene disruption studies of PfBlm by dsRNA showed that it is required for the ex-vivo intraerythrocytic development of the parasite P. falciparum 3D7 strain. The dsRNA mediated inhibition of parasite growth suggests that a variety of pathways are affected resulting in curtailing of the parasite growth. This study will be helpful in unravelling the basic mechanism of DNA transaction in the malaria parasite and additionally it may provide leads to understand the parasite specific characteristics of this protein. PMID:26917473

  18. Expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 requires the stress regulatory sigma factors AlgU and RpoH.

    PubMed

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Maillot, Olivier; Cornelis, Pierre; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an evolutionary conserved protein that is found in many Eukarya, Archae, and Bacteria, in which it plays several important functions including for example membrane biogenesis, signaling, and stress response. A tspo homolog gene has been identified in several members of the Pseudomonas genus, among which the soil bacterium P. fluorescens Pf0-1. In this bacterium, the tspo gene is located in the vicinity of a putative hybrid histidine kinase-encoding gene. Since tspo has been involved in water stress related response in plants, we explored the effects of hyperosmolarity and temperature on P. fluorescens Pf0-1 tspo expression using a strategy based on lux-reporter fusions. We show that the two genes Pfl01_2810 and tspo are co-transcribed forming a transcription unit. The expression of this operon is growth phase-dependent and is increased in response to high concentrations of NaCl, sucrose and to a D-cycloserine treatment, which are conditions leading to activity of the major cell wall stress responsive extracytoplasmic sigma factor AlgU. Interestingly, the promoter region activity is strongly lowered in a P. aeruginosa algU mutant, suggesting that AlgU may be involved at least partly in the molecular mechanism leading to Pfl01_2810-tspo expression. In silico analysis of this promoter region failed to detect an AlgU consensus binding site; however, a putative binding site for the heat shock response RpoH sigma factor was detected. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the region containing this sequence is increased in response to high growth temperature and slightly lowered in a P. aeruginosa rpoH mutant strain. Taken together, our data suggest that P. fluorescens tspo gene may belong at least partly to the cell wall stress response. PMID:26441945

  19. Expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 requires the stress regulatory sigma factors AlgU and RpoH.

    PubMed

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Maillot, Olivier; Cornelis, Pierre; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an evolutionary conserved protein that is found in many Eukarya, Archae, and Bacteria, in which it plays several important functions including for example membrane biogenesis, signaling, and stress response. A tspo homolog gene has been identified in several members of the Pseudomonas genus, among which the soil bacterium P. fluorescens Pf0-1. In this bacterium, the tspo gene is located in the vicinity of a putative hybrid histidine kinase-encoding gene. Since tspo has been involved in water stress related response in plants, we explored the effects of hyperosmolarity and temperature on P. fluorescens Pf0-1 tspo expression using a strategy based on lux-reporter fusions. We show that the two genes Pfl01_2810 and tspo are co-transcribed forming a transcription unit. The expression of this operon is growth phase-dependent and is increased in response to high concentrations of NaCl, sucrose and to a D-cycloserine treatment, which are conditions leading to activity of the major cell wall stress responsive extracytoplasmic sigma factor AlgU. Interestingly, the promoter region activity is strongly lowered in a P. aeruginosa algU mutant, suggesting that AlgU may be involved at least partly in the molecular mechanism leading to Pfl01_2810-tspo expression. In silico analysis of this promoter region failed to detect an AlgU consensus binding site; however, a putative binding site for the heat shock response RpoH sigma factor was detected. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the region containing this sequence is increased in response to high growth temperature and slightly lowered in a P. aeruginosa rpoH mutant strain. Taken together, our data suggest that P. fluorescens tspo gene may belong at least partly to the cell wall stress response.

  20. Expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 requires the stress regulatory sigma factors AlgU and RpoH

    PubMed Central

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Maillot, Olivier; Cornelis, Pierre; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an evolutionary conserved protein that is found in many Eukarya, Archae, and Bacteria, in which it plays several important functions including for example membrane biogenesis, signaling, and stress response. A tspo homolog gene has been identified in several members of the Pseudomonas genus, among which the soil bacterium P. fluorescens Pf0-1. In this bacterium, the tspo gene is located in the vicinity of a putative hybrid histidine kinase-encoding gene. Since tspo has been involved in water stress related response in plants, we explored the effects of hyperosmolarity and temperature on P. fluorescens Pf0-1 tspo expression using a strategy based on lux-reporter fusions. We show that the two genes Pfl01_2810 and tspo are co-transcribed forming a transcription unit. The expression of this operon is growth phase-dependent and is increased in response to high concentrations of NaCl, sucrose and to a D-cycloserine treatment, which are conditions leading to activity of the major cell wall stress responsive extracytoplasmic sigma factor AlgU. Interestingly, the promoter region activity is strongly lowered in a P. aeruginosa algU mutant, suggesting that AlgU may be involved at least partly in the molecular mechanism leading to Pfl01_2810-tspo expression. In silico analysis of this promoter region failed to detect an AlgU consensus binding site; however, a putative binding site for the heat shock response RpoH sigma factor was detected. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the region containing this sequence is increased in response to high growth temperature and slightly lowered in a P. aeruginosa rpoH mutant strain. Taken together, our data suggest that P. fluorescens tspo gene may belong at least partly to the cell wall stress response. PMID:26441945

  1. Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor/Translocator Protein Global Knock-out Mice Are Viable with No Effects on Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lan N.; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R.; Pelton, Susanne H.; Butler, W. Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M.; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo−/−) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo−/− mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo−/− mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  2. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseikelmann, B

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal gene transfer and transkingdom sex. Analyses of genes and gene products involved in DNA transfer suggest that DNA is transferred through a protein channel spanning the bacterial envelope. No common model exists for DNA translocation during phage infection. Perhaps various mechanisms are necessary as a result of the different morphologies of bacteriophages. The DNA translocation processes during conjugation, T-DNA transfer, and transformation are more consistent and may even be compared to the excretion of some proteins. On the basis of analogies and homologies between the proteins involved in DNA translocation and protein secretion, a common basic model for these processes is presented. PMID:7968916

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC.

  4. Substrate binding stabilizes a pre-translocation intermediate in the ATP-binding cassette transport protein MsbA.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2013-07-26

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to one of the largest protein superfamilies that expands from prokaryotes to man. Recent x-ray crystal structures of bacterial and mammalian ABC exporters suggest a common alternating access mechanism of substrate transport, which has also been biochemically substantiated. However, the current model does not yet explain the coupling between substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis that underlies ATP-dependent substrate transport. In our studies on the homodimeric multidrug/lipid A ABC exporter MsbA from Escherichia coli, we performed cysteine cross-linking, fluorescence energy transfer, and cysteine accessibility studies on two reporter positions, near the nucleotide-binding domains and in the membrane domains, for transporter embedded in a biological membrane. Our results suggest for the first time that substrate binding by MsbA stimulates the maximum rate of ATP hydrolysis by facilitating the dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains in a state, which is markedly distinct from the previously described nucleotide-free, inward-facing and nucleotide-bound, outward-facing conformations of ABC exporters and which binds ATP. PMID:23766512

  5. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAM proteins regulate the translocation of iron, zinc, and nitrogen compounds from vegetative tissues to grain.

    PubMed

    Waters, Brian M; Uauy, Cristobal; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Grusak, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The NAM-B1 gene is a NAC transcription factor that affects grain nutrient concentrations in wheat (Triticum aestivum). An RNAi line with reduced expression of NAM genes has lower grain protein, iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) concentrations. To determine whether decreased remobilization, lower plant uptake, or decreased partitioning to grain are responsible for this phenotype, mineral dynamics were quantified in wheat tissues throughout grain development. Control and RNAi wheat were grown in potting mix and hydroponics. Mineral (Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, S, and Zn) and nitrogen (N) contents of organs were determined at regular intervals to quantify the net remobilization from vegetative tissues and the accumulation of nutrients in grain. Total nutrient accumulation was similar between lines, but grain Fe, Zn, and N were at lower concentrations in the NAM knockdown line. In potting mix, net remobilization of N, Fe, and Zn from vegetative tissues was impaired in the RNAi line. In hydroponics with ample nutrients, net remobilization was not observed, but grain Fe and Zn contents and concentrations remained lower in the RNAi line. When Fe or Zn was withheld post-anthesis, both lines demonstrated remobilization. These results suggest that a major effect of the NAM genes is an increased efflux of nutrients from the vegetative tissues and a higher partitioning of nutrients to grain. PMID:19858116

  6. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC. PMID:16550298

  7. The YopB protein of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is essential for the translocation of Yop effector proteins across the target cell plasma membrane and displays a contact-dependent membrane disrupting activity.

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, S; Schesser, K; Persson, C; Galyov, E E; Rosqvist, R; Homblé, F; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    During infection of cultured epithelial cells, surface-located Yersinia pseudotuberculosis deliver Yop (Yersinia outer protein) virulence factors into the cytoplasm of the target cell. A non-polar yopB mutant strain displays a wild-type phenotype with respect to in vitro Yop regulation and secretion but fails to elicit a cytotoxic response in cultured HeLa cells and is unable to inhibit phagocytosis by macrophage-like J774 cells. Additionally, the yopB mutant strain was avirulent in the mouse model. No YopE or YopH protein were observed within HeLa cells infected with the yopB mutant strain, suggesting that the loss of virulence of the mutant strain was due to its inability to translocate Yop effector proteins through the target cell plasma membrane. Expression of YopB is necessary for Yersinia-induced lysis of sheep erythrocytes. Purified YopB was shown to have membrane disruptive activity in vitro. YopB-dependent haemolytic activity required cell contact between the bacteria and the erythrocytes and could be inhibited by high, but not low, molecular weight carbohydrates. Similarly, expression of YopE reduced haemolytic activity. Therefore, we propose that YopB is essential for the formation of a pore in the target cell membrane that is required for the cell-to-cell transfer of Yop effector proteins. Images PMID:8918459

  8. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  9. A Novel PET Imaging Probe for the Detection and Monitoring of Translocator Protein 18 kDa Expression in Pathological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Mara; Moon, Byung Seok; Park, Hyun Soo; Laquintana, Valentino; Jung, Jae Ho; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Byung Chul; Denora, Nunzio

    2016-01-01

    A new fluorine-substituted ligand, compound 1 (CB251), with a very high affinity (Ki = 0.27 ± 0.09 nM) and selectivity for the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), is presented as an attractive biomarker for the diagnosis of neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and tumour progression. To test compound 1 as a TSPO PET imaging agent in vivo, 2-(2-(4-(2-[18F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-6,8-dichloroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N,N-dipropylacetamide ([18F]1; [18F]CB251) was synthesized by nucleophilic aliphatic substitution in a single-step radiolabelling procedure with a 11.1 ± 3.5% (n = 14, decay corrected) radiochemical yield and over 99% radiochemical purity. In animal PET imaging studies, [18F]CB251 provided a clearly visible image of the inflammatory lesion with the binding potential of the specifically bound radioligand relative to the non-displaceable radioligand in tissue (BPND 1.83 ± 0.18), in a neuroinflammation rat model based on the unilateral stereotaxic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), comparable to that of [11C]PBR28 (BPND 1.55 ± 0.41). [18F]CB251 showed moderate tumour uptake (1.96 ± 0.11%ID/g at 1 h post injection) in human glioblastoma U87-MG xenografts. These results suggest that [18F]CB251 is a promising TSPO PET imaging agent for neuroinflammation and TSPO-rich cancers. PMID:26853260

  10. The expression of translocator protein in human thyroid cancer and its role in the response of thyroid cancer cells to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Bauer, Andrew; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Hardwick, Matthew J; Vasko, Vasyl V

    2012-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), formerly known as a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, exerts pro-apoptotic function via regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. We examined TSPO expression in human thyroid tumors (25 follicular adenomas (FA), 15 follicular cancers (FC), and 70 papillary cancers (PC)). The role of TSPO in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and apoptosis was examined in thyroid cancer cell lines after TSPO knockdown with siRNA and after treatment with TSPO antagonist (PK11195). Compared with normal thyroid, the level of TSPO expression was increased in FA, FC, and PC in 24, 26.6, and 55.7% of cases respectively. Thyroid cancer cell lines demonstrated variable levels of TSPO expression, without specific association with thyroid oncogene mutations. Treatment with inhibitors of PI3K/AKT or MEK/ERK signaling was not associated with changes in TSPO expression. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproic acid) increased TSPO expression in TSPO-deficient cell lines (FTC236 cells). TSPO gene silencing or treatment with PK11195 did not affect thyroid cancer cell growth and migration but prevented depolarization of mitochondrial membranes induced by oxidative stress. Induction of TSPO expression by valproic acid was associated with increased sensitivity of FTC236 to oxidative stress-inducible apoptosis. Overall, we showed that TSPO expression is frequently increased in PC. In vitro data suggested the role of epigenetic mechanism(s) in the regulation of TSPO in thyroid cells. Implication of TSPO in the thyroid cancer cell response to oxidative stress suggested its potential role in the regulation of thyroid cancer cell response to treatment with radioiodine and warrants further investigation.

  11. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  12. Specific imaging of inflammation with the 18 kDa translocator protein ligand DPA-714 in animal models of epilepsy and stroke.

    PubMed

    Harhausen, Denise; Sudmann, Violetta; Khojasteh, Uldus; Müller, Jochen; Zille, Marietta; Graham, Keith; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wunder, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a pathophysiological hallmark of many diseases of the brain. Specific imaging of cells and molecules that contribute to cerebral inflammation is therefore highly desirable, both for research and in clinical application. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) has been established as a suitable target for the detection of activated microglia/macrophages. A number of novel TSPO ligands have been developed recently. Here, we evaluated the high affinity TSPO ligand DPA-714 as a marker of brain inflammation in two independent animal models. For the first time, the specificity of radiolabeled DPA-714 for activated microglia/macrophages was studied in a rat model of epilepsy (induced using Kainic acid) and in a mouse model of stroke (transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, tMCAO) using high-resolution autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cold-compound blocking experiments were performed and changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined. Target-to-background ratios of 2 and 3 were achieved in lesioned vs. unaffected brain tissue in the epilepsy and tMCAO models, respectively. In both models, ligand uptake into the lesion corresponded well with the extent of Ox42- or Iba1-immunoreactive activated microglia/macrophages. In the epilepsy model, ligand uptake was almost completely blocked by pre-injection of DPA-714 and FEDAA1106, another high-affinity TSPO ligand. Ligand uptake was independent of the degree of BBB opening and lesion size in the stroke model. We provide further strong evidence that DPA-714 is a specific ligand to image activated microglia/macrophages in experimental models of brain inflammation. PMID:23936336

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands with low binding sensitivity to human single nucleotide polymorphism rs6971.

    PubMed

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Zhang, Yi; Jenko, Kimberly J; Gladding, Robert L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Fujita, Masahiro; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Taliani, Sabrina; Martini, Claudia; Innis, Robert B; Da Settimo, Federico; Pike, Victor W

    2014-10-15

    The imaging of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) in living human brain with radioligands by positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important means for the study of neuroinflammatory conditions occurring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. The widely used prototypical PET radioligand [(11)C](R)-PK 11195 ([(11)C](R)-1; [N-methyl-(11)C](R)-N-sec-butyl-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methylisoquinoline-3-carboxamide) gives a low PET signal and is difficult to quantify, whereas later generation radioligands have binding sensitivity to a human single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6971, which imposes limitations on their utility for comparative quantitative PET studies of normal and diseased subjects. Recently, azaisosteres of 1 have been developed with improved drug-like properties, including enhanced TSPO affinity accompanied by moderated lipophilicity. Here we selected three of these new ligands (7-9) for labeling with carbon-11 and for evaluation in monkey as candidate PET radioligands for imaging brain TSPO. Each radioligand was readily prepared by (11)C-methylation of an N-desmethyl precursor and was found to give a high proportion of TSPO-specific binding in monkey brain. One of these radioligands, [(11)C]7, the direct 4-azaisostere of 1, presents many radioligand properties that are superior to those reported for [(11)C]1, including higher affinity, lower lipophilicity, and stable quantifiable PET signal. Importantly, 7 was also found to show very low sensitivity to the human SNP rs6971 in vitro. Therefore, [(11)C]7 now warrants evaluation in human subjects with PET to assess its utility for imaging TSPO in human brain, irrespective of subject genotype.

  14. Computational modeling and biological validation of novel non-steroidal ligands for the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif of the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew S; Akula, Nagaraju; Rone, Malena B; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in the physiological homeostasis of the cell, contributing to numerous cellular processes, including bioenergetics, metabolism and cell life and death. Owing to their keystone role, mitochondria have gained much attention as pharmacological targets. The outer mitochondrial integral membrane translocator protein (TSPO) has attracted a significant degree of pharmacological interest owing to its ability to bind a number of classes of drugs with high affinity and specificity. In addition to its well-characterized drug binding site, TSPO possess an additional high-affinity ligand binding site, originally identified for its ability to bind the lipid cholesterol, which was named the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif. Previous investigations from our laboratory identified additional ligands targeted to TSPO's CRAC motif which are able to potently inhibit mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroid biosynthesis, processes for which TSPO has been well-characterized. However, all of these compounds possessed the steroidal backbone common to cholesterol and steroid hormones. In our efforts to expand our understanding of TSPO's CRAC motif, we performed studies aimed at identifying non-steroidal ligands for this motif. Molecular modeling and in silico screening of large chemical libraries identified a panel of compounds which were subsequently screened for bioactivity in a number of steroidogenic model systems. These efforts identified a family of non-steroidal CRAC ligands able to potently inhibit steroidogenesis, and at higher concentrations, promote apoptosis. In addition, the best candidate in this family was able to suppress testosterone synthesis when administered to rats, indicating that this novel family of non-steroidal CRAC ligands may serve as prototypes for the development of drugs useful for treatment of diseases of steroid overproduction, such as Cushing's syndrome and steroidogenic cell

  15. Characterization of a novel acetamidobenzoxazolone-based PET ligand for translocator protein (18 kDa) imaging of neuroinflammation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Yui, Joji; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kumata, Katsushi; Shimoda, Yoko; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Hatori, Akiko; Maeda, Jun; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-05-01

    We developed the novel positron emission tomography (PET) ligand 2-[5-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenyl)-2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl]-N-methyl-N-phenylacetamide ([(11)C]MBMP) for translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) imaging and evaluated its efficacy in ischemic rat brains. [(11)C]MBMP was synthesized by reacting desmethyl precursor (1) with [(11)C]CH3 I in radiochemical purity of ≥ 98% and specific activity of 85 ± 30 GBq/μmol (n = 18) at the end of synthesis. Biodistribution study on mice showed high accumulation of radioactivity in the TSPO-rich organs, e.g., the lungs, heart, kidneys, and adrenal glands. The metabolite analysis in mice brain homogenate showed 80.1 ± 2.7% intact [(11)C]MBMP at 60 min after injection. To determine the specific binding of [(11)C]MBMP with TSPO in the brain, in vitro autoradiography and PET studies were performed in an ischemic rat model. In vitro autoradiography indicated significantly increased binding on the ipsilateral side compared with that on the contralateral side of ischemic rat brains. This result was supported firmly by the contrast of radioactivity between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides in PET images. Displacement experiments with unlabelled MBMP or PK11195 minimized the difference in uptake between the two sides. In summary, [(11)C]MBMP is a potential PET imaging agent for TSPO and, consequently, for the up-regulation of microglia during neuroinflammation.

  16. Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of YL-IPA08, a potent ligand for the translocator protein (18 kDa).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ming; Zhao, Nan; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Zeng-Liang; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Chen, Hong-Xia; Xue, Rui; Zhang, You-Zhi; Yang, Ri-Fang; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that the translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-response and stress-related disorders, such as anxiety and depression, by affecting the production of neurosteroids, supporting the potential use of selective TSPO ligands as antidepressant or anxiolytic drugs. N-ethyl-N-(2-pyridinylmethyl)- 2-(3,4-ichlorophenyl)- 7-methylimidazo [1,2-a] pyridine-3-acetamide hydrochloride (YL-IPA08), a novel TSPO ligand that has been synthesized at our institute, exerted a high affinity for TSPO in a crude mitochondrial fraction prepared from rat cerebellum but exhibited only a negligible affinity for the central benzodiazepine receptor. As expected, YL-IPA08 incubation with the cultured rat astrocyte cells increased the pregnenolone and progesterone concentration from the cultured medium. Moreover, YL-IPA08 produced significant antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects in a series of mouse and rat behavior models. In addition, the antidepressant-like behavior of YL-IPA08 was totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 in a tail suspension test, and the anxiolytic effect was blocked by PK11195 but not by a CBR antagonist in the elevated plus-maze test. Furthermore, compared with the CBR agonist diazepam, YL-IPA08 had no myorelaxant effects and did not affect the motor coordination, memory or hexobarbitone-induced sleep in mice. Overall, these results indicate that YL-IPA08 is a more potent and selective TSPO ligand, which exerts antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects on behaviors that are mediated by TSPO but does not cause the side effects that are typically associated with conventional benzodiazepines.

  17. Solution Structures of the Prototypical 18 kDa Translocator Protein Ligand, PK 11195, Elucidated with 1H/13C NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO) is an important target for drug discovery and for clinical molecular imaging of brain and peripheral inflammatory processes. PK 11195 [1a; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] is the major prototypical high-affinity ligand for TSPO. Elucidation of the solution structure of 1a is of interest for understanding small-molecule ligand interactions with the lipophilic binding site of TSPO. Dynamic 1H/13C NMR spectroscopy of 1a revealed four quite stable but interconverting rotamers, due to amide bond and 2-chlorophenyl group rotation. These rotamers have been neglected in previous descriptions of the structure of 1a and of the binding of 1a to TSPO. Here, we used quantum chemistry at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) to calculate 13C and 1H chemical shifts for the rotamers of 1a and for the very weak TSPO ligand, N-desmethyl-PK 11195 (1b). These data, plus experimental NMR data, were then used to characterize the structures of rotamers of 1a and 1b in organic solution. Energy barriers for both the amide bond and 2′-chlorophenyl group rotation of 1a were determined from dynamic 1H NMR to be similar (ca.17 to 18 kcal/mol), and they compared well with those calculated at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Furthermore, the computed barrier for Z to E rotation is considerably lower in 1a(18.7 kcal/mol) than in 1b (25.4 kcal/mol). NMR (NOE) unequivocally demonstrated that the E rotamer of 1a is the more stable in solution by about 0.4 kcal/mol. These detailed structural findings will aid future TSPO ligand design and support the notion that TSPO prefers to bind ligands as amide E-rotamers. PMID:22860199

  18. The translocator protein (TSPO) ligand PK11195 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and sensitizes to chemotherapy treatment in pre- and post-relapse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Torres, Maria C; Roberts, Stephen S

    2013-04-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has a poor prognosis. Even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal, and new treatments are needed. Translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) ligands have been studied as potential new therapeutic agents in many cancers, but not in NB. We studied the effects of TSPO ligands on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis using paired cell lines derived from the same patient at the time of initial surgery and again after development of progressive disease or relapse post-chemotherapy. We found that TSPO expression was significantly increased 2- to 10-fold in post-relapse cell lines compared with pre-treatment lines derived from the same individual. Subsequently, these cell lines were treated with the specific TSPO ligand 1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide (PK11195) (0-160µM) as a single agent, with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents alone (carboplatin, etoposide or melphalan), or with combinations of PK11195 and chemotherapy drugs. We found that PK11195 inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, induced apoptosis and caused G 1/S cell cycle arrest in all tested NB cell lines at micromolar concentrations. In addition, PK11195 significantly decreased mRNA expression of the chemotherapy resistance efflux pumps ABCA3, ABCB1 and ABCC1 in two post-relapse NB cell lines. We also found that pre-treatment with PK11195 sensitized these cell lines to treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents. These results suggest that PK11195 alone or in combination with standard chemotherapeutic drugs warrants further study for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  19. Physiology in conservation translocations.

    PubMed

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R; Munn, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining 'success' as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall under a

  20. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  1. The Bacterial Twin-Arginine Translocation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip A.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Georgiou, George

    2009-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is responsible for the export of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Substrates for the Tat pathway include redox enzymes requiring cofactor insertion in the cytoplasm, multimeric proteins that have to assemble into a complex prior to export, certain membrane proteins, and proteins whose folding is incompatible with Sec export. These proteins are involved in a diverse range of cellular activities including anaerobic metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, metal acquisition and detoxification, and virulence. The Escherichia coli translocase consists of the TatA, TatB, and TatC proteins, but little is known about the precise sequence of events that leads to protein translocation, the energetic requirements, or the mechanism that prevents the export of misfolded proteins. Owing to the unique characteristics of the pathway, it holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:16756481

  2. PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11; 17)(q23; q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yi ); Guidez, F.; Rousselot, P.; Agadir, A.; Degos, L.; Chomienne, C. ); Zelent, A. ); Waxman, S. )

    1994-02-01

    Recently, the authors described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor [alpha] (RAR[alpha]). They have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR[alpha] chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR[alpha] and PLZF(B)-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins like the PML-RAR[alpha] protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR[alpha] in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR[alpha] transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR[alpha]-expressing plasmid concentration. A [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] effect was observed with vectors expressing RAR[alpha] and retinoid X receptor [alpha] (RXR[alpha]). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL.

  3. Human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1: cloning, expression and characterization of its interaction with the B-cell translocation protein BTG1.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, J A; Adams-Burton, C; Pedicord, D L; Sukovich, D A; Benfield, P A; Corjay, M H; Stoltenborg, J K; Dicker, I B

    1998-01-01

    The human BTG1 protein is thought to be a potential tumour suppressor because its overexpression inhibits NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. However, little is known about how BTG1 exerts its anti-proliferative activity. In this study, we used the yeast 'two-hybrid' system to screen for interacting protein partners and identified human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1 (hCAF-1), a homologue of mouse CAF-1 (mCAF-1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yCAF-1/POP2. In vitro the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex formation was dependent on the phosphorylation of a putative p34cdc2 kinase site on BTG1 (Ser-159). In yeast, the Ala-159 mutant did not interact with hCAF-1. In addition, phosphorylation of Ser-159 in vitro showed specificity for the cell cycle kinases p34CDK2/cyclin E and p34CDK2/cyclin A, but not for p34CDK4/cyclin D1 or p34cdc2/cyclin B. Cell synchrony experiments with primary cultures of rat aortic smooth-muscle cells (RSMCs) demonstrated that message and protein levels of rat CAF-1 (rCAF-1) were up-regulated under conditions of cell contact, as previously reported for BTG1 [Wilcox, Scott, Subramanian, Ross, Adams-Burton, Stoltenborg and Corjay (1995) Circulation 92, I34-I35]. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed that rCAF-1 localizes to the nucleus of contact-inhibited RSMCs, where it was physically associated with BTG1, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation with anti-hCAF-1 antisera. Overexpression of hCAF-1 in NIH 3T3 and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells was itself anti-proliferative with colony formation reduced by 67% and 90% respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that formation of the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex is driven by phosphorylation at BTG1 (Ser-159) and implicates this complex in the signalling events of cell division that lead to changes in cellular proliferation associated with cell-cell contact. PMID:9820826

  4. Proteolytic cleavage of cellubrevin and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) by tetanus toxin does not impair insulin-stimulated glucose transport or GLUT4 translocation in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hajduch, E; Aledo, J C; Watts, C; Hundal, H S

    1997-01-01

    Acute insulin stimulation of glucose transport in fat and skeletal muscle occurs principally as a result of the hormonal induced translocation of the GLUT4 glucose transporter from intracellular vesicular stores to the plasma membrane. The precise mechanisms governing the fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the plasma membrane are very poorly understood at present but may share some similarities with synaptic vesicle fusion, as vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) and cellubrevin, two proteins implicated in the process of membrane fusion, are resident in GLUT4-containing vesicles isolated from rat and murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes respectively. In this study we show that proteolysis of both cellubrevin and VAMP, induced by electroporation of isolated rat adipocytes with tetanus toxin, does not impair insulin-stimulated glucose transport or GLUT4 translocation. The hormone was found to stimulate glucose uptake by approx. 16-fold in freshly isolated rat adipocytes. After a single electroporating pulse, the ability of insulin to activate glucose uptake was lowered, but the observed stimulation was nevertheless nearly 5-fold higher than the basal rate of glucose uptake. Electroporation of adipocytes with 600 nM tetanus toxin resulted in a complete loss of both cellubrevin and VAMP expression within 60 min. However, toxin-mediated proteolysis of both these proteins had no effect on the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose transport which was elevated approx. 5-fold, an activation of comparable magnitude to that observed in cells electroporated without tetanus toxin. The lack of any significant change in insulin-stimulated glucose transport was consistent with the finding that toxin-mediated proteolysis of both cellubrevin and VAMP had no detectable effect on insulin-induced translocation of GLUT4 in adipocytes. Our findings indicate that, although cellubrevin and VAMP are resident proteins in adipocyte GLUT4-containing vesicles, they are not required for the acute insulin

  5. Promising potential of new generation translocator protein tracers providing enhanced contrast of arthritis imaging by positron emission tomography in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of and subsequent monitoring of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could benefit from detection of (sub)clinical synovitis. Imaging of (sub)clinical arthritis by targeting the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated macrophages is feasible using (R)-[11C] PK11195-based positron emission tomography (PET), but clinical applications are limited by background uptake in peri-articular bone/bone marrow. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two other TSPO ligands with potentially lower background uptake in neurological studies, [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714, in a rat model of arthritis. Methods TSPO binding of DPA-713, DPA-714 and PK11195 were assessed by in vitro competition studies with [3H]DPA-713 using human macrophage THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In vivo studies were performed in rats with methylated bovine serum albumin-induced knee arthritis. Immunohistochemistry with anti-TSPO antibody was performed on paraffin-embedded sections. Rats were imaged with [11C]DPA-713 or [18F]DPA-714 PET, followed by ex vivo tissue distribution studies. Results were compared with those obtained with the tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195, the established ligand for TSPO. Results In THP-1 cells, relative TSPO binding of DPA-713 and DPA-714 were 7-fold and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in PK11195. Comparable results were observed in CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In the arthritis rat model, immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of TSPO-positive inflammatory cells in the arthritic knee. PET images showed that uptake of [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 in arthritic knees was significantly increased compared with contralateral knees and knees of normal rats. Uptake in arthritic knees could be largely blocked by an excess of PK11195. [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 provided improved contrast compared with (R)-[11C]PK11195, as was shown by significantly higher arthritic knee-to-bone ratios of [11C]DPA-713 (1.60

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of new (18)F-labelled acetamidobenzoxazolone-based radioligands for imaging of the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Yui, Joji; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Mishra, Anil K; Shimoda, Yoko; Hatori, Akiko; Ji, Bin; Ogawa, Masanao; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-12-21

    The visualization of the activated microglia/TSPO is one of the main aspects of neuroimaging. Here we describe two new (18)F-labelled molecules, 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoroethoxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]2) and 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoropropyloxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]3) -2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl]-N-methyl-N-phenylacetamide as novel PET ligands for imaging the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain. The three-D pharmacophore evaluation and docking studies suggested their high affinity for the TSPO and in vitro binding assays of the TSPO showed binding affinities 6.6 ± 0.7 nM and 16.7 ± 2.5 nM for 2 and 3, respectively. The radiochemical yields for [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 were found to be 22 ± 4% (n = 8) and 5 ± 2% (n = 5), respectively at EOB. The radiochemical purity for both was found ≥98% and the specific activity was in the range of 98-364 GBq μmol(-1) at EOS. In vitro autoradiography with an ischemic rat brain showed significantly increased binding on the ipsilateral side compared to the contralateral side. The specificity of [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 for binding TSPO was confirmed using the TSPO ligands PK11195 and MBMP. The biodistribution patterns of both PET ligands were evaluated in normal mice by 1 h dynamic PET imaging. In the brain, regional radioactivity reached the maximum very rapidly within 0-4 min for both ligands, similar to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. The metabolite study of [(18)F]2 also favoured a more favourable profile for quantification in comparison to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. In summary, these data indicated that [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 have good potential to work as PET ligands, therefore there are merits to use these radioligands for the in vivo evaluation in animal models to see their efficacy in the living brain.

  7. Quantification of Translocator Protein (18 kDa) in the Human Brain with PET and a Novel Radioligand, 18F-PBR06

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yota; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Simèon, Fabrice G.; Taku, Andrew; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) (18 kDa), formerly called the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is upregulated on activated microglia and macrophages and is, thus, a biomarker of inflammation. We previously reported that an 11C-labeled aryloxyanilide (half-life, 20 min) was able to quantify TSPOs in the healthy human brain. Because many PET centers would benefit from a longer-lived 18F-labeled radioligand (half-life, 110 min), the objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a closely related aryloxyanilide (18F-N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline [18F-PBR06]) to quantify TSPOs in the healthy human brain. Methods A total of 9 human subjects were injected with 18F-PBR06 (~185 MBq) and scanned for 5 h, with rest periods outside the camera. The concentrations of 18F-PBR06, separated from radiometabolites, were measured in arterial plasma. Results Modeling of regional brain and plasma data showed that a 2-tissue-compartment model was superior to a 1-tissue-compartment model. Even if data for all time points were used for the fitting, concentrations of brain activity measured with PET were consistently greater than the modeled values at late (280–300 min) but not at early time points. The greater values may have been caused by the slow accumulation of radiometabolites in the brain. To determine an adequate time for more accurate measurement of distribution volume (VT), which is the summation of receptor binding and nondisplaceable activity, we investigated which scan duration would be associated with maximal or near-maximal identifiability. We found that a scan of 120 min provided the best identifiability of VT (~2%). The images showed no significant defluorination. Conclusion 18F-PBR06 can quantify TSPOs in the healthy human brain using 120 min of image acquisition and concurrent measurements of radioligand in plasma. Although brain activity is likely contaminated with radiometabolites, the percentage contamination is thought to be small

  8. A de novo balanced translocation t(7;12)(p21.2;p12.3) in a patient with Saethre-Chotzen-like phenotype downregulates TWIST and an osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-oc.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Patrizia; Raso, Alessandro; Beri, Silvana; Gimelli, Stefania; Merello, Elisa; Mascelli, Samantha; Baldi, Maurizia; Baffico, Ave Maria; Pavanello, Marco; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Giorda, Roberto; Gimelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is an autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndrome with variable expression. Here we report on a female infant with a de novo balanced translocation 46, XX, t(7;12)(p21.2;p12.3) and presenting at birth brachycephaly, antimongolic palpebral fissures, ocular hypertelorism, broad nose with low nasal bridge and low-set ears. This phenotype is suggestive of a subtle form of SCS, given the absence of limbs anomalies. Cloning of both breakpoints revealed that the translocation does not interrupt the TWIST1 coding region, on 7p21, known to be causative for SCS, but downregulates TWIST1 expression due to a position effect. On chromosome 12, the breakpoint translocates a shorter transcript of PTPRO gene, the osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-oc, near to regulatory region of 7p leading to down-regulation of PTP-oc in the proband's fibroblasts. This is a confirmatory case report providing further evidence for TWIST1 haploinsufficiency in SCS, although a possible role of PTP-oc as genetic factor underlying or at least influencing the development of craniosynostosis could not be a priori excluded.

  9. Metallic oxide nanoparticle translocation across the human bronchial epithelial barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Isabelle; Naudin, Grégoire; Boland, Sonja; Mornet, Stéphane; Contremoulins, Vincent; Beugnon, Karine; Martinon, Laurent; Lambert, Olivier; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2015-02-01

    Inhalation is the most frequent route of unintentional exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). Our aim was to quantify the translocation of different metallic NPs across human bronchial epithelial cells and to determine the factors influencing this translocation. Calu-3 cells forming a tight epithelial barrier when grown on a porous membrane in a two compartment chamber were exposed to fluorescently labelled NPs to quantify the NP translocation. NP translocation and uptake by cells were also studied by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Translocation was characterized according to NP size (16, 50, or 100 nm), surface charge (negative or positive SiO2), composition (SiO2 or TiO2), presence of proteins or phospholipids and in an inflammatory context. Our results showed that NPs can translocate through the Calu-3 monolayer whatever their composition (SiO2 or TiO2), but this translocation was increased for the smallest and negatively charged NPs. Translocation was not associated with an alteration of the integrity of the epithelial monolayer, suggesting a transcytosis of the internalized NPs. By modifying the NP corona, the ability of NPs to cross the epithelial barrier differed depending on their intrinsic properties, making positively charged NPs more prone to translocate. NP translocation can be amplified by using agents known to open tight junctions and to allow paracellular passage. NP translocation was also modulated when mimicking an inflammatory context frequently found in the lungs, altering the epithelial integrity and inducing transient tight junction opening. This in vitro evaluation of NP translocation could be extended to other inhaled NPs to predict their biodistribution.Inhalation is the most frequent route of unintentional exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). Our aim was to quantify the translocation of different metallic NPs across human bronchial epithelial cells and to determine the factors influencing this translocation. Calu-3 cells forming a

  10. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  11. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  12. Phospholipase D and its product, phosphatidic acid, mediate agonist-dependent raf-1 translocation to the plasma membrane and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M A; Shome, K; Vasudevan, C; Stolz, D B; Sung, T C; Frohman, M A; Watkins, S C; Romero, G

    1999-01-01

    The primary known function of phospholipase D (PLD) is to generate phosphatidic acid (PA) via the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. However, the functional role of PA is not well understood. We report here evidence that links the activation of PLD by insulin and the subsequent generation of PA to the activation of the Raf-1-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of the activation of ADP-ribosylation factor proteins, inhibited insulin-dependent production of PA and MAPK phosphorylation. The addition of PA reversed the inhibition of MAPK activation by BFA. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive variant of PLD2, but not PLD1, blocked insulin-dependent activation of PLD and phosphorylation of MAPK. Real time imaging analysis showed that insulin induced Raf-1 translocation to cell membranes by a process that was inhibited by BFA. PA addition reversed the effects of BFA on Raf-1 translocation. However, PA did not activate Raf-1 in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that the primary function of PA is to enhance the recruitment of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane where other factors may activate it. Finally, we found that the recruitment of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane was transient, but Raf-1 remained bound to endocytic vesicles.

  13. Measuring peptide translocation into large unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Sara A; Nelson, Rachel B; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-01-27

    There is an active interest in peptides that readily cross cell membranes without the assistance of cell membrane receptors(1). Many of these are referred to as cell-penetrating peptides, which are frequently noted for their potential as drug delivery vectors(1-3). Moreover, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial peptides that operate via non-membrane lytic mechanisms(4,5), particularly those that cross bacterial membranes without causing cell lysis and kill cells by interfering with intracellular processes(6,7). In fact, authors have increasingly pointed out the relationship between cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides(1,8). A firm understanding of the process of membrane translocation and the relationship between peptide structure and its ability to translocate requires effective, reproducible assays for translocation. Several groups have proposed methods to measure translocation into large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUVs)(9-13). LUVs serve as useful models for bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes and are frequently used in peptide fluorescent studies(14,15). Here, we describe our application of the method first developed by Matsuzaki and co-workers to consider antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin and buforin II(16,17). In addition to providing our protocol for this method, we also present a straightforward approach to data analysis that quantifies translocation ability using this assay. The advantages of this translocation assay compared to others are that it has the potential to provide information about the rate of membrane translocation and does not require the addition of a fluorescent label, which can alter peptide properties(18), to tryptophan-containing peptides. Briefly, translocation ability into lipid vesicles is measured as a function of the Foster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between native tryptophan residues and dansyl phosphatidylethanolamine when proteins are associated with the external LUV membrane (Figure 1). Cell

  14. Problem-elephant translocation: translocating the problem and the elephant?

    PubMed

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating "problem-elephants" is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they were released, while all the others left those parks. Translocated elephants showed variable responses: "homers" returned to the capture site, "wanderers" ranged widely, and "settlers" established home ranges in new areas soon after release. Translocation caused wider propagation and intensification of HEC, and increased elephant mortality. We conclude that translocation defeats both HEC mitigation and elephant conservation goals.

  15. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  16. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  17. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  18. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, P M; Linna, R P

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β≈1.36. This value can be explained by our derivation of β=4/3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  19. Metallic oxide nanoparticle translocation across the human bronchial epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    George, Isabelle; Naudin, Grégoire; Boland, Sonja; Mornet, Stéphane; Contremoulins, Vincent; Beugnon, Karine; Martinon, Laurent; Lambert, Olivier; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2015-03-14

    Inhalation is the most frequent route of unintentional exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). Our aim was to quantify the translocation of different metallic NPs across human bronchial epithelial cells and to determine the factors influencing this translocation. Calu-3 cells forming a tight epithelial barrier when grown on a porous membrane in a two compartment chamber were exposed to fluorescently labelled NPs to quantify the NP translocation. NP translocation and uptake by cells were also studied by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Translocation was characterized according to NP size (16, 50, or 100 nm), surface charge (negative or positive SiO2), composition (SiO2 or TiO2), presence of proteins or phospholipids and in an inflammatory context. Our results showed that NPs can translocate through the Calu-3 monolayer whatever their composition (SiO2 or TiO2), but this translocation was increased for the smallest and negatively charged NPs. Translocation was not associated with an alteration of the integrity of the epithelial monolayer, suggesting a transcytosis of the internalized NPs. By modifying the NP corona, the ability of NPs to cross the epithelial barrier differed depending on their intrinsic properties, making positively charged NPs more prone to translocate. NP translocation can be amplified by using agents known to open tight junctions and to allow paracellular passage. NP translocation was also modulated when mimicking an inflammatory context frequently found in the lungs, altering the epithelial integrity and inducing transient tight junction opening. This in vitro evaluation of NP translocation could be extended to other inhaled NPs to predict their biodistribution.

  20. Membrane and Chaperone Recognition by the Major Translocator Protein PopB of the Type III Secretion System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Discola, Karen F.; Förster, Andreas; Boulay, François; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Attree, Ina; Dessen, Andréa; Job, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system is a widespread apparatus used by pathogenic bacteria to inject effectors directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. A key component of this highly conserved system is the translocon, a pore formed in the host membrane that is essential for toxins to bypass this last physical barrier. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the translocon is composed of PopB and PopD, both of which before secretion are stabilized within the bacterial cytoplasm by a common chaperone, PcrH. In this work we characterize PopB, the major translocator, in both membrane-associated and PcrH-bound forms. By combining sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments, limited proteolysis, one-dimensional NMR, and β-lactamase reporter assays on eukaryotic cells, we show that PopB is stably inserted into bilayers with its flexible N-terminal domain and C-terminal tail exposed to the outside. In addition, we also report the crystal structure of the complex between PcrH and an N-terminal region of PopB (residues 51–59), which reveals that PopB lies within the concave face of PcrH, employing mostly backbone residues for contact. PcrH is thus the first chaperone whose structure has been solved in complex with both type III secretion systems translocators, revealing that both molecules employ the same surface for binding and excluding the possibility of formation of a ternary complex. The characterization of the major type III secretion system translocon component in both membrane-bound and chaperone-bound forms is a key step for the eventual development of antibacterials that block translocon assembly. PMID:24297169

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongsheng; Sarkar, Joy; Ahmed, Mohamed R.; Viswakarma, Navin; Jia Yuzhi; Yu Songtao; Sambasiva Rao, M.; Reddy, Janardan K. . E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

    2006-08-25

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

  2. Cloning and expression of the translocator protein (18 kDa), voltage-dependent anion channel, and diazepam binding inhibitor in the gonad of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) across the reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Doperalski, Nicholas J; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Prucha, Melinda S; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Barber, David S

    2011-08-01

    Cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane is rate-limiting for steroidogenesis in vertebrates. Previous studies in fish have characterized expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, however the function and regulation of other genes and proteins involved in piscine cholesterol transport have not been evaluated. In the current study, mRNA sequences of the 18 kDa translocator protein (tspo; formerly peripheral benzodiazepine receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel (vdac), and diazepam binding inhibitor (dbi; also acyl-CoA binding protein) were cloned from largemouth bass. Gonadal expression was examined across reproductive stages to determine if expression is correlated with changes in steroid levels and with indicators of reproductive maturation. In testis, transcript abundance of tspo and dbi increased with reproductive maturation (6- and 23-fold maximal increase, respectively) and expression of tspo and dbi was positively correlated with reproductive stage, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and circulating levels of testosterone. Testis vdac expression was positively correlated with reproductive stage and GSI. In females, gonadal tspo and vdac expression was negatively correlated with GSI and levels of plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol. Ovarian dbi expression was not correlated with indicators of reproductive maturation. These studies represent the first investigation of the steroidogenic role of tspo, vdac, and dbi in fish. Findings suggest that cholesterol transport in largemouth bass testis, but not in ovary, may be transcriptionally-regulated, however further investigation will be necessary to fully elucidate the role of these genes in largemouth bass steroidogenesis.

  3. Construction of a novel twin-arginine translocation (Tat)-dependent type expression vector for secretory production of heterologous proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lirong; Jia, Huimin; Xu, Daqing

    2015-11-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is recognized as a favorable host for the secretory production of heterologous proteins. However, there are few secretion-type expression vectors available for protein production in C. glutamicum. In this study, we constructed a shuttle expression vector pAU3, which harbors the strong promoter tac-M for constitutive gene transcription, the consensus RBS sequence for protein translation, and the strong cgR_0949 signal sequence for protein secretion via the Tat pathway in C. glutamicum. The applicability of pAU3 was confirmed by the highly efficient expression and secretion of the CAT protein in C. glutamicum. The vector pAU3 is highly useful for secretory production of heterologous proteins in C. glutamicum.

  4. Essential Role of the Donor Acyl Carrier Protein in Stereoselective Chain Translocation to a Fully Reducing Module of the Nanchangmycin Polyketide Synthase†

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Incubation of recombinant module 2 of the polyether nanchangmycin synthase (NANS), carrying an appended thioesterase domain, with the ACP-bound substrate (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl- NANS_ACP1 (2-ACP1) and methylmalonyl-CoA in the presence of NADPH gave diastereomerically pure (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (4a). These results contrast with the previously reported weak discrimination by NANS module 2+TE between the enantiomers of the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine-conjugated substrate analogue (±)-2- methyl-3-ketobutyryl-SNAC (2-SNAC), which resulted in formation of a 5:3 mixture of 4a and its (2S,4S)-diastereomer 4b. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with 2-ACP1 in the absence of NADPH gave unreduced 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (3) with a kcat of 4.4±0.9 min−1 and a kcat/Km 67 min−1 mM−1, corresponding to a ~2300-fold increase compared to the kcat/Km for the diffusive substrate 2-SNAC. Covalent tethering of the 2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl thioester substrate to the NANS ACP1 domain derived from the natural upstream PKS module of the nanchangmycin synthase significantly enhanced both the stereospecificity and the kinetic efficiency of the sequential polyketide chain translocation and condensation reactions catalyzed by the ketosynthase domain of NANS module 2. PMID:22229794

  5. Essential role of the donor acyl carrier protein in stereoselective chain translocation to a fully reducing module of the nanchangmycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E

    2012-01-31

    Incubation of recombinant module 2 of the polyether nanchangmycin synthase (NANS), carrying an appended thioesterase domain, with the ACP-bound substrate (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-NANS_ACP1 (2-ACP1) and methylmalonyl-CoA in the presence of NADPH gave diastereomerically pure (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (4a). These results contrast with the previously reported weak discrimination by NANS module 2+TE between the enantiomers of the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine-conjugated substrate analogue (±)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-SNAC (2-SNAC), which resulted in formation of a 5:3 mixture of 4a and its (2S,4S)-diastereomer 4b. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with 2-ACP1 in the absence of NADPH gave unreduced 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (3) with a k(cat) of 4.4 ± 0.9 min⁻¹ and a k(cat)/K(m) of 67 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹, corresponding to a ∼2300-fold increase compared to the k(cat)/K(m) for the diffusive substrate 2-SNAC. Covalent tethering of the 2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl thioester substrate to the NANS ACP1 domain derived from the natural upstream PKS module of the nanchangmycin synthase significantly enhanced both the stereospecificity and the kinetic efficiency of the sequential polyketide chain translocation and condensation reactions catalyzed by the ketosynthase domain of NANS module 2. PMID:22229794

  6. [PROTEIN CONTENT CHANGES IN RATS' LIVER AND BRAIN UNDER CHRONIC ALCOHOL INTOXICATION].

    PubMed

    Raksha, N G; Savchuk, A N; Kharchenko, O I; Galenova, T I; Ostapchenko, L I

    2015-01-01

    An electrophoretic investigation of quantitative protein content in rat's' tissyes under chronic alcoholic intoxication has been done. It was shown the significant increase of protein content with molecular mass 55, 48-50, 43-45, 39-41 KDa and the decrease-of protein fractions with molecular mass 46-48, 34-35, 27-30, 16-18 KDa accordingly in liver and brain homogenates of experimental animals. PMID:26827457

  7. Translocations in epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chad Brenner, J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic translocations leading to the expression of chimeric transcripts characterize several hematologic, mesenchymal and epithelial malignancies. While several gene fusions have been linked to essential molecular events in hematologic malignancies, the identification and characterization of recurrent chimeric transcripts in epithelial cancers has been limited. However, the recent discovery of the recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer has sparked a revitalization of the quest to identify novel rearrangements in epithelial malignancies. Here, the molecular mechanisms of gene fusions that drive several epithelial cancers and the recent technological advances that increase the speed and reliability of recurrent gene fusion discovery are explored. PMID:19406209

  8. Reduction of hypoxia-induced transcription through the repression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha/aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator DNA binding by the 90-kDa heat-shock protein inhibitor radicicol.

    PubMed

    Hur, Eunseon; Kim, Hong-Hee; Choi, Su Mi; Kim, Jin Hee; Yim, Sujin; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Choi, Youngyeon; Kim, Dae Kyong; Lee, Mi-Ock; Park, Hyunsung

    2002-11-01

    Under low oxygen tension, cells increase the transcription of specific genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glycolysis. Hypoxia-induced gene expression depends primarily on stabilization of the alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1alpha), which acts as a heterodimeric trans-activator with the nuclear protein known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt). The resulting heterodimer (HIF-1alpha/Arnt) interacts specifically with the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), thereby increasing transcription of the genes under HRE control. Our results indicate that the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) inhibitor radicicol reduces the hypoxia-induced expression of both endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and HRE-driven reporter plasmids. Radicicol treatment (0.5 microg/ml) does not significantly change the stability of the HIF-1alpha protein and does not inhibit the nuclear localization of HIF-1alpha. However, this dose of radicicol significantly reduces HRE binding by the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer. Our results, the first to show that radicicol specifically inhibits the interaction between the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer and HRE, suggest that Hsp90 modulates the conformation of the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer, making it suitable for interaction with HRE. Furthermore, we demonstrate that radicicol reduces hypoxia-induced VEGF expression to decrease hypoxia-induced angiogenesis.

  9. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  10. A Salmonella typhimurium-translocated Glycerophospholipid:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Promotes Virulence by Binding to the RhoA Protein Switch Regions

    SciTech Connect

    LaRock, Doris L.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Levin, Itay; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Miller, Samuel I.

    2012-08-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium translocates a glycerophospholipid: cholesterol acyltransferase (SseJ) into the host cytosol after its entry into mammalian cells. SseJ is recruited to the cytoplasmic face of the host cell phagosome membrane where it is activated upon binding the small GTPase, RhoA. SseJ is regulated similarly to cognate eukaryotic effectors, as only the GTP-bound form of RhoA family members stimulates enzymatic activity. Using NMR and biochemistry, this work demonstrates that SseJ competes effectively with Rhotekin, ROCK, and PKN1 in binding to a similar RhoA surface. The RhoA surface that binds SseJ includes the regulatory switch regions that control activation of mammalian effectors. These data were used to create RhoA mutants with altered SseJ binding and activation. This structure-function analysis supports a model in which SseJ activation occurs predominantly through binding to residues within switch region II. We further defined the nature of the interaction between SseJ and RhoA by constructing SseJ mutants in the RhoA binding surface. These data indicate that SseJ binding to RhoA is required for recruitment of SseJ to the endosomal network and for full Salmonella virulence for inbred susceptible mice, indicating that regulation of SseJ by small GTPases is an important virulence strategy of this bacterial pathogen. The dependence of a bacterial effector on regulation by a mammalian GTPase defines further how intimately host pathogen interactions have coevolved through similar and divergent evolutionary strategies.

  11. Molecular parasitism in the Escherichia coli-Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus system: translocation of the matrix protein from the host to the parasite outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, F; Romano, V; Valenzi, M; Di Giulio, M; Mupo, M R; Sacco, M

    1982-01-01

    During the intracellular maturation in Escherichia coli of the parasite Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus the outer membrane, major protein I of E. coli (i.e., the matrix protein) becomes associated with the outer membrane of the emerging parasite cells. The binding properties of this protein with the outer membrane of the host and of the parasite are identical. An analogous phenomenon also occurs during Bdellovibrio parasitism on Klebsiella pneumoniae and on Salmonella typhimurium. Possible roles for this scavenging action of Bdellovibrio, and similar phenomena in other parasitic systems, are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6765198

  12. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  13. A new set of regulatory molecules in plants: A plant phospholipid similar to platelet-activating factor stimulates protein kinase and proton-translocating ATPase in membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F; Martiny-Baron, G; Stoffel, B

    1988-08-01

    1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, an ether phospholipid from mammals known as platelet-activating factor (PAF), specifically stimulates proton transport in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) microsomes (G.F.E. Scherer, 1985, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commm. 133, 1160-1167). When plant lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography a lipid was found with chromatographic properties very similar to the PAF (G.F.E. Scherer and B. Stoffel, 1987, Planta, 172, 127-130). This lipid was isolated from zucchini hypocotyls, red beet root, lupin root, maize seedlings and crude soybean phospholipids. It had biological activity similar to that of the PAF, based on phosphorus content, and stimulated the steady-state ΔpH in zucchini hypocotyl microsomes about twofold. Other phospholipids, monoglyceride, diglyceride, triglyceride, oleic acid, phorbol ester, and 1-O-alkylglycerol did not stimulate proton transport. When microsomes were washed the PAF was ineffective but when soluble protein was added the PAF stimulation of H(+) transport was reconstituted. The soluble protein responsible for the PAF-dependent stimulation of transport activity could be partially purified by diethylaminoethyl Sephacel column chromatography. In the same fractions where the PAF-dependent transport-stimulatory protien was found, a protein kinase was active. This protein kinase was stimulated twofold either by the PAF or by Ca(2+). When Ca(2+) was present the PAF did not stimulate protein-kinase activity. When either the PAF, protein kinase, or both were added to membranes isolated on a linear sucrose gradient, ATPase activity was stimulated up to 30%. Comparison with marker enzymes indicated the possibility that tonoplast and plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase might be stimulated by the PAF and protein kinase. We speculate that a PAF-dependent protein kinase is involved in the regulation of proton transport in plants in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  15. Atomic structure of anthrax PA pore elucidates toxin translocation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Collier, R. John; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF), is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in human and animals. PA forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes LF and EF into the cytosol of target cells1. PA is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. Based on biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a Φ-clamp composed of Phe427 residues of PA catalyzes protein translocation via a charge-state dependent Brownian ratchet2–9. Although atomic structures of PA prepores are available10–14, how PA senses low pH, converts to active pore and translocates LF and EF are not well defined without an atomic model of the PA pore. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) with direct electron counting, we have determined the PA pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low-pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed. PMID:25778700

  16. Temporal changes in the expression of the translocator protein TSPO and the steroidogenic enzyme 5α-reductase in the dorsal spinal cord of animals with neuropathic pain: Effects of progesterone administration.

    PubMed

    Coronel, María F; Sánchez Granel, María L; Raggio, María C; Adler, Natalia S; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana L

    2016-06-15

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), still refractory to conventional treatment. The presence and biological activity of steroidogenic regulatory proteins and enzymes in the spinal cord suggests that neurosteroids locally generated could modulate pain messages. In this study we explored temporal changes in the spinal expression of the 18kDa translocator protein TSPO, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAr) and the steroidogenic enzyme 5α-reductase (5α-RI/II) in an experimental model of central chronic pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a SCI and sacrificed at different time points (1, 14 or 28days). The development of mechanical and cold allodynia was assessed. Injured animals showed an early increase in the mRNA levels of TSPO and 5α-RII, whereas in the chronic phase a significant decrease in the expression of 5α-RI and 5α-RII was observed, coinciding with the presence of allodynic behaviors. Furthermore, since we have shown that progesterone (PG) administration may offer a promising perspective in pain modulation, we also evaluated the expression of steroidogenic proteins and enzymes in injured animals receiving daily injections of the steroid. PG-treated did not develop allodynia and showed a marked increase in the mRNA levels of TSPO, StAR, 5α-RI and 5α-RII 28days after injury. Our results suggest that in the acute phase after SCI, the increased expression of TSPO and 5α-RII may represent a protective endogenous response against tissue injury, which is not maintained in the chronic allodynic phase. PG may favor local steroidogenesis and the production of its reduced metabolites, which could contribute to the antiallodynic effects observed after PG treatment.

  17. A new approach to polymer translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbeldam, Johan; Rostiashvili, Vakhtang; Milchev, Andrey; Vilgis, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Polymer translocation is ubiquitous in nature. It plays a role in phenomena like virus infections and in trafficking of proteins through pores in a cell membrane. Many theoretical models have been developed to explain scaling properties of simple polymer chains through tiny nanopores. This has not resolved the controversies in this field, however. In this paper we employ novel methods to shed light on the results that were obtained using the different models that are in use today. We use, for example fractional Brownian motion to explain the scaling of the variance in the translocation length with time and find good agreement between simulation results and theoretical predictions. An extension of the theory to nanopores with more complex geometries are discussed.

  18. Development of in-cell imaging assay systems for MMP-2 and MMP-9 based on trans-localizing molecular beacon proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jun; Cho, Young-Ah; Hwang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive in-cell imaging MMP-2 and MMP-9 detection systems that enables direct fluorescence detection of a target protease and its inhibition inside living cells has been developed. This in-cell imaging system utilizes the concept of fluorescent molecular beacon reporter (MBR) protein comprising a masking protein, a mitochondrial targeting sequence, a protease specific cleavage sequence and a fluorescent marker sequence, green fluorescent protein (GFP). The MBR protein is designed to change its intracellular location upon cleavage by either MMP-2 or MMP-9 from cytosol to mitochondria. Full and partial MMP-2 and MMP-9 were tested for optimal expression and activity in the cell. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was approximately 65-71%. Among MMP clones, MMP-2 catalytic domain and MMP-9 clone containing pro, catalytic and hemopexin domain were most active. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 required divalent ions Ca and Zn for its activity and MMP-9 was more active at higher Ca/Zn ratio. With the in-cell imaging assay the protease activity can be measured in cellular environment and cellular toxicity of candidate molecules can be monitored at the same time. These are great advantage when compared to other currently used in vitro biochemical assays. The in-cell imaging assay developed in this study can be modified for other MMPs and can be used in various life science and drug discovery researches including the high throughput screening and high contents screening applications.

  19. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; He, Li; Bao, Guoqiang; He, Xin; Fan, Saijun; Wang, Haichao

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells, thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses. In this study we aimed to test the possibility that ionizing radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and extracellular release. Method Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and animals (rats) were exposed to X-ray radiation, and HMGB1 translocation and release were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. Results At a wide dose range (4.0 – 12.0 Gy), X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation, and triggered a time- and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo. The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability. Conclusion radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes. PMID:27331198

  20. The retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP2 protein exhibits exonuclease activity and translocates to the nucleus in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Qiu Junzhuan; Cai Sheng; Chen Yuan; Cheetham, Michael E.; Shen Binghui; Pfeifer, Gerd P. . E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org

    2006-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. Mutations in the RP2 gene are linked to the second most frequent form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 is a plasma membrane-associated protein of unknown function. The N-terminal domain of RP2 shares amino acid sequence similarity to the tubulin-specific chaperone protein co-factor C. The C-terminus consists of a domain with similarity to nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs). Human NDK1, in addition to its role in providing nucleoside triphosphates, has recently been described as a 3' to 5' exonuclease. Here, we show that RP2 is a DNA-binding protein that exhibits exonuclease activity, with a preference for single-stranded or nicked DNA substrates that occur as intermediates of base excision repair pathways. Furthermore, we show that RP2 undergoes re-localization into the nucleus upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents inducing oxidative stress, most notably solar simulated light and UVA radiation. The data suggest that RP2 may have previously unrecognized roles as a DNA damage response factor and 3' to 5' exonuclease.

  1. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 activates Raf kinase and Raf perinuclear translocation via a protein kinase C-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lissoos, T W; Beno, D W; Davis, B H

    1993-11-25

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3's (D3) potential mitogenic mechanism of action was pursued in cultured rat hepatic Ito cells, a fibrogenic effector cell which proliferates in vivo during liver injury and fibrogenesis. D3 stimulated Ito cell DNA synthesis and potentiated platelet-derived growth factor-induced mitogenesis. D3's enhancement of [3H]thymidine incorporation was associated with nuclear Egr expression. Recent studies have causally linked the activated proto-oncogene c-Raf with downstream Egr induction. The serine-threonine kinase Raf protein is phosphorylation-activated by a large array of agonists including plasma membrane and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases but has not previously been associated with the steroid superfamily of mediators. To consider potential prenuclear acute pathways of D3-induced stimulation, the activation of Raf was examined following D3 exposure. D3 induced Raf activation as assessed via (a) enhanced Raf phosphorylation following in vivo 32P labeling, (b) enhanced kinase function utilizing exogenous histone 1 protein as substrate, and (c) the shift in Raf physical localization changing from a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution to a perinuclear domain. A similar activation of Raf kinase was found in 3T3 cells exposed to D3 with enhanced histone phosphorylation detectable within 1 min following stimulation. The proximal cascade leading to Raf kinase activation may involve a protein kinase activity was severely attenuated by stimulated kinase activity was severely attenuated by previous phorbol ester treatment for 20 h or staurosporine pretreatment.

  2. A refined atomic scale model of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K+-translocation protein Trk1p combined with experimental evidence confirms the role of selectivity filter glycines and other key residues.

    PubMed

    Zayats, Vasilina; Stockner, Thomas; Pandey, Saurabh Kumar; Wörz, Katharina; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ludwig, Jost

    2015-05-01

    Potassium ion (K+) uptake in yeast is mediated mainly by the Trk1/2 proteins that enable cells to survive on external K+ concentration as low as a few μM. Fungal Trks are related to prokaryotic TRK and Ktr and plant HKT K+ transport systems. Overall sequence similarity is very low, thus requiring experimental verification of homology models. Here a refined structural model of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trk1 is presented that was obtained by combining homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation and experimental verification through functional analysis of mutants. Structural models and experimental results showed that glycines within the selectivity filter, conserved among the K-channel/transporter family, are not only important for protein function, but are also required for correct folding/membrane targeting. A conserved aspartic acid in the PA helix (D79) and a lysine in the M2D helix (K1147) were proposed earlier to interact. Our results suggested individual roles of these residues in folding, structural integrity and function. While mutations of D79 completely abolished protein folding, mutations at position 1147 were tolerated to some extent. Intriguingly, a secondary interaction of D79 with R76 could enhance folding/stability of Trk1 and enable a fraction of Trk1[K1147A] to fold. The part of the ion permeation path containing the selectivity filter is shaped similar to that of ion channels. However below the selectivity filter it is obstructed or regulated by a proline containing loop. The presented model could provide the structural basis for addressing the long standing question if Trk1 is a passive or active ion-translocation system.

  3. The gene for human erythrocyte membrane protein band 7. 2 (EPB72) maps to 9q33-q34 centromeric to the Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Upender, M.; Ward, D.C.; Forget, B.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Erthrocyte band 7.2b is a 31-kDa integral phosphoprotein absent from the erythrocytes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt). HSt is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by mouth-shaped erythrocyte morphology on peripheral blood smears. The clinical severity of HSt is variable; some patients experience hemolysis and anemia while others are asymptomatic. The red cell membranes of these patients usually exhibit abnormal permeability to sodium and potassium with resultant modification of intracellular water content. The band 7.2b protein has been purified and the cDNA cloned. The approved gene name and symbol are erythrocyte membrane protein band 7.2 and EPB72, respectively, as assigned by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee. Using a human reticulocyte cDNA library as template, a 491-bp fragment corresponding to the 3' end of the coding region of the EPB72 cDNA was amplified. Three overlapping phase DNA clones were isolated using this probe. Four genomic DNA fragments of 2.0, 2.5, 4.5, and 5.0 kb, respectively, were isolated from these clones. To localize the EPB72 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization, these genomic DNA fragments were labeled with biotin-11-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes as described. Probes were preannealed to C[sub 0]t1-fractionated DNA to block repetitive sequences. Experiments were analyzed and digitally imaged using a cooled CCD camera. The probes, in combination, gave specific hybridization signals only in chromosome 9q. The gene for erythrocyte membrane protein 7.2 localized to 9q33-q34.

  4. Genomic Comparison of Translocating and Non-Translocating Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Nathan L.; Katouli, Mohammad; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of E. coli across the gut epithelium can result in fatal sepsis in post-surgical patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments have identified the existence of a novel pathotype of translocating E. coli (TEC) that employs an unknown mechanism for translocating across epithelial cells to the mesenteric lymph nodes and the blood stream in both humans and animal models. In this study the genomes of four TEC strains isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes of a fatal case of hospitalised patient (HMLN-1), blood of pigs after experimental shock (PC-1) and after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats (KIC-1 and KIC-2) were sequenced in order to identify the genes associated with their adhesion and/or translocation. To facilitate the comparison, the genomes of a non-adhering, non-translocating E. coli (46–4) and adhering but non-translocating E. coli (73–89) were also sequenced and compared. Whole genome comparison revealed that three (HMLN-1, PC-1 and KIC-2) of the four TEC strains carried a genomic island that encodes a Type 6 Secretion System that may contribute to adhesion of the bacteria to gut epithelial cells. The human TEC strain HMLN-1 also carried the invasion ibeA gene, which was absent in the animal TEC strains and is likely to be associated with host-specific translocation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four TEC strains were distributed amongst three distinct E. coli phylogroups, which was supported by the presence of phylogroup specific fimbriae gene clusters. The genomic comparison has identified potential genes that can be targeted with knock-out experiments to further characterise the mechanisms of E. coli translocation. PMID:26317913

  5. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets.

    PubMed

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5'-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism.

  6. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5′-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism. PMID:25331114

  7. Cryptotanshinone, a novel tumor angiogenesis inhibitor, destabilizes tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA via decreasing nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of RNA-binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhijie; Zhao, Yang; Li, Junbo; Tao, Li; Shi, Peiliang; Wei, Zhonghong; Sheng, Xiaobo; Shen, Dandan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Zhou, Liang; Tian, Chao; Fan, Fangtian; Shen, Cunsi; Zhu, Pingting; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Zhao, Qingshun; Lu, Yin

    2016-10-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CT), one major lipophilic component isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has shown to possess chemopreventive properties against various types of cancer cells. In this study, CT was shown to be a potent anti-angiogenic agent in zebrafish, and mouse models and could limit tumor growth by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. We further found that CT could inhibit the proliferation, migration, angiogenic sprouting, and tube formation of HUVECs. In addition, we demonstrated that CT could lower the level of TNF-α due to the destabilization of TNF-α mRNA, which associated with regulating 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of TNF-α and preventing the translocation of RNA binding protein, HuR, from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Moreover, the underlying mechanism responsible for the regulation in angiogenesis by CT was partially related to the suppression of NF-κB, and STAT3 activity. Based on the abilities of CT in targeting tumor cells, inhibiting angiogenesis, and destroying tumor vasculature, CT is worthy of further investigation for preventive, and therapeutic purposes in cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  9. Genes and translocations involved in POF.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, David; Herrera, Luisa; Crisponi, Laura; Mumm, Steven; Percesepe, Antonio; Pellegrini, Massimo; Pilia, Giuseppe; Forabosco, Antonino

    2002-08-15

    Changes at a single autosomal locus and many X-linked loci have been implicated in women with gonadal dysgenesis [premature ovarian failure (POF) with deficits in ovarian follicles]. For the chromosome 3 locus, a forkhead transcription factor gene (FOXL2) has been identified, in which lesions result in decreased follicles by haploinsufficiency. In contrast, sporadic X; autosomal translocations are distributed at many points on the X, but concentrate in a critical region on Xq. The association of the breakpoints with genes involved in ovarian function is thus far weak (in four analyzed cases) and has not been related to pathology in other POF patients. While many more translocations can be analyzed in detail as the human genome sequence is refined, it remains possible that translocations like X monosomy (Turner syndrome) lead to POF not by interrupting specific genes important in ovarian development, but by causing aberrations in pairing or X-inactivation during folliculogenesis. It is noted that the critical region has unusual features, neighboring the X-inactivation center and including an 18 Mb region of very low recombination. These suggest that chromosome dynamics in the region may be sensitive to structural changes, and when modified by translocations might provoke apoptosis at meiotic checkpoints. Choices among models for the etiology of POF should be feasible based on studies of ovarian follicle development and attrition in mouse models. Studies would prominently include gene expression profiling of developmental-specific pathways in nascent ovaries with controlled levels of Foxl2 and interacting proteins, or with defined changes in the X chromosome.

  10. [Bacterial translocation from the nutritional perspective].

    PubMed

    de Oca, J

    1994-01-01

    A variety of situations involving loss of the physical integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier, excess intraluminal bacterial growth or immunological compromise of the host, have been shown experimentally to predispose to bacterial translocation. While colonization of the mesenteric ganglia is a mechanism which stimulates local immune defenses, distant colonization of other organs causes these defences to fail. In general, in the latter situation, a variety of factors must combine, notably the nutritional state or nutritional therapy. Protein malnutrition states do not alone generate bacterial translocation, but they do facilitate the distant dissemination of germs in situations such as endotoxemia. Bacterial translocation is objectivized after the prolonged use of total parenteral nutrition or of chemically defined non-fiber diets. The addition of fiber restores the architecture and physiology of the intestinal microvilli and prevents bacterial translocation in animals with a variety of morphological lesions of the intestinal barrier. While the results of the clinical studies are as yet not very conclusive, there is a clear link between bacteremia of intestinal origin and multiple organ failures. Nutritional support of patients with an acute metabolic compromise must, at least as inferred from the experimental studies, take account of the following factors: in the first place, the use of a preparation with a qualitatively and quantitatively suitable fiber content, to prevent atrophy of the intestinal villi; in the second place, the use of "scavenger" agents or physiological sweepers of the free radicals of oxygen, such as vitamin A, E or C or selenium; and, finally, day by day there is an increasing interest in the therapeutic use of substrates with immunomodulatory capacity, such as glutamine or arginine. On the other hand, the use must be questioned of substances such as Omega 3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids which are on their own able to increase lipidic

  11. Nuclear translocation of the 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated rapid response to steroids) receptor protein and NF{kappa}B in differentiating NB4 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqing; Beilhartz, Greg; Roy, Yvette; Richard, Cynthia L.; Curtin, Maureen; Brown, Lauren; Cadieux, Danielle; Coppolino, Marc; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-04-15

    1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) primes NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocyte/macrophage lineage through a non-genomic mechanism. Here we show that NB4 cells express high levels of the recently identified membrane receptor for 1,25D{sub 3}, which is a distinct gene product from the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor. This 57 kDa protein, named 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (Membrane Activated Rapid Response to Steroids)/ERp57/PIA3 appears to associate in a complex with the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). In unstimulated cells, 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS can be co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed at NF{kappa}B, and NF{kappa}B is co-precipitated when antibodies against 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS or ERp57 are used. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrate that both 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS and NF{kappa}B begin translocating to the nucleus within minutes of co-stimulation with 1,25D{sub 3} and phorbol ester. The predominant nuclear localization of both proteins precedes the expression of the monocyte/macrophage phenotype and suggests that this event may be critical to the differentiation pathway. This suggests a role for 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS in the nucleus as a regulator of gene expression. Here it may also regulate the activity of NF{kappa}B and other factors with which it may be interacting.

  12. Unassisted translocation of large polypeptide domains across phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Brambillasca, Silvia; Yabal, Monica; Makarow, Marja; Borgese, Nica

    2006-12-01

    Although transmembrane proteins generally require membrane-embedded machinery for integration, a few can insert spontaneously into liposomes. Previously, we established that the tail-anchored (TA) protein cytochrome b(5) (b5) can posttranslationally translocate 28 residues downstream to its transmembrane domain (TMD) across protein-free bilayers (Brambillasca, S., M. Yabal, P. Soffientini, S. Stefanovic, M. Makarow, R.S. Hegde, and N. Borgese. 2005. EMBO J. 24:2533-2542). In the present study, we investigated the limits of this unassisted translocation and report that surprisingly long (85 residues) domains of different sequence and charge placed downstream of b5's TMD can posttranslationally translocate into mammalian microsomes and liposomes at nanomolar nucleotide concentrations. Furthermore, integration of these constructs occurred in vivo in translocon-defective yeast strains. Unassisted translocation was not unique to b5 but was also observed for another TA protein (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B) whose TMD, like the one of b5, is only moderately hydrophobic. In contrast, more hydrophobic TMDs, like synaptobrevin's, were incapable of supporting unassisted integration, possibly because of their tendency to aggregate in aqueous solution. Our data resolve long-standing discrepancies on TA protein insertion and are relevant to membrane evolution, biogenesis, and physiology.

  13. The process of microbial translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J W; Boyce, S T; Babcock, G F; Gianotti, L; Peck, M D; Dunn, D L; Pyles, T; Childress, C P; Ash, S K

    1990-01-01

    The process of microbial translocation was studied using Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, or endotoxin instilled into Thiry-Vella loops of thermally injured guinea pigs and rats. Translocation of C. albicans occurred by direct penetration of enterocytes by a unique process different from classical phagocytosis. Translocation between enterocytes was not observed. Internalization was associated with a disturbance of the plasma membrane and brush border, but most internalized organisms were not surrounded by a plasma membrane. Passage of the candida into the lamina propria appeared to be associated with disruption of the basal membrane with extrusion of cytoplasm of the cell and candida. Organisms in the lamina propria were commonly phagocytized by macrophages but also were found free in lymphatics and blood vessels. Translocation of E. coli and endotoxin also occurred directly through enterocytes rather than between them, but translocated endotoxin diffused through the lamina propria and muscular wall of the bowel wall by passing between rather than through the myocytes. These descriptive phenomena provide new insight into the role of the enterocyte and intestinal immune cells in the translocation process. Images Figs. 11A-E. Figs. 11A-E. Figs. 12A-C. Figs. 1A-F. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Fig. 3. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 5A-B. Fig. 5C. Fig. 6. Fig. 6. Figs. 7A and B. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:2222015

  14. Computer simulation of viral-assembly and translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti Prakash

    We investigated four different problems using coarse grained computational models : self-assembly of single stranded (ss) DNA virus, ejection dynamics of double stranded(ds) DNA from phages, translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore, and segmental dynamics of a polymer translocating through a synthetic nanopore. In the first part of the project, we investigated the self-assembly of a virus with and without its genome. A coarse-grained model was proposed for the viral subunit proteins and its genome (ssDNA). Langevin dynamics simulation, and replica exchange method were used to determine the kinetics and energetics of the self-assembly process, respectively. The self-assembly follows a nucleation-growth kind of mechanism. The ssDNA plays a crucial role in the self-assembly by acting as a template and enhancing the local concentration of the subunits. The presence of the genome does not changes the mechanism of the self-assembly but it reduces the nucleation time and enhances the growth rate by almost an order of magnitude. The second part of the project involves the investigation of the dynamics of the ejection of dsDNA from phages. A coarse-grained model was used for the phage and dsDNA. Langevin dynamics simulation was used to investigate the kinetics of the ejection. The ejection is a stochastic process and a slow intermediate rate kinetics was observed for most ejection trajectories. We discovered that the jamming of the DNA at the pore mouth at high packing fraction and for a disordered system is the reason for the intermediate slow kinetics. The third part of the project involves translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore. MspA protein pore has the potential for genome sequencing because of its ability to clearly distinguish the four different nucleotides based on their blockade current, but it is a challenge to use this pore for any practical application because of the very fast traslocation time. We resolved the state of DNA translocation

  15. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  16. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  17. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    PubMed

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus. PMID:26145586

  18. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    PubMed

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus.

  19. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L

    2012-01-24

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA. PMID:22219368

  20. Downside risk of wildlife translocation.

    PubMed

    Chipman, R; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C; Mendoza, M

    2008-01-01

    Translocation has been used successfully by wildlife professionals to enhance or reintroduce populations of rare or extirpated wildlife, provide hunting or wildlife viewing opportunities, farm wild game, and reduce local human-wildlife conflicts. However, accidental and intentional translocations may have multiple unintended negative consequences, including increased stress and mortality of relocated animals, negative impacts on resident animals at release sites, increased conflicts with human interests, and the spread of diseases. Many wildlife professionals now question the practice of translocation, particularly in light of the need to contain or eliminate high profile, economically important wildlife diseases and because using this technique may jeopardize international wildlife disease management initiatives to control rabies in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes in North America. Incidents have been documented where specific rabies variants (Texas gray fox, canine variant in coyotes, and raccoon) have been moved well beyond their current range as a result of translocation, including the emergence of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Here, we review and discuss the substantial challenges of curtailing translocation in the USA, focusing on movement of animals by the public, nuisance wildlife control operators, and wildlife rehabilitators. PMID:18634483

  1. Changes in Binding of [(123)I]CLINDE, a High-Affinity Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Selective Radioligand in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Donat, Cornelius K; Gaber, Khaled; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Brust, Peter; Pinborg, Lars H; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2016-06-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), secondary injuries develop, including neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to long-lasting impairments. These secondary injuries represent potential targets for treatment and diagnostics. The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is expressed in activated microglia cells and upregulated in response to brain injury and therefore a potential biomarker of the neuroinflammatory processes. Second-generation radioligands of TSPO, such as [(123)I]CLINDE, have a higher signal-to-noise ratio as the prototype ligand PK11195. [(123)I]CLINDE has been employed in human studies using single-photon emission computed tomography to image the neuroinflammatory response after stroke. In this study, we used the same tracer in a rat model of TBI to determine changes in TSPO expression. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact injury and sacrificed at 6, 24, 72 h and 28 days post surgery. TSPO expression was assessed in brain sections employing [(123)I]CLINDE in vitro autoradiography. From 24 h to 28 days post surgery, injured animals exhibited a marked and time-dependent increase in [(123)I]CLINDE binding in the ipsilateral motor, somatosensory and parietal cortex, as well as in the hippocampus and thalamus. Interestingly, binding was also significantly elevated in the contralateral M1 motor cortex following TBI. Craniotomy without TBI caused a less marked increase in [(123)I]CLINDE binding, restricted to the ipsilateral hemisphere. Radioligand binding was consistent with an increase in TSPO mRNA expression and CD11b immunoreactivity at the contusion site. This study demonstrates the applicability of [(123)I]CLINDE for detailed regional and quantitative assessment of glial activity in experimental models of TBI.

  2. Inhibition of Wnt signaling by cucurbitacin B in breast cancer cells: reduction of Wnt-associated proteins and reduced translocation of galectin-3-mediated β-catenin to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dakeng, Sumana; Duangmano, Suwit; Jiratchariyakul, Weena; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Bögler, Oliver; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha

    2012-01-01

    The cucurbitacins are tetracyclic triterpenes found in plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. Cucurbitacins have been shown to have anti-cancer and anti-inflamatory activities. We investigated the anti-cancer activity of cucurbitacin B extracted from Thai medicinal plant Trichosanthes cucumerina Linn. Cell viability was assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Results indicated that cucurbitacin B from T. cucumerina Linn. has a cytotoxic effect on breast cancer cell lines SKBR-3 and MCF-7 with an IC50 of 4.60 and 88.75 µg/ml, respectively. Growth inhibition was attributed to G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Cyclin D1, c-Myc, and β-catenin expression levels were reduced. Western blot analysis showed increased PARP cleavage and decreased Wnt-associated signaling molecules β-catenin, galectin-3, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and corresponding changes in phosphorylated GSK-3β levels. Cucurbitacin B treatment inhibited translocation to the nucleus of β-catenin and galectin-3. The depletion of β-catenin and galectin-3 in the nucleus was confirmed by cellular protein fractionation. T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF)-dependent transcriptional activity was disrupted in cucurbitacin B treated cells as tested by a TCF reporter assay. The relative luciferase activity was reduced when we treated cells with cucurbitacin B compound for 24 h. Our data suggest that cucurbitacin B may in part induce apoptosis and exert growth inhibitory effect via interruption the Wnt signaling.

  3. Arrestin translocation is stoichiometric to rhodopsin isomerization and accelerated by phototransduction in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Akiko K.; Xia, Hongai; Yan, Limin; Liu, Che-Hsiung; Hardie, Roger C.; Ready, Donald F.

    2010-01-01

    Upon illumination visual arrestin translocates from photoreceptor cell bodies to rhodopsin and membrane-rich photosensory compartments - vertebrate outer segments or invertebrate rhabdomeres - where it quenches activated rhodopsin. Both the mechanism and function of arrestin translocation are unresolved and controversial. In dark-adapted photoreceptors of the fruitfly Drosophila, confocal immunocytochemistry shows arrestin (Arr2) associated with distributed photoreceptor endomembranes. Immunocytochemistry and live imaging of GFP-tagged Arr2 demonstrate rapid reversible translocation to stimulated rhabdomeres in stoichiometric proportion to rhodopsin photoisomerization. Translocation is very rapid in normal photoreceptors (time constant <10 s), and can also be resolved in the time course of electroretinogram recordings. Genetic elimination of key phototransduction proteins, including phospholipase C (PLC), Gq and the light-sensitive Ca2+ permeable TRP channels, slows translocation by 10-100 fold. Our results indicate that Arr2 translocation in Drosophila photoreceptors is driven by diffusion, but profoundly accelerated by phototransduction and Ca2+ influx. PMID:20869596

  4. The role of phospholipase D in Glut-4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Frohman, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated Glut-4 translocation is regulated through a complex pathway. Increasing attention is being paid to the role undertaken in this process by Phospholipase D, a signal transduction-activated enzyme that generates the lipid second-messenger phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D facilitates Glut-4 translocation at potentially multiple steps in its outward movement. Current investigation is centered on Phospholipase D promotion of Glut-4-containing membrane vesicle trafficking and vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, in part through activation of atypical protein kinase C isoforms. PMID:14648804

  5. Insights into Buforin II Membrane Translocation from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Buforin II is a histone-derived antimicrobial peptide that readily translocates across lipid membranes without causing significant membrane permeabilization. Previous studies showed that mutating the sole proline of buforin II dramatically decreases its translocation. As well, researchers have proposed that the peptide crosses membranes in a cooperative manner through forming transient toroidal pores. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the structure of buforin II upon membrane entry and evaluate whether the peptide is able to form toroidal pore structures. These simulations showed a relationship between protein-lipid interactions and increased structural deformations of the buforin N-terminal region promoted by proline. Moreover, simulations with multiple peptides show how buforin II can embed deeply into membranes and potentially form toroidal pores. Together, these simulations provide structural insight into the translocation process for buforin II in addition to providing more general insight into the role proline can play in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:23022591

  6. Crystallographic snapshot of cellulose synthesis and membrane translocation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Strumillo, Joanna; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biological macromolecule, is an extracellular, linear polymer of glucose molecules. It represents an essential component of plant cell walls but is also found in algae and bacteria. In bacteria, cellulose production frequently correlates with the formation of biofilms, a sessile, multicellular growth form. Cellulose synthesis and transport across the inner bacterial membrane is mediated by a complex of the multi-spanning catalytic BcsA subunit and the membrane-anchored, periplasmic BcsB protein. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of BcsA and BcsB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides containing a translocating polysaccharide. The structure of the BcsA-B translocation intermediate reveals the architecture of the cellulose synthase, demonstrates how BcsA forms a cellulose-conducting channel, and suggests a model for the coupling of cellulose synthesis and translocation in which the nascent polysaccharide is extended by one glucose molecule at a time. PMID:23222542

  7. Single, ancient origin of a plastid metabolite translocator family in Plantae from an endomembrane-derived ancestor.

    PubMed

    Weber, Andreas P M; Linka, Marc; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2006-03-01

    Phylogenetic analyses show the single origin of a plastid metabolite translocator family in the Plantae from a gene encoding an existing endomembrane-derived protein. Red algal secondary endosymbiosis has spread a translocator gene into the ancestor of the "chromalveolate" protists, where it has diversified into a novel clade of proteins.

  8. Ancient class of translocated oomycete effectors targets the host nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schornack, Sebastian; van Damme, Mireille; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Cano, Liliana M; Smoker, Matthew; Thines, Marco; Gaulin, Elodie; Kamoun, Sophien; Huitema, Edgar

    2010-10-01

    Pathogens use specialized secretion systems and targeting signals to translocate effector proteins inside host cells, a process that is essential for promoting disease and parasitism. However, the amino acid sequences that determine host delivery of eukaryotic pathogen effectors remain mostly unknown. The Crinkler (CRN) proteins of oomycete plant pathogens, such as the Irish potato famine organism Phytophthora infestans, are modular proteins with predicted secretion signals and conserved N-terminal sequence motifs. Here, we provide direct evidence that CRN N termini mediate protein transport into plant cells. CRN host translocation requires a conserved motif that is present in all examined plant pathogenic oomycetes, including the phylogenetically divergent species Aphanomyces euteiches that does not form haustoria, specialized infection structures that have been implicated previously in delivery of effectors. Several distinct CRN C termini localized to plant nuclei and, in the case of CRN8, required nuclear accumulation to induce plant cell death. These results reveal a large family of ubiquitous oomycete effector proteins that target the host nucleus. Oomycetes appear to have acquired the ability to translocate effector proteins inside plant cells relatively early in their evolution and before the emergence of haustoria. Finally, this work further implicates the host nucleus as an important cellular compartment where the fate of plant-microbe interactions is determined.

  9. 2-Phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-containing ligands of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) behave as agonists and antagonists of steroidogenesis in a mouse leydig tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Altomare, Cosimo D; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-08-30

    Ligands of 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) are known for their ability to potently and dose-dependently stimulate steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. In this study, we investigated a number of 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide derivatives, analogs of alpidem, for their ability to bind TSPO and to affect steroidogenesis in a mouse Leydig tumor cell line. We observed that not only some compounds behaved as agonists, stimulating steroidogenesis (e.g., 3 and 4) with EC50 values (15.9 and 6.99μM) close to that determined for FGIN-1-27 used as positive control (7.24μM), but two compounds, namely 5 and 6, which on the other hand are the most lipophilic ones in the investigated series, behaved as antagonists, by significantly inhibiting steroid production at concentrations at least twenty times lower than the cytotoxic ones. To our surprise, the newly synthesized compound 3, which is a strict analog of alpidem bearing at the para position of the 2-phenyl group a methoxy group instead of chlorine, achieved a ten-fold stimulation of the steroid production (for comparison FGIN-1-27 achieved 1.6-fold stimulation). Within the limits of the examined property space, some unprecedented SARs were unveiled, which can help in understanding the key molecular factors underlying the transition from agonism to antagonism in the steroidogenesis process. Besides the substitution pattern and the physicochemical features (mainly hydrogen bonding potential) of the substituents at the positions C(6) and C(8) of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine nucleus, and at the para position of the 2-phenyl group, the structure-activity relationship analysis suggested lipophilicity, whose increase seems to be generally related to steroidogenesis inhibition, and steric hindrance, which appeared as a stimulation-limiting factor, as two main properties to control in the design or optimization of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-based TSPO ligands endowed with potential in modulating the

  10. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  11. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L.; Champion, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  12. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress.

  13. Importin-mediated nuclear translocation of galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Susumu; Hogan, Victor; Inohara, Hidenori; Raz, Avraham

    2006-12-22

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a member of a beta-galactoside-binding protein family, is involved in RNA processing and cell cycle regulation through activation of transcription factors when translocated to the nucleus. We have previously shown that Gal-3 can import into the nucleus through at least two pathways; via passive diffusion and/or active transport (Nakahara, S., Oka, N., Wang, Y., Hogan, V., Inohara, H, and Raz, A. (2006) Cancer Res. 66, 9995-10006). Here, we investigated the process mediated by the active nuclear transport of Gal-3 and have identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-like motif in its protein sequence, (223)HRVKKL(228), that resembles p53 and c-Myc NLSs ((378)SRHKKL(383), (322)AKRVKL(327)), respectively. Moreover, trimers of enhanced green fluorescence protein (3xGFP) fused with this NLS-like sequence, which is too large to passively diffuse through the nuclear pores, accumulated in the cell nuclei. To gain insights into this newly identified nuclear import mechanism, the interaction between Gal-3 and importins (importins alpha and beta) that carry the NLS harboring nuclear proteins into the nucleus, was investigated. Pull-down assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis revealed that wild-type Gal-3, but not mutant Gal-3 (R224A), binds to importin-alpha. Down-regulation of importin-beta by RNA interference (RNAi) efficiently abrogates its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that impaired nuclear translocation of mutant Gal-3 protein (R224A) results in accelerated degradation compared with the wild-type protein. Thus, these results suggest that Gal-3 is translocated to the nucleus, in part, via the importin-alpha/beta route and that Arg(224) amino acid residue of human Gal-3 is essential for its active nuclear translocation and its molecular stability. PMID:17056590

  14. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole.

  15. Biphasic translocation of Bax to mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Capano, Michela; Crompton, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Using green fluorescent protein-tagged Bax, we demonstrate that Bax is sequestered from the cytosol of cardiomyocytes in two distinct phases following the induction of apoptosis with staurosporine. In the first phase, lasting several hours, Bax removal from the cytosol was relatively small. In the second phase, Bax was very largely removed from the cytosol and sequestered into large aggregates associated with the mitochondria. To test which of the phases involved cytochrome c release, cells were transfected with a red fluorescent protein-cytochrome c fusion. The cytochrome c fusion protein was accumulated by mitochondria of healthy cells and was released by staurosporine in phase 1. When green fluorescent protein-Bax was immunoprecipitated from extracts of cells in phase 1 and phase 2, the voltage-dependent anion channel (mitochondrial outer membrane) and the adenine nucleotide translocase (mitochondrial inner membrane) were also precipitated. These data support a two-phase model of Bax translocation in which Bax targets the mitochondrial intermembrane contact sites and releases cytochrome c in the first phase, and is then packaged into large aggregates on mitochondria in the second. PMID:12097139

  16. Linkage map construction involving a reciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Farré, A; Benito, I Lacasa; Cistué, L; de Jong, J H; Romagosa, I; Jansen, J

    2011-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel statistical-genetic approach for the construction of linkage maps in populations obtained from reciprocal translocation heterozygotes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Using standard linkage analysis, translocations usually lead to 'pseudo-linkage': the mixing up of markers from the chromosomes involved in the translocation into a single linkage group. Close to the translocation breakpoints recombination is severely suppressed and, as a consequence, ordering markers in those regions is not feasible. The novel strategy presented in this paper is based on (1) disentangling the "pseudo-linkage" using principal coordinate analysis, (2) separating individuals into translocated types and normal types and (3) separating markers into those close to and those more distant from the translocation breakpoints. The methods make use of a consensus map of the species involved. The final product consists of integrated linkage maps of the distal parts of the chromosomes involved in the translocation.

  17. Polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiu TaiAndrew; Muthukumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism of polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel of finite diameter and length between two spherical compartments is developed. Unlike previous simplified systems, the finite diameter of the channel allows the number of polymer segments inside the channel to be adjusted during translocation according to the free energy of possible conformations. The translocation process of a Gaussian chain without excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions is studied using exact formulas of confinement free energy under this formalism. The free energy landscape for the translocation process, the distribution of the translocation time, and the average translocation time are presented. The complex dependencies of the average translocation time on the length and diameter of the channel, the sizes of the donor and receptor compartments, and the chain length are illustrated. PMID:18433273

  18. The mechanics of translocation: a molecular "spring-and-ratchet" system.

    PubMed

    Moran, Stephen J; Flanagan, John F; Namy, Olivier; Stuart, David I; Brierley, Ian; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2008-05-01

    The translation of genetic information into proteins is a fundamental process of life. Stepwise addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain requires the coordinated movement of mRNA and tRNAs through the ribosome, a process known as translocation. Here, we review current understanding of the kinetics and mechanics of translocation, with particular emphasis on the structure of a functional mammalian ribosome stalled during translocation by an mRNA pseudoknot. In the context of a pseudoknot-stalled complex, the translocase EF-2 is seen to compress a hybrid-state tRNA into a strained conformation. We propose that this strain energy helps overcome the kinetic barrier to translocation and drives tRNA into the P-site, with EF-2 biasing this relaxation in one direction. The tRNA can thus be considered a molecular spring and EF-2 a Brownian ratchet in a "spring-and-ratchet" system within the translocation process.

  19. cDNA sequence of a human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator: lack of a leader peptide, divergence from a fibroblast translocator cDNA, and coevolution with mitochondrial DNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Neckelmann, N.; Li, K.; Wade, R.P.; Shuster, R.; Wallace, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    The authors have characterized a 1400-nucleotide cDNA for the human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator. The deduced amino acid sequence is 94% homologous to the beef heart ADP/ATP translocator protein and contains only a single additional amino-terminal methionine. This implies that the human translocator lacks an amino-terminal targeting peptide, a conclusion substantiated by measuring the molecular weight of the protein synthesized in vitro. A 1400-nucleotide transcript encoding the skeletal muscle translocator was detected on blots of total RNA from human heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and HeLa cells by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes homologous to the coding region and 3' noncoding region of the cDNA. However, the level of this mRNA varied substantially among tissues. Comparison of our skeletal muscle translocator sequence with that of a recently published human fibroblast translocator cognate revealed that the two proteins are 88% identical and diverged about 275 million years ago. Hence, tissues vary both in the level of expression of individual translocator genes and in differential expression of cognate translocator genes. Comparison of the base substitution rates of the ADP/ATP translocator and the oxidative phosphorylation genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA revealed that the mitochondrial DNA genes fix 10 times more synonymous substitutions and 12 times more replacement substitutions; yet, these nuclear and cytoplasmic respiration genes experience comparable evolutionary constraints. This suggest that the mitochondrial DNA genes are highly prone to deleterious mutations.

  20. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development.

  1. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. PMID:25040040

  2. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  3. Snaps and mends: DNA breaks and chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Javadekar, Saniya M; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2015-07-01

    Integrity in entirety is the preferred state of any organism. The temporal and spatial integrity of the genome ensures continued survival of a cell. DNA breakage is the first step towards creation of chromosomal translocations. In this review, we highlight the factors contributing towards the breakage of chromosomal DNA. It has been well-established that the structure and sequence of DNA play a critical role in selective fragility of the genome. Several non-B-DNA structures such as Z-DNA, cruciform DNA, G-quadruplexes, R loops and triplexes have been implicated in generation of genomic fragility leading to translocations. Similarly, specific sequences targeted by proteins such as Recombination Activating Genes and Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase are involved in translocations. Processes that ensure the integrity of the genome through repair may lead to persistence of breakage and eventually translocations if their actions are anomalous. An insufficient supply of nucleotides and chromatin architecture may also play a critical role. This review focuses on a range of events with the potential to threaten the genomic integrity of a cell, leading to cancer.

  4. Disulfide bridge formation between SecY and a translocating polypeptide localizes the translocation pore to the center of SecY.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Kurt S; Or, Eran; Clemons, William M; Shibata, Yoko; Rapoport, Tom A

    2005-04-25

    During their biosynthesis, many proteins pass through the membrane via a hydrophilic channel formed by the heterotrimeric Sec61/SecY complex. Whether this channel forms at the interface of multiple copies of Sec61/SecY or is intrinsic to a monomeric complex, as suggested by the recently solved X-ray structure of the Methanococcus jannaschii SecY complex, is a matter of contention. By introducing a single cysteine at various positions in Escherichia coli SecY and testing its ability to form a disulfide bond with a single cysteine in a translocating chain, we provide evidence that translocating polypeptides pass through the center of the SecY complex. The strongest cross-links were observed with residues that would form a constriction in an hourglass-shaped pore. This suggests that the channel makes only limited contact with a translocating polypeptide, thus minimizing the energy required for translocation. PMID:15851514

  5. Translocation (Y;12) in lipoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cher-Wei; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Johannessen, Catherine; Hornick, Jason L; Dal Cin, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm in adults, and have been extensively characterized at the cytogenetic level. Chromosomal aberrations have been observed in the majority of lipomas, two-thirds of which involve chromosomal region 12q14.3. To date, structural rearrangements have been reported affecting every chromosome except chromosome Y. Here we report a case of a lipoma that shows a novel apparently balanced translocation involving chromosomes Y and 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a break-apart HMGA2 in-house probe set detected a single signal on the normal chromosome 12 but not on either the derivative chromosome Y or 12, indicating a cryptic loss of 12q14.3, where HMGA2 is mapped. Immunohistochemical studies, however, revealed overexpression of HMGA2 with nuclear expression in the majority of tumor cells, whereas MDM2 and CDK4 were negative. The overexpression of HMGA2 may be caused by a cryptic chromosomal aberration affecting either the cytogenetically unaltered HMGA2 allele or HMGA2 regulators elsewhere. The current case broadens our knowledge about the translocation partners of HMGA2 in lipomas and highlights the biological complexity in regulating HMGA2 expression. PMID:21356192

  6. Antigen translocation machineries in adaptive immunity and viral immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Peter U; Tampé, Robert

    2015-03-13

    Protein homeostasis results in a steady supply of peptides, which are further degraded to fuel protein synthesis or metabolic needs of the cell. In higher vertebrates, a small fraction of the resulting peptidome, however, is translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Antigenic peptides are guided to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and are finally displayed on the cell surface, where they mount an adaptive immune response against viral infected or malignantly transformed cells. Here, we review the structural organization and the molecular mechanism of this specialized antigen translocon. We discuss how the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter TAP communicates and cooperates within the multi-component peptide loading machinery, mediating the proper assembly and editing of kinetically stable peptide/MHC I complexes. In light of its important role within the MHC I antigen processing pathway, TAP is a prime target for viral immune evasion strategies, and we summarize how this antigen translocation machinery is sabotaged by viral factors. Finally, we compare TAP with other ABC systems that facilitate peptide translocation.

  7. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  8. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  9. Fast DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Storm, Arnold J; Storm, Cornelis; Chen, Jianghua; Zandbergen, Henny; Joanny, Jean-François; Dekker, Cees

    2005-07-01

    We report experiments and modeling of translocation of double-strand DNA through a siliconoxide nanopore. Long DNA molecules with different lengths ranging from 6500 to 97000 base pairs have been electrophoretically driven through a 10 nm pore. We observe a power-law caling of the translocation time with the length, with an exponent of 1.27. This nonlinear scaling is strikingly different from the well-studied linear behavior observed in similar experiments performed on protein pores. We present a theoretical model where hydrodynamic drag on the ection of the polymer outside the pore is the dominant force counteracting the electrical driving force. We show that this applies to our experiments, and we derive a power-law scaling with an exponent of 1.22, in good agreement with the data.

  10. A small post-translocation energy bias aids nucleotide selection in T7 RNA polymerase transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Oster, George

    2012-02-01

    The RNA polymerase (RNAP) of bacteriophage T7 is a single subunit enzyme that can transcribe DNA to RNA in the absence of additional protein factors. In this work, we present a model of T7 RNAP translocation during elongation. Based on structural information and experimental data from single-molecule force measurements, we show that a small component of facilitated translocation or power stroke coexists with the Brownian-ratchet-driven motions, and plays a crucial role in nucleotide selection at pre-insertion. The facilitated translocation is carried out by the conserved Tyr(639) that moves its side chain into the active site, pushing aside the 3'-end of the RNA, and forming a locally stabilized post-translocation intermediate. Pre-insertion of an incoming nucleotide into this stabilized intermediate state ensures that Tyr(639) closely participates in selecting correct nucleotides. A similar translocation mechanism has been suggested for multi-subunit RNAPs involving the bridge-helix bending. Nevertheless, the bent bridge-helix sterically prohibits nucleotide binding in the post-transolocation intermediate analog; moreover, the analog is not stabilized unless an inhibitory protein factor binds to the enzyme. Using our scheme, we also compared the efficiencies of different strategies for nucleotide selection, and examined effects of facilitated translocation on forward tracking.

  11. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  12. Molecular events during translocation and proofreading extracted from 200 static structures of DNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases in family B are workhorses of DNA replication that carry out the bulk of the job at a high speed with high accuracy. A polymerase in this family relies on a built-in exonuclease for proofreading. It has not been observed at the atomic resolution how the polymerase advances one nucleotide space on the DNA template strand after a correct nucleotide is incorporated, that is, a process known as translocation. It is even more puzzling how translocation is avoided after the primer strand is excised by the exonuclease and returned back to the polymerase active site once an error occurs. The structural events along the bifurcate pathways of translocation and proofreading have been unwittingly captured by hundreds of structures in Protein Data Bank. This study analyzes all available structures of a representative member in family B and reveals the orchestrated event sequence during translocation and proofreading. PMID:27325739

  13. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  14. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain. PMID:26484613

  15. Detection of Kinase Translocation Using Microfluidic Electroporative Flow Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Paris, Leela; Wang, Hsiang-Yu; Geahlen, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Translocation of a protein between different subcellular compartments is a common event during signal transduction in living cells. Detection of these events has been largely carried out based on imaging of a low number of cells and subcellular fractionation/Western blotting. These conventional techniques either lack the high throughput desired for probing an entire cell population or provide only the average behaviors of cell populations without information from single cells. Here we demonstrate a new tool, referred to as microfluidic electroporative flow cytometry, to detect the translocation of an EGFP-tagged tyrosine kinase, Syk, to the plasma membrane in B cells at the level of the cell population. We combine electroporation with flow cytometry and observe the release of intracellular kinase out of the cells during electroporation. We found that the release of the kinase was strongly influenced by its subcellular localization. Cells stimulated through the antigen receptor have a fraction of the kinase at the plasma membrane and retain more kinase after electroporation than do cells without stimulation and translocation. This tool will have utility for kinase-related drug discovery and tumor diagnosis and staging.

  16. Mechanism of Inhibition of Translocation by Localized Chilling 1

    PubMed Central

    Giaquinta, R. T.; Geiger, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Arrhenius plots of translocation velocity as a function of petiole temperature show a marked increase in temperature dependence below 10 C in bean (a chilling-sensitive species) but not in sugar beet (chilling-resistant). The increased temperature dependence below 10 C was not observed for cytoplasmic streaming or oxygen uptake in bean. Bean petioles were served to release pressure in order to determine whether sieve tubes are obstructed in cold-treated petioles. The resulting pressure release caused serious displacement of the crystalline protein bodies in the sieve tubes of petioles at 25 C, but in those locally cooled to 0 C for 30 minutes little displacement occurred, indicating obstruction in the latter. An ultrastructural study of sieve tubes in tissue frozen rapidly in situ and dehydrated by freeze substitution revealed that treatment at 0 C for 30 minutes caused structural alteration and displacement of the cytoplasmic material lining the sieve tube wall resulting in occlusion of sieve plates. The sieve plates of the control petioles at 25 C were generally clear of obstructions. The results indicate that inhibition of translocation by chilling in chilling-sensitive plants results from physical blockage of sieve plates rather than from direct inhibition of a metabolic process which drives translocation. Images PMID:16658332

  17. Energetics of Ortho-7 (Oxime Drug) Translocation through the Active-Site Gorge of Tabun Conjugated Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Vivek; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2012-01-01

    Oxime drugs translocate through the 20 Å active-site gorge of acetylcholinesterase in order to liberate the enzyme from organophosphorus compounds’ (such as tabun) conjugation. Here we report bidirectional steered molecular dynamics simulations of oxime drug (Ortho-7) translocation through the gorge of tabun intoxicated enzyme, in which time dependent external forces accelerate the translocation event. The simulations reveal the participation of drug-enzyme hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions and water bridges between them. Employing nonequilibrium theorems that recovers the free energy from irreversible work done, we reconstruct potential of mean force along the translocation pathway such that the desired quantity represents an unperturbed system. The potential locates the binding sites and barriers for the drug to translocate inside the gorge. Configurational entropic contribution of the protein-drug binding entity and the role of solvent translational mobility in the binding energetics is further assessed. PMID:22808117

  18. Translocation of Mitochondrially Synthesized Cox2 Domains from the Matrix to the Intermembrane Space▿

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Heather L.; Broadley, Sarah A.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of mitochondrially synthesized cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, Cox2, are translocated through the inner membrane to the intermembrane space (IMS). We investigated the distinct mechanisms of N-tail and C-tail export by analysis of epitope-tagged Cox2 variants encoded in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA. Both the N and C termini of a truncated protein lacking the Cox2 C-terminal domain were translocated to the IMS via a pathway dependent upon the conserved translocase Oxa1. The topology of this Cox2 variant, accumulated at steady state, was largely but not completely unaffected in mutants lacking proteins required for export of the C-tail domain, Cox18 and Mss2. C-tail export was blocked by truncation of the last 40 residues from the C-tail domain, indicating that sequence and/or structural features of this domain are required for its translocation. Mss2, a peripheral protein bound to the inner surface of the inner membrane, coimmunoprecipitated with full-length newly synthesized Cox2, whose leader peptide had already been cleaved in the IMS. Our data suggest that the C-tail domain is recognized posttranslationally by a specialized translocation apparatus after the N-tail has been translocated by Oxa1. PMID:17452441

  19. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogenbirk, Marc A; Heideman, Marinus R; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-06-28

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  20. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  1. Sensitivity Analysis Predicts that the ERK-pMEK Interaction Regulates ERK Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S; Lidke, Diane S; Jovin, Thomas M; Wilson, Bridget S; Oliver, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    Following phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), ERK1 and ERK2, is critical for both gene expression and DNA replication induced by growth factors. ERK nuclear translocation has therefore been studied extensively, but many details remain unresolved, including whether or not ERK dimerization is required for translocation. Here, we simulate ERK nuclear translocation with a compartmental computational model that includes systematic sensitivity analysis. The governing ordinary differential equations are solved with the backward differentiation formula and decoupled direct methods. To better understand the regulation of ERK nuclear translocation, we use this model in conjunction with a previously published model of the ERK pathway that does not include an ERK dimer species and with experimental measurements of nuclear translocation of wild-type ERK and a mutant form, ERK1-Δ4, which is unable to dimerize. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the delayed nuclear uptake of ERK1-Δ4 compared to that of wild-type ERK1 can be explained by the altered interaction of ERK1-Δ4 with phosphorylated MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase), and so may be independent of dimerization. Our study also identifies biological experiments that can verify this explanation. PMID:21028924

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related Microbial Translocation and Progression of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Balagopal, Ashwin; Philp, Frances H.; Astemborski, Jacquie; Block, Timothy M.; Mehta, Anand; Long, Ronald; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Thomas, David L.; Ray, Stuart C.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims HIV-1 infection has been associated with enhanced microbial translocation, and microbial translocation is a mechanism through which alcohol and some enteric conditions cause liver disease. We hypothesized that HIV promotes liver disease by enhancing microbial translocation. Methods We studied human cohorts in which hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV outcomes were carefully characterized. Results HIV-related CD4+ lymphocyte depletion was strongly associated with microbial translocation as indicated by elevated levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS binding protein, soluble CD14, fucose-binding lectin (AAL) reactive to IgG specific for the alpha galactose epitope, and suppressed levels of endotoxin-core antibodies (EndoCAb IgM) in HIV-infected subjects compared with the same persons before they had HIV infection and compared with HIV-uninfected subjects. The same measures of microbial translocation were strongly associated with HCV-related liver disease progression (cirrhosis), e.g. LPS, odds ratio 19.0 (p = 0.002), AAL, odds ratio 27.8 (p<0.0001); in addition, levels of LPS were elevated prior to recognition of cirrhosis. Conclusions Microbial translocation may be a fundamental mechanism through which HIV accelerates progression of chronic liver disease. PMID:18457674

  3. Positive charges on the translocating polypeptide chain arrest movement through the translocon.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hidenobu; Yamagishi, Marifu; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2011-12-15

    Polypeptide chains synthesized by membrane-bound ribosomes are translocated through, and integrated into, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by means of the protein translocation channel, the translocon. Positive charges on the nascent chain determine the orientation of the hydrophobic segment as it is inserted into the translocon and enhance the stop-translocation of translocating hydrophobic segments. Here we show that positive charges temporarily arrested ongoing polypeptide chain movement through the ER translocon by electrostatic interaction, even in the absence of a hydrophobic segment. The C-terminus of the polypeptide chain was elongated during the arrest, and then the full-length polypeptide chain moved through the translocon. The translocation-arrested polypeptide was not anchored to the membrane and the charges were on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The arrest effect was prevented by negatively charged residues inserted into the positive-charge cluster, and it was also suppressed by high salt conditions. We propose that positive charges are independent translocation regulators that are more active than previously believed. PMID:22223880

  4. H/sup +/-translocating ATPases: advances using membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, two primary active transport systems (H/sup +/ -ATPases) in plant cells are examined using membrane vesicles as a simple experimental tool. One electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPase is vanadate-sensitive and associated with the plasma membrane. Another electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPases is anion-sensitive, and localized on the tonoplast (and perhaps other membranes). According to the working model, the plasma membrane and tonoplast-type H/sup +/ -ATPases are detectable in inside-out plasma membrane and right-side-out tonoplast vesicles. The direction of H/sup +/ pumping into these vesicles would be consistent with the results from intact cells where H/sup +/ are extruded from the cell across the plasma membrane and pumped into the vacuole from the cytoplasm. Understanding the properties of H/sup +/ -pumping ATPases using membrane vesicles has paved the way for studies to identify secondary active transport systems coupled to the proton electrochemical gradient. Redox-driven transport systems can also be studied directly using the isolated vesicles. As transport proteins are identified, the functional activities can be specifically studied after reconstitution of the purified protein(s) into phospholipid membrane vesicles. 154 references.

  5. A genetic screen to isolate type III effectors translocated into pepper cells during Xanthomonas infection

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Anne Roden, Branids Belt, Jason Barzel Ross, Thomas Tachibana, Joe Vargas, Mary Beth Mudgett

    2004-11-23

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) uses a type III secretion system (TTSS) to translocate effector proteins into host plant cells. The TTSS is required for Xcv colonization, yet the identity of many proteins translocated through this apparatus is not known. We used a genetic screen to functionally identify Xcv TTSS effectors. A transposon 5 (Tn5)-based transposon construct including the coding sequence for the Xcv AvrBs2 effector devoid of its TTSS signal was randomly inserted into the Xcv genome. Insertion of the avrBs2 reporter gene into Xcv genes coding for proteins containing a functional TTSS signal peptide resulted in the creation of chimeric TTSS effector::AvrBs2 fusion proteins. Xcv strains containing these fusions translocated the AvrBs2 reporter in a TTSS-dependent manner into resistant BS2 pepper cells during infection, activating the avrBs2-dependent hypersensitive response (HR). We isolated seven chimeric fusion proteins and designated the identified TTSS effectors as Xanthomonas outer proteins (Xops). Translocation of each Xop was confirmed by using the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cydase reporter assay. Three xop genes are Xanthomonas spp.-specific, whereas homologs for the rest are found in other phytopathogenic bacteria. XopF1 and XopF2 define an effector gene family in Xcv. XopN contains a eukaryotic protein fold repeat and is required for full Xcv pathogenicity in pepper and tomato. The translocated effectors identified in this work expand our knowledge of the diversity of proteins that Xcv uses to manipulate its hosts.

  6. Gene deregulation and spatial genome reorganization near breakpoints prior to formation of translocations in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathas, Stephan; Kreher, Stephan; Meaburn, Karen J.; Jöhrens, Korinna; Lamprecht, Björn; Assaf, Chalid; Sterry, Wolfram; Kadin, Marshall E.; Daibata, Masanori; Joos, Stefan; Hummel, Michael; Stein, Harald; Janz, Martin; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Schrock, Evelin; Misteli, Tom; Dörken, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Although the identification and characterization of translocations have rapidly increased, little is known about the mechanisms of how translocations occur in vivo. We used anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) with and without the characteristic t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation to study the mechanisms of formation of translocations and of ALCL transformation. We report deregulation of several genes located near the ALCL translocation breakpoint, regardless of whether the tumor contains the t(2;5). The affected genes include the oncogenic transcription factor Fra2 (located on 2p23), the HLH protein Id2 (2p25), and the oncogenic tyrosine kinase CSF1-receptor (5q33.1). Their up-regulation promotes cell survival and repression of T cell-specific gene expression programs that are characteristic for ALCL. The deregulated genes are in spatial proximity within the nuclear space of t(2;5)-negative ALCL cells, facilitating their translocation on induction of double-strand breaks. These data suggest that deregulation of breakpoint-proximal genes occurs before the formation of translocations, and that aberrant transcriptional activity of genomic regions is linked to their propensity to undergo chromosomal translocations. Also, our data demonstrate that deregulation of breakpoint-proximal genes has a key role in ALCL. PMID:19321746

  7. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  8. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control. PMID:21167017

  9. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  10. Translocation and Accumulation of Translocate in the Sugar Beet Petiole 1

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, D. R.; Saunders, M. A.; Cataldo, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Accumulation of translocate during steady-state labeling of photosynthate was measured in the source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monogerm hybrid). During an 8-hr period, 2.7% of the translocate or 0.38 μg carbon/min was accumulated per cm petiole. Material was stored mainly as sucrose and as compounds insoluble in 80% ethanol. The minimum peak velocity of translocation approached an average of 54 cm/hr as the specific activity of the 14CO2 pulse was progressively increased. The ratio of cross sectional area required for translocation to actual sieve tube area in the petiole was 1.2. A regression analysis of translocation rate versus sieve tube cross sectional area yielded a coefficient of 0.76. The specific mass transfer rate in the petiole was 1.4 g/hr cm2 phloem or 4.8 g/hr cm2 sieve tube. Histoautoradiographic studies indicated that translocation occurs through the area of phloem occupied by sieve tubes and companion cells while storage occurs in these cells plus cambium and phloem parenchyma cells. The ability of the petiole to act as a sink for translocate is consistent with the concept that storage along path tissue serves to buffer sucrose concentration in the translocate during periods of fluctuating assimilation. Images PMID:16657254

  11. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  12. Post-modern pathogens: surprising activities of translocated effectors from E. coli and Legionella.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Zhang, Ying; Newton, Hayley J; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2015-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have the ability to manipulate cellular processes and interfere with host cell function through the translocation of bacterial 'effector' proteins. Dedicated protein secretion machines from Gram-negative pathogens, including type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems, inject virulence proteins into infected cells, altering normal cell physiology, including cell structure, metabolism, trafficking and signalling. While effectors were once thought to exert an effect simply by their localization and binding to host cell proteins, increasingly effectors are being recognised as enzymes, in some cases mediating highly novel post-translational modifications on host proteins. Here we highlight some of the more unusual activities of translocated effectors from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila.

  13. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  14. Translocation pathways for inhaled asbestos fibers.

    PubMed

    Miserocchi, G; Sancini, G; Mantegazza, F; Chiappino, Gerolamo

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers based on pulmonary and pleuro-pulmonary interstitial fluid dynamics. Fibers can pass the alveolar barrier and reach the lung interstitium via the paracellular route down a mass water flow due to combined osmotic (active Na+ absorption) and hydraulic (interstitial pressure is subatmospheric) pressure gradient. Fibers can be dragged from the lung interstitium by pulmonary lymph flow (primary translocation) wherefrom they can reach the blood stream and subsequently distribute to the whole body (secondary translocation). Primary translocation across the visceral pleura and towards pulmonary capillaries may also occur if the asbestos-induced lung inflammation increases pulmonary interstitial pressure so as to reverse the trans-mesothelial and trans-endothelial pressure gradients. Secondary translocation to the pleural space may occur via the physiological route of pleural fluid formation across the parietal pleura; fibers accumulation in parietal pleura stomata (black spots) reflects the role of parietal lymphatics in draining pleural fluid. Asbestos fibers are found in all organs of subjects either occupationally exposed or not exposed to asbestos. Fibers concentration correlates with specific conditions of interstitial fluid dynamics, in line with the notion that in all organs microvascular filtration occurs from capillaries to the extravascular spaces. Concentration is high in the kidney (reflecting high perfusion pressure and flow) and in the liver (reflecting high microvascular permeability) while it is relatively low in the brain (due to low permeability of blood-brain barrier). Ultrafine fibers (length < 5 mum, diameter < 0.25 mum) can travel larger distances due to low steric hindrance (in mesothelioma about 90% of fibers are ultrafine). Fibers translocation is a slow process developing over decades of life: it is aided by high biopersistence, by inflammation-induced increase in permeability, by low steric

  15. Analyzing disease risks associated with translocations.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Anthony W; Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca J

    2012-06-01

    Translocations of species are expected to be used increasingly to counter the undesirable effects of anthropogenic changes to ecosystems, including loss of species. Methods to assess the risk of disease associated with translocations have been compiled in a comprehensive manual of disease-risk analysis for movement of domestic animals. We used this manual to devise a qualitative method for assessing the probability of the occurrence of disease in wild animals associated with translocations. We adapted the method such that we considered a parasite (any agent of infectious or noninfectious disease) a hazard if it or the host had crossed an ecological or geographical barrier and was novel to the host. We included in our analyses hazards present throughout the translocation pathway derived from the interactions between host immunity and the parasite, the effect of parasites on populations, the effect of noninfectious disease agents, and the effect of stressors on host-parasite interactions. We used the reintroduction of Eurasian Cranes (Grus grus) to England to demonstrate our method. Of the 24 hazards identified, 1 was classified as high risk (coccidia) and 5 were medium risk (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, Mycobacterium avium, Aspergillus fumigatus, tracheal worms [Syngamus sp. and Cyathostoma sp.], and Tetrameres spp.). Seventeen other hazards were considered low or very low risk. In the absence of better information on the number, identity, distribution, and pathogenicity of parasites of wild animals, there is uncertainty in the risk of disease to translocated animals and recipient populations. Surveys of parasites in source and destination populations and detailed health monitoring after release will improve the information available for future analyses of disease risk. We believe our method can be adapted to assess the risks of disease in other translocated populations. PMID:22533691

  16. Novel GFP expression using a short N-terminal polypeptide through the defined twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Han, Yun Hee; Kim, Young Ok; Nam, Bo Hye; Kong, Hee Jeong

    2011-10-01

    Escherichia coli is frequently used as a convenient host organism for soluble recombinant protein expression. However, additional strategies are needed for proteins with complex folding characteristics. Here, we suggested that the acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric point (pI) range curves correspond to the channels of the E. coli type-II cytoplasmic membrane translocation (periplasmic translocation) pathways of twin-arginine translocation (Tat), Yid, and general secretory pathway (Sec), respectively, for unfolded and folded target proteins by examining the characteristic pI values of the N-termini of the signal sequences or the leader sequences, matching with the known diameter of the translocation channels, and analyzing the N-terminal pI value of the signal sequences of the Tat substrates. To confirm these proposed translocation pathways, we investigated the soluble expression of the folded green fluorescent protein (GFP) with short N-terminal polypeptides exhibiting pI and hydrophilicity separately or collectively. This, in turn, revealed the existence of an anchor function with a specific directionality based on the N-terminal pI value (termed as N-terminal pI-specific directionality) and distinguished the presence of the E. coli type-II cytoplasmic membrane translocation pathways of Tat, Yid, and Sec for the unfolded and folded target proteins. We concluded that the pI value and hydrophilicity of the short N-terminal polypeptide, and the total translational efficiency of the target proteins based on the ΔGRNA value of the N-terminal coding regions are important factors for promoting more efficient translocation (secretion) through the largest diameter of the Tat channel. These results show that the short N-terminal polypeptide could substitute for the Tat signal sequence with improved efficiency.

  17. Karanjin from Pongamia pinnata induces GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle cells in a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Yadav, Prem P; Maurya, Rakesh; Srivastava, Arvind K; Tamrakar, Akhilesh K

    2011-11-16

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is decreased in type 2 diabetes due to impaired translocation of insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) from intracellular pool to plasma membrane. Augmenting glucose uptake into this tissue may help in management of type 2 diabetes. Here, the effects of an identified antihyperglycemic molecule, karanjin, isolated from the fruits of Pongamia pinnata were investigated on glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle cells. Treatment of L6-GLUT4myc myotubes with karanjin caused a substantial increase in the glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface, in a concentration-dependent fashion, without changing the total amount of GLUT4 protein and GLUT4 mRNA. This effect was associated with increased activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Cycloheximide treatment inhibited the effect of karanjin on GLUT4 translocation suggesting the requirement of de novo synthesis of protein. Karanjin-induced GLUT4 translocation was further enhanced with insulin and the effect is completely protected in the presence of wortmannin. Moreover, karanjin did not affect the phosphorylation of AKT (Ser-473) and did not alter the expression of the key molecules of insulin signaling cascade. We conclude that karanjin-induced increase in glucose uptake in L6 myotubes is the result of an increased translocation of GLUT4 to plasma membrane associated with activation of AMPK pathway, in a PI-3-K/AKT-independent manner. PMID:21939653

  18. Salmonella translocates across an in vitro M cell model independently of SPI-1 and SPI-2.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Jepson, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    We have used an in vitro model of intestinal M cells to examine the mechanisms by which Salmonella enterica translocates across these specialized cells, which constitute a primary site of infection of the mammalian host. S. enterica can invade cultured cells by deploying a type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) to translocate effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm that trigger cellular responses, including prominent cytoskeletal rearrangements. After Salmonella enters the host cell, a second TTSS encoded in SPI-2 modulates intracellular trafficking and enables the bacteria to replicate within a modified vacuolar compartment. Within the host intestine, specialized antigen-sampling M cells, which reside in the epithelium overlying lymphoid tissues in the gut, are a preferential site of Salmonella invasion. The mechanisms of infection of M cells remain poorly defined and it is not known whether either SPI-1 or SPI-2 is required for infection of these cells. To address these questions we have employed an in vitro M cell model involving co-culture of polarized Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells with Raji B cells. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium translocated across Caco-2/Raji co-cultures to a much greater extent than they cross native Caco-2 cell monolayers. Salmonella translocation was greatly reduced by heat treatment or fixation, suggesting that processes distinct from the sampling of inert particles are the main determinants of bacterial translocation. Translocation across both mono-cultured and co-cultured Caco-2 cells was partially inhibited by treatment with the dynamin inhibitor dynasore, but resistant to EIPA, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. There was no difference between the abilities of wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium and mutants lacking multiple SPI-1 effectors to translocate across the M cell model, although the SPI-1 effector mutants were somewhat attenuated for translocation across native Caco

  19. [Identification of the 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation lines].

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xinguo, Zhu; Hongshen, Wan; Qin, Wang; Zongxiang, Tang; Shulan, Fu; Zujun, Yang; Manyu, Yang; Wuyun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L., RR) is a valuable genetic resource for the improvement of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD). Transferring alien rye genes into wheat by distant hybridization and automatic chromosome doubling is an important and efficient method to boost agronomic traits, disease resistance and widening the gene pool in wheat. In this study, an octoploid triticale CD-13 (AABBDDRR) was obtained via automatic chromosome doubling by crossing landrace Penganbaimaizi (T. aestivum L., AABBDD) and rye "Qinling rye" (S. cereale cv. Qinling, RR). GISH and FISH analyses indicated that CD-13 contained a 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation chromosome. In order to transfer the 1RS-7DS small segment translocation into hexaploid wheat, 58 lines of the F5 inbred population from the cross CD-13 x Chuanmai 42 were screened for rye chromosome segments by GISH and FISH analyses. The results showed that 13 lines contained the 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation chromosome by reciprocal translocation between 1RS and 7DS. These translocation lines carrying 1RS small rye alien segment were tested for the translocation breakpoints and the presence of a storage protein locus Sec-1. The Sec-1 locus was absent in the line 811, a stable 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation line. The translocation breakpoint of 1RS-7DS.7DL of this line was located in the interval of IB267-IAG95 around the telomere of 1RS chromosome. Thousand-kernel weight of the line 811 was much higher than the parent CD-13, but not significantly different from Chuanmai 42. This indicated that 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation had no negative effect on thousand-kernel weight in the genetic background of Chuanmai 42. The line with 1RS-7DS.7DL translocation chromosomes can be used as a new genetic material for further studies of valuable genes and their genetic effect on 1RS small segment.

  20. [Identification of the 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation lines].

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xinguo, Zhu; Hongshen, Wan; Qin, Wang; Zongxiang, Tang; Shulan, Fu; Zujun, Yang; Manyu, Yang; Wuyun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L., RR) is a valuable genetic resource for the improvement of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD). Transferring alien rye genes into wheat by distant hybridization and automatic chromosome doubling is an important and efficient method to boost agronomic traits, disease resistance and widening the gene pool in wheat. In this study, an octoploid triticale CD-13 (AABBDDRR) was obtained via automatic chromosome doubling by crossing landrace Penganbaimaizi (T. aestivum L., AABBDD) and rye "Qinling rye" (S. cereale cv. Qinling, RR). GISH and FISH analyses indicated that CD-13 contained a 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation chromosome. In order to transfer the 1RS-7DS small segment translocation into hexaploid wheat, 58 lines of the F5 inbred population from the cross CD-13 x Chuanmai 42 were screened for rye chromosome segments by GISH and FISH analyses. The results showed that 13 lines contained the 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation chromosome by reciprocal translocation between 1RS and 7DS. These translocation lines carrying 1RS small rye alien segment were tested for the translocation breakpoints and the presence of a storage protein locus Sec-1. The Sec-1 locus was absent in the line 811, a stable 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation line. The translocation breakpoint of 1RS-7DS.7DL of this line was located in the interval of IB267-IAG95 around the telomere of 1RS chromosome. Thousand-kernel weight of the line 811 was much higher than the parent CD-13, but not significantly different from Chuanmai 42. This indicated that 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation had no negative effect on thousand-kernel weight in the genetic background of Chuanmai 42. The line with 1RS-7DS.7DL translocation chromosomes can be used as a new genetic material for further studies of valuable genes and their genetic effect on 1RS small segment. PMID:26351056

  1. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  2. Nuclear translocation of Hand-1 acts as a molecular switch to regulate vascular radiosensitivity in medulloblastoma tumors: the protein uPAR is a cytoplasmic sequestration factor for Hand-1.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Rao, Jasti S; Velpula, Kiran Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is overexpressed in the tumor-stromal invasive microenvironment in many human cancers, including medulloblastoma. The role of uPAR in tumor progression and angiogenesis has been well characterized. Previously, in medulloblastoma cells, we showed that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced uPAR is a potent activator of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties and is associated with various transcription factors that are involved during embryonic development and cancer. In the present study, we show that uPAR protein acts as a cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand-1. The Hand-1 protein plays an essential role in the differentiation of trophoblast giant cells and cardiac morphogenesis, and yet its precise cellular function and its contribution to cancer remain mostly unknown. We also observed that the Hand-1 protein is upregulated in uPAR short hairpin RNA-treated medulloblastoma cells and accompanies sustained cell growth and angiogenesis. Furthermore, IR-induced uPAR overexpression negatively regulates Hand-1 activity and results in the stabilization of angiogenesis-promoting molecules, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, uPAR overexpression and its association with Hand-1 after IR treatment indicate that uPAR is capable of regulating Hand-1 and that uPAR has a role in the process of IR-induced tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Nuclear import can be separated into distinct steps in vitro: nuclear pore binding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, D D; Forbes, D J

    1988-03-11

    Large nuclear proteins must possess a signal sequence to pass through the nuclear pores. Using an in vitro system, we have been able experimentally to dissect nuclear protein transport into two distinct steps: binding and translocation. In the absence of ATP, we observe a binding of nuclear proteins to the pore that is signal sequence-dependent. Translocation through the pore, on the other hand, strictly requires ATP. These steps, visualized in the fluorescence and electron microscopes, were observed both with a natural nuclear protein, nucleoplasmin, and a synthetic nuclear protein, composed of the signal sequence of SV40 T antigen coupled to HSA. When a mutant signal sequence was coupled to HSA, neither transport nor binding were observed, indicating that both result from the presence of a functional signal sequence. An inhibitor of transport, the lectin WGA, also arrested nuclear proteins in a bound state at the cytoplasmic face of the pore. Therefore, only the translocation step is sensitive to the inhibitor WGA, which is known to bind specifically to proteins of the nuclear pore.

  4. An In Vitro Assay for Substrate Translocation by FhaC in Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Enguo; Norell, Derrick; Müller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The two-partner secretion (TPS) pathway is used by gram-negative bacteria to secrete a large family of virulence exoproteins. Its name is derived from the fact that it involves two proteins, a secreted TpsA protein and a cognate TpsB transporter in the outer membrane. A typical TPS system is represented by the filamentous hemagglutinin FhaB (TpsA protein) and its transporter FhaC (TpsB protein) of Bordetella pertussis. Results from mutational analysis and heterologous expression experiments suggested that FhaC is essential for FhaB translocation across the outer membrane of bacteria. We have devised a cell-free biochemical assay to reconstitute in vitro the translocation of FhaB into reconstituted membrane vesicles. Thereby the clearest evidence has been provided that the single β-barrel FhaC protein serves as the sole translocator to transport FhaB across the outer membrane. This is the first in vitro assay for protein secretion across the Escherichia coli outer membrane and the detailed protocol described here should be amenable to modifications and application to the analysis of related protein transport events occurring at the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Principles of ER cotranslational translocation revealed by proximity-specific ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Jan, Calvin H; Williams, Christopher C; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2014-11-01

    Localized protein synthesis is a fundamental mechanism for creating distinct subcellular environments. Here we developed a generalizable proximity-specific ribosome profiling strategy that enables global analysis of translation in defined subcellular locations. We applied this approach to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast and mammals. We observed the large majority of secretory proteins to be cotranslationally translocated, including substrates capable of posttranslational insertion in vitro. Distinct translocon complexes engaged nascent chains at different points during synthesis. Whereas most proteins engaged the ER immediately after or even before signal sequence (SS) emergence, a class of Sec66-dependent proteins entered with a looped SS conformation. Finally, we observed rapid ribosome exchange into the cytosol after translation termination. These data provide insights into how distinct translocation mechanisms act in concert to promote efficient cotranslational recruitment.

  6. Galectin-3 translocates to the perinuclear membranes and inhibits cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. A role for synexin in galectin-3 translocation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Finley, Russell L; Raz, Avraham; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2002-05-01

    Galectin-3 is a multifunctional oncogenic protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm and also the extracellular milieu. Although recent studies demonstrated an anti-apoptotic activity of galectin-3, neither the functional site nor the mechanism of how galectin-3 regulates apoptosis is known. In this study, we examined the subcellular localization of galectin-3 during apoptosis and investigated its anti-apoptotic actions. We report that galectin-3 translocates to the perinuclear membrane following a variety of apoptotic stimuli. Confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis revealed that galectin-3 is enriched in the mitochondria and prevents mitochondrial damage and cytochrome c release. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we screened for galectin-3-interacting proteins that regulate galectin-3 localization and anti-apoptotic activity. Synexin, a Ca(2+)- and phospholipid-binding protein, was one of the proteins identified. We confirmed direct interaction between galectin-3 and synexin by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay in vitro. We showed that galectin-3 failed to translocate to the perinuclear membranes when expression of synexin was down-regulated using an oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary to the synexin mRNA, suggesting a role for synexin in galectin-3 trafficking. Furthermore, synexin down-regulation abolished anti-apoptotic activity of galectin-3. Taken together, these results suggest that synexin mediates galectin-3 translocation to the perinuclear mitochondrial membranes, where it regulates mitochondrial integrity critical for apoptosis regulation. PMID:11839755

  7. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  8. Safety of probiotics: translocation and infection.

    PubMed

    Liong, Min-Tze

    2008-04-01

    The long history of safety has contributed to the acceptance of probiotics as a safe food adjunct. Consequently, many probiotic products and their applications have been granted GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status. However, this classification has been frequently generalized for all probiotic strains regardless of their application. Cases of probiotics from the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Enterococcus, and Bifidobacterium have been isolated from infection sites, leading to the postulation that these probiotics can translocate. Probiotic translocation is difficult to induce in healthy humans, and even if it does occur, detrimental effects are rare. Despite this, various reports have documented health-damaging effects of probiotic translocation in immunocompromised patients. Due to probiotics' high degree of safety and their morphological confusion with other pathogenic bacteria, they are often overlooked as contaminants and are least suspected as pathogens. However, the antibiotic resistance of some strains has increased the complexity of their eradication. Probiotic translocation and infection deserve further investigation and should become a facet of safety assessment so the negative effects of probiotics do not outweigh the benefits. PMID:18366533

  9. Safety of probiotics: translocation and infection.

    PubMed

    Liong, Min-Tze

    2008-04-01

    The long history of safety has contributed to the acceptance of probiotics as a safe food adjunct. Consequently, many probiotic products and their applications have been granted GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status. However, this classification has been frequently generalized for all probiotic strains regardless of their application. Cases of probiotics from the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Enterococcus, and Bifidobacterium have been isolated from infection sites, leading to the postulation that these probiotics can translocate. Probiotic translocation is difficult to induce in healthy humans, and even if it does occur, detrimental effects are rare. Despite this, various reports have documented health-damaging effects of probiotic translocation in immunocompromised patients. Due to probiotics' high degree of safety and their morphological confusion with other pathogenic bacteria, they are often overlooked as contaminants and are least suspected as pathogens. However, the antibiotic resistance of some strains has increased the complexity of their eradication. Probiotic translocation and infection deserve further investigation and should become a facet of safety assessment so the negative effects of probiotics do not outweigh the benefits.

  10. Marching to the beat of the ring: polypeptide translocation by AAA+ proteases.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Kristofor; Martin, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    ATP-dependent proteases exist in all cells and are crucial regulators of the proteome. These machines consist of a hexameric, ring-shaped motor responsible for engaging, unfolding, and translocating protein substrates into an associated peptidase for degradation. Here, we discuss recent work that has established how the six motor subunits coordinate their ATP-hydrolysis and translocation activities. The closed topology of the ring and the rigidity of subunit/subunit interfaces cause conformational changes within a single subunit to drive motions in other subunits of the hexamer. This structural effect generates allostery between the ATP-binding sites, leading to a preferred order of binding and hydrolysis events among the motor subunits as well as a unique biphasic mechanism of translocation.

  11. Bacterial translocation affects intracellular neuroinflammatory pathways in a depression-like model in rats.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, David; Caso, Javier R; Bris, Álvaro G; Maus, Sandra R; Madrigal, José L M; García-Bueno, Borja; MacDowell, Karina S; Alou, Luis; Gómez-Lus, Maria Luisa; Leza, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that depression is accompanied by an increased intestinal permeability which would be related to the inflammatory pathophysiology of the disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether experimental depression presents with bacterial translocation that in turn can lead to the TLR-4 in the brain affecting the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and antioxidant pathways. Male Wistar rats were exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS) and the intestinal integrity, presence of bacteria in tissues and plasma lipopolysaccharide levels were analyzed. We also studied the expression in the prefrontal cortex of activated forms of MAPK and some of their activation controllers and the effects of CMS on the antioxidant Nrf2 pathway. Our results indicate that after exposure to a CMS protocol there is increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. CMS also increases the expression of the activated form of the MAPK p38 while decreasing the expression of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2. The actions of antibiotic administration to prevent bacterial translocation on elements of the MAPK and Nrf2 pathways indicate that the translocated bacteria are playing a role in these effects. In effect, our results propose a role of the translocated bacteria in the pathophysiology of depression through the p38 MAPK pathway which could aggravate the neuroinflammation and the oxidative/nitrosative damage present in this pathology. Moreover, our results reveal that the antioxidant factor Nrf2 and its activators may be involved in the consequences of the CMS on the brain.

  12. Translocation by T7 RNA polymerase: a sensitively poised Brownian ratchet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Sousa, Rui

    2006-04-21

    Studies of halted T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) elongation complexes (ECs) or of T7RNAP transcription against roadblocks due to DNA-bound proteins indicate that T7RNAP translocates via a passive Brownian ratchet mechanism. Crystal structures of T7RNAP ECs suggest that translocation involves an active power-stroke. However, neither solution studies of halted or slowed T7RNAP ECs, nor crystal structures of static complexes, are necessarily relevant to how T7RNAP translocates during rapid elongation. A recent single molecule study of actively elongating T7RNAPs provides support for the Brownian ratchet mechanism. Here, we obtain additional evidence for the existence of a Brownian ratchet during active T7RNAP elongation by showing that both rapidly elongating and halted complexes are equally sensitive to pyrophosphate. Using chemical nucleases tethered to the polymerase we achieve sub-ångström resolution in measuring the average position of halted T7RNAP ECs and find that the positional equilibrium of the EC is sensitively poised between pre-translocated and post-translocated states. This may be important in maximizing the sensitivity of the polymerase to sequences that cause pausing or termination. We also confirm that a crystallographically observed disorder to order transition in a loop formed by residues 589-612 also occurs in solution and is coupled to pyrophosphate or NTP release. This transition allows the loop to make interactions with the DNA that help stabilize the laterally mobile, ligand-free EC against dissociation.

  13. Rad51 Inhibits Translocation Formation by Non-Conservative Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Glenn M.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a primary biological response to ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, and are likely to result from the inappropriate repair of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are created. An abundance of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes provides ample opportunity for such breaks to be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) between non-allelic repeats. Interestingly, in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae the central strand exchange protein, Rad51 that is required for DSB repair by gene conversion between unlinked repeats that conserves genomic structure also suppresses translocation formation by several HR mechanisms. In particular, Rad51 suppresses translocation formation by single-strand annealing (SSA), perhaps the most efficient mechanism for translocation formation by HR in both yeast and mammalian cells. Further, the enhanced translocation formation that emerges in the absence of Rad51 displays a distinct pattern of genetic control, suggesting that this occurs by a separate mechanism. Since hypomorphic mutations in RAD51 in mammalian cells also reduce DSB repair by conservative gene conversion and stimulate non-conservative repair by SSA, this mechanism may also operate in humans and, perhaps contribute to the genome instability that propels the development of cancer. PMID:20686691

  14. Efficient isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion translocators and assembly of heteromeric transmembrane pores in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fabian B; Rossi, Kyle C; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Clerico, Eugenia M; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2011-08-23

    Translocation of bacterial toxins or effectors into host cells using the type III secretion (T3S) system is a conserved mechanism shared by many Gram-negative pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects different proteins across the plasma membrane of target cells, altering the normal metabolism of the host. Protein translocation presumably occurs through a proteinaceous transmembrane pore formed by two T3S secreted protein translocators, PopB and PopD. Unfolded translocators are secreted through the T3S needle prior to insertion into the target membrane. Purified PopB and PopD form pores in model membranes. However, their tendency to form heterogeneous aggregates in solution had hampered the analysis of how these proteins undergo the transition from a denatured state to a membrane-inserted state. Translocators were purified as stable complexes with the cognate chaperone PcrH and isolated from the chaperone using 6 M urea. We report here the assembly of stable transmembrane pores by dilution of urea-denatured translocators in the presence of membranes. PopB and PopD spontaneously bound liposomes containing anionic phospholipids and cholesterol in a pH-dependent manner as observed by two independent assays, time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and sucrose-step gradient ultracentrifugation. Using Bodipy-labeled proteins, we found that PopB interacts with PopD on the membrane surface as determined by excitation energy migration and fluorescence quenching. Stable transmembrane pores are more efficiently assembled at pH <5.0, suggesting that acidic residues might be involved in the initial membrane binding and/or insertion. Altogether, the experimental setup described here represents an efficient method for the reconstitution and analysis of membrane-inserted translocators.

  15. Genomic Hallmarks of Genes Involved in Chromosomal Translocations in Hematological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shugay, Mikhail; Ortiz de Mendíbil, Iñigo; Vizmanos, José L.; Novo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs) leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs). Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5′ TPGs and to more stable 3′-UTR regions of 3′ TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5′ TPGs and of interaction partners of 3′ TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5′ and 3′ TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5′ and 3′ TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C) we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  16. Deconvoluting chain heterogeneity from driven translocation through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-02-01

    We study translocation dynamics of a driven compressible semi-flexible chain consisting of alternate blocks of stiff (S) and flexible (F) segments of size m and n, respectively, for different chain length N in two dimensions (2D). The free parameters in the model are the bending rigidity κb which controls the three-body interaction term, the elastic constant kF in the FENE (bond) potential between successive monomers, as well as the segmental lengths m and n and the repeat unit p (N=m_pn_p) and the solvent viscosity γ. We demonstrate that due to the change in entropic barrier and the inhomogeneous viscous drag on the chain backbone a variety of scenarios are possible, amply manifested in the waiting time distribution of the translocating chain. This information can be deconvoluted to extract the mechanical properties of the chain at various length scales and thus can be used to nanopore based methods to probe bio-molecules, such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

  17. Molecular determinants of nucleolar translocation of RNA helicase A

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhe; Kenworthy, Rachael; Green, Christopher; Tang, Hengli

    2007-10-15

    RNA helicase A (RHA) is a member of the DEAH-box family of DNA/RNA helicases involved in multiple cellular processes and the life cycles of many viruses. The subcellular localization of RHA is dynamic despite its steady-state concentration in the nucleoplasm. We have previously shown that it shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm by virtue of a bidirectional nuclear transport domain (NTD) located in its carboxyl terminus. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants for its translocation within the nucleus and, more specifically, its redistribution from the nucleoplasm to nucleolus or the perinucleolar region. We found that low temperature treatment, transcription inhibition or replication of hepatitis C virus caused the intranuclear redistribution of the protein, suggesting that RHA shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm and becomes trapped in the nucleolus or the perinucleolar region upon blockade of transport to the nucleoplasm. Both the NTD and ATPase activity were essential for RHA's transport to the nucleolus or perinucleolar region. One of the double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBD II) was also required for this nucleolar translocation (NoT) phenotype. RNA interference studies revealed that RHA is essential for survival of cultured hepatoma cells and the ATPase activity appears to be important for this critical role.

  18. The macroscopic rate of nucleic acid translocation by hepatitis C virus helicase NS3h is dependent on both sugar and base moieties.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Ali R; Field, Cassandra; Malik, Shuja; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Wang, Ruth; Hung, Magdeleine; Sakowicz, Roman; Brendza, Katherine M; Fischer, Christopher J

    2010-07-16

    The nonstructural protein 3 helicase (NS3h) of hepatitis C virus is a 3'-to-5' superfamily 2 RNA and DNA helicase that is essential for the replication of hepatitis C virus. We have examined the kinetic mechanism of the translocation of NS3h along single-stranded nucleic acid with bases uridylate (rU), deoxyuridylate (dU), and deoxythymidylate (dT), and have found that the macroscopic rate of translocation is dependent on both the base moiety and the sugar moiety of the nucleic acid, with approximate macroscopic translocation rates of 3 nt s(-1) (oligo(dT)), 35 nt s(-1) (oligo(dU)), and 42 nt s(-1) (oligo(rU)), respectively. We found a strong correlation between the macroscopic translocation rates and the binding affinity of the translocating NS3h protein for the respective substrates such that weaker affinity corresponded to faster translocation. The values of K(0.5) for NS3h translocation at a saturating ATP concentration are as follows: 3.3+/-0.4 microM nucleotide (poly(dT)), 27+/-2 microM nucleotide (poly(dU)), and 36+/-2 microM nucleotide (poly(rU)). Furthermore, results of the isothermal titration of NS3h with these oligonucleotides suggest that differences in TDeltaS(0) are the principal source of differences in the affinity of NS3h binding to these substrates. Interestingly, despite the differences in macroscopic translocation rates and binding affinities, the ATP coupling stoichiometries for NS3h translocation were identical for all three substrates (approximately 0.5 ATP molecule consumed per nucleotide translocated). This similar periodicity of ATP consumption implies a similar mechanism for NS3h translocation along RNA and DNA substrates.

  19. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  20. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  2. Engineering human tumour-associated chromosomal translocations with the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Martin, M C; Garcia, A; Cigudosa, Juan C; Ramirez, J C; Rodriguez-Perales, S

    2014-06-03

    Cancer-related human chromosomal translocations are generated through the illegitimate joining of two non-homologous chromosomes affected by double-strand breaks (DSB). Effective methodologies to reproduce precise reciprocal tumour-associated chromosomal translocations are required to gain insight into the initiation of leukaemia and sarcomas. Here we present a strategy for generating cancer-related human chromosomal translocations in vitro based on the ability of the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system to induce DSBs at defined positions. Using this approach we generate human cell lines and primary cells bearing chromosomal translocations resembling those described in acute myeloid leukaemia and Ewing's sarcoma at high frequencies. FISH and molecular analysis at the mRNA and protein levels of the fusion genes involved in these engineered cells reveal the reliability and accuracy of the CRISPR-Cas9 approach, providing a powerful tool for cancer studies.

  3. Effect of charge, hydrophobicity, and sequence of nucleoporins on the translocation of model particles through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Peleg, Orit; Kröger, Martin; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-02-26

    The molecular structure of the yeast nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the translocation of model particles have been studied with a molecular theory that accounts for the geometry of the pore and the sequence and anchoring position of the unfolded domains of the nucleoporin proteins (the FG-Nups), which control selective transport through the pore. The theory explicitly models the electrostatic, hydrophobic, steric, conformational, and acid-base properties of the FG-Nups. The electrostatic potential within the pore, which arises from the specific charge distribution of the FG-Nups, is predicted to be negative close to pore walls and positive along the pore axis. The positive electrostatic potential facilitates the translocation of negatively charged particles, and the free energy barrier for translocation decreases for increasing particle hydrophobicity. These results agree with the experimental observation that transport receptors that form complexes with hydrophilic/neutral or positively charged proteins to transport them through the NPC are both hydrophobic and strongly negatively charged. The molecular theory shows that the effects of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions on the translocating potential are cooperative and nonequivalent due to the interaction-dependent reorganization of the FG-Nups in the presence of the translocating particle. The combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions can give rise to complex translocation potentials displaying a combination of wells and barriers, in contrast to the simple barrier potential observed for a hydrophilic/neutral translocating particle. This work demonstrates the importance of explicitly considering the amino acid sequence and hydrophobic, electrostatic, and steric interactions in understanding the translocation through the NPC.

  4. Effect of charge, hydrophobicity, and sequence of nucleoporins on the translocation of model particles through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Peleg, Orit; Kröger, Martin; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-02-26

    The molecular structure of the yeast nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the translocation of model particles have been studied with a molecular theory that accounts for the geometry of the pore and the sequence and anchoring position of the unfolded domains of the nucleoporin proteins (the FG-Nups), which control selective transport through the pore. The theory explicitly models the electrostatic, hydrophobic, steric, conformational, and acid-base properties of the FG-Nups. The electrostatic potential within the pore, which arises from the specific charge distribution of the FG-Nups, is predicted to be negative close to pore walls and positive along the pore axis. The positive electrostatic potential facilitates the translocation of negatively charged particles, and the free energy barrier for translocation decreases for increasing particle hydrophobicity. These results agree with the experimental observation that transport receptors that form complexes with hydrophilic/neutral or positively charged proteins to transport them through the NPC are both hydrophobic and strongly negatively charged. The molecular theory shows that the effects of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions on the translocating potential are cooperative and nonequivalent due to the interaction-dependent reorganization of the FG-Nups in the presence of the translocating particle. The combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions can give rise to complex translocation potentials displaying a combination of wells and barriers, in contrast to the simple barrier potential observed for a hydrophilic/neutral translocating particle. This work demonstrates the importance of explicitly considering the amino acid sequence and hydrophobic, electrostatic, and steric interactions in understanding the translocation through the NPC. PMID:23404701

  5. Effect of charge, hydrophobicity, and sequence of nucleoporins on the translocation of model particles through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Peleg, Orit; Kröger, Martin; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure of the yeast nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the translocation of model particles have been studied with a molecular theory that accounts for the geometry of the pore and the sequence and anchoring position of the unfolded domains of the nucleoporin proteins (the FG-Nups), which control selective transport through the pore. The theory explicitly models the electrostatic, hydrophobic, steric, conformational, and acid-base properties of the FG-Nups. The electrostatic potential within the pore, which arises from the specific charge distribution of the FG-Nups, is predicted to be negative close to pore walls and positive along the pore axis. The positive electrostatic potential facilitates the translocation of negatively charged particles, and the free energy barrier for translocation decreases for increasing particle hydrophobicity. These results agree with the experimental observation that transport receptors that form complexes with hydrophilic/neutral or positively charged proteins to transport them through the NPC are both hydrophobic and strongly negatively charged. The molecular theory shows that the effects of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions on the translocating potential are cooperative and nonequivalent due to the interaction-dependent reorganization of the FG-Nups in the presence of the translocating particle. The combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions can give rise to complex translocation potentials displaying a combination of wells and barriers, in contrast to the simple barrier potential observed for a hydrophilic/neutral translocating particle. This work demonstrates the importance of explicitly considering the amino acid sequence and hydrophobic, electrostatic, and steric interactions in understanding the translocation through the NPC. PMID:23404701

  6. Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type.

    PubMed

    Plein, Michaela; Bode, Michael; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Conservation translocations, anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction, have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multispecies translocations and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition) on translocation strategies. We focus on how these different interaction types influence the optimal founder population sizes for successful translocations and the order in which the species are moved (simultaneous or sequential). Further, we assess the effect of interaction strength in simultaneous translocations and the time delay between translocations when moving two species sequentially. Our results show that translocation decisions need to reflect the type of interaction. While all translocations of interacting species require a minimum founder population size, which is demarked by an extinction boundary, consumer-resource translocations also have a maximum founder population limit. Above the minimum founder size, increasing the number of translocated individuals leads to a substantial increase in the extinction boundary of competitors and consumers, but not of mutualists. Competitive and consumer-resource systems benefit from sequential translocations, but the order of translocations does not change the outcomes for mutualistic interaction partners noticeably. Interspecific interactions are important processes that shape population dynamics and should therefore be incorporated into the quantitative planning of multispecies translocations. Our findings apply whenever interacting species are moved, for example, in reintroductions, conservation introductions, biological

  7. Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type.

    PubMed

    Plein, Michaela; Bode, Michael; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Conservation translocations, anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction, have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multispecies translocations and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition) on translocation strategies. We focus on how these different interaction types influence the optimal founder population sizes for successful translocations and the order in which the species are moved (simultaneous or sequential). Further, we assess the effect of interaction strength in simultaneous translocations and the time delay between translocations when moving two species sequentially. Our results show that translocation decisions need to reflect the type of interaction. While all translocations of interacting species require a minimum founder population size, which is demarked by an extinction boundary, consumer-resource translocations also have a maximum founder population limit. Above the minimum founder size, increasing the number of translocated individuals leads to a substantial increase in the extinction boundary of competitors and consumers, but not of mutualists. Competitive and consumer-resource systems benefit from sequential translocations, but the order of translocations does not change the outcomes for mutualistic interaction partners noticeably. Interspecific interactions are important processes that shape population dynamics and should therefore be incorporated into the quantitative planning of multispecies translocations. Our findings apply whenever interacting species are moved, for example, in reintroductions, conservation introductions, biological

  8. A Non-enveloped Virus Hijacks Host Disaggregation Machinery to Translocate across the Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Bagchi, Parikshit; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cytosolic Hsp110 family, in concert with the Hsc70:J-protein complex, functions as a disaggregation machinery to rectify protein misfolding problems. Here we uncover a novel role of this machinery in driving membrane translocation during viral entry. The non-enveloped virus SV40 penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to reach the cytosol, a critical infection step. Combining biochemical, cell-based, and imaging approaches, we find that the Hsp110 family member Hsp105 associates with the ER membrane J-protein B14. Here Hsp105 cooperates with Hsc70 and extracts the membrane-penetrating SV40 into the cytosol, potentially by disassembling the membrane-embedded virus. Hence the energy provided by the Hsc70-dependent Hsp105 disaggregation machinery can be harnessed to catalyze a membrane translocation event. PMID:26244546

  9. Histone modifications predispose genome regions to breakage and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Bharat; Zhang, Zhuzhu Z.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Lieb, Jason D.; Misteli, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are well-established hallmarks of cancer cells and often occur at nonrandom sites in the genome. The molecular features that define recurrent chromosome breakpoints are largely unknown. Using a combination of bioinformatics, biochemical analysis, and cell-based assays, we identify here specific histone modifications as facilitators of chromosome breakage and translocations. We show enrichment of several histone modifications over clinically relevant translocation-prone genome regions. Experimental modulation of histone marks sensitizes genome regions to breakage by endonuclease challenge or irradiation and promotes formation of chromosome translocations of endogenous gene loci. Our results demonstrate that histone modifications predispose genome regions to chromosome breakage and translocations. PMID:26104467

  10. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  11. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier.

  12. Translocation in the nonpolytrichaceous moss grimmia laevigata

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, P. )

    1989-10-01

    A superficially rhizomatous habit suggested that the moss Grimmia laevigata might function as a clonal, rhizomatous plant and translocate photoassimilates to below ground organs, even though the species is outside the order Polytrichales, which includes the only mosses known to posses sieve cells. Labelling with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} indicated that at least 10% of newly assimilated carbon was translocated out of leafy shoot portions within 26 hr. Of this carbon, approximately 75% was apparently moved into leafless, basal shoot portions and 25% into below ground stems. Infrared gas analysis of net CO{sup 2} flux was used to check that labelling gave a realistic measure of photosynthesis. Physiological integration and clonal spread may account for the unusual ability of this moss to colonize extremely xeric microsites.

  13. Subversion of Retrograde Trafficking by Translocated Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Personnic, Nicolas; Bärlocher, Kevin; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert the endocytic bactericidal pathway to form specific replication-permissive compartments termed pathogen vacuoles or inclusions. To this end, the pathogens employ type III or type IV secretion systems, which translocate dozens, if not hundreds, of different effector proteins into their host cells, where they manipulate vesicle trafficking and signaling pathways in favor of the intruders. While the distinct cocktail of effectors defines the specific processes by which a pathogen vacuole is formed, the different pathogens commonly target certain vesicle trafficking routes, including the endocytic or secretory pathway. Recently, the retrograde transport pathway from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network emerged as an important route affecting pathogen vacuole formation. Here, we review current insight into the host cell's retrograde trafficking pathway and how vacuolar pathogens of the genera Legionella, Coxiella, Salmonella, Chlamydia, and Simkania employ mechanistically distinct strategies to subvert this pathway, thus promoting intracellular survival and replication. PMID:26924068

  14. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  15. Translocation and encapsulation of siRNA inside carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2013-01-01

    We report spontaneous translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of various diameters and chirality using all atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. We use umbrella sampling method to calculate the free energy landscape of the siRNA entry and translocation event. Free energy profiles show that siRNA gains free energy while translocating inside CNT, and barrier for siRNA exit from CNT ranges from 40 to 110 kcal/mol depending on CNT chirality and salt concentration. The translocation time τ decreases with the increase of CNT diameter with a critical diameter of 24 Å for the translocation. In contrast, double strand DNA of the same sequence does not translocate inside CNT due to large free energy barrier for the translocation. This study helps in understanding the nucleic acid transport through nanopores at microscopic level and may help designing carbon nanotube based sensor for siRNA.

  16. Movements of translocated wolves in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, S.H.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    From Feb. 1975-May 1978, 104 wolves (C. lupus) captured at or near Minnesota farms where depredations on livestock had been reported were translocated northward and eastward for 50-317 km into extensive forests; 3 others were released westward. Nine wolves were translocated twice, and 1 three times. Information on movements was obtained by radiotracking 17 wolves and by recovery of 16 others. All radio-tagged wolves left the release areas; adults left quickly, but pups generally remained longer, behaved less decisively, and settled nearby temporarily. Wolves released together did not remain together. Initial travel of most radio-tagged adults was between south and west, the general direction to their original location. Final directions were primarily to the west and northwest, due in part to physiographic barriers. Eight adults homed, 1 twice, to capture areas that were < 64 km from release sites. Nonhoming wolves were radiotracked and/or recovered 32-351 km from their capture sites and 23-302 km from their release sites. Translocation was largely unsuccessful at keeping problem wolves out of lifestock production areas. The problem of initial travel away from release sites in wolf reintroductions probably could be minimized by transport and release of 6-9 mo. old wolves.

  17. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  18. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  19. Iron translocation by free fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M. W.; Eaton, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Organic extracts of cigarette smoke and uncombusted tobacco contain substances capable of translocating iron from aqueous solutions into immiscible organic solvents. Such extracts will also effect the organic solvation of iron present in ferruginous forms of asbestos such as amosite and crocidolite (Qian and Eaton, Arch Biochem Biophys 1989, 275:280). These substances, previously detected by their iron-translocating properties, have now been purified and identified by mass spectroscopy as saturated fatty acids, predominantly stearic and palmitic acids. Organic extracts of tobacco smoke, as well as the pure fatty acids, also transfer ferrous iron into both isolated red cell membranes and intact human erythrocytes. The increased membrane iron may enhance cellular susceptibility to exogenous oxidants; erythrocyte membranes subject to fatty acid-mediated iron accumulation show elevated peroxidation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids. These observations may help explain the phlogistic effects of tobacco use and suggest, in a broader context, that free fatty acids may act as physiologic and pathologic mediators of metal translocation. PMID:1750512

  20. Mitochondrial protein import: An unexpected disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Mokranjac, Dejana

    2016-08-15

    Most mitochondrial proteins are imported through the TIM23 translocation channel, the structure and molecular nature of which are still unclear. In this issue, Ramesh et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602074) show that the TIM23 subunit Tim17 contains a disulfide bond that is crucial for protein translocation and channel gating. PMID:27502488

  1. Mechanism of substrate translocation by a ring-shaped ATPase motor at millisecond resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Ring-shaped, hexameric ATPase motors fulfill key functions in cellular processes, such as genome replication, transcription or protein degradation, by translocating a long substrate through their central pore powered by ATP hydrolysis. Despite intense research efforts, the atomic-level mechanism transmitting chemical energy from hydrolysis into mechanical force that translocates the substrate is still unclear. Here we employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with advanced path sampling techniques and milestoning analysis to characterize how mRNA substrate is translocated by an exemplary homo-hexameric motor, the transcription termination factor Rho. We find that the release of hydrolysis product (ADP+Pi) triggers the force-generating process of Rho through a 0.1 millisecond-long conformational transition, the time scale seen also in experiment. The calculated free energy profiles and kinetics show that Rho unidirectionally translocates the single-stranded RNA substrate via a population shift of the conformational states of Rho; upon hydrolysis product release, the most favorable conformation shifts from the pre-translocation state to the post-translocation state. Via two previously unidentified intermediate states, the RNA chain is seen to be pulled by six K326 side chains, whose motions are induced by highly coordinated relative translation and rotation of Rho’s six subunits. The present study not only reveals in new detail the mechanism employed by ring-shaped ATPase motors, for example the use of loosely bound and tightly bound hydrolysis reac